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Weld Connect September 2019


Contents 03 06 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 22 24 25

A Message from the CEO National Manufacturing Summit Membership Matters New South Wales Division Victoria Division South Australia Division Queensland Division Western Australia Division Northern Territory Division Tasmania Division Training & Certification 2019-2020 Training Calendar Advanced Welder Training Courses Upcoming Events

Weld Australia Contact Information National Office Building 3, Level 3, Suite 5 Pymble Corporate Centre 20 Bridge Street Pymble, NSW 2073 (PO Box 197 Macquarie Park BC NSW 1670) T: +61 (0)2 8748 0100 E: info@weldaustralia.com.au Chief Executive Officer Geoff Crittenden T: +61 (0)2 8748 0100 E: g.crittenden@weldaustralia.com.au

Qualification & Certification Manager Paolo Corronca T: +61 (0)438 012 099 E: p.corronca@weldaustralia.com.au Training T: +61 (0)2 8748 0100 E: training@weldaustralia.com.au

Membership Manager Eva Chun T: +61 (0)2 8748 0135 E: e.chun@weldaustralia.com.au Editorial Content Sally Wood T: +61 (0)434 442 687 E: sally@wordly.com.au

Marketing & Communications Manager Donna South T: +61 (0)2 8748 0130 E: d.south@weldaustralia.com.au

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A Message from the CEO 2019 National Manufacturing Summit The 2019 National Manufacturing Summit was held at The Australian Synchrotron in Melbourne in August. With the theme Skills for the Future, the critical constraint of workforce capability and availability formed the basis of discussions throughout the Summit. Now in its third year, the Summit brought together thought leaders in the manufacturing sector to discuss the sector’s prospects, and identify policy measures designed to support industry growth and sustainability. With a program of engaging, informative and inspirational speakers and panellists, the Summit was a great success. We were fortunate to have the support of an impressive group of co-sponsors – the Advanced Manufacturing Growth Centre, AustralianSuper, the Centre for Future Work, IBSA Manufacturing, and TAFE Directors Australia. Manufacturers’ Monthly also supported the event as our Media Partner. I’d like to thank each of our co-sponsors—we are grateful for their input and their collaboration. For further information about the Summit, please see page 6.

A Visit to Whyalla and Port Augusta In August, Phillip Campbell OAM (General Manager Technical Standards, ARTC), Rob Johnson (Weld Australia Director and Customer and Market Relationship Manager, Liberty) and I visited the Whyalla Rolling Mill, which is part of Liberty OneSteel’s Whyalla Steelworks. We met with Liberty’s management team, including David McNeil (Customer Service and Fulfilment Manager, Liberty OneSteel), to discuss the barcoding and identification of welds in the rail manufacturing process. We also learnt about Liberty’s plans for a new rolling mill to replace the current 60-year-old infrastructure. This project is likely to be completed in partnership with Italian metal industry firm Danieli to boost annual steel production to 1.8 million tonnes. The team from Liberty then visited the ARTC Port Augusta Flashbutt Welding Facility. Phil Campbell took us on a tour of the facilities, including a behind-the-scenes look at the high-quality work being produced for the Inland Railway project. We spoke about ISO 9606-1 certification, welder training, welding procedures,

New Weld Australia Members: August Weld Australia would like to welcome the following members who joined in August 2019. Individual Members • Lucas Armstrong • Harish Charath Rajendran • Vladimir Cvetkovikj • Mike Dryden • Pushpinder Singh Lamay • Vanessa Nunn • Karl Saul • Chi Hwan Song • Paul Vermeulen • Ethan Woods Student Members • Jacob Jordan • Max Lim • Leigh Oxley • Amninder Singh • William Smart To become a Weld Australia member, all you need to do is: • Visit: weldaustralia.com.au • Phone: 02 8748 0100 • Email: membership@ weldaustralia.com.au Weld Australia membership is an investment in the success of your career or business. We will help you increase your income, decrease your costs and give you a competitive advantage over companies or people who aren’t members. A Weld Australia membership delivers: networking opportunities, professional development, industry insights and more.

Geoff Crittenden opens the Summit.

Minister Gayle Tierney speaks at the 2019 National Manufacturing Summit.

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A Message from the CEO and the importance of plant maintenance. This was a fantastic trip—one which demonstrated the importance of collaboration throughout the entire steel supply chain. I would like to thank both David McNeil and Phil Campbell for their hospitality. AIMEX I recently attended AIMEX in Sydney—the largest free-to-attend conference for the mining sector. The program concentrated on three key themes: Future Sector, focused on industry outlooks and lifting industry standards; Future Workforce, which highlighted future skills and responses to varying disruption; and Future Governance, which considered the effects of the shift towards a low carbon economy and energy consumption. I was invited to participate in a highly engaging panel discussion: Tomorrow’s Workforce—Enabling

and Cultivating Our Future Miners. This panel examined how the mining community can reinvent their approach to talent acquisition and retention for today’s agile, digital, mobile, analytical, and technologically-driven workforce in the mining sector.

WorkSafe authorities were in attendance (bar WorkSafeACT and WorkSafe Tasmania, both of whom were apologies), as well as the Australian Institute of Occupational Hygienists. Bruce Cannon (Principal Welding Engineer, Weld Australia) gave attendees an update on the discussions around welding fume safety that occurred at the recent IIW International Congress 2019 Commission VIII - Health, Safety and Environment.

I also presented on the topic of using advanced welder training technology to reduce costs and increase outputs in the mining industry. Delegates were then able to try their hand at advanced welder training technology at Weld Australia’s exhibition stand. Our Soldamatic augmented reality welding simulators proved very popular.

I presented a proposal for an Industry Scheme for Welder Safety Training and Workplace Certification. This proposal was well received by all in attendance, and a long discussion focused on the implementation of the proposed Scheme took place. It was agreed that Weld Australia will partner with the Australian Institute of Occupational Hygienists to prepare the Scheme.

Welding Safety Council Chaired by Weld Australia Director Adam Furphy (Managing Director, Furphy Engineering), Weld Australia’s Welding Safety Council held its inaugural meeting in early September. Representatives from all State and Commonwealth

Geoff Crittenden speaks on a panel at AIMEX: Tomorrow’s Workforce—Enabling and Cultivating Our Future Miners.

Geoff Crittenden presents at AIMEX.

The Weld Australia stand at AIMEX.

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The Weld Australia stand at AIMEX.

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A Message from the CEO TAFE Directors Australia Convention In early September, I attended the TAFE Directors Australia (TDA) Convention in Brisbane. Michael Pitt (National Business Development Manager, Weld Australia), Brian Rungie (National Manager Strategic Partnerships, Weld Australia) and Garry Hargreaves (Corporate Solutions Manager Commercial, SkillsTech TAFE Queensland) facilitated a workshop on the Soldamatic augmented reality welding simulators. This workshop was very well received. During the Convention, Steven

Joyce gave an extremely interesting presentation on his recently released report, Strengthening Skills: Expert Review of Australia’s Vocational Education and Training System. Weld Australia fully supports the recommendations outlined by Joyce in his report.

Skills and Employment. Joyce delivered the final report to the Government in March 2019. The Review focused on how the Australian Government can ensure millions of Australians have the skills they need to succeed in a changing labour market. It also focused on ensuring Australian businesses, including small and family businesses and businesses in rural and regional areas, have the skills they need to support their business growth.

In November 2018, the Prime Minister announced an independent review of Australia’s vocational education and training (VET) sector to examine ways to deliver skilled workers for a stronger economy. The review was led by the Honourable Steven Joyce, a former New Zealand Minister for Tertiary Education,

Geoff Crittenden CEO, Weld Australia

L to R: Michael Pitt, Brian Rungie and Garry Weld Australia’s exhibition stand at the recent TDA Convention. Hargreaves give a presentation at the recent Geoff Crittenden presents to Comission XIV - Education and Training. TDA Convention.

Weld Australia Fast Facts

A delegate tries their hand at the Soldamatic augmented reality welding simulator at the recent TDA Convention.

1

Meeting with State Government

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Presentations at industry events

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Member events

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Hotline enquiries resolved

8

Welding Sales Representative courses completed

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Meetings with welding industry stakeholders

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Newly trained International Welding Specialists Welders registered on the Australian Welder Certification Register

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National Manufacturing Summit Hosted by Weld Australia, the 2019 National Manufacturing Summit was held at The Australian Synchrotron in Melbourne on 21 and 22 August 2019. With the theme Skills for the Future, the critical constraint of workforce capability and availability formed the basis of discussions throughout the Summit. The program focused on how business, governments, industry bodies and the education system can work together to deliver actionable, practical solutions. Welcome Dinner The 2019 National Manufacturing Summit was opened by Geoff Crittenden (CEO, Weld Australia) at the Welcome Dinner. Held on 21 August in the Glen Waverly Novotel ballroom, delegates were treated to an engaging address by Michael Sharpe (Director, Advanced Manufacturing Growth Centre). According to Sharpe, “It is beholden on all of us to share the stories of manufacturing, otherwise we risk skipping a generation. We need to show kids today what’s possible.” “Ten years ago, the iPhone didn’t even exist. At the time, it was a whole new way of disrupting music, today apple is looking at shutting down the iTunes platform altogether. Ten years ago, there was no such job as an app developer. Today, it is a high paying job. Now, there is so much opportunity now for upskilling kids, and getting them involved in technology, and in our industry. There is a great skill uplift coming for people who can use their hands and skills to do high-quality work.”

was his first Paralympic games, and he was only 16 years of age at the time. Since then, Sam has won gold medals and broken records at events such as the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games, the 2007 South African World Championship, and the 2008 Beijing Paralympics. In 2009, Sam was awarded with the Order of Australia Medal. The advice that Sam had for everyone was that he received from sprinter Cathy Freeman: stay focused and soak up the atmosphere. The Summit Kicking off the National Manufacturing Summit at The Australian Synchrotron, Geoff Crittenden (CEO, Weld Australia) highlighted the importance of increasing the manufacturing industry’s skills to meet future needs. “The National Manufacturing Summit brings together thought leaders in the manufacturing sector to discuss the sector’s prospects, and identify policy measures designed to support industry growth and sustainability.”

David Lake (Chair, Weld Australia) speaks at the Summit Welcome Dinner.

Sam Bramham, paralympic swimmer and keynote speaker.

“The skills for the future start with us today, and I think there is a bright future ahead for all of us, if we work together.” Welcomed on-stage by David Lake (Chair, Weld Australia), keynote speaker Sam Bramham inspired everyone with his entertaining tales. A paralympic swimmer, Sam entered competition with a splash when he broke the 100m butterfly world record at the 2004 Athens Paralympics. This

Michael Sharpe (Director, Advanced Manufacturing Growth Centre) at the Welcome Dinner.

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National Manufacturing Summit Minister for Training and Skills, and Higher Education, The Hon Gayle Tierney MP Minister Tierney focused on manufacturing workforce capability and availability, and touched on how the Victorian Government is investing in more places through TAFEs and training organisations in areas that meet the skills needs of Victorian industries and priority workforces. According to Minister Tierney, “Manufacturing has a very special place in our economy. I have had first hand experience of the difficulties this sector has faced. I’ve seen what happens to individuals families and communities when the economy moves on and leaves workers behind. That is why I am driven by a commitment to ensuring all Victorians can access relevant training and up-to-date skills so, as the economy moves forward, so do our workers as well.” Professor Michelle Gee, Director, Sir Lawrence Wackett Centre Professor Gee spoke in detail about how universities and industry can work more closely together. “I think that the formula for universities and industry to really be effective in the way they work together to support each other is, firstly, to support the growth of industry and, secondly to support the business that is universities— the development of people and capability. It is about working together in an immerse way.” Federal Shadow Minister for Employment and Industry, The Hon Brendan O’Connor MP Shadow Minister O’Connor focused on both the challenges and opportunities facing manufacturing. According to Shadow Minister O’Connor, “Australian manufacturers, I believe, and you would agree with me, face very significant challenges,

but what I would argue is they need is a government or governments willing to back them. Not one that says we can’t afford to invest in manufacturing. There is no doubt in my mind that a strong, diverse, agile manufacturing sector is critical to Australia’s future. To ensure this is the case, we need to address the skills crisis facing this country, by developing an appropriately skilled workforce to drive us into the new era of manufacturing,” said Minister O’Connor. Nick Howie, Training Solutions Manager, Naval Shipbuilding College It is estimated that 15,000 jobs will be created across Australia over the next 10 years as a result of the Naval Ship Enterprise. This will create a sea change in Australia’s employment landscape over the coming decades. Nick Howie provided delegates with an overview Naval Shipbuilding College’s mission: to ensure a suitably skilled and qualified Australian workforce will be available – at the right time – to meet the needs of industry. Jim Stanford, Economist and Director, Centre for Future Work Jim Stanford spoke about the potential of value-added manufacturing in Australia (tied into the current momentum around lithium and lithium based products), in the context of Australia’s history. “Australia has a traditional overreliance on ‘staples’ industry – the concept in economics in which bulk commodities that are somehow produced or extracted from nature, and then used for value-added products. In Australia’s case, we usually extract those staple goods, and sell them to somebody else who then does something useful with them. We hope to live off the proceeds of that staples extraction and export, hoping to generate enough money to pay the bills for all the value-added stuff that we import,” said Stanford.

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Victorian Minister for Training and Skills, and Minister for Higher Education, The Hon Gayle Tierney MP.

Professor Michelle Gee (Director, Sir Lawrence Wackett Centre).

Federal Shadow Minister for Employment and Industry, The Hon Brendan O’Connor.

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National Manufacturing Summit The problem is, for raw lithium in spodumene form, you can expect US$750 per tonne. Once refined into lithium carbonate, and transformed into batteries through value-added manufacturing, this US$750 is worth over US$100,000. “The US$750 is virtually invisible in the total value chain. We need to set our sights a little bit higher... it is a losing proposition if we just stick to extraction,” said Stanford.

Nick Howie (Training Solutions Manager, Naval Shipbuilding College).

Jim Stanford (Economist and Director, Centre for Future Work).

Delegates at the 2019 National Manufacturing Summit.

Despite Australia’s advantages, no industry will develop spontaneously. It needs foresight, planning and intervention to make it happen. As such, according to Stanford, several measures must be implemented to ensure Australia can compete in valueadded manufacturing. Panel One: Unlocking the Power of Collaboration Chaired by Sharon Robertson (CEO, IBSA Manufacturing), panellists for the first discussion of the day included Craig Robertson (CEO, TAFE Directors Australia), Adrian Boden (Executive Director, SEMMA), Megan Lilly (Head of Workforce Development, Ai Group) and Shaun Manuell (Senior Portfolio Manager Investments, AustralianSuper). This panel delved into a discussion on how industry and the training and education sector can collaborate to ensure skilled workers are available to meet future demand. Lilly proposed that the issue in Australia is a ‘skills gap’ between what currently exists, and what is needed by industry, rather than an overall skills shortage. As such, she believes that there is room to expand micro-qualifications— short courses for employees to upskill while in employment. However, this should not come at the expense of foundational training and qualifications. With Lilly noting that 50% of all jobs in the future will shift in their composition by 50%, workplaces

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will have to become mini classrooms, with the participation of industry, so that upskilling can occur. Manuell emphasised the importance of all companies having a digital strategy in place. However, in his experience, when you talk to companies about where the largest skills gaps currently exist, it is in this very area. Companies are finding it difficult to recruit for roles such as data scientists, and people with the requisite digital and STEM skills. Boden highlighted that the structure of Australian industry is placing a strain on the ability of Australian manufacturing to support skills development. Australia is unique among the development world in the composition of the industrial sector, with 90% of companies employing less than 30 people. Given this structure, Boden said that one of the most important aspects of improving Australia’s skills crisis is discovering how to ensure business owners are interested in education and training and improving their skills, as well as those of their workforce. As small businesses, “it isn’t that they’re not trying their hardest, but education of themselves, let alone their workers, is probably not foremost in their minds”. Panel Two: Skills for a HighTech Manufacturing Future Panel Chair, Michael Sharpe (Director, AMGC) was joined by panellists Chris Brugeaud (CEO, SSS Manufacturing), Stuart Birkin (Stuart Birkin, Education Manager: Engineering, Manufacturing and Automotive, Federation TAFE) and Justine Evesson (Advisor, Skills and Apprenticeships). According to Evesson, it is little wonder that there is a national consensus that the existing vocational education and training system is broken—TAFE is “more or less invisible in national policy”.

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National Manufacturing Summit With funding diverted from TAFE into to the private sector, the quality of skills training has taken a nose-dive. In addition, Evesson highlighted that TAFE’s deep and rigid bureaucracies, has limited its ability to engage with industry when developing courses and curricula. Evesson outlined that Australia is not alone in confronting a skills crisis, particularly 21st century skills such as problem solving, collaboration, team work and creativity. While these skills are undoubtedly needed, a focus on these foundational skills cannot come at the expense of expertise in a particular area. As Evesson put it, “There’s not much use in collaborating if you have nothing to contribute.” Brugeaud noted that, as automation occurs across the workforce, there is potential for new technologies to expand the workforce, rather than shrink the number of employees. According to Brugeau, 100% of manufacturing a business will never be automated. Rather, high levels of automation in up to 60% of a business will improve efficiencies, enabling Australian manufacturers to hire more people. The problem is that, while the technical capabilities of Industry 4.0 like automation are available now, a lack of a skilled workers is limiting their the implementation. Panel Three: The Future of Skills and Diversity—Beyond Ticking the Box Chaired by Anne Koopman (Leadership and Development Consultant), panellists included Sharon Jones (National Manager of Indigenous Employment, Mindaroo Foundation), Kirsty Bateman (Director of Engineering Capability, BAE Systems Australia), and Sandra Taylor (Manufacturing Manager, Twinings).

Panel One: (L to R): Shaun Manuell, Adrian Boden, Megan Lilly, Craig Robertson, and Panel Chair Sharon Robertson.

Panel Two: (L to R): Chris Brugeaud and Justine Evesson.

Panel Three: Sharon Jones.

Panel Three: (L to R): Kirsty Bateman, Panel Chair Anne Koopman, and Sandra Taylor.

As roles change in manufacturing, new skills and competencies come from the new people that fill these roles. As Taylor pointed out, without a need to conduct heavy lifting in the production process more people, whether they be younger, older or of a different gender, can become involved in manufacturing. With this expanded set of employees, different ways of thinking can emerge. Bateman agreed, “Diverse thinking comes from diverse backgrounds and diverse experiences.” This diversity will lead to new ways of working. Clearly, there is no simple answer to solving the looming skills crisis

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Panel Two: (L to R): Stuart Birkin and Panel Chair Michael Sharpe.

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within the manufacturing sector. It will require a multi-faceted approach from industry, education and training providers, and support from all levels of government—an approach that must be characterised by collaboration, diversity, digital skills and forward-planning. Weld Australia was fortunate to have the support of an impressive group of co-sponsors – the Advanced Manufacturing Growth Centre (AMGC), AustralianSuper, the Centre for Future Work, IBSA Manufacturing, and TAFE Directors Australia. Manufacturers’ Monthly has also supported the event as our Media Partner.

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Membership Matters How to Access Your Weld Australia Member Benefits Being a Member of Weld Australia opens you up to a world of benefits. In the August edition of Weld Connect, we profiled just some of these benefits, from attending our free member events which are held regularly across the states, through to discounts on our wide range of training, examination and certification programs. How to Access Member Benefits Accessing the wide array of Weld Australia member benefits is easy—all you need is your: • Weld Australia Member ID (a six digit number issued to you when you joined) • Username and password for our Members Portal (when you joined Weld Australia, you will have been prompted to set up your username and password, linked to your Member ID) Our Members Portal stores all your membership information (such as contact details) which you can update as required. You can also use the Members Portal to access a range of free industry documents, obtain a copy of your Membership Certificate, register for training courses and RSVP to Member Events. To Access the Member Portal: • Go to Weld Australia’s website: www.weldaustralia.com.au • In the top right-hand corner, click on the orange text: ‘Member Login’ • Enter your username and password

Australian Welder Certification Register (AWCR) As a Weld Australia Member, you can also register on the Australian Welder Certification Register (AWCR). The AWCR provides a national framework for qualifying and testing welders to International Standards AS/NZS ISO 9606. The AWCR allows qualified and certified registered welders to be able to work on any site without further testing resulting in a significant cost saving to industry. It provides industry with access to a database of welders with up to date certification and details of their career history. When you register for the AWCR, you will be issued with a WeldQ number. This number will then be required every time you log into the AWCR. Your WeldQ number will start with your initials, followed by six digits. For instance, if your name was John Smith, your WeldQ number would be something like JS123456. To Access the AWCR or WeldQ Programs: • Go to Weld Australia’s website: www.weldaustralia.com.au • In the top right-hand corner, click on the AWCR icon:

Scroll down and click on ‘Existing User Login’

If you don’t have an ‘Existing User Login’ and need to register, simply select ‘Click Here to Register’.

What To Do If You Misplace Your Weld Australia Username, Password, or Member ID If you misplace any of your Weld Australia access information, including your username, password, or Member ID, simply contact us via: • •

Email: membership@weldaustralia.com.au Phone: +61 2 8748 0135 or 1800 620 820

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New South Wales Division News The Weld Australia New South Wales Division recently facilitated a technical evening focused on High Deposition Welding. When it comes to high deposition welding, achieving increased deposition rates, without compromising puddle stability and weld quality is high priority. A solution is now available to heavy fabrication welding that can not only improve the deposition rate by 80% compared to current single wire process, but offers improved quality with less undercutting and internal discontinuities.

Lincoln’s product management, marketing and the Application Solution Centre. Paul brought to this session an in-depth insight and understanding of the technology and innovation in this space. At the conclusion of Paul’s presentation, there was ample time for networking and connecting with other Weld Australia members. Weld Australia would like to extend its thanks to Lincoln Electric Australia for hosting this event.

In this session, Lincoln Electric also demonstrated how greater deposition rates can be achieved using solutions such as Hyperfill. Hyperfill is a patent-pending twin wire MIG solution that allows for increase deposition rates without compromising weld quality. The event was presented by Paul Smith (Marketing Manager, Lincoln Electric Australia). Paul brings over 40 years experience in the industry working with Lincoln Electric. Paul is currently driving New South Wales Division Contact Paolo Corronca Qualification & Certification Manager 0438 012 099 p.corronca@weldaustralia.com.au

Save the Date Upcoming Event The Effects of Gas Shielding on Welding Performance If you have ever wondered which shielding gas to use for a particular welding job, then this is the event for you. With decades of experience in the manufacturing and gas industry, Pat Kenna will explore with you which shielding gases to use, as well as the most appropriate shielding gas for each different type of job. The selection of a gas mixture significantly impacts the quality of a weld so it is crucial to have an understanding of your shielding gas choice to deliver a quality weld.

Paul Smith (Marketing Manager, Lincoln Electric) demonstrates Hyperfill.

L to R: Paul Smith and Alan Taylor (NSW Division Committee Chairman).

This important presentation will give you an understanding of gas selection, including: • Gain a detailed understanding of the uses and benefits of different shielding gases on different processes, • Learn how to select the best shielding gas for a particular job, and • Learn about the mixture of gas available from Coregas. At the conclusion of the presentation, please join us for some light refreshments. Event Details • Date: Thursday 26 September • Time: 6.00pm to 8.00pm • Venue: Coregas Building, • 66 Loftus Road, Yennora NSW 2161

REGISTER NOW Weld Australia members at Lincoln Electric’s Application Solution Centre.

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For further information, email: membership@weldaustralia.com.au

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Victoria Division News Victoria Division Welcomes a New Committee Member The Weld Australia Victoria Division Committee would like to welcome its newest member: James Johnson. With over 20 years industry experience, James commenced his career as a boilermaker, using MIG, GTAW, MMAW and SAW processes on sheet metal, right through to heavy plate and pipe. Since 2010, he has been a Welding Supervisor and Inspector, as well as an NDT Technician and Coatings Inspector. He has worked across industries as diverse as structural steel, shipping, mining, rail, hydro power and pipeline. According to James, “I’ve joined the Weld Australia Victoria Division Committee because I want to help improve fabrication and welding within the manufacturing industry, and I want to expand my own personal knowledge and experience.” Victoria Division Contact Victor Blain Senior Welding Engineer 0409 823 991 v.blain@weldaustralia.com.au

Bombardier to Supply New VLocity Trains for Regional Rail The latest batch of VLocity trains has been ordered to meet growing demand for regional rail services. Bombardier in Dandenong will build the next six VLocity trains, supporting 100 direct jobs and hundreds more throughout the supply chain. The new VLocity trains will include the latest technology, including accessibility improvements and mobile phone signal boosting technology. Bombardier is expected to begin building the new trains next year, before they are delivered to the network in 2021. The new trains are part of the $340 million investment in the Victorian Budget 2019-2020 to purchase up to 18 new three-carriage trains. The Victorian Government has already delivered a 40 per cent increase in regional rail services, with V/ Line now running more than 2,000 services every week. An additional $50 million has been invested to refurbish 75 trains in the existing VLocity regional train fleet, including new seat coverings and padding, and other minor repairs.

Save the Date Upcoming Event The Cost and Economics of Welding Every year, welding manufacturing operations lose millions of dollars in profits due to the improper calculation of costs and inefficient welding practices. Presented by Victor Blain (Senior Welding Engineer, Weld Australia), this session will focus on learnings from industry to help you avoid the pitfalls and help your business stay out of the red. This technical session will: • Help you identify and manage the costs of production in order to reduce expenses and ensure quality. • Explain how to calculate the costs of welding by weight of deposited metal, and give some tips and techniques for cost estimation. • Discuss the main factors influencing weld costs to highlight where it is possible to optimise the welding process and save money. • Use real business case examples to highlight the costs of welding and how to optimise it. Event Details • Date: Thursday 12 September • Time: 5:30pm to 7.30pm • Location: Chisholm Institute, Building V, Room 114, 121 Stud Road, Dandenong VIC 3175

REGISTER NOW For further information or to register for the event, email: membership@weldaustralia.com.au The new VLocity trains include the latest technology. Image courtesy of Bombardier.

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South Australia Division News The South Australia Division recently held an essential technical session at the TAFE SA Regency campus. The event focused on upcoming changes in the defence industry and its workforce, new welding technologies (such as the Soldamatic welding simulators), and applicable Australian and international welding Standards. With the welding industry operating at an ever-increasing fast pace, it is important to touch base with the essentials of welding to ensure you and your staff are equipped with the knowledge and the best technologies now available in Australia. The welding industry has some new technologies that deliver real benefits to safety, productivity and the bottom line. At the recent technical event, presenters included Penny Johnson (Director Defence Industries, TAFE SA), Christopher McDermott Ormerod (Lecturer, TAFE SA) and Brian Rungie (National Manager, Strategic Partnerships, Weld Australia). Penny Johnson and Christopher McDermott Ormerod gave their insights into the defence industry skills, as well as an update on the Advanced Welder Training Centre (AWTC) program at TAFE SA. The training delivered at the AWTC will support the qualification of welders to ISO 9606 –1 Qualification testing of welders — fusion welding. The AWTCs are equipped with a state-of-the-art augmented reality lab, featuring the most advanced welding simulators available anywhere in the world. Attendees had the opportunity to try their hand at the welding simulators.

9606 –1 Qualification testing of welders — fusion welding. This presentation covered why this particular Standard was selected for use in Australia. AS/NZS ISO 9606-1 is the only International Standard reflecting an individuals Welder skill that is recognized and accepted in Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand and by the Asian Welding Federation, which includes Japan and China. ISO 9606-1 is the minimum requirement for welders to work on projects involving the manufacturing of rolling stock, defence and defence industry, large infrastructure development and manufacture of pressure equipment. ISO 9606-1 is also required under several international Standards, including EN 15085 Railway applications—Welding of railway vehicles and components, and DIN 2303 Welding and allied processes— Quality requirements for production and maintenance companies for military products. The adoption of ISO 9606-1 across various sectors supports much greater transferability of welders between projects, worksites, employers and industry, while potentially reducing the costs to requalify welders where qualification has been maintained.

A member tries a welding simulator.

TAFE SA’s AWTC.

A member tries a welding simulator.

Brian Rungie then gave an insightful presentation on ISO

South Australia Division Contact Brian Rungie National Manager Strategic Partnerships 0438 588 214 b.rungie@weldaustralia.com.au

Attendees at the South Australia Division’s recent technical session at TAFE SA.

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2019 South Australia Conference & Trade Exhibition 4-6 November 2019, Adelaide Convention Centre Presented by Australian Institute for Non-destructive Testing The 2019 AINDT Conference will be a three-day gathering of NDT & CM experts from a wide range of industry, research and academic backgrounds including; mining, defence, oil and gas, offshore, pipelines, power generation, petrochemical, manufacturing, fabrication and construction.

REGISTRATIONS OPEN!

Early Bird Rates extended to end of August. We also remind Delegates that there are additonal opportunities to be part of the event and gain some great industry exposure by...

EXHIBITING WITH A STAND TAKING UP A SPONSORSHIP PACKAGE PRESENTING A TECHNICAL PAPER This will be essential for all people in the Welding sector to further their knowledge-base, and network with leading experts on a variety of topics related to welding technology within the NDT and CM industry.

For more information about registering as a Delegate, Exhibitor, Sponsor or Submitting a Paper, contact the Federal office of AINDT on +61 03 9328 8831 or visit ndtsa.com.au Gold Sponsor

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Queensland Division News The Queensland Division recently held a technical event that brought together experts from the Galvanizers Association of Australia and Valmont Coatings to present a detailed analysis and review of various aspects of the galvanizing process. Attendees gained valuable insights into the effects of various materials on galvanizing and what the industry offers. The session covered: • The importance of corrosion protection, particularly in light of: the cost of maintenance and replacement; safety issues such as the failure of structures; and environmental considerations • Atmospheric corrosion of steel • How zinc protects steel corrosion • Dissimilar metal corrosion • An overview of the hot-dip galavanizing process and manufacturing standards • The durability of zinc coatings, including atmospheric corrosion categories and standards • Galavanized steel in concrete

The Basics of designing for galvanizing

The presenters included David Harrison (Market and Specification Engineer, Galvanizers Association of Australia), as well as Karl Paulsen (Sales Executive, Valmont Coatings). Attendees were also treated to a tour of the Valmont Coatings facilities in Carole Park. Valmont Coatings is a leading provider of hot-dip galvanizing and protective coating services for a variety of metal products, bolstering their durability, lifespan and aesthetic value.

Valmont’s primary focus has always been hot dip galvanizing; however, to keep up with the demand for a diversified coating selection, they have expanded their service offerings to include powder coating, liquid coating, anodizing and e-coating. They service customers in nearly every industry from bridges and highways to solar and alternative energy, as well as medical, military and sporting goods. Their rapid expansion over the years means that Valmont now has over 35 coatings facilities in six countries. For more information about Valmont Coatings, visit: http://www.valmontcoatings.com

Steve Brown (Operations Manager Carole Park, Valmont Coatings). Weld Australia members tour Valmont Coatings facilities.

L to R: Steve Richards (Queensland Committee Member) and David Harrison

Queensland Division Contact Abhishek Trivedi Senior Welding Engineer 0409 670 433 a.trivedi@weldaustralia.com.au

Weld Australia members tour Valmont Coatings facilities.

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Western Australia Division News METRONET Railcars to be Proudly Built in Western Australia World-class railcar manufacturer, Alstom, was recently announced as the preferred proponent to build 246 new C-series railcars, six cars to replace the existing Australind service and a manufacturing and assembly plant in Bellevue.

successful proponent will also be responsible for maintaining the fleet of rail cars for the next 30 years.

As part of the project, Alstom will establish a base in Western Australia at the 12,000m2 plant near Midland, where railcar maintenance will also be carried out for the next 30 years. Under the policy, which was taken to the 2017 election, a new 50 per cent local content target has been set to ensure jobs are maximised in Western Australia.

While the final design and features of the railcars are still to be finalised, the six-car trains will carry about 1,200 passengers and have an operational life of 35 years.

Since the Midland Railway Workshops were closed in 1994, new trains added to the network were predominately built in Queensland, with only two per cent of the work completed in WA. Construction on the first stage of the Bellevue plant is expected to start next year and be completed in 2021, creating new jobs in itself. Meanwhile, construction of the following stages, including the new railcar depot and diesel facility will continue to 2023.

From 2022, the new trains will run on the Mandurah and Joondalup Lines initially, as these have the highest patronage demand, highest service frequency and the highest line speed.

Additional and wider than normal passenger doors will make it easier to get on and off, while technology including USB charging points, LED lighting and regenerative braking will also be installed to make the new trains more efficient.

know that it was built in Western Australia, by Western Australians.” “When the then Liberal Government closed the Midland Railway Workshops in 1994, we lost all the jobs and economic activity that went with it. Currently the work carried out locally is limited to window tinting and passenger seating, just two per cent of the work - WA can do so much more than that. “So we’re bringing railcar manufacturing back to WA and back to its home in the Midland area, with a new railcar facility in Bellevue.” “It means hundreds of quality, local jobs, more training and apprenticeship opportunities for our kids and WA made trains, on our new WA built METRONET lines.”

Transport Minister Rita Saffioti said, “This major job-creating project will deliver 246 new railcars over the next decade - the biggest order of railcars in our State’s history. The tender process has confirmed that it is more cost-effective to build railcars locally. Just like we promised at the election, we have set a target Premier Mark McGowan said, “These of at least 50 per cent local content are WA trains, so they should be to generate as much local economic WA jobs. When people ride on a activity as possible.” new METRONET train, everyone will Funding of up to $20,000 is available through the Local Capability Fund to assist local businesses interested in working on METRONET projects to improve their capability and competitiveness in supplying goods and services.

Budgeted at $1.6 billion over ten years, the project will deliver 246 new railcars over the next decade (102 for the METRONET rail expansion and 144 to replace the ageing A-Series) - the biggest order of railcars in the State’s history. Once the contract is finalised, expected to be later this year, the

Western Australia Division Contact Mehdi Tajfar Welding Engineer 0417 044 370 m.tajfar@weldaustralia.com.au

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Northern Territory Division News Third Straight Year of Record Mineral Production: Boost for Jobs and Economy Minister for Primary Industry and Resources Paul Kirby announced earlier this month that the value of mineral production in the Northern Territory for the past year was the highest on record at $4.92 billion. This announcement, made at NT Resources Week during the Minister’s Mining the Territory address, signals a 10% increase from last financial year, and the third straight year of record production figures. The Territory Government last year announced mineral production had exceeded the $4 billion mark for the first time, while the year prior recorded what was then a record production value of $3.63 billion. This means there has been a $1.29 billion increase in the value of Territory mineral production in just over two years. According to Minister for Primary Industry and Resources, Paul Kirby: “Posting a third straight year of record mineral production is sensational for the industry, and directly supports thousands of local jobs. With a number of projects now well advanced through the approvals process the industry is in a healthy position to continue to expand – this means more jobs for Territorians.”

Start of Gas Manufacturing Industry in NT West Australian chemical company Coogee has commenced a feasibility study into a methanol plant near Darwin. The 350,000 tonne per annum methanol plant would be located at Middle Arm industrial precinct. A final investment decision is expected in quarter 1 early 2021, with construction commencing soon after. The project will cost approximately $500 million and commence operating in 2024, and is estimated to create around 1,000 jobs during construction and 350 direct and indirect jobs on an ongoing basis. Ship Lift to be Built in Darwin The Territory Government will build the largest ship lift in northern Australia, paving the way for hundreds of jobs and positioning Darwin as a major international and national player in the marine services industry. Territory-owned and headquartered Paspaley Group is partnering with the Territory

Northern Territory Committee Expressions of Interest We are currently seeking expressions of interest for new Northern Territory Committee members. The application process is open to all Weld Australia members with an emphasis on the shipbuilding and rail industries, as well as the consumables industry. To submit your expression of interest, please email

membership@weldaustralia.com.au

Government in the $400 million project. The ship lift at East Arm will bring $260 million into the Northern Territory economy every year. It will create about 100 jobs during the construction phase, lead to an expansion of the ship building and repairs and maintenance industry, and generate around 400 direct and indirect ongoing jobs during its operation.

“Exploration and mining continues to deliver long term benefits to the Northern Territory economy and continue to drive growth.”

Northern Territory Division Contact Abhishek Trivedi Senior Welding Engineer 0409 670 433 a.trivedi@weldaustralia.com.au

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Tasmania Division News The Tasmanian Minerals, Manufacturing and Energy Council (TMEC) recently facilitated two weeks of welder training at Mountain Heights High School in Queenstown—Tasmania’s most remote school. This was the first metals program completed in the school within the last four years. The training comprised both the use of Soldamatic augmented reality welding simulators, and realworld welding skills in a class room environment for a total of 80 students. Students ranged in age from grade five, through to grade 13. The majority of the augmented reality training was conducted over week one. Students moved from beginner level to intermediate level in Gas Metal Arc Welding, and tackled the beginner level in Manual Metal Arc Welding processes. The students all achieved good average scores in the range of 80% to 97% with continued practice. The second week of training comprised a mixture of practical welding in the metals workshop and further simulator practice. Several standout students produced single run fillet welds of a very acceptable quality standard. The program was warmly received—all session were attended with great enthusiasm. The student engagement was particularly pleasing, resulted in very high rates of hands-on learning.

minerals, manufacturing and energy industries and provides leadership, effective issues management and cooperative action on behalf of its members. Incorporated in 1985 as the Tasmanian Chamber of Mines, the organisation has since evolved to be the Tasmanian Minerals, Manufacturing and Energy Council and encompasses the Tasmanian manufacturing sector. Today there are more than 70 members of the Council, representing the state’s most significant industrial businesses and associated suppliers delivering products and services for the modern world.

Students undertake welder training at Mountain Heights High School, Tasmania’s most remote school.

Their mission is to promote the development of sustainable exploration, mining, industrial processing and manufacturing sectors which add value to the Tasmanian people and communities. For further information, visit: https://tasminerals.com.au

Students undertake welder training at Mountain Heights High School, Tasmania’s most remote school.

About the Tasmanian Minerals, Manufacturing and Energy Council The Tasmanian Minerals, Manufacturing and Energy Council (TMEC) represents the state’s

Tasmania Division Contact Victor Blain Senior Welding Engineer 0409 823 991 v.blain@weldaustralia.com.au

Students undertake welder training at Mountain Heights High School in Queenstown—Tasmania’s most remote school.

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Training & Certification News Why Engineers Need to Understand Welding Some engineers have little practical experience when it comes to welding and welding processes. This is problematic as engineers are responsible for designing the structures (from bridges and roads to buildings and art installations) that welders then fabricate. If engineers are unfamiliar with how welding works, they are less likely to design infrastructure which effectively incorporates welding elements to create structures that are safe and of sound quality. Welding quality must be incorporated into the design process from the very beginning. By including detailed planning of welding activities – right from the beginning of the fabrication process through to the development of welding procedures and environmental constraints – the manufacturer is not only able to accurately estimate the scope of the project and its timeframe, they are also able to ensure the quality of the product.

Part of the reason it is integral that engineers are aware of welding processes and incorporate that knowledge into the initial design is that the only way to completely verify the quality of a welded joint is by destroying it – which is a costly and time-disruptive exercise. Weld serviceability it not guaranteed after inspection, which is why quality needs to be built into the welded joint. The importance of engineers being aware of welding processes is also becoming particularly pertinent as the desire for engineers with hands-on, practical experience increases. Nowadays, during the hiring process many companies will ask engineers whether they are familiar with welding processes and quality issues, as it becomes a point of difference for companies when competing in a global market. Essentially, by being knowledgeable about welding, engineers are not

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September 2019

only be able to identify defects, but also understand the root cause of the problem and offer a solution based on that knowledge. How Can Engineers Improve Their Knowledge of Welding? Weld Australia offers an in-depth course on Welding Technology Appreciation for Engineers. Held over three days, this course provides technical personnel with an understanding of the design, specification, fabrication, inspection and testing of welded structures and components. With locations across Australia, including Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney, no engineer need miss out on improving their knowledge of welding. Locations are also available on demand, and Weld Australia can conduct this course in-house. To enrol, or for further information, visit Weld Australia’s website.

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Training & Certification News Weld Australia is the premier welding certification body in Australia. Nationally recognised and accredited by the International Institute of Welding (IIW), Weld Australia offers individual certification in: Welding Specialist, Welding Inspector, Welding Technologist, Welding Engineer AS1796 Welding Supervisor Certificate 10, and AS2214 Welding Supervisor. Key Weld Australia Exam Dates Examinations are generally held in State capital cities around Australia. Locations and start and finish times of examinations will be provided upon confirmation of registration. The National Examination dates to be held in state capital cities where sufficient registrations are received: • 6 November – IWS and National Welding Supervisor Paper A • 7 November – Welding Supervisor B1 and B2 Code exams Examinations will also be held on other dates in 2019. Keep an eye on Weld Connect or the Weld

Australia website for details: https://weldaustralia.com.au. Applying for Exams Exam applications must be submitted online through the WeldQ system. Please login to your WeldQ profile at https://wtia.weldq. com/applicant/login using your WeldQ ID. If you have been issued with qualifications or certifications by Weld Australia or WTIA in the past, a WeldQ account has been created for you with your own unique WeldQ ID. If you do not know your WeldQ ID, email qnc@weldaustralia.com.au.

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If you have not been issued with qualifications or certifications by Weld Australia or WTIA in the past, you will be required to create a WeldQ account. To create a WeldQ account please go to https://wtia. weldq.com/applicant/login and click on the red button that says ‘Click Here to Create an Account’. Exam applications must be submitted no later than six weeks prior to the exam date. If the exams you are interested in are not listed above please email qnc@weldaustralia.com.au For all exam inquiries, please email qnc@weldaustralia.com.au

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Training & Certification News Under the Australian Welder Certification Register (AWCR) system, welders are invited to complete a test that qualifies them to a welding procedure as set out in AS/NZS ISO 9606-1 or AS/NZS 2980. Once qualified, the welder is certified to that procedure, becoming a Registered Welder, and the information recorded in the AWCR. Becoming an AWCR Approved Examiner Weld Australia has recently relaxed the requirements that individuals must satisfy in order to become an AWCR Approved Examiner. In doing so, we hope to see more people applying for, and being successful in, becoming an AWCR Approved Examiner. The new requirements are as follows: • Be a Weld Australia Member or an employee of a Weld Australia Member Company • Be qualified to one of the following: • Welding Supervisor (AS1796 or AS2214) • International Welding Inspector (Standard) • International Welding Specialist • International Welding Technologist • International Welding Engineer • An equivalent certification as verified by Weld Australia, i.e. CSWIP 3.1, CSWIP 3.2 • Have a sound understanding of AS/NZS ISO 9606-1 or AS/NZS 2980 • Be fully conversant with

welding safety procedures Study the Approved Examiner Training and complete the Questionnaire

Role of the Approved Examiner The Approved Examiner is the cornerstone of the AWCR. The Approved Examiner has complete responsibility for carrying out weld tests and entering the results into the AWCR. As an Approved Examiner you must conduct weld tests at an approved Testing Centre. A Testing Centre is a place determined by an Approved Examiner to meet the requirements set out by Weld Australia. Benefits of Becoming an AWCR Approved Examiner As an Approved Examiner you will be entitled to charge for the following services: • Conducting and examining a weld test. • Mechanical testing. • Inspection of test centres to ensure they meet the required standard set by Weld Australia. For further information, visit: https://awcr.org.au

Approved AWCR Testing Centres New South Wales • lllawarra TAFE: www.illawarra.tafensw.edu.au Victoria • Bombardier Transportation Australia: www.bombardier.com • Box Hill Institute: www.boxhill.edu.au • Robert Vernon: 0487 400 002 or robvernon@bigpond.com • Victorian Testing and Inspection Services: www.victesting.com.au South Australia • Regency TAFE: www.tafesa.edu.au Tasmania • Tasmanian Minerals and Energy Council: http://tasminerals.com.au Queensland • Kangaroo Training Institute: https://kangarootraininginstitute.com.au • TAFE Queensland SkillsTech: https://tafeskillstech.edu.au Northern Territory • Charles Darwin University: www.cdu.edu.au Western Australia • Australian Welding Academy: •

http://australianweldingacademy. com.au

QSM Fabrication: www.qsmfabrication.com.au

To register as an Approved AWCR Testing Centre, complete the Application Form and send it to awcr@weldaustralia.com.au.

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2019-2020 Training Calendar Weld Australia delivers a comprehensive range of training and certification services, all of which are designed to help Australian welders and fabrication companies achieve and maintain a competitive advantage. As the premier welding certification body in Australia, an International Institute of Welding (IIW) Authorised Nominated Body (ANB) and an Authorised Training Body (ATB), Weld Australia offers a range of individual certifications, including: Welding Inspector, Welding Specialist, Welding Technologist, Welding Engineer, AS1796 Welding Supervisor Certificate 10, and AS2214 Welding Supervisor. International Welding Inspector - Basic Location

Dates

Adelaide

11 - 15 Nov 2019

Brisbane

20 - 24 April 2019

Melbourne

16 - 20 Sep 2019

Sydney

9 - 13 Sep 2019

International Welding Inspector - Standard Location

Dates

Adelaide

IWI-S Part 1: 13 - 17 July 2020 IWI-S Part 2: 3 - 5 Aug 2020

Brisbane

IWI-S Part 1: 16 - 20 Nov 2020 IWI-S Part 2: 7 - 9 Dec 2020

Mackay

IWI-S Part 1: 9 - 13 Sep 2019 IWI-S Part 2: 23 - 25 Sep 2019

Melbourne

IWI-S Part 1: 28 Sep - 1 Nov 2019 IWI-S Part 2: 11 - 13 Nov 2019

Sydney

IWI-S Part 1: 23 - 27 Sep 2019 IWI-S Part 2: 9 - 11 Oct 2019

International Welding Specialist Location

Dates

Brisbane

Week 1: 19 - 23 Aug 2019 Week 2: 30 Sep 2019 - 04 Oct 2019 Week 3: 28 Oct 2019 - 01 Nov 2019 Week 4: 25 - 29 Nov 2019 Week 5: 16 Dec 2019 - 20 Dec 2019

Mackay

Week 4: 4 - 8 Nov 2019 Week 5: 2 - 6 Dec 2019

Perth

Week 1: 10 - 14 Feb 2020 Week 2: 9 - 13 Mar 2020 Week 3: 20 - 24 April 2020 Week 4: 18 - 22 May 2020 Week 5: 15 - 19 June 2020

Sydney

Week 1: 18 - 22 Nov 2019 Week 2: 9 - 13 Dec 2019 Week 3: 13 - 17 Jan 2020 Week 4: 17 - 21 Feb 2020 Week 5: 16 - 20 March 2020 Welding Workshop Supervisor (Blended Learning Program)

Location

Dates

Australia-wide 7 Jan 2019 - 20 Dec 2019

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2019-2020 Training Calendar International Welding Engineer Location

Dates

Wollongong

Module 1: 23 - 27 Sep 2019 Practical Phase: 25 - 29 Nov 2019 Module 2: 2 - 6 Dec 2019 Module 3: 10 - 14 Feb 2020 Module 4: 4 - 8 May 2020

International Welding Technologist Location

Dates

Wollongong

Module 1: 23 - 27 Sep 2019 Practical Phase: 25 - 29 Nov 2019 Module 2: 2 - 6 Dec 2019 Module 3: 10 - 14 Feb 2020 Module 4: 4 - 8 May 2020

Welding Technology Appreciation for Engineers (3DE) Location

Dates

Brisbane

11 - 13 May 2020

Sydney

16 - 18 Nov 2019

Perth

26 - 18 Oct 2019

Melbourne

19 - 21 Oct 2019

Online & Blended Learning In conjunction with the American Welding Society (AWS), Weld Australia offers online courses to help develop your welding knowledge and to better inform you for your professional development. The content has been developed by senior people within the profession and is regularly updated. These courses are available any time, day and night, and are designed as self-paced modules which will allow the student to complete them in their own time. Courses include: Economics of Welding; Fabrication Maths (Basic and Advanced); Metallurgy (Basic and Advanced); Non-Destructive Testing; Welding Fundamentals (Basic and Advanced); Welding Safety; Welding Sales Representative; and Welding Symbols. In-House Training Weld Australia can present any of its courses to your employees in-house at the location of your choosing. We can also tailor training courses specifically for your company and employees. The Benefits of Training & Qualification Weld Australia training and certification is a strong addition to your career portfolio. It demonstrates to employers that you possess advanced welding knowledge, essential to ensuring the highest levels of workmanship. Qualification demonstrates to employers that you are dedicated to continually learning and growing in your field. These are qualities that are essential for success in team leadership roles or for more complex projects. Designed to provide an interesting and stimulating industrial perspective, all our courses are supported by a broad range of major industry groups and hundreds of Australian companies. Plus, our presenters are all International Welding Engineers or Technologists with extensive industry experience. Further Information For further information, or to enrol in a Weld Australia training course today, please contact: training@weldaustralia.com.au or +61 2 8748 0100, or visit www.weldaustralia.com.au. Weld Australia reserves the right to cancel or change dates of any training course due to insufficient registrations or other reasons beyond its control, and reserves the right to refuse enrolments.

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Advanced Welder Training Courses Fusion Welding Courses There are two ISO 9606 Qualification test of welders — Fusion welding —Part 1: Steels courses listed on Training.gov.au, the National Register of Vocational Education and Training (VET) in Australia. This is the authoritative source of Nationally Recognised Training and Registered Training Organisations (RTOs). These courses were developed in Victoria in 2018. One is intended for inexperienced welders, the other for experienced welders. Both use augmented reality welding simulators as a key component of the training. Transition Workers To be awarded a certificate for the Course in Fusion Welding to AS/NZS ISO 9606 for Transition Workers, you must successfully complete seven units of competency (four core and three elective). Core units: • Simulate fusion welding processes using augmented reality equipment • Identify welding processes, safe welding practices and use of hand and power tools • Interpret and apply AS/NZS ISO 9606 for fusion welding processes • Perform fusion welding procedures to meet the procedures of ISO 9606-1 (Steels – carbon steels) Experienced Welders To be awarded a Statement of Attainment for the Course in Fusion Welding to AS/NZS ISO 9606 for Experienced Welders, you must successfully complete three units of competency (one core and two elective). The core unit is: Interpret and apply AS/NZS ISO 9606 for fusion welding processes. Elective Units Other elective units available include: • Perform fusion welding procedures to meet the procedures of AS/NZS ISO 9606-1 (Steels – stainless steel) • Perform fusion welding procedures to meet the requirements of • AS/NZS ISO 9606-2 (Aluminium and aluminium alloys) • Perform fusion welding procedures to meet the requirements of AS/NZS ISO 9606-3, 4 or 5 (Exotic metals) • Perform routine manual metal arc welding • Perform routine gas metal arc welding • Perform manual heating and thermal cutting • Read and interpret technical drawings and make measurements for a welding procedure

Enrol in a Fusion Welding Course Today

You can enrol in a Fusion Welding course through any of the Advanced Welder Training Centres across Australia. These are all listed below. Queensland TAFE Queensland Caboolture Campus https://tafeqld.edu.au Tallon Street, Caboolture, Queensland TAFE Queensland SkillsTech https://tafeqld.edu.au 247 Bradman Street, Acacia Ridge, Queensland South Australia TAFE SA Regency Campus https://www.tafesa.edu.au 137 Days Road, Regency Park, South Australia Tasmania Tasmanian Minerals and Energy Council https://tasminerals.com.au 13 Wellington Street, Burnie, Tasmania Victoria Box Hill Institute https://www.boxhill.edu.au 465 Elgar Road, Box Hill, Melbourne, Victoria Bendigo TAFE http://www.bendigotafe.edu.au 23 Mundy Street, Bendigo, Victoria Federation University https://federation.edu.au Lydiard Street South, Ballarat, Victoria

Further Information For further information, please contact: training@weldaustralia.com.au or +61 2 8748 0100, or visit www.weldaustralia.com.au.

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For Your Diary: Upcoming Events Whether you need to brush up on skills acquired years ago, or want to try your hand at something new, there’s sure to be an event for you. Keep in mind that attending Weld Australia events counts towards CPD requirements for certification applications and renewals. For details, contact events@weldaustralia.com.au or +61 2 8748 0100. Australasian Coasts & Ports 2019 Hobart, 10 to 13 September Australasian Coasts and Ports 2019 will bring together engineers, planners, scientists and researchers to Hobart, to focus on the technological, scientific, policy, planning and design issues related to our diverse and developing coasts. For information, visit: https://coastsandports2019.com.au Australian Steel Convention Sydney, 15 to 17 September The Australian Steel Institute’s 2019 Convention looks at current infrastructure opportunities and beyond the project pipeline, focussing on forging deeper and more meaningful commercial links that will see our industry continue to grow and thrive. For further details, visit: https://www.steel.org.au AINDT Conference Adelaide, 4 to 6 November The 2019 AINDT Conference will be a three-day gathering of NDT & CM experts from a wide range of

industry, research and academic backgrounds, including mining, defence, oil and gas, offshore, pipelines, power generation, petrochemical, manufacturing, fabrication and construction. For further details, visit: www.ndtsa.com.au 5th SIA Submarine Science, Technology and Engineering Conference 2019 (SubSTEC5) Fremantle, 18 to 21 November With the theme of ‘Innovation and Investment in the Subsea Environment’, SubSTEC5 will be held at the Esplanade Hotel in Fremantle, with the support of the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST). For further details, visit: https://www. submarineinstitute.com World Engineers Convention Melbourne, 20 to 22 November Learn from global engineering experts, forge connections with industry leaders and explore the distinctive and sustaining mindset of our profession; the notion that ‘anything is possible’. For

September 2019

further details, visit: https://www. wec2019.org.au Corrosion & Prevention Conference Melbourne, 24 to 27 November Join industry experts at the largest corrosion conference and exhibition in the southern hemisphere. This year, the premier event is being held at Crown Promenade in Melbourne. For further details, visit: https:// conference.corrosion.com.au Asia-Pacific International Symposium on Aerospace Technology Gold Coast, 4 to 6 December Since the inception of APISAT in 2008 by the national aerospace societies of Korea (KSASS), China (CSAA), Japan (JSASS) and Australia (RAeS Australian Division), the symposium has grown steadily to an average of 250 papers and well over 300 delegates. APISAT has become the prime forum for aerospace research and development in the Asia-Pacific region. For further details, visit: https://www.apisat2019.com

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Expand Your Audience. Grow Your Business. Advertise with Weld Australia.

Weld Australia is happy to offer you and your business the opportunity to promote your products and services directly to the decision makers in the welding and fabricating industry­. We have a range of cost effective advertising and editorial packages available, in both Weld Connect and Australian Welding.

For further information, contact: Donna South on d.south@weldaustralia.com.au or +61 (0)2 8748 0130

Profile for Weld Australia

Weld Connect September 2019  

Weld Australia is Australia's peak body for the welding industry. Weld Connect is the monthly welding publication jammed packed with industr...

Weld Connect September 2019  

Weld Australia is Australia's peak body for the welding industry. Weld Connect is the monthly welding publication jammed packed with industr...