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weldaustralia.com.au | info@weldaustralia.com.au | +61 (0)2 8748 0100 | 20 Bridge Street, Pymble NSW

Weld Connect July 2018

Weld Australia


Contents 03

A Message from the CEO

05

Pipeline Repair Course

06

National Manufacturing Summit

09

New South Wales Division

10

Victoria Division

11

South Australia Division

12

Queensland Division

13

Western Australia Division

14

Northern Territory Division

15

Training & Certification

17

2018 Training Calendar

19

Upcoming Events

Weld Australia Contact Information National Office Building 3, Level 3, Suite 5 Pymble Corporate Centre 20 Bridge Street Pymble, NSW 2073 (PO Box 197 Macquarie Park BC NSW 1670) T: +61 (0)2 8748 0100 E: info@weldaustralia.com.au

Qualification & Certification Manager Paolo Corronca T: +61 (0)438 012 099 E: p.corronca@weldaustralia.com.au

Chief Executive Officer Geoff Crittenden T: +61 (0)2 8748 0100 E: g.crittenden@weldaustralia.com.au

Marketing & Communications Manager Donna South T: +61 (0)2 8748 0130 E: d.south@weldaustralia.com.au

Training Manager Paul James T: +61 (0)2 8748 0150 E: p.james@weldaustralia.com.au

July 2018

Membership Coordinator Margarita Baldoria T: +61 (0)2 8748 0135 E: m.baldoria@weldaustralia.com.au Editorial Content Sally Wood T: +61 (0)434 442 687 E: sally@wordly.com.au

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A Message from the CEO The 2018 National Manufacturing Summit The extremely successful 2018 National Manufacturing Summit was held at Parliament House in Canberra on 25 and 26 June. I’d like to thank all our keynote speakers and panellists; their contribution made the Summit an event well worth attending. The theme of the Summit was Solutions to Critical Issues: Energy and Technical Training. One of the key findings that arose from discussions around Energy is that the Government has lost control of the agenda. When the Government outsourced Australia’s energy industry to the private sector, they forfeited all control in the process. As a result, there has been a policy vacuum for the last 15 years, which is only now being filled by individual operators within the energy industry. As a result, operators within the energy industry are not investing in coal-fired power. Instead, they are investing in renewable energy sources. However, coal-fired power stations still need to be factored in as a requirement for base load electricity supply for at least the next 10 to 20 years. This means that investment in asset maintenance and upgrades is a non-negotiable. So then, what is the way forward? Many of the keynote speakers, including Professor Ross Garnaut (President, SIMEC Zen Energy) and the Hon Mark Butler (Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy) highlighted the importance of innovative, sustainable and environmentally ethical solutions to return much needed certainty and security to Australian businesses, making a significant contribution to the renewal of manufacturing.

One way to ensure energy security in Australia is through renewable energy sources, so long as the intermittence of these sources is balanced by battery technologies. As part of the discussion around Technical Training, Dr Jim Stanford (Economist and Director, Centre for Future Work) launched a new report, Advanced Skills for Advanced Manufacturing: Rebuilding Vocational Training in a Transforming Industry. According to the report, TAFE has been the victim of social engineering—school leavers have been directed into universities instead of into trades for several years. This has been an abject failure. Moving forward, we must encourage kids into trades. The benefits of studying a trade are diverse and well-documented, from job opportunities and stability, to high earning potential. The push to operate TAFEs as profitable business units has failed just as dismally as the push for university education. A fundamental flaw in both our education and government systems is that TAFE is not treated as essential infrastructure. TAFE simply does not receive the funds required to deliver high-quality technical vocational training to Australians. Our governments treat TAFE as a business—not as infrastructure— expecting increased revenue year-on-year. And yet, Government funded primary and secondary schools are not expected to generate revenue. So why has technical trade training become the poor relation of Australia’s education system? Our Governments must invest in the TAFE system—without expecting revenue—to help ensure Australian industry has the

July 2018

Geoff Crittenden (Chief Executive Officer, Weld Australia)

pipeline of skilled workers that it so desperately needs. There has been an absolute Government policy vacuum in the areas of both Energy and Technical Training for the last 10 to 20 years. This needs to be addressed at all levels of Government to secure the future of Australia’s manufacturing and welding industries.

New Weld Australia Members: June 2018 Weld Australia would like to welcome the following new members who joined in June: Individual Members • Dennis Aguado • Meyer Appleby • Adam Brown • Dylan Stephenson Corporate Members • Rockpress: www.rockpress.com.au/ To become a member, visit weldaustralia.com.au, or contact us on 02 8748 0100 or

membership@weldaustralia.com.au.

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A Message from the CEO Government Funding Announced for Advanced Welder Training Centres Three of the nation’s first Advanced Welder Training Centres (AWTC) will be opened in Burnie, Adelaide and Caboolture thanks to the announcement of both Federal and State Government funding over the last week. Minister for Education and Training, the Hon Simon Birmingham, pledged $750,000 worth of funding for an AWTC to be established at the Tasmanian Minerals and Energy Council Centre of Excellence in South Burnie, Tasmania. Minister for Industry and Skills the Hon David Pisoni pledged $1 million worth of funding to establish an AWTC at the Regency Campus of TAFE SA. Caboolture (in South-East Queensland) will become the home of Queensland’s first AWTC, with Minister for Foreign Affairs the Hon Julie Bishop MP announcing a major partnership with Weld Australia, and pledging $750,000 worth of funding. The newly refurbished centres will feature state-of-the-art augmented reality labs equipped with the most advanced welding simulators available anywhere in the world. This technology is three times cheaper, faster and more effective when compared to traditional training methods. By using this technology, we will not only be able to upskill existing welders, but also train transitional workers and apprentices to work on rolling stock, defence and infrastructure projects. The training delivered at the AWTC will quickly qualify welders to the standard required by ISO 96061 Qualification testing of welders

- Fusion welding. ISO 9606 is the only Standard in the world which is accepted in both Europe and America, and is the minimum requirement for working on rolling stock, defence and infrastructure projects. The combination of a curriculum based on global best practice delivered via advanced training technology will help ensure a strong supply of capable welders, both now and well into the future. Without a doubt, the successful implementation of this innovative training initiative will revolutionise welder training in Australia. It will raise the standard of welder education in Australia exponentially, putting our welder training on par with the best in Europe and America. Weld Australia convened an Industry Skills Group in mid-2017 to prepare a training curriculum tailored for both experienced

welders and transitional workers. The courses were accredited by the Victorian Registration and Qualifications Authority (VRQA) in late 2017. As a result, TAFEs around the country can now teach the accredited course, with funding provided by their parent State Government. Weld Australia will work in close collaboration with all the TAFEs involved to ensure the success of the project. We expect that the first of the AWTCs will be open from September 2018. It is anticipated that an additional five AWTCs will receive funding for establishment in 2018, with similar numbers expected over the next two years. Geoff Crittenden CEO, Weld Australia

Weld Australia Fast Facts 3 23 2

Member events

8

Hotline queries resolved

Meetings with welding industry stakeholders

4

State Division Committee meetings

Meeting with State Governments

3

Presentations at industry events

24

People completed Welding Technology Appreciation training

10

913

Welders registered on the Australian Welder Certification Register

1

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People completed the online Welding Sales Representative course Industry conference hosted

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Pipeline Repair, Hot Tapping & In-Service Welding Course

Avoid Shutdowns & Service Interruptions. Realise Economic & Environmental Benefits. Facilitated by Weld Australia, this course will provide an in-depth overview of the various aspects of pipeline modification and repair, and address common concerns associated with welding onto in-service pipelines. A thorough understanding of the factors that affect welding onto in-service pipelines helps avoid pipeline shutdowns and interruptions of service, thereby bolstering both economic and environmental benefits for operators and welders alike. Plus, repairs can be undertaken efficiently, effectively and with full confidence.

Who Should Attend? Pipeline engineers, designers, operators and service professionals who are involved with the maintenance, design, inspection and repair of oil and gas pipelines.

A must attend course for pipeline repair personnel. Excellent course material.”

Course Overview

The course includes a review and critical analysis of available thermal analysis models, including the original Battelle model, the heat sink capacity method and the PRCI thermal model for Hot Tap Welding. Course attendees will learn why these models, while useful as planning tools, should not be regarded as ‘magic bullets’ against hydrogen cracking in hot tap welding by utilising comparative examples. This course will give an unbiased analysis of the best strategies for avoiding burn through and the development of crack susceptible weld microstructures. It will also cover the latest defect assessment methods for pipeline engineers and managers, from simple, quick assessments through to more detailed ‘fitness for purpose’ analysis.

Course Details • • • •

Date: 23 to 24 October Location: Sydney Register Now: weldaustralia.com.au/pipelinerepair Further Details: • events@weldaustralia.com.au • 02 8748 0130

Register Today Weld Australia Member: $3,100 + GST Non Weld Australia Member: $3,380 + GST weldaustralia.com.au/pipelinerepair

www.weldaustralia.com.au | events@weldaustralia.com.au | +61 (0)2 8748 0100 | Building 3, Level 3, 20 Bridge Street, Pymble NSW 2073


National Manufacturing Summit The 2018 National Manufacturing Summit saw a diverse group of industry stakeholders assemble at Parliament House in Canberra on Tuesday 26 June. Hosted by Weld Australia, with the theme ‘Solutions to Critical Issues: Energy and Technical Training’, the Summit sought solutions to the two crucial constraints faced by the manufacturing sector in Australia: energy insecurity and fragmented skills and training. Welcome Dinner A Welcome Dinner was held on the evening of Monday 25 June at Australian Parliament House, to welcome delegates and encourage early networking opportunities. Delegates enjoyed highly engaging keynote addresses by Michael McLeod (Chairman and Director, Indigenous Defence and Infrastructure Consortium) and Craig Robertson (Chief Executive Officer, TAFE Directors Australia). Energy Insecurity The increasing cost and unreliability of Australia’s energy supply is putting manufacturing under considerable pressure, undermining the sector’s competitiveness in today’s global market. Many of the keynote speakers, including Professor Ross Garnaut (President, SIMEC Zen Energy) and the Hon Mark Butler (Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy) highlighted the importance of innovative, sustainable and environmentally ethical solutions to return much needed certainty and

security to Australian businesses, making a significant contribution to the renewal of manufacturing. According to Garnaut, the way to ensure energy security in Australia is through renewable energy sources, balancing the intermittence of these sources with battery technologies, and investing in training skills for the manufacturing sector. In fact, Garnaut says Australia also has a comparative advantage in the new world of renewables. “Nowhere in the developed world are solar and wind resources together so abundant as in the west-facing coasts and peninsulas of southern Australia. South Australian resources are particularly rich…Play our cards right, and Australia is a superpower of the low-carbon world economy,” said Garnaut. The Hon Mark Butler (Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy) highlighted the issues with the Australian energy sector. “The National Energy Guarantee, and its inadequate emissions reduction

Michael McLeod (Chairman and Director, Indigenous Defence and Infrastructure Consortium) at the Welcome Dinner.

target of 26% is unsustainable into the future.” “It will shift a whole range of responsibilities for emissions reduction to other sectors of the economy like manufacturing, that simply don’t have the ability — the low-cost technology — to engage in emissions reduction in the way that electricity sector could do if it were allowed to by Malcolm Turnbull. Labor is committed to not only real emissions reductions, but a transition to a competitive, low pollution and growing manufacturing industry,” said Butler. The Summit program also featured two Energy themed panel sessions. These sessions highlighted the importance of innovative, sustainable and environmentally ethical solutions to return much needed certainty and security to Australian businesses, making a significant contribution to the renewal of manufacturing. Paul Hodgson (General Manager Innovation and Stakeholder Engagement - East Coast, NERA) believes that competitiveness and collaboration could be one way to

Keynote speaker Professor Ross Garnaut (President, SIMEC Zen Energy).

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National Manufacturing Summit improve Australia’s energy market. “As the Industry Growth Centre for the energy resources sector, NERA (National Energy Resources Australia) welcomes increased productivity and competitiveness from industry while working with established operators and the supply chain to encourage manufacturers adopt energy efficiency technologies, negotiate competitive deals with suppliers and retailers and help the sector transition towards a sustainable and low carbon energy future,” said Hodgson. Other Energy keynote speakers included Penny Prasad (Director, The Eco Efficiency Group) and Gordon Wymer (Chief Commercial Officer, Snowy Hydro). Other Energy panel members included Ben Oquist (Executive Director, The Australia Institute), Daniel Walton (National & NSW Secretary, Australian Workers Union), Milo Foster (General Manager - Albury Mill, Norske Skog), Chris Lamont (Director of Policy and Advocacy, NSW Business Chamber), Tony Wood AM (Energy Program Director, The Grattan Institute), Tanya Barden (Chief Executive Officer, Australian Food and Grocery Council), Tony Dixon (Chief Executive, Australian

Steel Institute) and John Pierce AO (Chairman, Australian Energy Market Commission). Technical Training With increasing employment opportunities in manufacturing (particularly in light of the Australian Government’s $90 billion Naval Shipbuilding Plan), highly skilled workers are required now more than ever, by defence prime contractors, a range of subcontractors and numerous manufacturing companies. If projects are to be delivered efficiently and Australian companies are to take full advantage of the opportunities available, technical training needs an overhaul. To achieve the necessary degree of skill and competence, a significant amount of both individual and company up-skilling and technical training is required to meet global standards. Many of the Summit’s keynote speakers—including Dr Jim Stanford (Economist and Director, Centre for Future Work), Neil Coulson (Victorian Skills Commissioner), and the Hon Dough Cameron (Shadow Minister for Skills, TAFE and Apprenticeships)— focused on the importance of technical

Energy Panel Two (L to R): Tanya Barden, John Pierce AO, Tony Wood AM, Tony Dixon, and Stephen Fallet.

training to the future of Australian manufacturing, and what action needs to be taken now to ensure Australia has the workforce capability to deliver major projects. “No sector feels the pain of the failure of vocational training more than manufacturing, precisely because advanced skills are so essential for the success of advanced manufacturing techniques,” said Standford. According to Coulson, the answer is cooperation between industry and training organisations, “Industry input can lead to more strategic and targeted interventions to align the training system with industry needs. As such, the manufacturing industry can help facilitate information sharing and collaboration between government, employers, trade unions and training providers,” he said. Shadow Minister for Skills, TAFE and Apprenticeships, Doug Cameron, addressed the increasing demand for technical skills throughout Australia’s manufacturing sector—an area where is Australia is falling short, according to Cameron. “Demand for deeper technical skills for the workforce, particularly in advanced manufacturing, is growing,” said Cameron.

Penny Prasad (Director, The Eco Efficiency Group).

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Dr Jim Standford (Economist and Director, Centre for Future Work).

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National Manufacturing Summit “We need a system built on quality, collaboration, depth, reliability and transferability that: equips people with knowledge and education for good working lives; skills the workforce for existing and emerging jobs...and recognises the importance of highly skilled TAFE teaching professionals.”

sessions. These sessions focused on the importance of technical training to the future of Australian manufacturing, including exploring and identifying the actions that need to be taken now to ensure Australia has the workforce capability to deliver major projects to an international standard.

The Summit was closed by Assistant Minister for Vocational Education and Skills, Karen Andrews, who spoke about rebuilding confidence in the manufacturing industry

According to Panel Chair, Dr Jens Goennemann (Managing Director, Advanced Manufacturing Growth Centre), “We are witnessing a remarkable transformation in global manufacturing in terms of innovation, digital integration and mass customisation. Therefore, Australia’s industry must increase its technical leadership, servitisation offerings and overall skillset to remain competitive and relevant.”

“Rebuilding confidence in the industry will grow the demand for skilled workers as well, presenting an opportunity to thousands of Australian apprentices and trainees,” said Andrews. “I am confident the apprentices in the coming years and the qualified workers they will become will have the exact skill sets needed by the manufacturing sector to deliver major projects to world standard and beyond.” The Summit program featured two Technical Training themed panel

Panelist Pat Forward (Deputy Federal Secretary and Federal TAFE Secretary, Australian Education Union) emphasized the important role that TAFE has to play in the future of the Australian manufacturing industry. Similarly, panelist Jon Black (Managing Director, TAFE NSW)

expressed just how important the role of TAFE will be in overcoming Australia’s crippling skills shortage. According to Black, “TAFE is the answer here. We need to squash the stigma around TAFE and the preconceived idea that university is more prestigious.” Other Technical Training keynote speakers included Michael Sharpe (Director – East, Advanced Manufacturing Growth Centre), and Geoff Crittenden (Chief Executive Officer, Weld Australia). Other Technical Training panel members included Carl de Koning (Executive General Manager, Business Development and External Relations, Quickstep), Michael Wright (Australian Steel Liaison, Naval Group), Alisha Fisher (Managing Director, Asia Pacific Simulation Alliance), Craig Robertson (Chief Executive Officer, TAFE Directors Australia), Jack Cullen (Chief Executive Officer and Founder, JAR Aerospace) and Lauren Tiltman (National Executive Director, National Apprentice Employment Network).

2019 Manufacturing Summit

Planning for next year’s Summit has already begun. If you would like to register your interest to attend, sponsor or participate in 2019, visit: manufacturingsummit.com.au

Technical Training Panel Two (L to R): Dr Jens Goennemann, Craig Robertson, Lauren Tiltman, Jack Cullen, and Alisha Fisher.

Delegates at the 2018 National Manufacturing Summit.

Neil Coulson (Victorian Skills Commissioner).

With Thanks to the 2018 National Manufacturing Summit Co-Sponsors

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New South Wales Division News Weld Australia recently visited Albury-Wodonga to undertake audits for IIW MCS ISO 3834 certification. Lead Auditor Sasanka Sinha (Technology Manager, Weld Australia) and Auditor Mehdi Tajfar (Welding Consultant, Weld Australia) audited three local fabricators over the course of their five day visit. Milspec Weld Australia began with a surveillance audit of Milspec. Milspec was certified to ISO 3834 in 2017. As such, their first surveillance audit was due for completion. For over 40 years, Milspec has worked hard to become the premier designer and manufacturer of brushless alternators and portable power systems for defence forces across the World. Operating in a global market that demands precision, reliability, and low costs, Milspec works across the defence and rail industries, partnering with companies such as Rheinmetall, BAE Systems and Thales. Nelmac Weld Australia then undertook a two-day certification audit of Nelmac. Nelmac has a broad range of bridge construction experience, including footbridges, deck and in-situ slabs, temporary bridging, and prestressed structures and components. Nelmac also owns and operate its own precast yard capable of manufacturing a range of prestressed products and is prequalified to CC level with the RMS for the manufacture of: T Beams, T Roff, prestressed concrete slabs and piles, and precast concrete piles.

One of the major manufacturers in the area, JC Butko operates two workshops. JC Butko Engineering have a very diversified workshop with projects ranging from large structural steel, large developed sections, tanks, pipe spooling, conveyor systems, food and materials handling systems, pressure vessel work in either mild steel or stainless steel. Their machine shop can handle turning up to 5m between centres. They have a rolling capacity for up to 3m wide x 8mm plate, together with section rollers for flats, angle, channel and beams. The audit results are still under review. However, it is extremely encouraging to have three new companies apply for ISO 3834 certification, particularly in a regional area.

The Milspec team.

The Milspec team.

Nelson McIntosh, the founder and owner of Nemac.

L to R: Sasanka Sinha, Keith Quinn (Quality & OHSE Manager, JC Butko) and Mehdi Tajfar.

L to R: Sasanka Sinha with Nelmac staff Bob Martin (Quality Advisor), Marten Hanley (Welder), and Jeanette Sargeant (Account Manager).

L to R: JC Butko staff Andrew Dryden (Project Coordinator), Gavin Bihler (Project Manager), Keith Quinn (Quality & OHSE Manager), and Sasanka Sinha

JC Butko Finally, Weld Australia undertook a certification audit of JC Butko. New South Wales Division Contact Mehdi Tajfar Welding Consultant 0417 044 370 m.tajfar@weldaustralia.com.au

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Victoria Division News Last month, the Victoria Division hosted the first of three Question and Answer (Q&A) Forums at Chisholm Institute in Dandenong. This informal event was an opportunity for attendees to have any and all welding-related questions answered. An expert panel from across the welding industry was assembled for the Q&A Forum. This panel included: • Phil Stubbington (National Welding Engineer - Alloy Specialist at Lincoln Electric Australia) • Melissa Odendaal (Welding Consultant, Weld Australia) • Mat Billman (Quality Assurance Manager, Crib Point Engineering) • Paul Gekas (Southern Region Manager, Scott Automation and Robotics) • Robert Vernon (Chairman, Victoria Division) chaired the Q&A Forum Questions varied from queries about the requirements of AS 1554.1 in reference to gaps between plates with fillet welds, through to weldability when joining stainless steel to copper within the food industry.

to Paul Gekas on the advantages and direction of automation in jobbing and production workshops, particularly around whether robots will replace boilermakers and welders. Paul reassured all members in attendance that jobs will not be lost with the introduction of automation and robotics. Rather, jobs and skills will change as workflows within workshops do. Paul also provided a range of practical advice around how to make use of the latest welding technology to improve productivity. The Victoria Division would like to thank all our panel members for contributing their time and expert opinion during the Q&A Forum.

Upcoming Events: Q&A Forums Weld Australia will be organising two more Q&A Forums in the North and West areas of Melbourne. The dates and locations for these events will be confirmed shortly. So be sure to keep an eye on the events section of our website. Registrations will be open soon! Please feel free to email m.odendaal@weldaustralia.com.au or membership@weldaustralia. com.au with any specific questions or topics you would like covered in these upcoming Q&A Forums.

The discussion then turned to the qualification of welding personnel and whether legislation will be reintroduced to ensure that all fabricators are working on a level playing field when quoting on and fabricating components. Questions were also raised on topics such as the choice of consumables for the welding of stainless steel operating at high temperatures.

Weld Australia members enjoy the Q&A Forum.

Many questions were directed

Victoria Division Contact Melissa Odendaal Welding Consultant 0418 922 369 m.odendaal@weldaustralia.com.au

Paul Gekas (Southern Region Manager, Scott Automation and Robotics) speaks at the recent Q&A Forum.

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South Australia Division News The South Australia Division recently hosted an event at Welding Industries of Australia (WIA) in Melrose Park. The event showcased Miller ArcReach Technology, demonstrating how the technology can help minimise downtime, and maximise arc on time, weld quality and job site safety. During the technical information session, WIA showcased new welding technology from their miller range. This included a brief presentation and overview of the new technologies followed by a practical demonstration of Miller ArcReach Technology. Miller ArcReach Technology Miller’s ArcReach welding technology can minimise the nonvalue-added time spent walking to and from the power source and maximise arc-on time, weld quality and job-site safety. Giving operators complete control at the feeder or remote — even hundreds of feet away from the power source, ArcReach minimises downtime and maximises productivity, while improving operator safety and high quality welds. In addition, a heavy-duty drive motor with tachometer control provides wire feed speed that is

accurate and consistent from the start of the weld to the finish and from one weld to the next, which provides consistent arc quality. Wide voltage range for small and large wires with no contactor chatter or arc outages. Welding Intelligence - Insight Core™ Cloud Weld Monitoring Solution Insight Core™ can transform data into actionable information that will drive continuous improvement with welding technology. It’s a simplified, internet-based welding information solution that reports operator productivity and verifies weld parameters. This technology has specifically been designed to help welding operations increase productivity, improve quality, and manage costs with arc data management. Using basic dashboard reporting

of weld parameters, or realtime operator feedback on the detection of weld defects, this technology can turn welding data into dollars. About WIA This evening was made possible by the sponsorship and support of WIA, a premium corporate member of Weld Australia. For over 50 years, WIA have been supplying the Australian market with reliable welding products and expertise that is second to none. Part of the ITW Welding Group, WIA also represent and supply the Australia market with the world’s most highly regarded premium welding brands, including, Miller for industrial equipment, Hobart for flux cored wires, and Bernard for MIG guns and consumables. For further information, visit: https://www.welding.com.au

South Australia Division Contact Paolo Corronca Qualification & Certification Manager 0438 012 099 p.corronca@weldaustralia.com.au

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Queensland Division News SSS Manufacturing Site Tour Weld Australia members had the opportunity to tour SSS Manufacturing and IR4’s Yatala facilities in late June. Chris Brugeaud, CEO, took members on a tour of their innovative facility, and was on hand to answer questions throughout. Queensland company, IR4 developed the automation technology operated by SSS Manufacturing with the objective of fabricating structural steel in the most cost competitive way using ‘artificially intelligent’ robotic technology. The automated hardware and software it utilises has been developed in house by their own people, who have been previously responsible for delivering globally significant automation projects providing significant commercial benefit to their customers. With such new and exciting technology behind a team of personnel that have extensive industry experience, it’s easy Queensland Division Contact Abhishek Trivedi Technology Manager 0409 670 433 a.trivedi@weldaustralia.com.au

to see why SSS Manufacturing represents a formidable supply partner to any organisation seeking to leverage the technology across a range of sectors. The SSS Manufacturing plant in Yatala is staffed largely by robots and controlled by an artificially intelligent software platform which analyses 3D plans to plot the most cost-effective way to fabricate custom-made structural steel sections. SSS Manufacturing employs just nine people and yet has a manhour rate of between 1.5 to 4 hours per tonne for automatically processed steel, compared to the industry average of 10+ hours per tonne. Automation has delivered two noticeable outcomes: it has more than halved the time it takes the company to produce a tonne of fabricated steel; and its number of employees has risen from three to nine, to include software, mechatronics and robotics engineers. SSS Manufacturing is set to bring jobs back ‘onshore’, reversing the trend of laying off people as technology improves. For more information about SSS Manufacturing, please visit: www.sssmanufacturing.com

Chris Brugeaud (CEO of SSS Manufacturing) presents to Weld Australia members.

Weld Australia members tour SSS Manufacturing’s facilities.

Weld Australia members tour SSS Manufacturing’s facilities.

Weld Australia members tour SSS Manufacturing’s facilities.

Weld Australia members enjoy Chris Brugeaud’s presentation.

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Western Australia Division News Defence Welding Hub Launch and Networking Night Welding is a core capability critical in the delivery of upcoming defence equipment projects. In order to facilitate collaboration through the network of defence welding professionals and organisations, Weld Australia is preparing to launch the first Defence Welding Hub. Each Defence Welding Hub will provide a focal point for defence welding activity through a network of contractors, subcontractors and relevant supporting organisations. They will: • Facilitate collaboration through network of defence welding professionals and organisations • Provide access to Advanced Welder Training Centres, incorporating augmented reality simulators and advanced welder training systems, delivering state subsidised welder training courses to AS/NZS ISO 9606-1 • Deliver welding, supervision, inspection, technology and engineering (IWI, IWS, IWT and IWE) courses • Offer welding consulting services on establishing factory production control systems to AS/NZS ISO 3834 and other technical welding problems • Provide IIW Certification to AS/NZS ISO 3834 • Expedite technology transfer, research development and commercialisation projects through Weld Australia’s relationship with DMTC, DSTG

Western Australia Division Contact Louise Petrick Technology Manager 0409 789 540 l.petrick@weldaustralia.com.au

and the French, Italian, Spanish and German Welding Institutes Weld Australia, EMICoL and Henderson Alliance members are invited to attend the evening. The Hon Paul Papalia MP, Minister for Tourism, Racing and Gaming, Small Business, Defence Issues, Citizenship and Multicultural Interests will also be in attendance. The evening will provide a unique

opportunity to network with stakeholders within the defence welding industry. Event Details • •

Date: 22 August 2018 Location: South Metropolitan TAFE, Burslem Drive, Thornlie Time: 6:00pm to 9:30pm

Places are limited so register now to avoid disappointment!

UPCOMING EVENT: INTERNATIONAL CORROSION SERVICES SITE TOUR ICS was established in 2010 in Perth. Since its inception, ICS has been a market leader in the supply of quality products and services relating to the cleaning, descaling and pickling and passivation of stainless steel. ICS have collectively over 100 years of experience in the safety and quality conscious oil and gas industry. Weld Australia members and their guests are invited to learn more about ICS’ internal processes and compliance standards that are followed within their premises during their pickling, passivation, and eletropolishing processes. Date & time: 27 July 2018 at 5:30pm Location: 16 Da Vinci Way, Forrestdale, Western Australia, 6112 Places are limited, so register now to avoid disappointment.

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Northern Territory Division News According to the Northern Territory Government, infrastructure is a key enabler of economic development. It underpins the state’s capacity to create jobs, increase productivity and stimulate growth. Infrastructure supports the quality of social well-being, the future of our children, cultural and lifestyle experiences, and services used every day. To support the ongoing development of new infrastructure and maintenance of existing infrastructure, the Northern Territory Government has a 10 Year Infrastructure Plan in place. The Infrastructure Plan is informed by the Economic Development Framework and the Infrastructure Strategy. It provides an assessment of where sectors have prioritised infrastructure investment, as well as planned and proposed infrastructure projects over a 10 year horizon. In the short term the Infrastructure Plan will help industry, with its own planning and workforce management, and inform decision-making across all levels of government. Over the longer term, the Infrastructure Plan sets direction for planning and delivering infrastructure in the Northern Territory. Priority List The Northern Territory Government provided a formal submission to Infrastructure Australia through the Australian Infrastructure Audit process in 2015. This has resulted in three key strategic initiatives outlined in the Territory’s submission being placed on the Infrastructure Priority List.

Islands and Jabiru) This initiative proposes a range of upgrades, including: • Road upgrades to improve accessibility and flood resilience of key road networks, including the Arnhem Highway and Port Keats Road • Upgrades to water storage and wastewater management facilities • Upgrades to provide additional public housing and upgrades to social infrastructure. 2. Upgrading the Tanami Road This initiative proposes building a 527km two lane, sealed road from the Stuart Highway just north of Alice Springs to Newmont’s Granites operations, and a further 176km of gravel standard road to the Western Australian border. 3. Upgrading the Darwin region water supply infrastructure This initiative proposes upgrades to the Darwin region water

supply infrastructure in response to increasing water demand associated with population growth and industrial development, and a forecast of future impact on future water supply from climate change and increasing evaporation and transpiration.

1. Infrastructure and essential services to remote NT communities (Wadeye, Tiwi

Northern Territory Division Contact Donna South Membership Manager 02 8748 0130 d.south@weldaustralia.com.au

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Training & Certification News Is it time to return Welding as a stand-alone trade path? By Paul James (Training Manager, Weld Australia) Trade training—as part of Vocational Education and Training (VET)—has undergone dramatic changes in structure over the last 30 years. Changes to the traditional apprenticeship system, coupled with the decision to introduce competency based training in the late 80s, has changed not only the way trades are obtained but the trades that are actually available. As the result of a rationalisation process, the trades of Fitter and Turner, Boilermaker and Welder were placed into new categories under the Australian Qualifications Framework. In essence, the three separate trades ceased to exist. Other trade streams also went through a similar rationalisation. These changes mean that a person wanting to become a welder (as a trade qualification) now needs to complete (at a minimum) a three year Certificate III in Engineering (Fabrication). The Certificate III includes pathways for metal fabrication, forging,

founding, structural steel erection, electroplating, metal spinning, metal polishing, sheet metal work and welding. These courses are structured in such a way that the trainee completes mandatory core competencies. Then, the employer or trainee must choose from a selection of ‘elective’ units of competency. These elective units include welding, as well as other engineering and fabrication competencies. People who earn their Certificate III then go onto employment. Their role may require them to use a variety of skills learned during their Certificate III. However, sometimes people gain employment in a position that is purely focused on welding—a task they will perform for the majority of their career. While their trade training has prepared them, sometimes only a portion of the training is devoted to the welding proficiencies required. When companies need to employ

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welders for their business, it’s important that they understand that a Certificate III in Fabrication is not necessarily the same for everyone. Hiring managers should be aware that when hiring welding personnel, only the transcripts from the course itemise the competencies that were completed—the Certificate must be taken at face value only. The transcripts will identify each individual welding process that the person has been deemed competent in, and will also indicate (by omission) the processes in which they are not competent. This is by no means a criticism of people with this trade or the people conducting the training. It is a failing of the vocational education system to understand industry needs and wants, namely a dedicated welding trade. Welding requires extensive knowledge and is a very specialised and technical skill. It is something that used to be a profession, not a list of ‘elective’ competencies.

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Training & Certification News International Welding Engineer and Technologist Course 2018 Weld Australia will again conduct the International Welding Engineer Course at the University of Wollongong, commencing on 24 September 2018. Successful completion of this course will see graduates obtain the globally recognised qualification, International Institute of Welding (IIW) – International Welding Engineer (IWE) or International Welding Technologist (IWT), depending on the applicant’s prerequisites. IWE certification will take on a greater importance over the coming years with the requirement for companies to become AS/NZS ISO 3834 certified to work with some of the prime contractors on the large Defence projects starting in Australia. This will require the certified companies to have a nominated Responsible Welding Coordinator with the IWE

and IWT qualifications amongst the recommended education requirements. Other areas in Australia that will be looking for competent Welding Engineers are companies looking for certification to EN 15085 Railway Applications - Welding of Railway Vehicles and Components. This requires the company to have an IWE or IWT as the nominated Responsible Welding Coordinator within their organisation. Early enrolment will put you ahead of the curve, boost your career and earning potential, and make you the preferred candidate for largescale projects around the globe. About the Course Weld Australia’s IWE/IWT course covers: • Welding processes and equipment • Materials and their behaviour

• • •

during welding Construction and design Fabrication and applications engineering Hands on practical welding

As such, IWE certification is a strong addition to your career portfolio—it clearly demonstrates to current and future employers that you possess advanced welding knowledge and experience. Designed to provide an interesting and stimulating industrial perspective, the course is supported by a broad range of major industry groups and hundreds of Australian companies. Further Information If you require any information with regards to the next course, please contact Paul James (Training Manager, Weld Australia) via p.james@weldaustralia.com.au or 02 8748 0150.

Migration to WeldQ is Now Complete Weld Australia is happy to announce that the migration of data into the WeldQ platform is now complete. A profile has been created for all people who gained qualifications or certifications from 2000 onwards both through Weld Australia (formerly known as the WTIA) and the IIW (issued in Australia). Please note that not all qualifications issued prior to 2000 have been migrated across to WeldQ. To check if you have a WeldQ profile, simply send an email to qnc@weldaustralia.com.au or contact us on (02) 8748 0100 and dial 1. If you’d like to apply for an examination or a certification, you must now submit all applications through the Australian Welder Certification Register (AWCR) WeldQ program. You can also access your digital records via their mobile phone by using the WeldQ app. The WeldQ app is available to download from both the App Store and the Play Store.

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2018 Training Calendar Weld Australia delivers a comprehensive range of training and certification services, all of which are designed to help Australian welders and fabrication companies achieve and maintain a competitive advantage. As the premier welding certification body in Australia, an International Institute of Welding (IIW) Authorised Nominated Body (ANB) and an Authorised Training Body (ATB), Weld Australia offers a range of individual certifications, including: Welding Inspector, Welding Specialist, Welding Technologist, Welding Engineer, AS1796 Welding Supervisor Certificate 10, and AS2214 Welding Supervisor. International Welding Inspector - Basic

Location

Dates

Adelaide

22 – 26 Oct 2018

Brisbane

3 – 7 Sep 2018

Mackay

6 - 10 Aug 2018

Melbourne

3 - 7 Sep 2018

Perth

9 - 13 Jul 2018

Sydney

29 Oct - 2 Nov 2018

International Welding Inspector - Standard Location

Dates

Adelaide

IWI-S Part 1: 26 - 30 Nov 2018 IWI-S Part 2 (Mandatory): 3 - 5 Dec 2018

Brisbane

IWI-S Part 1: 6 – 10 Aug 2018 IWI-S Part 2 (Mandatory): 27 – 29 Aug 2018

Mackay

IWI-S Part 1: 13 - 17 Aug 2018 IWI-S Part 2 (Mandatory): 20 – 22 Aug 2018

Perth

IWI-S Part 1: 8 – 12 Oct 2018 IWI-S Part 2 (Mandatory): 22 – 24 Oct 2018

Sydney

IWI-S Part 1: 22 - 26 Oct 2018 IWI-S Part 2 (Mandatory): 5 - 7 Nov 2018

International Welding Specialist

Location

Dates

Brisbane

Week 1: 16 - 20 Jul 2018 Week 2: 20 - 24 Aug 2018 Week 3: 17 - 21 Sep 2018 Week 4 : 15 - 19 Oct 2018 Week 5: 19 - 23 Nov 2018

Mackay

Week 1: 10 - 14 Sep 2018 Week 2: 8 - 12 Oct 2018 Week 3: 12 - 16 Nov 2018 Week 4: 10 - 14 Dec 2018 Week 5: 21 - 25 Jan 2019

Sydney

Week 1: 20 - 24 Aug 2018 Week 2: 17 - 21 Sep 2018 Week 3: 15 - 19 Oct 2018 Week 4: 12 - 16 Nov 2018 Week 5: 10 - 14 Dec 2018

The practical and theoretical knowledge of the trainers was excellent, the opportunity to draw on their knowledge was fantastic.”

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2018 Training Calendar Welding Technology Appreciation for Engineers

Location

Dates (To Be Confirmed)

Brisbane

24 - 26 Sep 2018

Melbourne

3 - 5 Oct 2018

Perth

10 - 12 Sep 2018

Sydney

27 - 29 Aug 2018

International Welding Engineer & Technologist

Location

Dates (To Be Confirmed)

Wollongong

IIWE Module 1: 24 - 28 Sep 2018 IWE/T Practical Phase: 3 - 07 Dec 2018 IWE Module 2: 10 - 14 Dec 2018 IWE Module 3: 11 15 Feb 2019 IWE Module 4: 13 - 17 May 2019

In-House Training Weld Australia can present any of its courses to your employees in-house at the location of your choosing. We can also tailor training courses specifically for your company and employees.

The Benefits of Training & Qualification Weld Australia training and certification is a strong addition to your career portfolio. It demonstrates to employers that you possess advanced welding knowledge, essential to ensuring the highest levels of workmanship. Qualification demonstrates to employers that you are dedicated to continually learning and growing in your field. These are qualities that are essential for success in team leadership roles or for more complex projects. Designed to provide an interesting and stimulating industrial perspective, all our courses are supported by a broad range of major industry groups and hundreds of Australian companies. Plus, our presenters are all International Welding Engineers or Technologists with extensive industry experience. Further Information For further information, or to enrol in a Weld Australia training course today, please contact: training@weldaustralia.com.au or +61 2 8748 0100, or visit www.weldaustralia.com.au. Weld Australia reserves the right to cancel or change dates of any training course due to insufficient registrations or other reasons beyond its control, and reserves the right to refuse enrolments.

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For Your Diary: Upcoming Events Whether you need to brush up on skills acquired years ago, or want to try your hand at something new, there’s sure to be an event for you. Keep in mind that attending Weld Australia events counts towards CPD requirements for certification applications and renewals. For details on these events, contact events@weldaustralia.com.au or +61 2 8748 0100. 71st IIW Annual Assembly & International Conference Bali, 15 to 20 July 2018 The IIW 2018 International Conference, organised by Indonesian Welding Society will take place at the Bali Nusa Dua Convention Center. In conjunction with the IIW General Annual Assembly, the conference is a forum for networking and knowledge exchange among scientists, researchers, and industry related to welding. For details, visit: www.iiw2018.com AMTIL National Conference Melbourne, 22 August 2018 With the theme of Strategies for Manufacturing Growth and Resilence, this Conference will help Australian manufacturers discover new ideas and techniques to help their businesses thrive. It will provide tips on how to position your business to become a supplier to OEMs. For details, visit: http://www.amtil.com.au

Australian Steel Convention Melbourne, 16 to 18 September 2018 With the theme of Future Steel, the 2018 Steel Convention explores current and emerging trends in Australian industry and economy. Focused on equipping Australian Steel with the tools needed to navigate a changing landscape, qualify, differentiate, compete and win business, the 2018 Steel Convention is not to be missed. For details, visit: https://www.steelconvention.com Pipeline Repair, Hot Tapping & In-Service Welding Sydney, 23 to 24 October 2018 This Weld Australia workshop will provide an overview of pipeline modification and repair, and address common concerns associated with welding onto inservice pipelines. It will also cover thermal analysis models. For details, visit: weldaustraliacom.au/ pipelinerepair

July 2018

Upcoming Weld Australia Exam Dates IWI B and IWI S 27 and 28 September IWS and Weld Australia Welding Supervisor (AS 1796 Cert 10 and AS 2214) 7 and 8 November Examinations are generally held in capital cities. Locations and start and finish times of examinations are provided upon confirmation of registration. For further information about IIW and Weld Australia exams, contact us via email: qnc@weldaustralia.com.au. CAMS 2018 Wollongong, 27 to 29 November 2018 CAMS2018 continues a series of meetings that evolved from cooperation between two eminent materials professional societies in Australia: Materials Australia (MA) and the Australian Ceramic Society (ACS). The forging of joint objectives has created a series of meetings that started in 2004. For details, visit: https://www.cams2018.com.au

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Expand Your Audience. Grow Your Business. Advertise with Weld Australia. Weld Australia is happy to offer you and your business the opportunity to promote your products and services directly to the decision makers in the welding and fabricating industry­. We have a range of cost effective advertising and editorial packages available, in both Weld Connect and the Australian Welding Journal.

For further information about advertising in Weld Connect, please contact: Donna South on d.south@weldaustralia.com.au or +61 (0)2 8748 0130

Weld Australia

Weld Connect - July 2018  

Weld Connect is the official monthly e-newsletter of Weld Australia, serving Australia’s welding, fabrication and manufacturing industry pro...

Weld Connect - July 2018  

Weld Connect is the official monthly e-newsletter of Weld Australia, serving Australia’s welding, fabrication and manufacturing industry pro...

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