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3606 West End Avenue Nashville, TN 37205 1.888.97.WELCH | welch.edu President's Page—1


From the President Dear Prospective Student, Thank you for considering Welch College. Your decision on where to spend your college years will open up a world of opportunity for you. We provide a unique setting in which to prepare you to serve God in the field to which He is calling you, whatever it may be. Since 1942 Welch College has been helping students like you find their place in God’s world. It is a privilege to be part of this college and its mission, “to educate leaders to serve Christ, His Church, and His world through Biblical thought and life.” God may be calling you to ministry in a local church or cross-cultural mission setting, or He may be calling you to live out your faith as a leader in education, healthcare, the family, or the marketplace. Or perhaps you have yet to discover what He is calling you to do. Our goal is to help you discover your calling and to prepare you for that calling, for a life of leadership and service for Christ, His church, and His world. This catalog will familiarize you with the programs of study at Welch College. Here you will receive an excellent education from a well-prepared, dedicated faculty. As you read this catalog, you will find that we offer a variety of academic majors preparing students for a diversity of careers. We also offer excellent student life opportunities, with an emphasis on spiritual formation, the arts, societies, an intramural sports program, and Flames and Lady Flames intercollegiate athletics. At Welch you will make the best friends you will ever have. We are here to serve you. Please call or email our staff if you have any questions about Welch College, and be sure to check out our website, welch.edu.

J. Matthew Pinson President

2—President's Page


Contents School Events Calendar.................................................................................................... 4 Part One: This Is Welch College General Information................................................................................................. 7 Spiritual Emphasis.................................................................................................. 11 Campus Activities................................................................................................... 13 Part Two: Admissions, Finances, and General Information Admission of Students............................................................................................ 16 Financial Information............................................................................................. 23 Financial Aid........................................................................................................... 27 Academic Standards............................................................................................... 36 Part Three: Programs and Courses of Study What Do You Want To Be?.................................................................................... 46 Programs of Study................................................................................................... 47 The Welch College Core......................................................................................... 50 School of Theology ................................................................................................. 54 The Welch College Bible Cores.............................................................................. 55 Department of Arts and Sciences.......................................................................... 71 Department of Music.............................................................................................. 93 Department of Teacher Education...................................................................... 102 Adult Studies.......................................................................................................... 115 Online Learning................................................................................................. 116 Adult Degree Program....................................................................................... 118 Lifetime Learning............................................................................................... 121 Course Descriptions............................................................................................. 123 Part Four: Personnel Board of Trustees.................................................................................................. 166 Administration and Staff...................................................................................... 166 Faculty.................................................................................................................... 168 Inquiries......................................................................................................................... 173 Professional Organizations......................................................................................... 174 Index............................................................................................................................... 175 No person in whatever relation with Welch College shall be subject to discrimination because of race, color, national origin, age, gender, or disability.

Contents—3


Calendar of Events Fall Semester Faculty In-Service Training Student Leaders Conference Dorms open for new students Dining Hall opens New Student Registration New Student Orientation Dorms open for returning students Returning Student Registration Opening Services (7:00 pm) Classes Begin Opening Convocation (10:05 am) Schedule-change Deadline Day of Prayer Missions Conference Senior Days Mid-semester Examinations Fall Break* Classes Resume Theological Symposium Welcome Days Thanksgiving Holidays* Classes Resume Fall Senior Assessments** Christmas on Richland Semester Examinations Fall Semester Ends

Spring Semester

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

Aug. 15-19 Aug. 15-19 Aug. 18 Aug. 18 Aug. 19 Aug. 20, 22 Aug. 21 Aug. 22 Aug. 22-24 Aug. 23 Aug. 23 Aug. 29 Sept. 14 --------- Oct. 6-7 Oct. 17-19 Oct. 20-24 Oct. 25 Oct. 24-25 Nov. 3-5 Nov. 22-28 Nov. 29 Nov. 29 Dec. 2 Dec. 6-9 Dec. 9

Aug. 14-18 Aug. 14-18 Aug. 17 Aug. 17 Aug. 18 Aug. 19, 21 Aug. 20 Aug. 21 Aug. 21-23 Aug. 22 Aug. 22 Aug. 28 Sept. 13 Oct. 1-3 TBA Oct. 16-18 Oct. 19-23 Oct. 24 TBA TBA Nov. 21-27 Nov. 28 Nov. 28 Dec. 1 Dec. 5-8 Dec. 8

Aug. 13-17 Aug. 13-17 Aug. 16 Aug. 16 Aug. 17 Aug. 18, 20 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 20-22 Aug. 21 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 12 --------TBA Oct. 15-17 Oct. 18-22 Oct. 23 TBA TBA Nov. 20-26 Nov. 27 Nov. 27 Nov. 30 Dec. 4-7 Dec. 7

2016-2017

(ALL Spring 2017 dates are tentative) New Student Orientation Jan. 6, 7 Dorms open for returning students Jan. 8 Dining Hall opens Jan. 8 Registration (all students) Jan. 9 Classes Begin Jan. 10 Schedule-change Deadline Jan. 16 Day of Prayer Feb. 1 Spring Senior Assessments*** Feb. 13 Mid-semester Examinations Mar. 1-3 Senior Days Mar. 2-3 Forum/Bible Conference Mar. 5-7 Spring Vacation Mar. 8-19 Classes Resume Mar. 20 Welcome Days Mar. 23-25 Spring Musical Mar. 23-25 Graduate grades & transcripts due Apr. 28 Semester Examinations Apr. 27-May 3 Graduate Breakfast (8:00 am) May 4 Awards Chapel (10:00 am) May 4 Baccalaureate (7:00 pm) May 4 Commencement (10:00 am) May 5 Spring Semester Ends May 6 * Begins at 1pm

2017-2018

2018-2019

Jan. 12, 13 Jan. 14 Jan. 14 Jan. 15 Jan. 16 Jan. 22 Feb. 7 Feb. 19 Mar. 7-9 TBA Mar. 11-13 Mar. 14-25 Mar. 26 Apr. 19-20 Apr. 19-20 May 4 May 3-9 May 10 May 10 May 10 May 11 May 11

Jan. 11, 12 Jan. 13 Jan. 13 Jan. 14 Jan. 15 Jan. 21 Feb. 6 Feb. 18 Mar. 6-8 TBA Mar. 10-12 Mar. 13-24 Mar. 25 Apr. 18-19 Apr. 18-19 May 3 May 2-8 May 9 May 9 May 9 May 10 May 10

** Required for students completing programs of study in December

*** Required for May graduates

Note: The College reserves the right to make changes, additions, or deletions in the calendar without notice. In preparation of this document, every effort has been made to maintain accuracy at the time of its printing. The provisions contained herein should not be construed to be an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. The College reserves the right to change courses, programs, financial requirements, the calendar, and other Catalog statements, etc., without prior notice. This may be done as deemed necessary to provide for the better education of students and prudent management of the College, and/or to meet expectations of constituent bodies, accrediting/approval agencies, graduate institutions, and requirements of the professional job market.

4—Calendar of Events


PART ONE This Is Welch College Campus Map—5


6—Campus Map


General Information Mission

The mission of Welch College is to educate leaders to serve Christ, His church, and His world through Biblical thought and life.

Institutional Purpose

(Expanded Mission Statement) Welch College was founded in 1942 by the National Association of Free Will Baptists. Its original purpose, as indicated in the Charter of Incorporation registered in 1945, was to be “devoted to the promotion and impartation of higher Biblical education” for the purpose of “the equipment of Christian workers, teachers, ministers, and missionaries of both sexes for Christian service.” The mission statement above is intended to express the same fundamental concept. As a Bible college, the institution emphasizes a distinctly Christian education with a strong core of Biblical and theological studies at the heart of all educational programs, a Christian worldview integrating the entire curriculum, Christian morals and ethics, and Christian leadership and service. The College seeks Christian students who are serious about pursuing academic excellence and doing God's will. It offers associate, baccalaureate, and masters degree programs with various majors, preparing men and women for church-related ministries and other vocations appropriate for Christians who live to serve Christ. In both cases the College is fulfilling the traditional Protestant vision of the sacredness of divine vocation. The College intends that graduates of baccalaureate degree programs be prepared either for immediate employment or for graduate study in their respective fields. The College serves the Free Will Baptist denomination in particular and the Christian church in general. Consequently, the College is committed to upholding the cardinal doctrines of the traditional Christian faith and the distinctives of the sponsoring denomination. Its mission requires that it prepare leaders for the church, both ministers and laity, who will actively serve the church in accomplishing its greater mission. All functions of the College relate directly to the objectives of the educational program conceived to carry out the mission. Thus the role of all divisions that are not directly educational is that of a means to an end—as in the following examples: (1) The Administrative division provides leadership that enables the educational program to be effective in fulfilling the College’s mission. (2) The Enrollment Services office strives to admit students whose interests are appropriate to the College’s mission and who are capable of benefiting from the College’s educational program. (3) The Student Services staff works to foster the overall development of students General Information—7


toward the maturity required for Christian life and service. (4) The Christian Service Department oversees required service learning opportunities that complement and strengthen classroom learning. (5) The Library provides access to information necessary to support the educational program. (6) Institutional Advancement informs the constituency about the College’s educational program and seeks necessary financial resources. (7) Plant Operations maintains buildings, grounds, and technological resources that facilitate the educational program. The following general objectives, which are also detailed in each program of study, indicate the knowledge, attitudes, and abilities that the College regards as generally essential for effective Christian service. The College intends that these be developed in good measure in all graduates: (1) A broad comprehension of Biblical teaching; (2) Christian character and spiritual maturity, manifested in living according to Biblical principles and a meaningful devotional life; (3) A Christian worldview, manifested in an awareness of its implications for thought and life; (4) An informed mind, manifested in critical thinking and intellectual honesty; (5) A concern for global missions and evangelism, manifested in consistent giv ing, praying, and witnessing toward the accomplishment of the Great Com mission; (6) A knowledgeable commitment to physical and emotional health; (7) A commitment to Christian leadership and service in career, church, family, and private life; (8) Social adjustment, manifested in healthy interpersonal relationships; (9) The knowledge and skills needed to function effectively in one’s chosen vocation; (10) Compassion, manifested in an active desire to help the poor and hurting; (11) Communication skills, manifested in effective reading, writing, listening, and speaking; and (12) Cultural refinement, manifested both in lifestyle and in appreciation for that which is noble and uplifting.

Accreditation and Recognition

Welch College is both regionally and nationally accredited and is a member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) by virtue of either of these. It is approved by the Tennessee State Department of Education to offer degrees leading to teacher education licensure in grades PreK-12. Welch College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate, baccalaureate, and master degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Welch College. (Note: Other than for general inquiries the Commission on Colleges should be contacted only if there is evidence that appears to support an institution’s significant non-compliance with a requirement or standard.) 8—General Information


Welch College is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of the Association for Biblical Higher Education to grant degrees at the associate, bachelor, and master levels. Contact the Commission on Accreditation of the Association for Biblical Higher Education at 5850 T.G. Lee Blvd., Suite 130, Orlando Florida 37822 or call 407-207-0808 for questions about the accreditation of Welch College. The College is also approved by the: • State of Tennessee, which provides for its students to participate in grants and loans provided by Tennessee; • Tennessee State Approving Agency for the training of veterans and their eligible dependents; and • Tennessee State Department of Education for teacher education (graduates of the teacher education programs and with approved majors and degrees may be recommended for professional license to teach in the public schools of Tennessee). Welch College also maintains membership in a number of organizations, including the Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association, Tennessee College Association, Association of Christian Schools International, Council for Independent Colleges, and Evangelical Training Association. (See page 174 for a more complete list.)

Denominational Affiliation

As implied in the statement of Institutional Purpose above, Welch College is owned and operated by the National Association of Free Will Baptists and is governed by a board of trustees elected by the National Association of Free Will Baptists. Doctrinally, Welch College subscribes to the beliefs and practices set forth in the Free Will Baptist Treatise.

History

The National Association of Free Will Baptists founded Welch College in 1942 as a two-year institution. Eight students comprised the original student body. The College added a third year of study in 1949 and a fourth year in 1950, and awarded its first bachelor’s degrees to five seniors in 1951. Today the College enrolls about 380 students annually from approximately 25 states and several countries. In addition to the required Theological Studies Major, various majors and minors are available in Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music Education degree programs. Two-year associate degree programs are also offered. (See page 47 for a complete listing of all programs offered.)

Location

The College is located in a quiet, residential community in Nashville, Tennessee, the home of at least 17 colleges and universities. This concentration of educational institutions gives the city the well-earned title, “Athens of the South.” More than a dozen Free Will Baptist churches are in greater Nashville; many more are in the surrounding communities. Nashville offers excellent access to ground transportation and worldwide air travel via three interstates, rail traffic, and an international airport.

General Information—9


Nashville is a very cosmopolitan city with at least 20 major language groups represented in the Metropolitan area. This accounts for nearly 15 percent of the city's residents being from non-English-speaking backgrounds. Training is available for learning some 141 languages through a local language institute. This offers a unique perspective from which our students can prepare themselves for diverse local church and foreign ministries. The greater Nashville area includes over 1.5 million inhabitants, and offers expansive shopping centers, fine arts and museum exhibits, a variety of sporting teams and events, including NFL, NHL, and PGA/LPGA venues. Nashville has an abundance of good, clean, family entertainment, including beautiful nature sites. Nashville was chosen to be the College's home because its founders believed that this location was most central within the denomination.

Report to Students and Prospective Students

As required by the Student Right-To-Know Act, colleges must report graduation/ completion rates to all enrolled and prospective students: • The current graduation/program completion rate for 2014-2015 is 32.78%. This percentage includes non-degree seeking students, such as dual enrollment or off-site, students in special courses, and students who transfer to other institutions, as well as students who enroll but do not complete a program of studies at Welch College. • The current retention rate between fall of 2014 and fall of 2015 from the freshman to sophomore years is 69.84% Further inquiries may be directed to the Registrar.

Student Consumer Information

• According to the Campus Security Act, a Campus Security Report is available to prospective students and employees by request from the Student Services Office. • According to the Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act, the most recent report is available to anyone by request from the Student Financial Aid Office. • Students and parents should note that the requirements to return federal Title IV funds may result in a balance due to the College subsequent to withdrawal. • For more information, visit: http://welch.edu/academics/academic-offices/ office-of-planning-and-assessment/.

10—General Information


Spiritual Emphasis One of Welch College's unique features is its interest in all areas of each student’s life. Of special importance is our concern for every student's spiritual welfare, as manifested in the general objectives defined in the Statement of Institutional Purpose (page 7). The College plans its entire program so that it affords every student the opportunity to mature spiritually. Bible Study In addition to studying for classes, students are encouraged to study the Bible for their personal development. Dormitory and student lounge discussions of Biblical and theological issues are common. Chapel services suggest practical applications of the Bible to daily life. The College’s library is a rich repository of Bible study aids. Chapel Four days each week, Tuesday through Friday, the College family assembles for chapel, worshipping in song and prayer and the hearing of God's Word preached byWelch College personnel, representatives of other denominational offices, and special guest speakers. On Mondays, the chapel hour is reserved for meetings of the student body, classes, societies, and vocational groups for devotional and other activities. Prayer Prayer is an expression of our need for God and an important part of life at Welch College. Students are urged to rise early enough each day to provide for a meaningful time of personal devotions. Classes begin with prayer. Evening group prayer meetings known as SpirituaLife groups meet each Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. Global Missions Fellowship meets daily to pray for missions. A Day of Prayer is set aside each semester for prayer. Christian Service While the College exists to train Christians to live and work for Christ, Christian service should not be put off until graduation. Every student chooses an area of Christian service each year. When possible, it is in the area of service in which the student is studying. Students are required to engage in one Christian Service activity each semester until a total of eight semesters have been completed. As noted in the Statement of Institutional Purpose (page 7), this is one of the College's distinctive emphases. Benefits are many, including skill and confidence in communicating the gospel. Area churches profit from the assistance of scores of capable workers. Students share the gospel with hundreds of people each year, and make many life-changing decisions. Students may also volunteer to participate in preaching trips, mission trips, and Spiritual Emphasis—11


humanitarian relief efforts that may take place during the academic year. Each year teams of students are selected by Missions faculty or Enrollment Management personnel to travel on evangelistic service trips to cities like New York, Chicago, Havana, and Nantes. Student teams have also been assembled by the Christian Service Department to travel to assist churches and communities following natural disasters. Conferences and Special Services Welch College provides many special services and programs during the school year to benefit students spiritually. These include the following: A World Missions Conference is held in the fall of every odd year. Speakers present the challenge of evangelism and missionary service to the College family and visitors. The College's mission requires that we promote missions-mindedness. The annual Forum/Bible Conference each March is a spiritual highlight for the College and the denomination. Alumni and friends from across the denomination join the College family to hear Biblical preaching by Free Will Baptists and guests from outside the denomination. The Leroy Forlines Lectures bring well-known speakers to the campus to address challenging issues related to theology, philosophy, worldviews, global evangelism, and other topics. The following are some past lecturers: Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary Dr. Ronald Allen, Professor of Bible Exposition,

Dallas Theological Seminary Dr. Stephen Ashby, Dean of the Faculty, Hillsdale Free Will Baptist College Dr. Daniel Block, Professor of Old Testament Interpretation, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Dr. Donald Carson, New Testament Professor Trinity Evangelical Divinity School Dr. Norman Geisler, Dean, Southern Evangelical Seminary Dr. Gary Habermas, Professor of Apologetics, Liberty University Dr. Eric Johnson, Lawrence and Charlotte Hoover Professor of Pastoral Care at South- ern Baptist Theological Seminary Dr. Walter Kaiser, President Emeritus and dis- tinguished professor of Old Testament,

Dr. Gerald Mattingly, Professor of Biblical Studies, Johnson Bible College Dr. Edward Moody, Department Chairman, Counselor Education, North Carolina Central University Dr. Russell Moore, Vice President, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Dr. Robertson McQuilkin, President Emeritus, Columbia International University Dr. Ronald Nash, Professor of Systematic Theology, Reformed Theological Seminary Dr. Edward Panosian, Church History Professor, Bob Jones University Dr. Matthew Pinson, President, Welch College Dr. Leland Ryken, Clyde S. Kilby Professor of English, Wheaton College

Other conferences are also sponsored from time to time.

Missionary-in-Residence The Missionary-in-Residence (MIR) program brings a missionary to Welch College who has current experience on the mission field. The MIR comes to teach and promote missions among the students. The goal is to help students develop a vision for and accept the challenge of global evangelism. The MIR program is operated in cooperation with the Free Will Baptist International Missions Department. Generally, the MIR serves a one-year term before returning to the field. The MIR is available on campus to counsel students.

12—Spiritual Emphasis


Campus Activities As Christians, students will enjoy life at Welch College. As part of its purpose, defined in the Statement of Institutional Purpose (page 7), the College is eager to help students grow socially, culturally, intellectually, and spiritually. Some of the main features of campus life are mentioned below.

College Organizations

The organizations listed here work together to enhance student life. The presidents of these groups join the elected Student Body officers to form the Student Council. Societies: Every student belongs to one of nine societies, four for men, four for women, and one combined society for commuter students. The men’s societies are John Bunyan, William Jennings Bryan, Pi Gamma Chi, and Alpha Chi. The women’s societies are Louisa May Alcott, Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Christina Rossetti. An alternative society for commuter students is called Commuter Student Fellowship. Societies engage in athletic competition, provide units for fellowship, plan programs, and pursue projects. Global Missions Fellowship (GMF): Members are students who intend to be missionaries or who have a keen interest in missions. GMF conducts regular meetings, a daily missionary prayer band (M-F), and an annual missions retreat. Professional Educators of Tennessee (PET): Members are faculty and students in teacher education who are engaged in programs leading to teaching licensure. This association provides liability protection to students who enter PreK-12 school classrooms to engage in field experience and student teaching. It also provides advice regarding the current teaching environment and assistance with constraint solution.

Sports

The College recognizes the body as the temple of the Holy Spirit and emphasizes a Christian regard for it. Participants, as representatives of the Lord and the College, are expected to exhibit exemplary Christian conduct. A year-round intramural athletic program helps students stay healthy and provides a wholesome outlet for energies. Intramural sports provide for competition among societies. These include, but are not limited to basketball and volleyball. The College sponsors intercollegiate basketball, golf, and cross-country for men and women, and volleyball for women. College teams are known as the Flames. Most sporting events take place in the Picirilli Activity Center, which includes basketball and volleyball courts, exercise rooms and equipment, and athletic training facilities.

Campus Activities—13


Social Events

The College senses a responsibility to provide the most wholesome, enriching social life possible and provides both formal and informal occasions for this purpose. Formal social and cultural occasions include banquets, student and faculty recitals, concerts, dramatic presentations, and the Sarah Lacey Nicholas Artist Series. Informal activities include opportunities for dating, casual contacts, various programs, Coffee House/Student Center activities, outings, and other special events.

The Lumen

Each year a staff of students, elected by the faculty and supervised by a College adviser, plans and produces the College’s yearbook, the Lumen. The title means “light” and matches the College verse, Psalm 43:3. Advertisements and a student fee underwrite the cost of producing the book. Every full-time student who attends both semesters of a given school year will receive the Lumen when it is published. Part-time students and those who attend just one semester can receive a yearbook by paying a total of $79 (add $7.50 for mailing).

Student Wellness Activities

The Student Wellness Committee sponsors several activities each semester that promote physical, emotional, and spiritual health. Group activities such as walking and jogging, seminars, and campus-wide emphases are designed to provide opportunities for all students to be actively involved in the development of healthy, positive, Biblical thinking and living.

Peer Mentoring, Peer Tutoring, and Freshman Coordinator

The College's Access to Success (A2S) program is designed to welcome and support new students as they transition to Welch College. Each new student is assigned a peer mentor who is prepared to provide an immediate, positive link to campus life. The College also offers academic support through paid peer tutors. The A2S program is managed by the Freshman Coordinator, who also has faculty status. The Coordinator works with peer mentors, student tutors, Student Services, and faculty peers to know and address academic, social, and spiritual needs of new students. The A2S program features five campus-wide initiatives that comprise the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP). A QEP is required for all SACS-accredited colleges.

14—Campus Activities


PART TWO Admissions, Finance, & General Academic Information Admission of Students—15


Admission of Students Entrance Requirements

Welch College is owned and operated by the National Association of Free Will Baptists. As such, it exists primarily to meet the educational needs of Free Will Baptist churches. The College’s primary mission is to educate leaders for those churches who will take seriously a life of service to Christ, His church, and His world. The College also opens its doors to students who share its commitment to the Christian faith in its historic, evangelical Protestant expression. Character–Every applicant must have experienced a genuine Christian conversion marked by Christian discipleship and high moral character. Applicants must also exhibit a commitment to Christian higher education as outlined in the College's Mission and Institutional Purpose, sign a statement of Christian faith, and provide references to confirm their Christian character. Students are expected to behave in a manner consistent with their Christian testimony at all times. Any student who fails to do so forfeits the right to remain at the College. High School Graduation–Applicants must present evidence of graduation from a standard high school or the equivalent. This may be a high school equivalency certificate, satisfactory scores on the General Education Development Tests (GED), or satisfactory completion of an approved homeschool program. In exceptional cases, a person who is not a high school graduate may enroll as a special student, but will not be admitted to candidacy for a degree without achieving high school equivalence. This includes current high school students who register for courses. As required by the Tennessee State Department of Education, graduates of high schools that are neither state-approved nor regionally-accredited may be admitted on a provisional basis and will remain so until they have earned a C average in at least 24 credit hours. The College does not specify an exact list of units that must be earned in the applicant’s high school program. We advise that the student take as many solid, academic units as possible, including English (four years), history, social studies, science, mathematics (two years or more recommended), and a foreign language (if possible). The high school counselor can advise the student concerning available college preparatory courses. Students are advised to develop computer literacy before college enrollment. Pre-college Tests–Applicants must take the ACT or SAT. High school students should take the tests during or before their senior year, if possible, or early in the summer before admission to the College. Students receiving grades below the 50th percentile should consider retaking such tests to increase the composite grade. Information concerning the time and place these tests are administered can be obtained from high school counselors or by writing American College Testing Program, P.O. Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa 52243-0414. Applicants who do not take either the ACT or SAT before admission or who transfer 12 hours or less must come to campus early to 16—Admission of Students


take the ACT at their own expense during New Student Orientation. While standardized scores are not used as a basis for admission or rejection, they are used to determine whether students are ready for college-level mathematics. Those with scores lower than 18 on the ACT (or the equivalent on the SAT in that area) will be required to take the appropriate remedial course. Immunization Record–As required by the Tennessee State Health Department, each applicant must provide an immunization record signed by a physician or certified health professional before admission is complete. Students will not be permitted to stay in the dormitory unless they are already on the recommended track for completion of all inoculations as required for completion of the health form.

Application Procedure

Freshman (First-time college student) The steps required for application are as follows: (1) Complete the Application for Admission. As part of the completed applica tion, the students must submit a written essay, giving personal testimony of their salvation experience and reasons for desiring to attend Welch College. Attention should be given to proper English composition. (2) Submit the names and contact information of two non-family personal refer ences and a pastor reference. (3) Submit a $35 application fee. Contact the office of Enrollment Management for details. (4) Submit a transcript of high school credits. Students applying during their senior year may submit credits completed through their junior year. (5) Arrange to take the ACT or SAT test and have the score sent to the College. (Our institutional code for the ACT is 3961. The SAT code is 1232.) If acceptance is granted, the following additional items must be submitted: (1) a final high school transcript, (2) a health record, (3) an immunization record, (4) medical authorization form, and (5) a Student Consent to Release Academic Information Form (FERPA). All records must be filed in the Enrollment Management Office and approved before a student can enroll. Homeschool Students Admission of a homeschooler to Welch College requires the same documentation as any other Welch freshman applicant. In lieu of a high school transcript, a homeschooling record or transcript is required. Welch recognizes homeschool transcripts under parental authorization. Umbrella school and correspondence school transcripts are also accepted. Transfer Students Welch College also accepts applications for admissions from transfer students, defined as high school graduates with more than 12 transferrable semester hours, who have attended other accredited institutions. Students should complete steps 1-5 required for freshman applicants, and request for previously-attended colleges send official transcripts of academic work directly to Welch.

Admission of Students—17


Graduate Students See Welch College Graduate School Catalog for applications requirements and procedures.

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit for courses taken in residence at another college may be granted, providing the student remains in good standing at that college and subject to the following limitations. Generally, courses approved for transfer carry letter grades and contribute to the student’s Welch grade-point average (g.p.a.). In the event that the transferring college utilizes a quality point system differing from Welch's, all quality points awarded will be converted to the Welch system. (1) Courses must be essentially equal in content and level to Welch courses. (2) Courses must meet requirements or serve as electives in the degree program as defined at Welch. (3) Courses must have received a final grade of C or better. (4) Courses from an unaccredited college must be validated by examination or satisfactory, probationary residence. Satisfactory residence means the completion of the student’s first 24 attempted hours at Welch with at least a 2.00 g.p.a. Courses from unaccredited, nonresidential programs will not be recognized. In general, no more than 30 hours credit is transferrable. Upon written appeal, the Registrar, chair of the major (and minor) department, and the Provost may award additional credit. (5) A group of courses in a single field, acceptable to Welch, may be recognized as a minor for a degree with a major in Biblical Studies. (6) Once the student has enrolled at Welch, no courses toward Welch degree requirements can be taken elsewhere without prior approval by the department chair or program coordinator overseeing the student’s program, expressed in writing to the Registrar. Contact the Registrar’s Office for the appropriate forms. (Students who take a course without approval risk not having that course approved for transfer credit.) (7) As indicated elsewhere, no more than 12 of the final 60 hours of a baccalaureate degree program can be earned other than in residence at Welch. Any portion of those 12 hours approved to be taken after the student’s final semester in residence must be completed within 24 months for the degree to be awarded on that basis. (See page 20 under Residency Requirements.) (8) Students may transfer courses for credit to Welch to substitute for courses already taken at Welch in which the student made a D or F. However, to eliminate the D or F course from g.p.a. computation, the same course must be repeated at Welch.

International Students

International students who wish to enter Welch College must file their applications and complete certified copies of official transcripts, certificates, diplomas, and degrees translated to English well in advance of the semester for which they seek admission. All regular admission requirements must be completed before final acceptance will be granted, including evidence of financial resources sufficient enough to pay expenses while the student is at the College. The College's Certification of Financial Support must be on file at the time that the I-20 is issued. International students will have the same financial policy applied to them as any other student. In addition, an advance deposit of $1,000 USD is held in escrow for the total period of enrollment. The de18—Admission of Students


posit must be received prior to the issuance of the letter of acceptance. At the time of enrollment, the student must present an I-94, a visa, and a passport. Students for whom English is not the first language must take the TOEFL or provide appropriate documentation of competency from a recognized college or university or other reputable agency, and attain a minimum score of 550 on the paper-based assessment, and a minimum score of 82 on the Internet-based assessment (with at least these individual scores: Writing – 22; Speaking – 22; Reading – 21; and Listening – 17). All applicants whose academic records are from schools, colleges, and universities located outside the United Sates must provide a course-by-course report, as well as appropriate accrediting recognition of the college or university that issues the document. Based on recommendations from approval groups and the American Association of College Registrars and Academic offices, we do not engage in initial analysis of international transcripts. Original transcripts from international colleges and universities are generally forwarded to a recognized agency engaged in transcript analysis. These agencies usually require a contract fee in advance. The student is responsible for contacting the group he or she chooses to review the transcript and to furnish any information the agency may require. To be deemed official, a report should be sent directly to the Welch Registrar from the evaluating agency. Under no circumstances should the student hand-deliver these, as this would compromise the integrity of the document. Failure to complete admission requirements or unresolved issues with the Business Office or Financial Aid may result in suspension of a student’s privileges.

Re-Enrollment

Any student who has not been enrolled in residential courses for one semester or more is classified as a re-enrollee. Students who intend to re-enroll at Welch College follow a different procedure than do students who are continuously enrolled. Students will not be officially re-enrolled at the College, until the following have been observed. (1) Complete the Application for Readmission, along with a $15 application fee. The Admissions Committee must approve all readmission applications. (2) A re-admit applicant who has attended other institutions since leaving Welch must have an official academic transcript forward from each institution. The Enrollment Management Office must receive these documents at least 90 days before the semester begins. No readmission will be processed for a student during a term of academic suspension since leaving Welch or any other school. (3) Re-enrollees wishing to return after a suspension, whether academic or disciplinary, must also meet (a) completely observe all terms of the suspension; and (b) submit for approval a written plan for improvement either to the Registrar, in the event of academic suspension; or to the Student Dean, in the event of disciplinary suspension. Additionally, coursework taken during terms of suspension will not be transferred to Welch. (4) Re-enrollees may be required to meet any changes in the program or curriculum under which they were originally enrolled (re-enrolless should consult the Catalog requirements under which they re-enroll).

Admission of Students—19


Dual Enrollment Students

Superior high school students may be admitted for regular college work. To do so, these minimum requirements must be fulfilled. Dual enrollment (DE) students may enroll in selected courses at Welch College either on or off of campus. Requirements include the following: (1) Students who apply for off-campus courses must complete Welch College's DE application, and be approved for course admission by the Registrar. Students who apply for on-campus courses must complete steps 1-5 for freshman applicants, and be approved by the Admissions Committee. (2) Be at least 15 years of age or classified as a junior or senior in a secondary school. (3) Possess a grade-point average (g.p.a.) of at least 3.00 on a 4.00 scale. (4) Be students who have a reasonable expectation for successfully completing the course(s). (5) Submit at least one recommendation from a Christian leader and a written testimony of personal salvation. (6) May not accrue more than 12 semester hours of credit in this manner and before receipt of an official high school diploma or its equivalent. (7) Submit a recommendation from either a high school teacher, principal, or equivalent supervisor. (8) All such students will be expected to fulfill all regular course requirements for those courses designated for credit. (9) Dual enrollment students may only enroll in courses designated by the Provost. Welch cannot guarantee that credits earned by taking early admission courses will automatically transfer to any other institution. Each college/university reserves the right to determine transfer credit.

Residency Requirements

The following requirements apply to all programs of study. Residence means courses taken for credit at Welch College. (1) Two-thirds of any major must be completed in residence. (2) No more than 12 of the final 60 hours of a baccalaureate degree program may be taken other than in residence. (Equivalency to this standard is required for all associate degrees.) (3) The application of non-residency courses to a student's degree requirements is subject to his or her program coordinator, subject to the Registrar’s appro val. (4) When a student’s residence at Welch has been interrupted for 12 months, the department faculty administering the student’s program must determine what program requirements must be met, subject to review by the Registrar.

Credit-By-Examination

Welch College does not give examinations of its own design as a basis for awarding credit. It does recognize generally accepted, standardized examinations designed for this purpose as follows. Credits recognized by these methods do not carry letter grades and are not included in the student’s grade-point average. 20—Admission of Students


(1) Advanced Placement high school courses may be credited, normally up to a maximum of 32 semester hours, when the score on the final AP examination is at least a 3. Although based on the testing agency's recommendation, these must ordinarily be at the introductory college level and generally correspond to Welch courses. Higher level courses may receive credit from AP. (2) Standardized examinations prepared and administered by appropriate agencies, specifically to serve as a basis for college credit, may be recognized. These include the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), the Proficiency Examination Program (PEP), and other approved examinations.

Special Courses

Transfer students and new students with less than 12 hours of college credit from an appropriately accredited college must take the appropriate Welch College orientation sessions during the first semester on campus. Students who have area scores of 17 or less on the ACT must register for the developmental course in mathematics as soon as this course is offered on campus or as soon as available at another college. Developmental mathematics must be completed by the end of the student’s second semester on campus.

Nontraditional Courses

The following policies govern the awarding of credit for courses not taken in residence at regularly constituted colleges. Any credits awarded for such courses may or may not carry letter grades and may or may not contribute to the student’s Welch grade-point average. (1) Nonresidential courses will be credited and applied to program requirements only when appropriate and when taken from accredited colleges; some examples include correspondence, external study, and distance learning. Prior written approval is required to the Provost from the department chair or program coordinator overseeing the student’s program, as well as separate Provost or Registrar approval. (2) Credit for structured educational experiences obtained outside the traditional college setting may sometimes be recognized when the original experience has been formally approved for this purpose by a recognized educational agency or by an accredited college that has evaluated the instruction and determined that college credit is justified. Primary among these are schools conducted by the various branches of the United States Armed Forces, with formal recommendations written up by the American Council on Education (ACE) and as accompanied by official written recommendation documents from the military education office.

Credit For Military Training

Welch College recognizes the value of military training. The College may award credit for qualifying military experience. The student will need to present the College Registrar with proper official military documents for analysis.

Veterans Benefits

Welch College is approved by the Tennessee State Approving Agency for the training of veterans and their eligible dependents. Recipients wishing to receive benefits must notify the campus Veterans Administration (VA) officer. Applicants must furnish Admission of Students—21


proof of eligibility as a condition of enrollment; however, the College does not exempt the student from financial obligations until expenses have been settled by the VA. An applicant should obtain an application for benefits from a local VA office, College, or the official governmental website, and complete and mail it as directed. The College is also approved to instruct the orphans of qualified veterans to receive training under Public Law 634. These should follow the above procedure. Note: Veterans should become familiar with the College’s probationary system (page 31). For purposes of benefits, they must be making satisfactory progress toward their degree objective. If they fall behind one semester, they have the following probationary semester to meet the standards. If they fail to do so, the VA will be notified and benefits terminated. They may also be asked to withdraw for a semester. At the end of that period, they may apply for readmission to the College and renewal of benefits.

Employment

While Welch College assumes no obligation to secure employment for students, the Student Services Office maintains a Job Bank to offer help in finding jobs on and/or off campus. Students should work no more than necessary lest it conflict with the basic purpose for being a student. Students who must work should adjust their academic loads (see the Student Handbook for comparison of work and academic loads). This may necessitate a longer residence than normal. Employment is subject to approval of the Dean of Students.

Student Residences

Single students under 25 years of age and taking more than six hours must room in dormitories maintained and supervised by Welch College. Exceptions, which must be approved by the Dean of Students, include students living with parents or grandparents in the Nashville area, already having a B.S. or B.A. degree, beginning a sixth year as a full-time student, or having served four years or more in military service. Dormitory students must supply their own pillows and linens. Extra furnishings such as rugs and lamps may be added as desired. No pieces of large furniture should be brought. No electrical appliances may be used without permission. Students’ belongings are not covered by the College’s fire insurance program. Married students and parents of young children should find housing as near the College as conditions allow. They may not reside in the College dormitories, although they can arrange payment to eat in the College dining hall for the noon meal. Note: Applicants and prospective students may obtain certain consumer information as required by law (page 10).

22—Admission of Students


Financial Information Schedule of Charges (2016-2017) Tuition - Per Semester

12-18 hours (block)*................................................................................................. $8,960 1-11 hours (per semester hour)*................................................................................ $612 19+ hours (each hour over 18 hours, per semester hour)....................................... $612 Online & Adult Degree (age 23 and older, per semester hour).............................. $348 Audit of Course(s) (per semester hour).................................................................... $306 Dual Enrollment (per semester hour)....................................................................... $150 *Donations received from Free Will Baptist churches and generous supporters represent a scholarship for every Welch College student. Without this donor support, educational expenses would be increased significantly as in many private, Christian colleges.

Room and Meal Plan - Per Semester **

Dormitory and 20-Meal Plan (required for freshmen), per semester................ $3,630 Dormitory and 14-Meal Plan (optional for upper classmen), per semester...... $3,444 Commuter (off-campus) Student Meal Plan............................................................ $425 **Pricing includes long distance and voice mail capability, plus optional 195 or 165 block meal plans.

The cost per semester for the average dormitory student taking 12-18 hours will therefore be $12,590 with the 20-Meal Plan (195 Meal Plan); or $12,404 with the 14Meal Plan (165 Meal Plan). The cost per semester for commuter (off-campus) students (taking 12-18 hours) will be $8,960 each semester (excluding meal plan).

Methods of Payment

A student's registration signifies an agreement by the student and his or her parents to fulfill the related financial obligations for that semester and to comply with the payment policies established by Welch College. The College expects that every student will care for his or her account and believes that responsibility for handling the student account is part of the educational experience. All semester expenses, after subtraction of financial aid awards, are due and payable at registration. Students unprepared to pay semester charges in full at the time of registration should pay according to the following payment plan established in an effort to enable students and families to more easily budget for educational expenses.

Financial Information—23


Deferred Payment Plan

A down payment is required for all students not paying in full at registration/ the beginning of each term. Those enrolled as full-time students (12+ hours) will pay $2,400; or, if less, the account balance after all financial aid is calculated/applied. Those enrolled as part-time students (11 hours or less) will pay $1,800 or; if less, the account balance after all financial aid is calculated/applied. The remaining account balance will be paid over the remainder of the term after charges are invoiced. Payment terms will be defined on the student account statement distributed by the Business Office. In the fall, charges are invoiced on or around September 1 with installment payments being due on September 15 and October 15. The balance is to be paid in full with the final installment due on November 15. Late fees will be assessed on the next business day after November 15 on any unpaid balances. Spring semester charges are invoiced on or around February 1 with payments due on February 15, March 15, and April 15. The balance is to be paid in full on April 15. Late fees will be assessed on the next business day after April 15 on any unpaid balances. For more information regarding payment plan options, refer to the Welch College website under the Admissions and Aid, Tuition and Financial Aid section at the following address: http://www.welch.edu/admissions/tuition-financial-aid/. If a payment is unpaid at the end of the month of payment due (e.g., the September 15 payment is unpaid on September 30) a late fee will be assessed according to the following schedule: Payment Amount Late Fee Up to $1,000.................................................................................................................... $15 $1,001 - $2,000............................................................................................................... $30 $2,001 - $3,000............................................................................................................... $45 $3,001 - $4,000............................................................................................................... $60 Over $4,001..................................................................................................................... $75 Each semester must be paid in full before registering for a new semester. Any student who has become delinquent through failure to make payment or proper financial arrangements will be subject to disenrollment until such matters are satisfactorily resolved with the Business Office. A student's account must be paid in full in order for a student to be allowed to take final semester exams. If a student is also a Welch College student employee, his or her student payroll check can be held and up to 75% applied to past due student accounts. Until all financial obligations are satisfied, no transcript of credit or diploma may be issued, no semester examinations taken, and no graduation participation permitted. No degrees will be awarded and no transcript of credits issued until all financial obligations to Welch College are discharged in full. For immediate release, payment must be in the form of cash, credit card, money order, or cashier's check. Payment by personal check will necessitate a delay of ten working days before transcripts or diplomas will be released. The College reserves the right to make financial changes for any and all charges between times of publication of any catalogs.

24—Financial Information


Refund Policy

A student must properly withdraw from the College in order to qualify for any credit or refund. Credit for tuition, room, and board charges are as follows: 90% during the 1st week, 80% during the 2nd, 70% during the 3rd, 60% during the 4th, 50% during the 5th, and no credit or refund for tuition and room after the 5th week. Withdrawal procedures for students who register during early registration are the same as for those registering in August and January. Students who register early must officially withdraw and must not have attended any classes or resided on campus to qualify for a 100% credit of all charges. Otherwise, credit for tuition and room charges as listed in the paragraph above will apply. Withdrawal obligations for the Adult Degree Program and Lifetime Learning are as follows: Adult Degree Program: A 90% tuition refund will be made if the student withdraws before the second class meeting. A 45% tuition refund will be made if the student withdraws before the third class meeting. There will be no refund for withdrawals beyond the third class meeting. Online Courses: A 90% tuition refund will be made if the student withdraws before the end of the first week of the online session. A 45% tuition refund will be made if the student withdraws before the end of the second week of the online session. There will be no refund for withdrawals beyond the second week of the online session. Lifetime Learning: If a student feels he or she will be unable to meet the requirements of the course, he or she may withdraw from the course without penalty by September 15 (fall semester), February 1 (spring semester), or June 1 (summer session). No credit or refund will be given beyond those dates. The withdrawal should be submitted in writing to be received in this office on or before the required date. Any dormitory student who voluntarily decides to be a commuter (off-campus) student (must be approved in writing by the Dean of Students) will be subject to the room credit or refund schedule above. Note: This does not apply to courses dropped while remaining in school. A student must properly drop the course during drop/add week to avoid payment of tuition. Students who properly drop classes after drop/add week must still pay full tuition for these classes. Upon written recommendation of the choral director, some students associated with traveling groups may be given through the Monday following the drop/add date to make adjustments in their schedules without penalty.

Credit or refunds for meals (board) will be effective the week of withdrawal. No credit is given for meals missed, since the semester rate is based on the assumption that students miss some meals (and would be higher if the rate were calculated on a per-meal basis). Also, takeout meals are available for those whose work conflicts with normal dining hours. No refunds are given for unofficial withdrawal from courses/college. The monthly payment schedule does not reflect in any way the student’s financial obligation upon withdrawal. Also, financial aid will be adversely affected.

Financial Information—25


Transcripts

Official transcripts are provided to students (current or alumni) or to a designated agency only upon receipt of a request or approved facsimile signed by the student. No telephone, email, or verbal requests will be processed. Unofficial transcripts and degree audits may be provided to currently enrolled students as requested. Release of information forms may be printed from our website at http://welch.edu/transcript. Please address all correspondence regarding transcripts to the Registrar or his or her designee. Allow at least five working days for transcripts to be processed. Until all financial obligations are satisfied, no transcript of credit or diploma may be issued, no semester examinations taken, and no graduation participation permitted.

Student Insurance

All students must carry minimal accident insurance through a school-sponsored plan. Welch College assumes no liability for accidents or illnesses that require medical attention, but expects all students to carry adequate coverage. The College provides this minimal student accident insurance for each on-campus student for the academic year through a nationally recognized student accident insurance company. New students in the spring semester are added to the coverage. This coverage is intended to be a secondary policy to the student’s major medical health insurance. This coverage pays after any other insurance available to the student pays, picking up any deductibles, co-pay, or any remaining expense from an event incurring injury as a result of an accident on campus property. Claim forms must be submitted to the carrier and are available in the Business Office. Any claim must be filed within one year of the accident.

Room Reservation Deposit

A $100 room reservation deposit will be charged to all dormitory students. This is not part of the student account charges but is held in reserve to offset costs for room preparation/reservation, room damage upon vacating, and ultimately for any unpaid financial obligation such as student account, student loan account, etc. Allow six weeks for issuance of room reservation deposit refund. This deposit must be paid by July 1 for the fall semester or December 1 for the spring semester. It will be refunded only if requested in writing up until five days before registration for the fall or spring semesters. It is not refundable, for example, if a fall semester student does not give written notice that he or she will not return for the spring semester at least five business days before the spring registration date. Campus Guests Breakfast............................................................................................................... $5.50 Lunch/Sunday Dinner........................................................................................ $6.00 Dinner/Sunday noon.......................................................................................... $6.50 Steak or Special.................................................................................................... $7.00 Dormitory guest overnight...................................................................................$20.00 Students arriving on campus earlier than the day before registration will be charged $35 per night. Note: Welch College reserves the right to adjust these costs at any time without notice.

26—Financial Information


Financial Aid Welch College has established a Financial Aid Office for the purpose of helping eligible students meet the financial needs of attending college. Financial aid may take the form of grants, loans, on-campus employment, or scholarships. Two basic types are described in the following paragraphs: (1) aid backed by funds from the federal government, and (2) aid from funds administered by the College and/or other sources. Note: All students should carefully review the required standards of academic progress described at the end of this section of the Catalog.

Governmental Aid Procedures: For all forms of government aid listed below, the student must complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This may be submitted online using the address: http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. Welch College's school code is 030018. In order to be eligible for aid, students must apply for admission to Welch College and be approved by the Admissions Committee. New and transfer students will receive a Financial Aid Award Letter. Returning students will be awarded when their financial aid file is complete. Students are awarded on a rolling basis as files are completed. Note: Those who desire aid should apply early (January-March) in the year in which aid is needed. Since some programs have specific deadlines, the College will give priority to early applicants. The FAFSA should be filed no later than March 15 to meet the priority date of April 15. The student must also be approved for admission by the Admissions Committee by the April 15 priority date. See pages 18 and 19 for important information regarding applying for admission.

Grants: Federal Pell Grants: These are federally-funded gift aids that range annually from $598 to $5,815, depending on the need as determined by family income, number, etc. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): These partially federally-funded grants are available to students with even more extreme financial needs. Students must be enrolled at least half-time and must demonstrate academic or creative promise. Students are eligible only for the duration of the period required for the completion of the first bachelor’s degree. Awards range from $200 to $1,000 each year. These grants are considered gift aid. FSEOG funds are limited. Loans: Subsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program: Need-based loans are available to eligible students through the Department of Education. The student must apply for federal aid to determine his or her eligibility for the loan. Unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program (FSL): Non-need based loans are also available for students. Student eligibility for the FSL must first be determined. Financial Aid—27


Federal PLUS Direct Loan Program: Federal PLUS loans are available to parents of students. Specific information about loan terms, sample repayment schedules, necessity of loan repayment, exit counseling, and terms and conditions of need-based employment is available, from the Student Financial Aid Office upon request. Employment: Federal Work-Study Program (FWS): Welch College provides limited federal funds to assist students who have established they need part-time employment in order to pursue college studies. FWS jobs are available on campus. Employment is determined by students' needs, skills, availability of funds, job vacancies, and willingness to work. Note: Students are required to apply 75% of campus payroll toward past-due student accounts.

Endowed and Funded Scholarships

Scholarships are available from donors in amounts ranging from $100 to $2,000 per year. These scholarships are granted to students selected by Welch College administration. Need, academic achievement, and character are considered in selecting the recipients. Please note that not all scholarships are funded each year. William E. and Dixie M. Atkinson Scholarship Berkeley Free Will Baptist Church Scholarship Louis and Thelma Brautigan Scholarship Fund Pat Burttram Memorial Scholarship L. D. Carlisle Scholarship Christian Business Leaders Association Scholarship Christian Education Scholarship Thomas B. Collins Business Scholarship Marvin Z. and Agnes M. Cobb Scholarship Cornerstone Free Will Baptist Church Scholarship Mary Wilkerson Covington Memorial Scholarship Reverend Robert Crawford Scholarship Reverend Ronald and Mary Belle Creech Scholarship Reverend O. L. and Lois Fields Scholarship Fund Riley Giddons Scholarship Jewel Sutton Hagewood Memorial Scholarship Will Hall Memorial Scholarship Ralph C. and Lucille Hampton Academic Scholarship Billy D. Hanna Pastoral Scholarship Carlisle and Marie Hanna Missions Scholarship Elba Baxter Harwell Family Scholarship Fund Heritage Scholarship Mrs. Ada C. Hollis Memorial Scholarship L. C. Johnson Scholarship Paul J. Ketteman Memorial Scholarship Fund Lakeview (NC) Free Will Baptist Church Scholarship Leckrone/Bethel Scholarship Lowdermilk Scholarship William H. Lowe Memorial Scholarship Charles McNeese Memorial Scholarship Jesse Meade Memorial Scholarship Mrs. Gertrude Reese Montgomery Memorial Scholarship John and Vivian Mouser Scholarship Dr. W. Stanley Outlaw Biblical Studies Scholarship Tilden and Rosalie Parks Scholarship

28—Financial Aid

Henry and Imogene Patterson Memorial Scholarship Emila Patton Memorial Scholarship Yvonne Philpot Memorial Music Scholarship Reverend and Mrs. L. V. Pinson Scholarship Reverend Henry L. “Roy” Player Memorial Missions Scholarship Fannie L. Polston Scholarship Ashlee Powelka Missionary Scholarship Price/Kicklighter Memorial Scholarship The Ken and Carolyn Riggs Memorial Scholarship Ada Rice Memorial Scholarship Helen Sanders Memorial Fund SherwoodForestFreeWillBaptistChurchScholarshipFund Linda Shipley Music Scholarship Judy Aycock Simpson Scholarship Simpson-Frazier Scholarship Reverend and Mrs. Ralph Staten Scholarship Rebecca Stewart Scholarship Sturgill Family Business Administration Scholarship Texas Student Scholarship J. A. Thigpen Scholarship Dr. Jonathan Thigpen Scholarship Owen Thomas Scholarship Fund Oliver Family Scholarship Victory (NC) Free Will Baptist Church Scholarship Leah Waddell Memorial Scholarship Fund Webb’s Prarie Fund Lee and Ethel Whaley Scholarship Minnie S. Wilkinson Memorial Scholarship Homer Willis Music Scholarship Herbert Winchester Memorial Scholarship Dr. Mary R. Wisehart Scholarship Dr. Robert E. Woodard Pastoral Ministry Scholarship Beacon FWB Church Scholarship


The completed scholarship application, which gives more detailed information about each scholarship, is due in the Student Financial Aid Office no later than May 15. In order to be eligible for a scholarship, the applicant must have a completed admissions file in the Enrollment Management Office no later than May 15. Applicants must also apply for Federal Aid using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Only applicants whose FAFSAs have a process date of May 15 or earlier will be considered for institutional scholarships. The applicant should file for federal aid as soon as possible after January 1. If these criteria are not met, the student’s application will be discarded. Recipients of scholarships must enroll for no less than 12 credit hours to retain the awarded scholarship. Scholarship opportunities may found at http://welch.edu/scholarships.

Academic Merit Scholarships

Welch College offers merit-based scholarships based on ACT/SAT scores for first-time-in-college students as follows: Scholarship Level

ACT Score

SAT Score^

Maximum Award †

Annual Scholarship

GPA Required for renewal*

Presidential Honors

31-36

$40,000

$10,000

3.1

Provost’s Honors

28-30

$32,000

$8,000

2.8

Academic Honors

25-27

$16,000

$4,000

2.6

Leadership Award

21-24

$10,000

$2,500

2.3

New SAT score requirements will be announced and used once ACT/SAT score equivalencies are officially published by ACT, Inc. Until then, SAT score equivalencies will be based on estimates like those published at www.magoosh.com. * Includes Passing Chapel and Christian Service † Assumes 4-year program ^

Transfer Scholarships

For transfer students, Welch College also offers merit scholarships based on the student’s transfer GPA as follows: Level

Transfer GPA*

Annual Scholarship

Maximum Award †

GPA Required for renewal**

Level III

3.60 and up

$6,000

$18,000

3.10

Level II

3.10 to 3.59

$4,000

$12,000

2.80

Level I

2.60 to 3.00

$2,000

$6,000

2.30

Note: The transfer scholarship originally awarded cannot increase after enrollment *Based on GPA earned at institution from which student is transferring **Includes passing Chapel and Christian Service † Assumes 3-year completion of program

Financial Aid—29


General Institutional Scholarships Scholarship

Amount

Availability

Legacy

$2500 annual (renewable)

Children of full-time Free Will Baptist pastors and career Free Will Baptist missionaries

Spouse

Variable

12 + semester-hrs. at full-tuition; spouse may register at half-tuition up to equal number of semester-hrs.

Christian School and Homeschool

$2,000 annual (renewable)

Christian school and homeschool graduates

Truth & Peace, E-Team, NYC Winner

$1,000 annual (one per year)

Eligible participants

Maintaining Scholarships

Recipients must achieve the GPA required for renewal and pass both Chapel and Christian Service each semester. Scholarship amounts will be reduced by 15% for each subsequent semester after a student fails to achieve the required GPA or does not pass both Chapel and Christian Service. Scholarship may be reinstated when the student achieves the minimum required GPA and passes both Chapel and Christian Service. Reinstatement will occur in the subsequent semester. Residential student recipients of institutionally-funded scholarships must enroll in at least 15 semester-hours per semester and meet requirements for satisfactory progress. Aid may be suspended (page 32).

Applying Scholarships to Student Accounts

Welch College-administered scholarships are applied to student account balances at the conclusion of each semester, and will be applied to student account balances up to the maximum annual award for an academic year and cannot create credit balances. The above merit scholarships are not applicable to non-traditional students.

Employment

Campus Employment: A limited amount of college funds is available for the employment of students who have established need and do not otherwise qualify for the FWS (above). Campus employment is determined by a student’s skills, availability of funds, job vacancies, and willingness to work. Campus work applications are available in the Financial Aid Office. Off-Campus Employment: The College maintains a log of employment opportunities in the Nashville area for the use of all students.

Other Aid Programs

Vocational Rehabilitation: Students who may qualify for aid under this program should contact their local Vocational Rehabilitation Office.

30—Financial Aid


Requirements for Satisfactory Progress

Financial Aid recipients must demonstrate through their scholastic records that they are making satisfactory academic progress toward completion of their program(s) of study in order to maintain eligibility for enrolling in classes and receiving any form of federal, state, or college financial assistance. Academic progress for financial aid is measured at the end of each term; this is measured by utilizing qualitative and quantitative standards. Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress In order for a student to remain fully elibible for aid, Welch College’s policy requires that he or she show satisfactory progress in the following three ways: 1. Pass 75% of the semester hours attempted each semester, with no less than 6 credit hours earned. 2. Maintain a minimum grade point average that makes progress toward the 2.00 minimum required for graduation, as follows: After attempting this number of hours

Minimum g.p.a. (4-year program)

Minimum g.p.a. (2-year program)

12

——

1.25

24

1.25

1.50

36

1.35

1.75

48

1.50

2.00

60

1.70

72

1.90

84

2.00

3. Complete enough hours each semester to remain on course for completing a fouryear degree in a maximum of six years, a three-year degree in four-and-a-half years, and a two-year degree in three years, as follows: At the end of the academic year (including summer)

This % of required credits in a four-year degree

This % of required credits in a two-year degree

1st

14%

30%

2nd

29%

65%

3rd

46%

100%

4th

66%

5th

84%

6th

100%

Financial Aid—31


Determining Satisfactory Academic Progress and Notification

Satisfactory Academic Progress will be evaluated at the end of fall and spring semesters. After grades are posted at the end of each semester, the Student Financial Aid Office will notify students who are not meeting satisfactory academic progress standards by letter.

Incomplete Grades

A grade of “incomplete” will not be factored into calculating satisfactory academic progress until the grade is changed to a completed grade. This may result in failure to achieve satisfactory academic progress and denial of aid until a final grade is earned. A student should contact the Financial Aid Office when an incomplete grade is changed to a final grade for recalculation of satisfactory academic progress.

Repeated Courses

Repeated courses affect satisfactory academic progress as follows: • Grade Point Average: Only the most recent grade counts in students' g.p.a. • Pace of Completion (POC) and Maximum Time Frame (MTF): Each repeated course will be counted as attempted hours.

Withdrawal From Classes

Once a student has begun attendance in a semester, if he or she then drops a class or withdraws from the semester after the last day to drop without academic record for the enrollment period, those credit hours will be counted as credit hours attempted in calculating POC and MTF. A student who withdraws from a semester and returns the following semester must meet the SAP requirements in order to be eligible for federal aid.

Transfer Students

Transfer hours accepted by Welch College are counted as both hours attempted and hours completed for calculating POC, and are counted towards the student’s overall Maximum Time Frame. Transfer credits do affect a student’s g.p.a. New transfer students will be eligible for federal aid during their first semester at Welch College, unless they have already exceeded their MTF. Transfer students who previously were enrolled at Welch College will have their eligibility determined by evaluating past credits/grades earned at Welch combined with transfer credits accepted.

Financial Aid Warning

A student who does not meet satisfactory academic progress standards is placed on Financial Aid Warning (FAW) for one term, during which the student is eligible to receive financial aid. If the student meets the standards at the end of the probationary term, he or she is removed from FAW status and maintains financial aid eligibility. If the student does not meet the standards at the end of the probationary term, the student is placed on Financial Aid Suspension (FAS).

32—Financial Aid


Financial Aid Suspension

A student on FAS is not eligible for any form of federal, state, or college financial assistance and remains ineligible until satisfactory academic progress standards in Welch College courses are met.

Appeal Process

A student who feels mitigating circumstances existed that adversely affected his or her ability to maintain satisfactory academic progress may submit a written appeal within 21 business days of receiving notification of the suspension status. This appeal should be directed to the Coordinator of Financial Aid explaining: • Why the student failed to make satisfactory academic progress; and • What has changed in the student’s situation that will allow him or her to make satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation. The Financial Aid Advisory Committee will hold a hearing in a timely manner to hear the appeal. The committee is chaired by the Coordinator of Financial Aid as a non-voting member except in the event of a tie. Other members are the Director of Enrollment Services, Provost, Registrar, Vice President for Financial Affairs, and Vice President for Student Affairs. If a student’s appeal is approved by the Financial Aid Advisory Committee, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation and will be eligible to receive aid for at least one semester if: • It is determined that he or she should be able to meet the standards after the subsequent semester; or • The student is placed on an Academic Plan that, when followed, will ensure the student will meet the standards by a specific time. The student who fails to meet the satisfactory academic progress requirements at the end of a semester of Financial Aid Probation, or is not adhering to the requirements of an Academic Plan, will be put on Financial Aid Suspension and will not be eligible to receive aid until eligibility has been reinstated. If the student’s appeal is not approved, he or she has no additional recourse. A student is limited to one FAS appeal.

Title IV Return of Funds Upon Withdrawal

If a recipient of Title IV assistance withdraws from school, a statutory schedule is used to determine the amount of Title IV funds a student has earned as of the date he or she ceases attendance. The amount of Title IV program assistance earned is based on the amount of time the student spent in academic attendance. The unearned portion of the Title IV funds must be returned. These programs include the Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, Federal Stafford Loans (subsidized and unsubsidized), and Federal PLUS Loans. If a student enrolls but never begins classes, all aid will be refunded to the source. If the student begins attending classes, but leaves before completing the term, some aid may be able to be retained, based on the refund calculation set forth by the Department of Education. If a student receives federal student aid and withdraws from school, some of that money may have to be returned to the source. Even if the student does not complete his or her coursework, he or she will have to repay any loan funds received, minus any Financial Aid—33


loan funds that the school returns to the lender. The student will also be responsible for paying any school charges that were previously paid by aid and have now become a debit because of aid returned. When a student withdraws from the College, his or her account will be reviewed in order to post any necessary tuition reductions, calculate necessary Title IV refunds, and clear any remaining credit or debit balance. In addition, NSLDS must be updated and loan exit paperwork mailed to the student if applicable. Title IV Return of Funds Procedures: The following steps will be completed for a withdrawn student: (1) The Financial Aid Office (FAO) will receive a copy of the Withdrawal Form from the Registrar’s Office once it has been completed. The form will verify that the student has withdrawn and will give the official date of withdrawal. (2) The Business Office will post any necessary tuition and fees reductions to the student’s account in Populi. Credit for tuition and room charges is as follows: (a) 90% during 1st week (b) 80% during 2nd week (c) 70% during 3rd week (d) 60% during 4th week (e) 50% during 5th week (f) No credit or refund for tuition and room after the 5th week (3) The Financial Aid Office will use the Department of Education’s Return of Title IV Worksheet to calculate the Return of Title IV Aid for the student. (4) The Financial Aid Office will proceed with the student’s aid based on the Return of Title IV Aid Formula Calculation. The number of days attended divided by the number of days in the enrollment period determines the percentage of aid earned, calculated as follows: - Percentage of aid earned (%) = Calendar days completed (DC) divided by Calendar days in the enrollment period (CD). [DC/CD=%] - After the 60% point, the student is assumed to have earned 100% of the aid. After calculating the amount the student has earned, three possibilities may follow: (a) The amount disbursed = the amount earned. No further action necessary (b) The amount disbursed > the amount earned. The unearned portion must be returned to the appropriate fund source, and in the order specified below: (i) Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loans (ii) Subsidized Federal Direct Loans (iii) Federal Direct PLUS Loans (iv) Federal Pell Grants (v) Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (vi) Other Title IV Programs (c) The amount disbursed < the amount earned. The student may elect to receive a post-withdrawal dis bursement from the appropriate source. (5) The FAO will process any return of unearned aid within 45 days from the date the school determines the student withdrew.

Returning Unearned Funds The responsibility to repay unearned Title IV aid is shared by Welch College and the student. For example, the calculation may require Welch College to return a portion of federal funds to the Federal Title IV programs. In addition, the student may also 34—Financial Aid


be required to return funds based on the calculation. A student returns funds to the Federal Stafford Loan programs based on the terms and conditions of the promissory note of the loan. A student who receives a Federal Pell Grant may be required to repay 50% of the funds received. The return of Federal aid is in the following order: Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans, Subsidized Federal Stafford loans, Federal Perkins loans, Federal PLUS (Parent) loans, Federal Pell Grants, and Federal SEOG (Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant). Students who owe funds to a grant program are required to make payment of those funds within 45 days of being notified that they owe this overpayment. During the 45-day period students will remain eligible for Title IV funds. If the student does not take any positive action within 45 days of being notified, the College will notify the U.S. Department of Education of the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overpayment situation. The student will no longer be eligible for Title IV funds until he or she enters into a satisfactory repayment agreement with the U.S. Department of Education. During the 45-day period, the student can make full payment to Welch College of the overpayment. The College will forward the payment to the U.S. Department of Education, and the student will remain eligible for Title IV funds. If a student is unable to pay his or her overpayment in full, he or she can set up a repayment plan with the U.S. Department of Education. Before doing this he or she should contact Welch's FAO. Students must make sure that Welch has referred their situation to the U.S. Department of Education before any repayment plan can be set up.

Financial Aidâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;35


Academic Standards Registration

Each student should complete registration on the days designated for this purpose. Those failing to do so will be charged a late registration fee of $75. No student may register later than 10 days after classes begin. Admission to a course is not final until the student has completed registration and satisfied the Business Office. Credit will not be given for any course in which the students not properly registered. Students will have five class days to make any class changes without penalty (ADP and Lifetime Learning students should refer to the appropriate sections of the Catalog). When a schedule change within this time period is necessary, the student must follow the procedure prescribed by the Registrar.

Grading System Grade with explanation

Quality points per hour

A—(93-100)—Superior

4

B—(85-92)—Above average

3

C—(77-84)—Average

2

D—(70-76)—Below average

1

F—(Under 70)—Failure

0

W—Withdrew

0

WP—Withdrew Passing

0

WF—Withdrew Failing

0

X—Audit

0

I—Incomplete

0

P/F—Pass/Fail

0

If a student officially withdraws from school, or from a course before midterm, a grade of W will be given, whether he or she is passing or failing. If a student withdraws from a course after midterm, a grade of WP will be assigned if he or she is passing, and WF if he or she is failing. If a student unofficially withdraws from school or drops a course, or willfully abandons a course, a grade of WF will be given (also see Withdrawals, pages 39-40). The grade I (Incomplete) means that a part of the semester’s work is unsatisfactory or unfinished for acceptable reasons. Any course with a grade of I must be completed within eight weeks from the last day of the semester during which the I was awarded. If the course is not completed in that time frame, the grade will be assigned as a grade of F. Any grade of I or WF will be counted in the g.p.a. as an F. 36—Academic Standards


Notification of Grades

Grades are available via the student’s personal, secure, digital information managment portal (DIMP) within three working days of the end of midterm and semester exams. Any time a grade change is made on a transcript, this is visible to both the student and the advisor on the digital information management portal. Transcripts and degree audits are available to advisors before the beginning of each semester, and all students must obtain their advisor’s written permission to register, change a schedule, or change his or her program. Senior students are furnished marked copies of transcripts and degree audits during the summer preceding their senior year, as well as on a number of other occasions during their senior year. All students have access to their transcripts and degree audits during each registration. All students have access to unofficial student transcripts and/or degree audits via their personal, secure DIMP or upon request from the Registrar's Office. As provided under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), students may request an appointment to review their records. Parents or other guardians are furnished copies of dependent student report cards only as provided under FERPA and on student request. As provided under FERPA, parents may request an appointment to review their dependent child’s records. Students may also arrange for parents and guardians to view their records via digital means.

Grade Change

Any student who has a question regarding a grade should contact the facultymember-of-record immediately. If this results in a grade change, the faculty member should notify the Provost at once. In the event the student and faculty member are unable to resolve the question, the student may submit a written appeal to the Registrar.

Appeals Regarding Grades

Students may register a written appeal to the Provost regarding any grade(s),which must be received within 10 days after the last day of the semester during which the course was taught. An appeals committee composed of the Provost, Registrar, facultymember-of-record, and one other faculty member will review the appeal. The student may appear before the committee at his or her discretion.

Classification of Students

Freshman: An enrolled student with 0-23 hours of credit Sophomore: One with 24-57 hours of credit Junior: One with 58-91 hours of credit Senior: One with at least 92 hours of credit and otherwise reasonable prospect for graduation at the end of the academic year

Note: Students are not generally reclassified during the academic year; an exception is made to classify a student as a senior if he or she will graduate at the end of the year.

Special and Part-Time Students

Welch College may admit a limited number of students who are neither candidates for a degree nor meet the minimum requirements for admission as regular students. Students who do not have a high school diploma or equivalency can be enrolled only Academic Standards—37


under this classification and may not exceed seven percent full-time enrollment (FTE) of the general student population FTE. The term part-time refers to (1) all students who enroll in fewer than 12 hours, whether or not they are degree-seeking; and (2) students who, although otherwise eligible for degree candidacy, have been formally permitted to take a limited number or special selection of degree-credit courses or courses in a post-baccalaureate program without regard to normal degree requirements. Auditing students are counted separately for the purposes of reporting to some accrediting and other agencies. Dual enrollment students are also counted separately.

Post-Baccalaureate Students

Students who have an appropriate degree from a regionally accredited institution but who are returning to complete teacher education licensure requirements are classified as post-baccalaureate students. These students must meet all the requirements specified by the Tennessee State Department of Education for licensure application. All requirements of the Welch College Teacher Education Department for application to enter, continue, or complete a teacher education program leading to recommendation for licensure must be met as well.

Academic Load, Probation, Suspension, and Appeals

A normal load is about 16 hours of class work per week. Some students, especially those who must work a number of hours, will need to reduce their loads. No student whose academic standing is lower than a 3.00 g.p.a. the previous semester may register for more than 17 semester hours. No student will be permitted to take more than 23 hours in a semester. Many students should consider the possibility of spending five years at Welch College to complete their programs of study, especially married students, others with heavy work schedules, and those whose program requires over 128 hours. The College follows a formal probationary system, outlined as follows: At the end of the His or her g.p.a. must semester in which the be at least this And at least this student has tried much to remain much to avoid probation this number of hours in school 0-17 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1.00 18-30 1.25 1.50 31-45 1.25 1.75 46-60 1.50 2.00 61-75 1.75 2.00 76 up 2.00 2.00 A student whose g.p.a. falls below the minimum that is required to remain in school will be academically ineligible to enroll in the next semester. Two exceptions include: (1) Usually, academic ineligibility rulings are made only once each year, during the summer, and so apply only to the fall semester; and (2) any student making a C average in a given semester will be allowed another semester of eligibility even 38â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Academic Standards


though the above standards are not otherwise met. While on probation, the student may not take more than 12 hours, and may not participate in extracurricular teams or groups. The standard for probation and satisfactory progress for two-year programs is slightly different, since the student must meet the minimum grade-point average for graduation earlier than the bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree candidate. In two-year programs, the student must have a minimum g.p.a. of 1.00 by the time he or she has completed 24 hours, 1.30 when 36 hours have been completed, and 2.00 when 60 hours have been completed.

Appeals of Suspension

No coursework taken during a term of academic suspension may be transferred to Welch. Students may register an appeal regarding academic ineligibility. This should be done in writing and addressed to the Provost within 10 days after the end of the semester contributing to the suspension. A student is limited to one appeal of academic suspension.

Readmission After Academic Suspension

Following a semester of scholastic suspension, a student must request and complete a readmission packet. This should be returned to the Enrollment Management Office. Students who are readmitted following academic suspension will be placed on academic probation. Upon readmission following academic suspension, a student must show significant academic progress and achieve at least a C (2.00 g.p.a.) average overall within the first semester back on campus. Failure to achieve this will mean that the student will be ineligible to enroll for a second semester with no appeal being available.

Attendance Regulations

Attendance and punctuality are required at all regular classes, chapel, rehearsals, and Christian service assignments. All students are required to attend baccalaureate and commencement exercises. When a student is absent for any reason, he or she must follow the prescribed procedure for determining whether the absence is excusable or be subject to the required penalties. When a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absences approach three weeks, the Provost will contact him or her to determine if he or she intends to continue the class. If no response is received, the class will be declared abandoned after exceeding three weeks of absences. In any event, the grade awarded will be an F once absences exceed the equivalent of three weeks. As required, the College will notify appropriate agencies. Class attendance policies and appeals procedures are found in the Student Handbook that is distributed to each student at the beginning of the school year or at the time of enrollment for the Adult Degree Program, Lifetime Learning, second semester, and summer school.

Academic Standardsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;39


Withdrawals

(also see Financial Information, page 23, and Grading System, page 36) The process of withdrawing from a course, or from school, begins with the Registrar’s Office. Before taking midterm exams, all course withdrawals will show as W on the student’s transcript. After midterm exams, those withdrawing from a course with a passing grade will be shown as WP, and those with a failing grade as WF (note page 36). Withdrawal from school will be addressed as W. In order to withdraw from the College, the student must obtain a withdrawal form from the Registrar’s Office. The form must be properly filled out and signed by the Dean of Students. Otherwise, the grades for that semester will be F. Any credit or refunds will be based on the date of official written withdrawal from school as received in the Registrar’s Office regardless of the date on the withdrawal form. Merely ceasing to attend classes does not constitute official withdrawal. Students who pre-register must follow the official withdrawal process to avoid being charged for all classes for which they enroll. Withdrawal must take place before the fifth day of classes during normal semesters. Withdrawal from ADP, Online courses, and Lifetime Learning will follow the schedule in those particular catalogs. Withdrawal from summer school must take place by the end of the second day of class. Any student who is out of college for a semester for any reason must request and complete a readmission packet. This should to be returned to the Enrollment Management Office.

Repeat Courses

When a student improves a final grade by repeating a course taken at Welch College, honor points and credit will be awarded as though the course had been taken only the second time. Both the initial and the repeated courses must be taken at Welch College. No application is made under this rule for courses taken at other schools or for substitute courses taken at Welch College.

Student Honors

President’s List: Any full-time student who has all As will be placed on the President’s List. Provost’s List: Any full-time student who makes a 3.25 or higher, with all work complete and no grade lower than B, will be placed on the Provost’s List. Graduation with Honors: Bachelor’s degrees may be awarded with honors, as follows, according to their overall grade-point average (g.p.a.): cum laude, 3.25; magna cum laude, 3.50; summa cum laude, 3.75. The Lumen Medal: This is awarded annually to the editor of the College yearbook. The Outstanding Student Medal: The faculty selects a deserving student considering attitude, influence, leadership, initiative, spiritual life, social life, neatness, dependability, and cooperation to receive this award. The name of the student selected for this honor each year is placed on a plaque maintained for that purpose. Delta Epsilon Chi Honor Society: Each year a few seniors qualify for election to the honor society founded by the Association for Biblical Higher Education, the honor typically going to students with the highest academic average. The Greek letters signify 40—Academic Standards


“Approved in Christ.” Class Scholarship Medals: This is awarded to the outstanding scholar in each of three lower level classes, as well as the nongraduating and graduating senior receive these awards. Best All-Around Students: The students elect from their number one gentleman and one lady whom they deem “Best All-Around.” Other Awards and Scholarships: These are made during Awards Day exercises on the day before graduation.

ROTC: Cross-Enrollment

Welch College offers its students the opportunity to participate in Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) programs leading to officer commission in the U.S. Military Service. These programs are offered through cross-enrollment in local colleges.

Army ROTC Program

Army ROTC is available by cross-enrollment with Vanderbilt University, which is near the Welch College campus. When successfully completed, the program serves as a means for obtaining a commission in the U.S. Army, including Reserve or Guard units. When combined with the regular academic disciplines, the program provides the student with a broadly based knowledge of management, leadership, and technical skills. Some scholarships are available to students in the program. Those scholarships cover tuition, fees, books and uniforms, and provide a monthly stipend.

Air Force ROTC Program

Students may participate in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) on the campus of Tennessee State University (TSU). AFROTC provides precommissioning training to college students (male and female) who desire to serve as officers in the U.S. Air Force. Students from Welch College must apply to TSU as a special student and will be allowed to participate in the program The majority of students will earn scholarships that may cover all or a significant portion of tuition costs. In addition, cadets earn a monthly stipend ranging from $250 - $400 and an annual textbook allowance of $600. Cadets are required to attend AFROTC classes in uniform one day per week. During the summer between the sophomore and junior year in AFROTC, cadets must attend a four-week military training session known as Field Training. The eligibility requirements for scholarships and contract entry into the program are as follows: • Must be a U.S. citizen; • Must NOT be older than the age of 30 prior to December 31 of their graduation year (with the exception of those who have prior service time and waiverable up to the age of 35); • Must meet the AF height and weight standards; • Must pass the AF Physical Fitness Test; • Must have a 2.50 cumulative college g.p.a.; and • Must pass the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test. Academic Standards—41


Upon graduation, cadets will earn a commission as Second Lieutenants in the U.S. Air Force and must serve a minimum of four years on active duty. Students may find detailed information about enrollment in AFROTC at https:// www.afrotc.com, or they may reach the detachment admissions officer at 615-9635931. Enrollment in the program is entirely voluntary and non-scholarship students incur no obligation for active military service during their freshman and sophomore years. The deadline for application is June 1 for enrollment during the fall term and November 1 for the spring term. For further information about the program, address inquiries to the Welch College Registrar’s Office.

Privacy, Release of Information

Welch College is subject to the provisions of the federal law known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). This Act guarantees students, parents, and guardians access to certain educational records, and restricts the College from releasing and disclosing these records to third parties. The College releases no information to third parties except as noted below or upon receipt of an original signed request by the student. The College accords all rights under the law to students who are declared independent. The Act provides that information may be released to personnel within the institution, officials of other institutions at which the student wishes to enroll, persons or organizations providing student financial aid, accrediting agencies carrying out their function in compliance with a judicial order, and persons in an emergency in order to protect the health and safety of students or others. At its discretion and as appropriate, the College may provide directory information to approved agencies in accordance with the provisions of the Act to include name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, and any other similar information. Any student who does not wish disclosure of directory information should notify the Registrar in writing, specifying what information he wants withheld. This request will remain in effect as long as the student is enrolled or until he or she files a written request to discontinue it. A copy of FERPA is available in the Registrar’s Office. Find additional information at www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html.

Permission for Release of Student Records

No release of student records or verification of attendance and grades will be made, except as provided above or upon receipt of an original signed request by the student or a fax containing the student's original signature and upon receipt of appropriate fees. Release forms may be found on the College website, http://welch.edu/transcript. These should be forwarded to the Registrar's attention. Emails and telephone requests will not be honored

42—Academic Standards


Graduation Requirements: A Summary (1) Satisfactory Completion of All Courses in Declared Program of Studies All courses in the student's declared program of studies must be satisfactorily completed in order for a student to be considered for the awarding of the degree. This includes completion of Microcomputer Applications. Students with outstanding coursework or incomplete courses will not be approved to participate in Commencement, and degrees will not be awarded until all coursework is satisfactorily completed. The College seeks Christian students who are serious about pursuing academic excellence and doing God's will. College graduates must have developed in good measure the College's general objectives, which include spiritual, moral, ethical, and attitudinal objectives (see page 8), in order to satisfactorily complete their program of studies. (2) Faculty Approval/Recommendation The faculty will make the final determination as to whether to recommend the awarding of any degree to any student. All prospective graduates must be approved by the faculty. The faculty makes this decisions near the end of the spring term prior to Commencement. The faculty's recommendation is presented to the President prior to his granting the degree at Commencement. Note: No candidate will be recommended for any degree or diploma who possesses personal qualities that might render him unacceptable as a Christian leader in his or her community or that might reflect discredit upon the College were he or she was granted a degree. The College reserves to itself, after careful consideration, the sole and final right to determine this without respect of any curricular requirements. (3) Minimum Degree Hours All Associate of Arts and Associate of Science programs require a minimum of 62 hours or more. All bachelor's degrees require a minimum of 124 hours; most require more. The student should review the degree requirements listed in the departmental sections of the Catalog. (4) Transfer Credit and Transfer Transcripts Students who have taken courses at other properly accredited and approved institutions must request an official transcript from that institution be sent to the Welch College Registrar. The transcript must be received by the Welch College Registrar on or before the deadline for senior transcripts and grades listed in the Welch Catalog. Courses for which documentation of satisfactory completion at a CHEA-recognized, accredited institution is not received by the deadline will be considered incomplete, and the student will not be able to participate in Commencement exercises. Students who want to take courses at other institutions to be applied to their Welch College program of studies must have the course(s) and institutions approved in advance. The application of non-residence courses to meet degree requirements is subject to the approval of the department faculty administering the student's program, and the Registrar.

Academic Standardsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;43


(5) Residency Requirements Two-thirds of any major must be completed in residence at Welch College. No more than 12 of the final 60 hours of a baccalaureate degree program may be taken other than in residence. (Equivalency to this standard is required for all associate degrees.) (6) Minimum g.p.a. Students must have a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. in the Bible major and overall. Some programs require a higher g.p.a. in the major (currently TE licensure requires 2.50; Missions requires 2.50 in Bible major as well as the Missions major). Check the College Catalog for all applicable g.p.a. requirements in your program of studies. (7) Christian Service and Chapel Requirements Students must have a minimum of one Christian Service unit for each semester he or she has been on campus up to a total of eight units. Students must also maintain Satisfactory Chapel attendance for each semester of enrollment (see Chapel Attendance Policy in The Student Handbook). Either a P or an F will be assigned for Christian Service and Chapel. (8) Meeting Financial Obligations to the College Students with outstanding financial obligations will not be eligible to participate in Commencement exercises. The College strives to work with students who demonstrate good faith efforts in this area but arrangements to meet financial obligations must be made before participation in Commencement is approved. (9) Participation in Commencement Exercises and Issuance of Diplomas In some instances graduates may not be required to participate in Commencement. Those who choose not to participate in Commencement must provide appropriate evidence supporting a need to be excused and notify the Provost of this in writing at least three weeks before Commencement. The College reserves the right to exclude from Commencement exercises students who have holds on their accounts due to unresolved financial, Student Services, or other issues. Diplomas will not be issued to students who have remaining unresolved financial, Student Services, or other issues. (10) Length of Time Necessary to Complete Degree Programs The College does not gaurantee completion of a degree program within a particular time frame. For the most part, degrees can be completed in four years, with the exceptions of some teacher education degrees, which may take five years, and the B.M.E. degree. Personal scheduling of the courses by the student or requirements of some degree programs may mean that the student will have to engage in regular academic studies for longer than four years.

44â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Academic Standards


PART THREE Programs & Courses of Study Programs of Studyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;45


What Do You Want to Be? As indicated in its Statement of Institutional Purpose (page 7), Welch College offers programs to prepare students for various church and and lay vocations. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATOR: B.S. in Business Administration (page 77). BIVOCATIONAL MINISTRY/LOCAL CHURCH MINISTRY: A.S. in Ministry (page 64); the Online Associate of Science degree program in Ministry is designed for adults involved in local church ministry. Students may earn the A.S. entirely online. COACH/ATHLETIC DIRECTOR/RECREATIONAL OR ORGANIZATIONAL ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR: B.S., Major in Exercise Science (page 83), with emphases in Recreation Leadership (page 84), Physical Education (page 84), Sports Management (page 85), Human Performance (page 85), and Human Performance, Pre-Health Science (page 86). DOCTOR/DENTIST/PHARMACIST/VETERINARIAN: Students interested in medical, dental, pharmacy, or veterinary school, or related training for physical therapy and optometry may see information about biology program (pages 74, 76). NURSE: A.S. in Biology (page 75); Pre-nursing and preparation for the 2+2 Partners in Nursing program with Belmont University leading to the B.S.N. LAWYER: Students interested in law school may see information about pre-law programs (pages 87, 89). MILITARY OFFICER: Two ROTC (Army or Air Force) programs by cross-enrollment at Vanderbilt University or Tennessee State University (page 41). MINISTER OF MUSIC: B.S., Worship Ministry (page 97); B.S., Music Major (page 95). MINISTER OF YOUTH AND FAMILY: B.A. or B.S, Major in Theological Studies, Youth and Family Ministry Track (pages 66, 67). MISSIONARY: B.A., Major in Theological Studies, Intercultural Studies Track (page 69). MUSICIAN/CHURCH MUSICIAN: B.S., Major in Music (page 95); and B.S., Major in Worship Ministry (page 97). PASTOR, EVANGELIST, CHURCH PLANTER: B.A., Major in Theological Studies, Biblical Studies Track (page 60); B.A. or B.S., Major in Theol. Studies, Pastoral Ministry Track (page 61, 62); B.S., Major in Theological Studies, General Christian Ministries Track (page 63); and M.A., Theology and Ministry (Welch College Graduate School Catalog). PSYCHOLOGIST/COUNSELOR: B.S., Major in Psychology (page 90); and Minor in Psychology (to prepare students to pursue a master's degree in the field, page 91). TEACHER/CHILD CARE SPECIALIST: B.S., Major in Early Childhood (grades PreK-3, page 106); A.S. in Early Childhood (page 107); B.S., Major in Child Development and Learning (grades K-5, page 109); B.S., Major in Theological Studies (grades 6-12, pages 59, 111); B.S., Major in Biology Education (grades 6-12, pages 73, 111); B.S., Major in English (grades 6-12, pages 81, 112); B.S., Major in History (grades 6-12, pages 88, 112); B.S., Major in Music Education (K-12, pages 99, 113); and B.S., Excercise Science Major: Physical Education (K-12, pages 84, 113).

While most of these programs are intended to prepare students for specific vocations or graduate studies, students may pursude other programs not so designed, such as an Associate of Arts degree for those who need to transfer to another college to pursue a field of study not offered here. See page 47 for a list of further possibilities.

46â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Programs of Study


Programs of Study

Welch College offers various organized programs, including the following. Page numbers correspond to where to turn to find each program's objectives and requirements. Master of Arts (M.A.) Degree Theology and Ministry (Welch College Graduate School Catalog) Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Degree* Theological Studies Major Biblical Studies Track (page 60) Intercultural Studies Track (page 69) Pastoral Ministry Track (page 61) Youth and Family Ministry Track (page 66) Theological Studies Major and Combination Tracks (page 58) English Major (page 80) History Major (page 87) *The College requires all 12 hours of language in B.A. programs to be taken in the same language. Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree Theological Studies Major General Christian Ministries Track (page 63) Pastoral Ministry Track (page 62) Youth and Family Ministry Track (page 67) Theological Studies Major, Bible Teaching Licensure (page 59) Biology Major (page 74) Biology Education Major, Teaching Licensure (page 73) Business Administration Major (page 77) MBA Preparation (page 78) International Business (page 78) Child Development and Learning (page 109) Combination Tracks (page 58) Early Childhood Major, Teaching Licensure (page 106) Early Childhood Major, Non-teaching (page 106) English Major, Teaching Licensure (page 81) Exercise Science Major (P.E.), Non-teaching (page 83); Emphasis in Recreation Lead-

ership (page 84); Sports Management (page 85); Human Performance (page 85); or Human Performance, Pre-health Science (page 86). History Major, Teaching Licensure (page 88) Music Major, Performance Emphasis (page 95) Physical Education Major, Teaching Licensure (page 84) Psychology Major (page 90) Worship Ministry Major (page 97) Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.E.) Degree Music Education Major, Teaching Licensure (page 99) Minors Minor in EL (page 114) Minor in English (page 82) Minor in History (page 89) Minor in Intercultural Studies (page 70) Minor in Music (page 101) Minor in Pre-health Science (pages 76, 86) Minor in Psychology (page 91) Minor in Youth and Family Ministry (page 68) Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degrees Associate of Arts Degree (page 92) Associate of Science Degree in Biology for Pre-nursing (page 75) Associate of Science Degree in Business (page 79) Associate of Science Degree in Teacher Educ. for Early Childhood (page 107) Associate of Science in Theological Studies for Ministry (online degree, page 64) Evangelical Training Association (ETA Diploma (page 57)

Programs of Studyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;47


Minimum Program Hours

All Associate of Arts programs require a minimum of 63 hours or more; and Associate of Science programs require a minimum of 62 hours or more. All bachelor’s degrees require a minimum of 124 hours; most require more. Students should review the degree requirements listed in the departmental sections of the Catalog.

Departments of Study

Courses are grouped in four broad subject-matter areas that provide the basis for departments of study. The remainder of this Catalog largely describes these departments and defines each department's programs of study and offered courses. Courses are identified by a prefix (BIB for Bible, ENG for English, PSY for Psychology, etc.) and by increasing levels of difficulty: 1000 offered primarily for freshman, 2000 for sophomores, 3000 for juniors, and 4000 for seniors). Students are not generally permitted to take courses more than one level above their academic classification. In the course descriptions, notation is made as to when courses are offered. These refer to the chronological year, and not the school year. For example, “spring semester, even year” indicates the second semester (January-May) in even calendar years (e.g., 2016, 2018, 2020). The four divisions include:

SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY, page 54. DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, page 71. DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC, page 93. DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION, page 102.

The College also maintains an Office of Adult Studies, including the Online degree programs, Lifetime Learning courses, and an Adult Degree Program for those who wish to take courses by alternative means (pages 115-122). The College does not guarantee completion of a degree program within a particular time frame. Generally, degrees can be completed in four years, with the exceptions of some teacher education degrees, which usually take five years, and the B.M.E. degree. Personal scheduling of courses by the student or requirements of some degree programs may mean that the student will have to engage in regular academic studies for longer than four years. Note: No candidate will be recommended for any degree or diploma who possesses personal qualities that might render him or her unacceptable as a Christian leader in his or her community, or that might reflect discredit upon the College were he or she granted a degree. The College reserves to itself, after careful consideration, the sole and final right to determine this without respect of any curricular requirements.

48—Programs of Study


Welch Library

The College's Welch Library provides all students with access to services and a total collection of over 100,000 volumes, including the library's general collection, print journals, numerous databases (including JSTOR, ATLA, and the Tennessee Electronic Library), e-books, the Free Will Baptist Historical Collection, curriculum lab, music collection, and other materials. For further information see the library website at http://welchlibrary.wordpress.com. The Welch Library Handbook may be accessed through the library website link. An inclusive Information Literacy Plan is incorporated throughout all programs of study at Welch College. The objectives of the Welch Library are to: (1) Support the curriculum with information and services; (2) Provide resources for studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; independent learning; (3) Provide for some of the research and professional growth of the faculty; and (4) Equip students for life-long learning. For more information about the Welch Library, contact Librarian Carol Reid at this address: creid@welch.edu or (615)844-5274.

Programs of Studyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;49


The Welch College Core WELCH COLLEGE GENERAL EDUCATION OBJECTIVES AND CORE COURSES The Welch College Core is a general education core curriculum designed by the faculty to integrate the Christian worldview across the curriculum. Striving for a unified worldview extends back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Greeks believed that there was some basic knowledge that all people should know if they were going to become “philosophers” (“lovers of wisdom”). They called this knowledge enkuklios paideia or “the rounded education” (the origin of our term “encyclopedia”). This “rounded knowledge” included language, literature, and the arts, as well as mathematics and the sciences. Later, the Romans called these subjects the artes liberales (“the liberal arts”), perhaps implying that such knowledge is appropriate for a liber, a free man or citizen who could take part in the debate in the public square. With the spread of the Christian Gospel, theology and the study of Scripture became part of the liberal arts and sciences as well. The schools that arose in Europe in the late Middle Ages were called “universities” precisely because they aimed to expose their students to the universitas or “the whole” of Christian learning. Welch College follows in this noble Christian tradition of higher education. We want to help our students see the whole of life from a Christian perspective, what we often call the Christian worldview. The Welch College Core is our version of those basic studies that our students will need in order to think deeply and Christianly about life and culture. Critical Thinking and Communication (1) All students will develop a capacity for critical thinking and the ability to communicate their ideas effectively to others. Students will demonstrate success in developing such competencies by: (a) Expressing ideas effectively in writing and speaking, utilizing traditional principles of grammar, rhetoric and logic, in communication to people across cultures; (b) Exercising critical judgment in listening and reading, employing discernment, critical thinking, and interpretive skills in the acquisition of knowledge from diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives; and (c) Utilizing analysis and synthesis, planning and action, and assessment and evaluation to engage in problem-solving. The Great Tradition (2) All students will develop an appreciation for and understanding of the foundational intellectual and literary traditions of the Western and Christian traditions.

50—The Welch College Core


Students will demonstrate success in developing such competencies by: (a) Having a broad knowledge of the intellectual and cultural inheritance of Western civilization and the ability to articulate its relationship with the Christian tradition toward a Biblical philosophy of life and history; (b) Understanding Christian tradition essentials, integrating a basic knowledge of the Free Will Baptist tradition, and relating both to contemporary faith, prac tice, and culture; as well as comprehending the importance of heritage and the value of intergenerational faithfulness in the home, church, and culture; (c) Understanding the great ideas of human history as seen in the Western literary and philosophical traditions in light of the principles of Scripture and the Judeo Christian tradition, ascertaining their importance for interpreting the contem porary world and demonstrating the rationality of Christian faith; and (d) Understanding the basic principles of American government, political and religious liberty, and economy, as exemplified in the founding era and its foun dational texts. The Arts and Culture (3) All students will develop an appreciation of and Christian perspective on the arts and culture. Students will demonstrate success in developing such competencies by: (a) Gaining exposure to broad aesthetic experiences by means of the masterpieces of literature, the arts, and drama; learning basic principles for evaluating these experiences by Christian standards of truth, goodness, and beauty; and grappling with the ideas embodied in the arts and applying Christian analysis and dis cern ment to culture, including popular culture; and (b) Gaining exposure to the great tradition of music, understanding its role in culture, society, and Christian worship, and developing rudimentary musical knowledge and skill so as to be able to participate in community and church music programs. Humanity and the Human Environment (4) All students will develop a broad, holistic view of humanity and the human environment that is understood by scientific perspectives as informed by the Christian worldview. Students will demonstrate success in developing such competencies by: (a) Being able to justify Christian moral and ethical decisions shaped by the commands and principles of Scripture and informed by the wisdom of the clas sical, Hebrew, and Christian traditions; (b) Understanding the forces that shape global society and being able to form meaningful conclusions regarding the applications of Christian ethics to the hu man family as divine image bearers, in both private and public spheres; (c) Understanding the principles of physical and mental health, and exercising Christian regard for a healthy mind and body; (d) Understanding and using basic mathematical and scientific principles, espe cially The Welch College Core â&#x20AC;&#x201D;51


as they relate directly to the human environment, obtaining a Christian perspective on the benefits and limits of science and technology; (e) Gaining a broad comprehension of how to understand and relate ethically and constructively to oneself and other people through the lenses of the Bible, the Christian tradition, and the behavioral sciences; and (f) Understanding the principles of the Bible, the Christian tradition, and the be havioral sciences regarding dynamics that produce a healthy Christian marriage and home life, including the rearing of psychologically and spiritually healthy children. Leadership (5) All graduates will learn basic theoretical principles of leadership and develop the practical ability to implement such principles in their own lives and communities. Students will demonstrate success in developing such competencies by: (a) Comprehending the principles of sound personal management of time, abili ties, and finances and relating them to effective Christian leadership and steward ship; (b) Supporting and defending effective, basic principles of servant-leadership, including a commitment to continual spiritual, social, and intellectual develop ment in the context of the family, the church, and the world; and (c) Manifesting Christian personal and professional cultural sensibilities in refine ment and social skills.

52â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Welch College Core


GENERAL EDUCATION CORE COURSES BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab (4) (offered only for traditional students) BUS 1050. Microcomputer Applications, or BUS 1150. Microcomputer Applications ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II (3, 3) ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II (3, 3) HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II (3, 3) IDS 1001. Leadership and Calling: Personal Development (2) IDS 2001. Leadership and Calling: Leadership Principles (2) IDS 1902. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview: Introduction (2) IDS 3101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview: Intermediate (2) IDS 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview: Capstone (2) International Language (12) (for B.A. only) MAT 1101. College Algebra (3) MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation (3) PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness (2) PHE Activity Course (1) PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy (3) SCI 2204, 2214. Physical Science Survey and Lab (4) (offered only for online students) SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech (3) SSC 3101. Marriage and Family (3)

The Welch College Core â&#x20AC;&#x201D;53


School of Theology Dean, School of Theology Kevin Hester, Ph.D.

Faculty:

Kevin Hester, Ph.D. Matthew Bracey, M.T.S., J.D. Ron Callaway, D.Min. Jeffrey L. Cockrell, Ph.D. F. Leroy Forlines, Th.M. (professor emeritus) Matthew McAffee, Ph.D. John Murray, M.A. Matthew Pinson, Ed.D. Barry Raper, D. Min. Chris Talbot, M.A. Randall Corn, M.Div. (adjunct) Jeff Manning, D.Min. (adjunct) David Outlaw, Ph.D. (adjunct) Stanley Outlaw, Ph.D. (professor-in-retirement)

The College’s mission as a Bible College requires both that the entire curriculum be Bible-centered and that every student receive courses in Bible and Christian doctrine. These should be enough to ensure a dependable and comprehensive knowledge of them. Underlying this is the confidence that the Bible is God's Word and speaks with complete trustworthiness about the nature of man and the universe, and about the meaning of human history and life. Thus, a person is best educated who has a basic knowledge of the Bible’s teachings. The College’s mission also includes preparing students for employment in full-time Christian ministries. Included in this category are such offices as pastor, missionary, youth and family minister, evangelist, or church planter. The Department of Theological Studies offers programs of study that fulfill these two basic commitments. That Bible and ministry are linked together in one department imply that: (1) mastery of the Bible is the most important preparation for any ministry, professional or lay; (2) areas in Bible and ministry must directly inform each other; and (3) all Welch College students are being prepared for professional or lay ministry, regardless of vocational intention. Therefore, every bachelor’s degree program includes a major in this area. This typically appears in either of two forms: (1) a major in Theological Studies, for one of the ministry areas; or (2) a major in Theological Studies, required in other programs. Both are described below. 54—School of Theology


The Welch College Bible Cores Theological Studies: Objectives for All Programs

Every program of study includes a concentration in Biblical and doctrinal studies. The objectives of this emphasis are essential to the College's very reason for existence. Any graduate of the College should therefore be able to: (1) Demonstrate a general and comprehensive knowledge of the Bible as a whole and in its major parts; (2) Interpret the Bible consistently and persuasively according to sound hermeneutical principles; (3) Apply Biblical truth in the formation of his or her own character in a manner consistent with a Christian worldview; and (4) Use the Bible effectively in the particular ministry for which he or she prepares, or as a Christian layperson in more general Christian service.

Thirty-hour Bible Core (non-ministry majors)

For the accomplishment of the objectives listed above, the following 30 hours are required for all Welch College baccalaureate programs (minimum 2.00 g.p.a. required for graduation), except for those included in the majors in Theological Studies ("Major in Theological Studies" below):

BIB 1011. Old Testament Survey: Law and History, 3

BIB 1031. New Testament Survey: Epistles and Revelation, 3

BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2

BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2

BIB 2032. Old Testament Survey: Poetry and Prophecy, 2

BIB 2062. New Testament Survey: Gospels and Acts, 2

BIB 4000. Electives, 4

IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview: Introduction, Intermediate, Capstone, 6 (these courses are shared with the Arts and Sciences Core)

PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 (this course is shared with the Arts and Sciences Core)

THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3

School of Theologyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;55


Thirty-seven-hour Major in Theological Studies (ministry majors)

For the accomplishment of the objectives listed above, the following 37 hours are required for all baccalaureate programs in Ministry at Welch College (minimum 2.0 g.p.a. required for graduation; ICS majors - 2.5 g.p.a. required):

BIB 1011. Old Testament Survey: Law and History, 3

BIB 1031. New Testament Survey: Epistles and Revelation, 3

BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2

BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2

BIB 2032. Old Testament Survey: Poetry and Prophecy, 2

BIB 2062. New Testament Survey: Gospels and Acts, 2

BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 4 (THE 4854 may be required in this area.)

BIB/THE 4000. Electives, 6 (At least 3 of these hours must include the BIB prefix; LNG 3045 or 4026 if taken will be counted as a Bible elective in this area.)

THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2

THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3

THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3

THE 4032. Eschatology, 2

The Welch College Ministry Core

The Ministry Core is shared between the Pastoral and Youth and Family Ministry Tracks and is meant to meet objectives related to specific vocational ministry. MIN 1011. Local Church and World Missions, 2

MIN 2336. Church Growth: Theory and Practice, 3

MIN 3011. Christian Ministry, 3

MIN 3111, 3122. Homiletics, 4

MIN 3601. Christian Counseling, 3

MIN 4253. Christian Worship, 2

IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview: Introduction, Inter mediate, Capstone, 6 (these courses are shared with the Welch Arts and Sciences Core)

56â&#x20AC;&#x201D;School of Theology


School of Theology

Theological Studies Program Program Coordinator, Theological Studies Matthew McAffee, Ph.D. Major in Theological Studies (Vocational Ministry)

The purpose of a program of study in this major is to prepare the student for a specific vocational ministry. It may follow five tracks: Biblical studies, pastoral ministry, general Christian ministries, youth and family ministry, and intercultural studies.

The Evangelical Training Association (ETA) Diploma

This diploma is provided in cooperation with and granted by the Evangelical Training Association. The purpose is to recognize that Bible college students are prepared to train leaders in the local church. Students who complete many of the College’s bachelor’s degrees will automatically qualify for the ETA diploma. These include all programs with concentrations in Pastoral Ministry, Intercultural Studies, Youth and Family Ministry, or Teacher Education. Students must make application for this certificate when making application for graduation.

Preparation for Seminary or Graduate School

While most seminaries do not recommend one particular undergraduate major as best, they do have basic educational expectations. Applicants for seminary education are expected to have sound communication skills, a thorough knowledge of the English Bible, and a broad Arts and Sciences core that includes literature, philosophy, history, science, and the social sciences. In addition, one must either have a working knowledge of Biblical languages or else acquire it upon entering seminary. Graduate schools of religion have their own individual prerequisites that must be met. Students planning to attend graduate school and pursue a degree other than one emphasizing an area in religion should make a preliminary examination of the requirements of schools they would like to attend and programs they plan to pursue. Like those who will attend a seminary, strong communication proficiency, a broad Arts and Sciences core, 36 or more semester hours in the major, and a strong g.p.a. are essential for acceptance into more reputable programs. Department faculty members are available to provide personal counsel to students who plan to continue their education beyond the baccalaureate level. If a student decides upon a particular seminary or graduate school early in their college program, his or her advisor can be of greater help in making curriculum decisions. Most of our recent graduates who have continued to seminary graduated with the bachelor’s degree in Theological Studies, with a second major, such as English, History, or Psychology. Whatever students' program preference, their academic advisor will assist them in planning their educational career. Welch College is committed to helping students

School of Theology—57


receive the education they need to serve Christ and His Church. Evangelical seminaries and graduate schools are looking for students with solid Christian character, commitment to Christian service, proven academic ability, and the study skills and work habits essential for success. Faculty want to help students prepare for their future.

Master of Arts in Theology and Ministry

The Master of Arts in Theology and Ministry is a 33-semester-hour graduate degree that integrates the classical theological disciplines with the study of the practice of Christian ministry. It is designed for college graduates who desire additional education in Biblical and theological studies and ministry studies, whether they are or wish to be in ordained Christian ministry or lay ministry. The program of studies is unique in that it aims at the interdisciplinary study of Christian theology and the practice of Christian ministry. Thus, the classical theological disciplines are studied with a focus on ministry practice, and ministry is studied with a focus on the application of theology. Full information about this program may be found in the Graduate Catalog. Persons interested in this degree should contact the Graduate Program Coordinator Dr. Jeff Cockrell at (615) 844-5243 or jcockrell@welch.edu.

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degrees Program Combinations (Personalized)

In special cases, B.A. and B.S. degree programs may be individually tailored. Combinations are only available in fields of study where the College already offers concentrations and can be assured that 25% of the major will be taught by faculty with a doctorate. Such a program will be approved only when the combination fits a student’s special interests and is a realistic Christian ministry combination. Possibilities involved include, but are not limited to: • Business/Youth and Family Ministry: For a dual role such as church secretary or bookkeeper and youth minister, or business manager for a Christian school and youth minister. • ICS/Worship Ministry: For lay missionary working as a music specialist. • ICS/Teacher Education: For a lay missionary working in an educational role. • ICS/Youth and Family Ministry: for a lay missionary serving as a youth and family ministry specialist. The student interested in program combination must first contact the Provost, who will arrange for a faculty committee representing the departments involved to work with the student and design a program of study subjcet to the Provost's approval. Requirements will always include essentially the same Bible major and Arts and Sciences core as in other degree programs, and a minimum total of 124 hours. The B.A. degree program will require 12 hours of language. All program combinations require approval of the Dean of the School of Theology and faculty, as well as the chair and faculty from the department that has oversight of the particular degree.

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degrees Major in Theological Studies

Specific objectives for these programs include those stated above for Theological Studies (page 55), for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), as well as for the 58—School of Theology


Professional Education Core common to all teacher education programs for students pursuing secondary school licensure (page 105). Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Theological Studies: This program of study combines the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regular Theological Studies major with an Arts and Sciences core and a Professional Education Core and has the purpose of preparing students to teach Bible at the high school level. The primary purpose in offering this program is to provide for those who plan to teach in Christian schools. It leads to licensure by the Tennessee State Department of Education to teach Bible in grades 6-12. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee State Department of Education. Requirements: 124 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree.

(1) Arts and Sciences Core, 41 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (2) Theological Studies Major, 48 hours (those obtaining licensure in a second area may take the 30-hour Theological Studies Major): BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Phil., 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 THE 3251, 3301, 3402. Systematic Theology I, II, III, 8 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 3 BIB/THE 4000. Electives, 6 (at least 3 of these hours must include the BIB prefix) (3) Professional Education Core, 35 hours: PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 EDU 3312. Classroom Management, 2 EDU 3801. The Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4201. School Assessment, 2 EDU 4302. Methods and Materials of Secondary Education, 3 EDU 4332. Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Areas, 3 EDU 4401. History and Philosophy of Education, 2 EDU 4450. Introduction to Student Teaching, 1 EDU 4500. Student Teaching Seminar, 2 EDU 4800. Enhanced Student Teaching: 6-12, 10

School of Theologyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;59


Bachelor of Arts Degree: Major in Theological Studies, Biblical Studies Track: The Biblical Studies track at Welch College is designed to expose students to rigorous study of the Biblical text. Central to this track is a firm grounding in the Biblical languages. Students are required to complete two two-year sequences of language study, in Biblical Hebrew and in Koine Greek. Additional exegesis courses on individual books or sections of the Bible are also required. We believe that the study of Biblical languages serves as a foundational component of good Biblical interpretation. The Biblical Studies track is ideal for students who wish to pursue graduate school, but can also be applied more broadly to all areas of ministry where applying the Bible to life is essential. Requirements: 127 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree. (1) Arts and Sciences Core, 53 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 LNG 2013-2026. Beginning Koine Greek I, II, 6 LNG 3034. Intermediate Koine Greek I, 3 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (2) Theological Studies, 74 hours: (a) Bible and Theology Major, 37 hours: BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 LNG 3045. Intermediate Koine Greek II, 3 THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2 THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3 THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 THE 4854. Free Will Baptist History, 2 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 2 BIB 4000. Electives, 3 (b) Ministry Core, 17 hours: IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) MIN 1011. Local Church and World Missions, 2 MIN 3011. Christian Ministry, 3 MIN 3111, 3122. Homiletics, 4 MIN 4253. Christian Worship, 2 (c) Biblical Studies Track, 20 hours: LNG 3014-3025. Beginning Biblical Hebrew I, II, 6 LNG 4013-4026. Hebrew Exegesis I, II, 6 BIB 4000. Electives, 6 BIB 4907. Research Projects in Biblical Studies: B.A. Paper in Biblical Studies, 2

60â&#x20AC;&#x201D;School of Theology


School of Theology

Ministry Programs Program Coordinator, Ministry Studies: Barry Raper, D.Min. Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degrees Major in Theological Studies, Pastoral Ministry Track

This program trains preachers for leadership ministry, for Free Will Baptists especially, usually as pastors, church planters, or evangelists. Specific objectives include those for Theological Studies (page 55) and those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). The graduate should also be able to: (1) Articulate a Biblical theology and philosophy of church life and ministry; (2) Minister Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Word effectively through preaching and teaching; (3) Demonstrate competency in effective leadership and interpersonal skills; and (4) Develop and direct various church ministries centered around worship, evangelism, and edification. This program may be pursued either for the B.A. or for the B.S. degree.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts: 127 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree. (1) Arts and Sciences Core, 53 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 LNG 2013-2026. Beginning Koine Greek I, II, 6, or LNG 3014-3025. Beginning Biblical Hebrew I, II, 6 LNG 3034. Intermediate Koine Greek I, 3, or LNG 4013. Hebrew Exegesis I, 3 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (2) Theological Studies, 74 hours: (a) Bible and Theology Major, 37 hours: BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 LNG 3045. Intermediate Koine Greek II, 3, or LNG 4026. Hebrew Exegesis II, 3 THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2 THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3 THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 THE 4854. Free Will Baptist History, 2 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 2

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BIB 4000. Electives, 3 (b) Ministry Core, 23 hours: IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) MIN 1011. Local Church and World Missions, 2 MIN 2336. Church Growth: Theory and Practice, 3 MIN 3011. Christian Ministry, 3 MIN 3111, 3122. Homiletics, 4 MIN 3601. Christian Counseling, 3 MIN 4253. Christian Worship, 2 (c) Pastoral Ministry Track, 14 hours: HIS 3204. Church History, 3 PMN 3052. Pastoral Leadership, 3 PMN 4211, 4222. Pastoral Internship, or PMN 4208. Pastoral Internship, 2 PMN 4602. Fundamentals of Effective Preaching, 2 PMN 3300. Current Topics in Pastoral Ministry electives, 4 (the student will select two 2-hour seminars on different topics taught by guest lecturers)

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science: 124 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree. (1) Arts and Sciences Core, 50 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 LNG 2013-2026. Beginning Koine Greek I, II, 6, or LNG 3014-3025. Beginning Biblical Hebrew I, II, 6 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (2) Theological Studies, 74 hours: (a) Bible and Theology Major, 37 hours: BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2 THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3 THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 THE 4854. Free Will Baptist History, 2 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 2 BIB/THE 4000. Electives, 6 (at least 3 of these hours must include the BIB prefix) (b) Ministry Core, 23 hours: IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) MIN 1011. Local Church and World Missions, 2 MIN 2336. Church Growth: Theory and Practice, 3 MIN 3011. Christian Ministry, 3 MIN 3111, 3122. Homiletics, 4 MIN 3601. Christian Counseling, 3 MIN 4253. Christian Worship, 2

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(c) Pastoral Ministry Track, 14 hours: HIS 3204. Church History, 3 PMN 3052. Pastoral Leadership, 3 PMN 4211, 4222. Pastoral Intership, or PMN 4208. Pastoral Internship, 2 PMN 4602. Fundamentals of Effective Preaching, 2 PMN 3300. Current Topics in Pastoral Ministry electives, 4 (the student will select two 2-hour seminars on different topics taught by guest lecturers)

A Church Planting Emphasis is available within the Pastoral Ministry Track as an elective. Students who choose this emphasis will take PMN 4307 Church Planting in lieu of one of the pastoral seminars. PMN 4507 or 4517-4527 Church Planting Internship will be substituted for the regular Pastoral Internship.

Bachelor of Science Degree Major in Theological Studies, General Christian Ministry Track

This program of study is designed to prepare Christian leaders (both lay leaders and preachers) to perform various ministries within a local church context. In addition to the objectives stated for Theological Studies (page 55) and the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), the student will be able to: (1) Articulate a practical Biblical theology and philosophy of life and ministry; (2) Demonstrate skills in a variety of local church ministries; (3) Provide leadership in a local church through teaching/preaching, planning, organizing, and overseeing programs of outreach, growth, and maturing of new believers.

Requirements: 124 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree. (1) Arts and Sciences Core, 44 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (2) Theological Studies, 67 hours: (a) Bible and Theology Major, 37 hours BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 4 BIB/THE 4000. Electives, 6 (at least 3 of these hours must include the BIB prefix) THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2 THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3 THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 (b) Ministry Studies Core, 30 hours: IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these

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courses are shared with the A/S Core) MIN 1101. Local Church and World Missions, 2 MIN 3601. Christian Counseling, 3 Ministry electives, 17 selected from any ministry area: PMN, ICS, MIN and YFM (with at least 8 hours from courses at the 3000 level or above) YFM 2002. Education in the Local Church, 2 (3) General electives, 13 hours (all free electives transferred from other institutions must meet the requirements for transfer credits set forth in this Catalog)

Associate of Science Degree: Ministry

This program is intended to provide quality, basic preparation for local church ministry, but not for further education. The primary purpose for offering this program is to support and enhance the Christian ministries of bivocational pastors and volunteer lay workers in the local church. The Associate of Science degree in Ministry is not considered to be preparation for a full-time ministry. Those who definitely plan to be full-time pastors, missionaries, or to have a vocational Youth and Family Ministry are advised to pursue a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in Theological Studies. The Associate of Science degree in Ministry may be earned entirely online. In addition to meeting the specific objectives stated elsewhere for the major in Theological Studies and for the Arts and Sciences core, the graduate should be able to: (1) Apply and demonstrate Biblical principles of thought and life in consistent Christian witness; (2) Serve and minister effectively in a variety of local church responsibilities; and (3) Support and extend the ministry of the local church in his or her community. Requirements: 63 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree.

(1) Arts and Sciences, 26 hours ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 HIS 1011. History of Western Civilization, 3 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 IDS 1902. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 2 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness, 2 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 (2) Theological Studies, 37 hours BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 ICS 1102. Biblical Basis of Missions, 2 MIN 2336. Church Growth: Theory and Practice, 3 MIN 1011. Local Church and World Missions, 2 MIN 3011. Christian Ministry, 3 MIN 3111. Homiletics, 2 SSC 3101. Marriage and the Family, 3 THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 YFM 1003. Philosophy of Youth and Family Ministry, 2

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Spanish Language Certificate in Biblical and Ministry Studies

The Spanish Language Certificate in Biblical and Ministry Studies is designed to support and enhance Spanish-speaking, volunteer and bivocational church workers’ local church ministry. Courses are available online and may be done in a one-year, fifteen-hour group. All courses composing this certificate have been translated into Spanish. Courses include:

BIB 1017, 1037, 2037, 2067. Bible Survey, 12 BIB 1107. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1257. Evangelism and Discipleship, 1

The Spanish Language Certificate in Biblical and Ministry Studies has two primary learning objectives: students receiving this certificate will be able to (1) apply and demonstrate Biblical principles of thought and life in consistent Christian witness; and (2) support and extend the local church’s ministry in his or her community. The certificate is intended to provide quality, basic instruction for local church ministry, but not for further education. All certificate courses will be offered on the College’s current online delivery platform, Populi, through which all students have access to student services and student learning support including: technical assistance, advising, library training, library resources, and the Student Services department. Students interested in obtaining the Spanish Language Certificate in Biblical and Ministry Studies will be admitted as special students, but will not be admitted to degree programs. Should certificate holders wish to enroll in one of the College’s degree programs, they will be subject to the full admission standards.

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Program Coordinator, Youth and Family Ministry Chris Talbot, M.A. Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degrees: Major in Theological Studies, Youth and Family Ministry Track

This program prepares the student for youth and family ministry in a local church as an associate pastor, or for other church-related vocations in the field of youth and family ministry. Specific objectives include those stated for Theological Studies (page 55) and the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). Program graduates of this track will be able to: (1) Articulate a philosophy of youth ministry that is Biblically based and philosophically sound; (2) Develop a team approach to ministry which involves the equipping of volunteers, both adult and youth, to evangelize and disciple students; (3) Understand the impact that society has on the family and how this influences youth; and (4) Implement sound management principles for effective ministry. This program may be pursued either for the B.A. or for the B.S. degree.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts: 128 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree.

(1) Arts and Sciences Core, 53 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 LNG 2013-2026. Beginning Koine Gk., I, II, 6, or LNG 3014-3025. Beginning Bib. Heb. I, II, 6 LNG 3034. Intermediate Koine Greek I, 3, or LNG 4013. Hebrew Exegesis I, 3 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (2) Theological Studies, 75 hours: (a) Bible and Theology Major, 37 hours: BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 LNG 3045. Intermediate Koine Greek II, 3, or LNG 4026. Hebrew Exegesis II, 3 THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2 THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3 THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 THE 4854. Free Will Baptist History, 2 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 2 BIB 4000. Electives, 3 (b) Ministry Core, 23 hours: IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these

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courses are shared with the A/S Core) MIN 1011. Local Church and World Missions, 2 MIN 2336. Church Growth: Theory and Practice, 3 MIN 3011. Christian Ministry, 3 MIN 3111, 3122. Homiletics, 4 MIN 3601. Christian Counseling, 3 MIN 4253. Christian Worship, 2 (c) Youth and Family Ministry Track, 15 hours: YFM 1003. Philosophy of Youth and Family Ministry, 2 YFM 2002. Education in the Local Church, 2 YFM 2106. Spiritual Disciplines, 2 YFM 3004. Children's Ministry, 2 YFM 3201. Apologetics and Evangelism for Students, 2 YFM 4303. Theology and Culture, 3 YFM 4508. Internship, 2

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science: 128 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree. (1) Arts and Sciences Core, 50 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 LNG 2013-2026. Beginning Koine Gk. I, II, 6, or LNG 3014-3025. Beginning Bib. Heb. I, II, 6 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (2) Theological Studies, 78 hours: (a) Bible and Theology Major, 37 hours: BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2 THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3 THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 THE 4854. Free Will Baptist History, 2 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 2 BIB/THE 4000. Electives, 6 (at least 3 of these hours must include the BIB prefix) (b) Ministry Core, 23 hours: IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) MIN 1011. Local Church and World Missions, 2 MIN 2336. Church Growth: Theory and Practice, 3 MIN 3011. Christian Ministry, 3 MIN 3111, 3122. Homiletics, 4 MIN 3601. Christian Counseling, 3 MIN 4253. Christian Worship, 2 (c) Youth and Family Ministry Track, 18 hours: YFM 1003. Philosophy of Youth and Family Ministry, 2 YFM 2002. Education in the Local Church, 2 YFM 2106. Spiritual Disciplines, 2

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YFM 3004. Children's Ministry, 2 YFM 3201. Apologetics and Evangelism for Students, 2 YFM 3405. Teaching Methods, 3 YFM 4303. Theology and Culture, 3 YFM 4508. Internship, 2

Theological Studies, Minor in Youth and Family Ministry

Students may attach a Youth and Family Ministry Minor to any Welch College bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree program. The minor may not have more than one-third of the coursehours in common with the declared major. Program objectives will include those for the given major, as well as those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). The Youth and Family Ministry Minor requires these 18 hours:

YFM 1003. Philosophy of Youth and Family Ministry, 2 YFM 2002. Education in the Local Church, 2 YFM 2106. Spiritual Disciplines, 2 YFM 3004. Children's Ministry, 2 YFM 3201. Apologetics and Evangelism for Students, 2 YFM 3405. Teaching Methods, 3 YFM 4303. Theology and Culture, 3 YFM 4508. Internship, 2

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School of Theology

Intercultural Studies Program Program Coordinator, Intercultural Studies Ron Callaway, D. Min. Bachelor of Arts Degree Major in Theological Studies, Intercultural Studies Track

This B.A. program trains men and women for ministry as cross-cultural missionaries. Specific objectives include those stated for Theological Studies (page 55) and those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). The graduate will be able to: (1) Articulate a Biblical theology and philosophy of missions that will be manifested in a methodology which will be directed at accomplishing God’s global missionary purpose; (2) Comprehend, conform to, and effectively communicate God’s Word in a global context; (3) Comprehend the nature, function, and history of the Church and relate this knowledge to cross-cultural church planting; and (4) Meet the educational qualifications necessary to serve with Free Will Baptist International Missions or similar organizations.

Requirements: 131 or 128 hours (if the student takes Greek or Hebrew), with a C average (2.5 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree. (1) Arts and Sciences Core, 65 or 62 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture and Worldview, 6 LNG elective, 12 (If either LNG 3045 or 4026 is taken, the course will be credited as a 4000-level Bible course) MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 PSY 2001. General Psychology, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (2) Theological Studies, 66 hours: (a) Bible and Theology Major, 37: BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 THE 3204. Survey of Church History, 3

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THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2 THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3 THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 BIB/THE 3000. Electives, 1 BIB/THE 4000. Electives, 6 (at least 3 of these hours must include the BIB prefix; if either LNG 3045 or 4026 is taken for language requirements, it will satisfy 3 hours of the BIB/ THE electives in this area) (b) Intercultural Studies Track, 29 hours: ICS 1102. Biblical Basis of Missions, 2 ICS 2101. History of Missions, 2 ICS 2202. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 3 ICS 2307. Cross-Cultural Practicum, 1 ICS 3111. Cross-Cultural Communication, 3 ICS 3122. Cross-Cultural Church Planting, 2 ICS 3132. Principles of Cross-Cultural Leadership, 3 ICS 3402. Preparation for Short-Term Overseas Practicum, 1 ICS 3408. Student Overseas Practicum II, 3 ICS 3452. Survey of World Religions, 3, or ICS 3007. Introduction to Islam, 3 (with faculty permission) ICS 4301. Strategy for World Outreach, 2 MIN 3111. Homiletics, 2 YFM 3201. Apologetics and Evangelism for Students, 2

Theological Studies, Minor in Intercultural Studies

Students may attach an Intercultural Studies Minor to any Welch College bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree program. The minor may not have more than one-third of the course-hours in common with the declared major. Program objectives will include those for the given major, as well as those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). The Intercultural Studies Minor requires these 21 hours: ICS 1102. Biblical Basis of Missions, 2 ICS 2101. History of Missions, 2 ICS 2202. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 3 ICS 3132. Principles of Cross-Cultural Leadership, 3 ICS 3111. Cross-Cultural Communications, 3 ICS 3452. Survey of World Religions, 3 THE 3204. Survey of Church History, 3 YFM 3201. Apologetics and Evangelism for Students, 2

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Arts and Sciences Faculty:

Chairman: Ian Hawkins, Ph.D.

Ian Hawkins, Ph.D. Stephen Beck, M.Ed. Matthew Bracey, M.T.S., J.D. John Carter, M.Ed., M.S. Rebecca Deel, D.A. Jon Forlines, Ph.D. Kevin Hester, Ph.D. Darrell Holley, Ph.D. (on leave) Michael Oliver, M.Ed. Thurman Pate, Ph.D. Matthew Pinson, Ed.D. Carol Reid, M.L.S. Frank Thornsbury, M.A. Tina Tolbert, M.A. Gary Turner, M.Ed.

Adjunct Faculty:

Scott Benton, M.A., D.C. Sarah Bracey, M.S. Neil Gilliland, Ph.D. Lynn Griffith, D.A. Allen Jinnette, Ph.D. Linda Marable, Ed.D. Ahad Nasab, Ph.D. Jeff Nichols, M.B.A. Kenneth Riggs, Ph.D. Chris Snoddy, M.S. James Sprouse, Ph.D. Lori Westgard, M.Ed. Steven Woodworth, Ph.D.

Many of the College’s general objectives (page 8) relate to the effects of what is often called “general education.” Any educated person, for example, needs to understand the forces that shape society. The Christian worker, in particular, can minister to people more effectively if he/she understands them. The College therefore maintains a department of Arts and Sciences, which aims to broaden and deepen students' general education, enhance their position as citizens and servants in the world, cultivate Christian culture, and develop refinement and social skills. Toward these ends the department offers a core curriculum of studies in several areas of Arts and Sciences, as well as curriculums in closely related fields of study. Freshmen who make less than 18 on the Math section of the ACT must take Developmental Math.

General Requirements for the Degree

All degree programs require a core curriculum in Arts and Sciences. This core's objectives include helping students develop those skills and understandings generally associated with a well-rounded education. In particular, students who complete these core requirements should be able to: (1) Express themselves effectively in writing and speaking; (2) Exercise critical judgment in listening and reading; (3) Enjoy aesthetic experiences in literature, art, drama, and music, and thus have a broad and continuing appreciation of beauty;

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(4) Grapple with ideas embodied in literature and the other arts, and in this way understand themselves and others; (5) Understand the forces that shape society; (6) Understand principles of physical and mental health and exercise Christian regard for a healthy mind and body; (7) Understand and use basic mathematical-scientific principles, especially as they relate directly to the environment; (8) Understand contemporary world cultures, including salient linguistic, sociological, and historical factors; (9) Understand the psychological, spiritual, and moral development of personality; (10) Sustain a desire for continued personal development, socially, spiritually, and intellectually; (11) Relate ethically and constructively to others; and (12) Manifest Christian culture in refinement and social skills.

Specific core requirements for a given degree differ slightly from one program to another. Students should consult their program of choice for specific requirements.

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Department of Arts and Sciences

Biology Programs Program Coordinator: Ian Hawkins, Ph.D. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Biology Education

(May be used for Secondary School Licensure, Grades 6-12) This program is designed to prepare students to teach with competence as a highly qualified teacher in middle school science or secondary biological science in Christian or public schools. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, including the Specialty Area test in Science, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee State Department of Education. Graduates should be able to: (1) Demonstrate significant proficiency in areas of science which support the field of biology; (2) Apply scientific knowledge and principles in the context of the field of biol- ogy; and (3) Synthesize Biblical values, general knowledge, and scientific principles to su port a career in biology education. Requirements: 141 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 BIB elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 37 hours: ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Science Major, 41 hours: (a) Biology Major Core, 26 hours: BIO 1101, 1111. General Biology I and Lab, 4 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core and meet BIO1001, 1011 requirements) BIO 1202, 1212. General Biology II, and Lab, 4

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BIO 2204. Genetics, 3 BIO 3103, 3113. Ecology and Lab, 4 BIO 3205. Evolution and Origins, 2 BIO 4502. Biology Senior Seminar, 1 CHE 1004, 1014. General Chemistry I and Lab, 4 CHE 1105, 1115. General Chemistry II and Lab, 4 (b) General Biology, 15 hours: BIO 3303, 3313. Cell Biology and Lab, 4 BIO 4105, 4115. Biochemistry and Lab, 4 MAT 3011. Statistics I, or MAT 2202. Calculus, 3 SCI 2204, 2214. Physical Science and Lab, 4 (4) Professional Education Core, 33 hours: PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 EDU 3801. Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4201. School Assessment, 2 EDU 4302. Teaching in the Secondary Grades, 3 EDU 4332. Content Area Reading/Writing, 3 EDU 4401. History and Philosophy of Education, 2 EDU 4450. Introduction to Student Teaching, 1 EDU 4500. Student Teaching Seminar, 2 EDU 4800. Enhanced Student Teaching: 6-12, 10

Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Biology, Emphasis in Pre-health Sciences or Cell and Molecular Biology

The program is designed to prepare students planning to pursue health related careers (Pre-health Sciences) or advanced careers in biology (Cell and Molecular Biology Emphasis). Graduates should be able to: (1) Demonstrate significant proficiency in areas of science which support the field of biology; (2) Apply scientific knowledge and principles in the context of the field of biology; and (3) Synthesize Biblical values, general knowledge, and scientific principles to support a career in biology or related fields. Requirements for the Bachelor of Science: Pre-health Sciences: 136 hours; OR Bachelor of Science: Cell and Molecular Biology Emphasis: 128 hours; both emphases require a 2.50 g.pa. overall and in each segment of the degree. (1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 BIB elective, 4 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 37 hours: ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4

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MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Biology Major, 69 or 61 hours, (a) Biology Major Core plus either (b) Pre-health Sciences Emphasis or (c) Cell and Molecular Biology Emphasis: (a) Biology Major Core, 26 hours, required for both emphases: BIO 1101, 1111. General Biology I and Lab, 4 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core and meet BIO1001, 1011 requirements) BIO 1202, 1212. General Biology II, and Lab, 4 BIO 2204. Genetics, 3 BIO 3205. Evolution and Origins, 2 BIO 3103, 3113. Ecology and Lab, 4 BIO 4502. Biology Senior Seminar, 1 CHE 1004, 1014. General Chemistry I and Lab, 4 CHE 1105, 1115. General Chemistry II and Lab, 4 (b) Pre-health Sciences Emphasis: Cell and Molecular Biology, 43 hours: BIO 2106, 2116. Microbiology and Lab, 4 BIO 2401, 2411. Anatomy & Physiology I and Lab, 4 BIO 2502, 2512. Anatomy & Physiology II and Lab, 4 BIO 3304, 3314. Cell Biology and Lab, 4 BIO 4006, 4016. Molecular Biology and Lab, 4 BIO 4105, 4115. Biochemistry and Lab, 4 CHE 2003, 2013. Organic Chemistry I and Lab, 4 CHE 2106, 2116. Organic Chemistry II and Lab, 4 MAT 3011. Statistics I, or MAT 2202. Calculus, 3 PHY 2003, 2013. General Physics I and Lab, 4 PHY 2106, 2116. General Physics II and Lab, 4 (c) Cell and Molecular Biology Emphasis, 35 hours: BIO 2106, 2116. Microbiology and Lab, 4 BIO 2401, 2411. Anatomy & Physiology I and Lab, 4 BIO 2502, 2512. Anatomy & Physiology II and Lab, 4 BIO 3304, 3314. Cell Biology and Lab, 4 BIO 4006, 4016. Molecular Biology and Lab, 4 BIO 4105, 4115. Biochemistry and Lab, 4 CHE 2003, 2013. Organic Chemistry I and Lab, 4 MAT 3011. Statistics I, or MAT 2202. Calculus, 3 PHY 2003, 2013. General Physics I and Lab, 4

Associate of Science Degree: Pre-nursing

(May lead to B.S. in Nursing at Belmont University through cooperative 2+2 program and other health care related vocations) This two-year degree prepares students planning to enter a nursing program or related health care field. Welch College is a member of the Partners in Nursing Program. Seats in the Partners in Nursing Program (administered through Belmont University by the Tennessee State Board of Nursing) are set aside for qualified Welch College graduates of the A.S. in Science who can then complete the Bachelor of Science Degree at Belmont University in two additional years.

Note: Students applying for the B.S. in Nursing at Belmont may be required to take a residual ACT. Although a limited number of seats are set aside for Welch College students, Belmont University reserves the right to accept only those applicants who have the most competitive ACT scores and grade-point averages.

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In addition to meeting the specific objectives stated elsewhere for the major in Theological Studies and for the Arts and Sciences core, the graduate should be able to: (1) Demonstrate significant proficiency in areas of science which support the field of nursing; and (2) Apply scientific knowledge and principles in the context of the field of nurs ing; and (3) Synthesize Biblical values, general knowledge, and scientific principles to sup port a career in nursing. Requirements: 71 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall (minimum 2.0 g.p.a. in each segment of the degree). (1) Theological Studies, 16 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 2 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S) (2) Arts and Sciences, 20 hours: ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 HIS 1011. History of Western Civilization, 3 IDS 1001. Leadership and Calling, 2 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 (3) Nursing Related Courses, 15 hours: BIO 2308. Principles of Nutrition, 3 PSY 2001. General Psychology, 3 PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 PSY 4001. Abnormal Psychology, 3 SSC 2008. Introduction to Sociology, 3 (4) Biology and Chemistry, 20 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 BIO 2106, 2116. Microbiology and Lab, 4 BIO 2401, 2411. Human Anatomy and Physiology I and Lab, 4 BIO 2502, 2512. Human Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab, 4 CHE 1004, 1014. General Chemistry I and Lab, 4

Minor in Pre-health Science

Students wishing to pursue careers requiring medical school, dental school, veterinary school, and other health related graduate programs are not required to major in science, but must show proficiency in the area. While the following Welch courses are generally required by health science programs, students should consult the graduate program or programs to which they wish to apply about completion of prerequisites specific to that particular program.

BIO 1101, 1111. General Biology I and Lab, 4 BIO 1202, 1212. General Biology II and Lab, 4 BIO 2106, 2116. Microbiology and Lab, 4 BIO 2401, 2414. A&P I and Lab, 4 BIO 2502, 2512. A&P II and Lab, 4 CHE 1004, 1014. General Chemistry I and Lab, 4

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CHE 1105, 1115. General Chemistry II and Lab, 4 CHE 2003, 2013. Organic Chemistry I and Lab, 4 CHE 2106, 2116. Organic Chemistry II and Lab, 4 PHY 2003, 2013. General Physics I and Lab, 4 PHY 2106, 2116. General Physics II and Lab, 4


Department of Arts and Sciences

Business Programs Program Coordinator: Rebecca Deel, D.A. The College offers programs to prepare Christian men and women for careers in business. On the one hand, there is a need for people thus prepared to serve in Christian organizations: churches, schools, and various agencies. On the other hand, many Christians who feel that their calling is to the secular business world need to be equipped not only for that vocation but also for effective witness and ministry, both in the workplace and as lay leaders in their churches. The programs offered here will provide that kind of education, combining a Biblical orientation for life and service, a solid base of Arts and Sciences, and a thorough business curriculum. The department offers both a four-year baccalaureate degree in business administration and a two-year associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree; it also offers a basic computer course included in the Arts and Sciences component of all degree programs.

Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Business Administration

(M.B.A. Preparation, International Business, Department Approved Emphases) This program provides broad preparation in three areas: professional business courses, Arts and Sciences, and Theological Studies. The program includes a wide range of courses in business administration. The student who completes this program should be well prepared for a career in business, for either a secular firm or a Christian organization, or for graduate school in the field. This curriculum also serves as an excellent pre-law program (see page 89). Emphasis on the spiritual growth and development of each student, and on the importance of Christian witness and service in the world of work, is a unique feature of this program in its Bible College setting. Specific objectives include those stated elsewhere in the Catalog for the Theological Studies Major (page 55) and for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). In addition, the student who successfully completes the program should be able to: (1) Demonstrate a broad knowledge of general business theory including principles, skills, and techniques; understand the legal environment within which businesses operate; analyze and apply economic theories and principles to present-day situations; and evaluate ethical dilemmas with Biblical founda tions for ethical decisions; and (2) Develop the ability to apply and implement business theory in practice inc- luding basic financial and accounting principles, management and operati- on of business, and techniques of retail business activities; apply oral and written communication skills in the business environment; and integrate computer skills and techniques into business decision making.

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Requirements: 128 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each major.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 BIB elective, 4 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 44 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MAT 3011. Statistics I, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Business Administration Core, 33 hours: BUS 1201. Introduction to Business, 2 BUS 2001. Business Communications, 3 BUS 2211, 2222. Principles of Accounting I, II, 6 ECO 2411. Principles of Macroeconomics, 3 ECO 2422. Principles of Microeconomics, 3 BUS 3114. Legal and Social Environment of Business, 3 BUS 3206. Marketplace Management, 3 BUS 3301. Principles of Management, 3 BUS 3401. Business Finance, 3 BUS 4202. Strategic Planning, 3 BUS 4920. Capstone Experience, 1 (4) Business Emphasis, 21 hours: (a) M.B.A. Preparation, 21 hours: BUS 2405. Management of Information Systems, 3 BUS 3506. Production and Operations Systems, 3 BUS 3805. Entrepreneurship/Small Business Management, 3 BUS 4003. Human Resources Management, 3 BUS 4102. International Business, 3 MAT 3022. Statistics II, 3 Business electives, 3 (b) International Emphasis, 21 hours: ICS 2202. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 3 ICS 3452. Survey of World Religions, 3 ECO 3732. History of the World Economy, 3 BUS 4003. Human Resources Management, 3 BUS 4102. International Business, 3 Business/International electives, 6

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Associate of Science Degree: Business

This two-year program will enable the student to develop the character and skills necessary for efficiency as an accounting clerk, office manager, or other office worker. The increasing demand by our denominational offices, churches, and Christian schools for bookkeepers and business managers calls for the integrated preparation that a Bible-centered business curriculum offers. This kind of education is equally valuable to those who serve as Christian witnesses in the business world. The Associate of Science degree in Business may be earned entirely online. All graduates of this program should be able to: (1) Demonstrate Christian principles, values, and responsible stewardship in life and work; and (2) Demonstrate appropriate office skills including communication (oral and written), computer skills, and basic accounting skills. Requirements: 63 hours, with a 2.00 g.p.a. in all segments of the degree.

(1) Theological Studies, 16 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 2 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S) (2) Arts and Sciences, 27 hours: ENG 1011, 1022. Basic English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra (or higher), 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness, 2 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and the Family, 3 (3) Business, 20 hours: BUS 1201. Introduction to Business, 2 BUS 2211, 2222. Principles of Accounting I, II, 6 ECO 2411. Principles of Macroeconomics, 3 ECO 2422. Principles of Microeconomics, 3 BUS 3301. Principles of Management, 3 BUS electives, as approved by department faculty, 3

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Department of Arts and Sciences

English Programs Program Coordinator: Frank Thornsbury, M.A. The English Programs exist to prepare students with a knowledge of the structure, history, and use of the English language and with a knowledge of the literary works that the English and American literary culture has shaped and produced. Courses offered by the department will refine the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writing and speaking, develop his or her critical judgment in listening and reading, and advance his or her knowledge of the literary art in English and its history. Degree programs with an English major offered by this department include the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in English and the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in English (which may lead to licensure in teaching grades 6-12). In addition, the department also provides a Bachelor of Arts degree with a minor in English.

Policies Regarding Requirements for All Degrees

All students are required to take ENG 1011, unless they bring credit for it from another college or make appropriate scores on Advanced Placement or similar assessments. Students are no longer exempted from this course on the basis of ACT/SAT scores. A grade of C on ENG 1011 is required for enrollment in ENG 1022.

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degrees: Major in English

Specific objectives for these programs include those stated for the Theological Studies Major (page 55), and the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), as well as for the Professional Education Core common to all teacher education programs for students pursuing secondary school licensure (page 105). The graduate should also be able to: (1) Understand the grammar and syntax of the English language well enough to be able to listen and read critically; (2) Be able to select, read, and interpret literature for the enjoyment and benefit of himself and others; and (3) Be able to demonstrate knowledge of library resources and scholarly work in literature by following an orderly, effective method of research and by presenting the results of this research logically, accurately, and appropriately. Bachelor of Arts Degree: Major in English: This degree is offered either as a general liberal-arts education with emphasis on the literary arts or as a preparatory education for those who may pursue graduate-level studies. English is an appropriate undergraduate major for students wishing to pursue various programs of advanced, graduate-level study in such areas as English language or literature, comparative literature, law, theology, communication arts, or other related areas (for information about a pre-law program, see page 89). 80â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Arts and Sciences


Requirements: 124 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each major.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Phil, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 BIB elective, 4 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 41 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 LNG. Second-year international language, 6 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) English Major, 36 hours beyond the generally required freshman courses: ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) ENG 3204. Shakespeare, 3 ENG 3403. History of the English Language, 3 ENG 3605. Literary Criticism, 3 ENG 4006. Advanced English Grammar, 3 LNG. First-year international language, 6 SPE 2002. Advanced Oral Communication, 2 Literature electives, 10 (4) Electives, 17 hours

Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in English: This degree combines the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s English major (as above) with an Arts and Sciences core and Professional Education Core and prepares students to teach English with competence in either Christian, public, or private high schools; it leads to licensure to teach English in grades 6-12 in the public schools of Tennessee. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, including the Specialty Area test in English, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee State Department of Education. Requirements: 134 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Phil., 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3

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BIB elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 35 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) English Major, 36 hours: ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) ENG 3204. Shakespeare, 3 ENG 3403. History of the English Language, 3 ENG 3605. Literary Criticism, 3 ENG 4006. Advanced English Grammar, 3 LNG. First-year international language, 6 SPE 2002. Advanced Oral Communication, 2 Literature electives, 10 (4) Professional Education Core, 33 hours: PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 EDU 3801. Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4201. School Assessment, 2 EDU 4302. Teaching in the Secondary Grades, 3 EDU 4326. Content Area Reading/Writing, 3 EDU 4401. History and Philosophy of Education, 2 EDU 4450. Introduction to Student Teaching, 1 EDU 4500. Student Teaching Seminar, 2 EDU 4800. Enhanced Student Teaching: 6-12, 10

Minor in English

Students may attach an English Minor to any Welch College bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree program. This program provides an opportunity for candidates to develop understanding and abilities in English and speech as much as possible within the limitations of a minor concentration. Specific objectives of this program of study will be substantially the same as those stated for the major in English. The minor may not have more than one-third of the course-hours in common with the declared major. Program objectives will include those for the given major(s), as well as those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). Requirements: 20 hours

ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature, I, II, 6 SPE 2002. Advanced Oral Communication, 2 ENG 3000, 4000 electives, 12

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Department of Arts and Sciences

Exercise Science and Physical Education Program Program Coordinator: Gary Turner, M.S. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Exercise Science

This program is offered as an Arts and Sciences program with emphasis in human performance, recreation leadership, sports management, pre-health science and teacher education, or as a preparatory education to those who may pursue graduate studies in related fields of study. The Exercise Science/Physical Education program is an appropriate undergraduate major for students planning to pursue careers in corporate fitness, recreation, personal fitness training, sports management, or teaching, as well as in preparing for graduate school in health sciences. Specific program objectives include those stated for the Theological Studies Major (page 55) and for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). The graduate should: (1) Develop leadership abilities in a variety of exercise and/or recreational programs within a chosen area of study through course presentations and internship involvement; (2) Articulate a meaningful philosophy of exercise science; (3) Design exercise and/or recreation programs using established principles and guidelines; and (4) Adjust the variables of frequency, intensity, and duration in increasing human performance capabilities. Note: Each student completing a degree in Exercise Science must have current CPR certification. If a graduating senior is not CPR certified (current), he or she must be certified during the last semester of attendance as a part of the graduation requirements.

Requirements: All of the Exercise Science degree emphases require the following:

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 BIB elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 38 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6

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IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Excercise Science Core, 27 hours: BIO 2401, 2411. Anatomy and Physiology I and Lab, 4 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHE/REC 2455. Foundations of Physical Education and Recreation, 3 PHE 2606. Prevention and Care of Athletic Injury, 3 PHE 2705. Coaching Techniques, 2 PHE 3156. Adapted Physical Education, 3 PHE 3205. Physiology of Exercise, 3 PHE 3256. Instruction and Analysis of Individual and Dual Sports, 2 PHE 3264. Instruction and Analysis of Team Sports, 2 PHE 4006. Administration and Supervision of Physical Education, 2

Exercise Science Major: Recreation Leadership Emphasis: This provides preparation for careers in areas such as athletics and recreation programming, sports management, and camp directing. In addition to the requirements below, this degree requires the Theological Studies Major (pages 55, 83), Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52, 83-84), and Exercise Science Core (page 84) as listed above. Requirements: 124 hours, with a 2.00 g.p.a. overall and in each segement of the degree. (4) Recreation Leadership Emphasis, 27 hours: PHE activity electives, 2 PHE 3104. Kinesiology, 3 PHE 3704. Motor Learning, 2 PHE/BUS 3853. Sports Management, 3 PHE 4103. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education, 2 PHE/REC 4257. Physical Education/Rec Leadership Internship, 2 PHE/REC 4357. Physical Education/Rec Leadership Research, 2 REC 2003. Recreation Administration and Programming, 3 REC 2455. Foundations of Physical Education and Recreation, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the Exercise Science Core; for credit hour purposes, this course is counted in the ES Core) REC 3007. Outdoor Recreation and Camp Administration, 3 REC 4007. Current Issues in Recreation, 2 (5) Electives, 2 hours

Exercise Science Major: Physical Education Emphasis: This may be used for teaching licensure, Grades K-12. This program, when it includes both the Physical Education Major and the Professional Education Core (as outlined below and page 105), will prepare students to teach Physical Education in grades K-12, whether in a Christian, public, or private school. The program is designed to meet all requirements for licensure to teach Physical Education in the public schools in Tennessee. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, including the Specialty Area test in Physical Education, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee State Department of Education. In addition to the requirements below, this degree requires the Theological Studies Major (pages 55, 83), Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52, 83-84), and Exercise Science Core (page 84) as listed above.

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Requirements: 130 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (4) Physical Education and Professional (teacher licensure, K-12) Emphasis, 35 hours: PHE activity elective, 1 PHE 3104. Kinesiology, 3 PHE 3503. Psychomotor Development of Children, 3 PHE 3704. Motor Learning, 2 PHE 4103. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education, 2 PHE 4707. Teaching Secondary Physical Education, 2 PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 EDU 4401. History and Philosophy of Education, 2 EDU 4450. Introduction to Student Teaching, 1 EDU 4500. Student Teaching Seminar, 2 EDU 4700. Enhanced Student Teaching: K-12, 10

Exercise Science Major: Sports Management Emphasis: This provides preparation for students to enter sports business with opportunities for office management in public recreation such as YMCA and other sports businesses such as racquet clubs, golf clubs, etc. In addition to the requirements below, this degree requires the Theological Studies Major (pages 55, 83), Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52, 83-84), and Exercise Science Core (page 84) as listed above. Requirements: 124 hrs, with a 2.00 g.p.a. overall and in each segment of degree. (4) Sports and Business Management Emphasis, 25 hours: BUS 3206. Marketplace Management, 3 BUS 3301. Principles of Management, 3 BUS 4202. Strategic Planning, 3 BUS 4947. Special Topics in Business, 1 MAT 3011. Statistics I, 3 PHE/REC 4257. Physical Education/Rec Leadership Internship, 2 PHE/REC 4357. Physical Education/Rec Leadership Research, 2 PHE 4907. Research Project in Exercise Science, 3 PHE electives, 5 (5) Electives, 4 hours

Exercise Science Major: Human Performance Emphasis: Careers in personal training, strength and conditioning, corporate wellness, and coaching are among the options made possible by a degree in human performance. In addition to the requirements below, this degree requires the Theological Studies Major (pages 55, 83), Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52, 83-84), and Exercise Science Core (page 84) as listed above. Requirements: 124 hours, with a 2.00 g.p.a. overall and in each segment of the degree. (4) Human Performance Emphasis, 13 hours: PHE activity electives, 2 PHE 3104. Kinesiology, 3 PHE 3704. Motor Learning, 2 PHE 4103. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education, 2 PHE/REC 4257, 4357. Physical Educ./Rec. Leadership Internship and Research, 4 (two courses) (5) Electives, 16 hours

Department of Arts and Sciencesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;85


Exercise Science Major: Human Performance Emphasis, Pre-health Science Minor: As with the Associate of Science Degree: Science for Nursing, students wishing to pursue career options such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, allied health, and medicine may add the following minor to the human performance major by using program electives. Students should be advised that there may be more requirements for graduate school admission. Students must evaluate graduate schools being considered regarding requirements not included in this degree. Students should inquire early in their matriculation with graduate schools regarding requirements. The Biology Program coordinator may also advise students regarding these requirements. Requirements: 138 hours, with a 3.00 g.p.a. for the following minor.

(4) Human Performance Emphasis, 13 hours: PHE activity elective, 2 PHE 3104. Kinesiology, 3 PHE 3704. Motor Learning, 2 PHE 4103. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education, 2 PHE/REC 4257. Physical Education/Rec Leadership Internship, 2 PHE/REC 4357. Physical Education/Rec Leadership Research, 2 (5) Pre-health Science Minor, 34 hours: BIO 1101, 1111. General Biology I and Lab, 4 (these courses, not required in this program, satisfy the BIO 1001, 1011 req. in A/S Core) BIO 1202, 1212. General Biology II and Lab, 4 BIO 2502, 2512. Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab, 4 CHE 1004, 1014. General Chemistry I and Lab, 4 CHE 1105, 1115. General Chemistry II and Lab, 4 MAT 3011. Statistics I, 3 PHY 2003, 2113. General Physics I and Lab, 4 PHY 2106, 2116. General Physics II and Lab, 4 PSY 2001. General Psychology, 3

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Department of Arts and Sciences

History Programs Program Coordinator: John Carter, M.Ed., M.S. Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degrees: Major in History

Specific objectives include those stated for the Theological Studies Major (page 55), the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), as well as for the Professional Education Core common to all teacher education programs for students pursuing secondary school licensure (page 105). The graduate should also be able to: (1) Analyze the origin and development of ideas; (2) Develop a broader understanding of the world related to historical perspectives, political structures, and religious systems; (3) Demonstrate competency in original research; and (4) Personalize a Christian worldview through the integration of Biblical content with historical issues.

Bachelor of Arts Degree: Major in History: This degree is offered as part of the core disciplines in a liberal arts education. Knowledge of the past challenges one to think beyond contemporary and often trendy fads, to ideas and issues which are timeless. Such knowledge urges the student to greater intellectual and spiritual maturity. History provides a solid foundation for graduate study in history as well as entry into such fields as teaching, ministry, law, journalism, medicine, and business, among others. Requirements: 124 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment:

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 BIB elective, 4 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 53 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 LNG. International language, 12 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) History Major, 34 hours: HIS 2201. Introduction to the Study of History, 1

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HIS 2605. Non-Western Cultures and People, 3 HIS 3204. Survey Church History, 3 HIS 3404. U.S. The Founding Era, 3 HIS 4305. Renaissance and Reformation, 3 HIS 4807. Historiography, 3 HIS electives, 18 hours (9 hours must be at the HIS 4000 level) (4) Electives, 7 hours

Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in History: This degree incorporates the History major and the Arts and Sciences core along with the Professional Education Core to prepare students to teach history skillfully in Christian, private, or public junior and senior high schools. The program leads to licensure in Tennessee, which provides for students to be able to teach history in grades 6-12 in public schools. Licensure requires the successful completion of the PRAXIS II Assessments, including the Specialty Area test in history, according to minimum scores determined by the Tennessee State Department of Education. Requirements: 138 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 BIB elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 41 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) History Major, 34 hours: HIS 2201. Introduction to the Study of History, 1 HIS 2605. Non-Western Cultures and People, 3 HIS 3204. Survey of Church History, 3 HIS 3404. U.S. The Founding Era, 3 HIS 4305. Renaissance and Reformation, 3 HIS 4807. Historiography, 3 Electives, 18 hours (9 hours must be at the HIS 4000 level) (4) Professional Education Core, 33 hours: PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 EDU 3801. Exceptional Child, 3

88â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Arts and Sciences


EDU 4201. School Assessment, 2 EDU 4302. Teaching in the Secondary Grades, 3 EDU 4326. Content Area Reading/Writing, 3 EDU 4401. History and Philosophy of Education, 2 EDU 4450. Introduction to Student Teaching, 1 EDU 4500. Student Teaching Seminar, 2 EDU 4800. Enhanced Student Teaching: 6-12, 10 (5) Additional Endorsements: Students may add these endorsements to their History major. A passing score on the required PRAXIS specialty test(s) must be achieved before licensure can be granted. Economics, 12 hours: Psychology, 12 hours: ECO 2411. Macroeconomics, 3 PSY 2001. General Psychology, 3 ECO 2422. Microeconomics, 3 PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 ECO 3732. World Economy History, 3 PSY 4204. History and Systems of Psychology, 3 BUS elective, 3 PSY 4305. Psychol. Assessment and Research, 3

Minor in History

Students may attach a History Minor to any Welch College bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree program. This program offers the student a basic exposure to the history field. It may not have more than one-third of the course-hours in common with the declared major. Program objectives will include those for the given major(s), as well as those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). Requirements: 18 hours:

HIS 2013. History of the United States, 3 9 hours from other courses required in the major 6 hours from other history courses as approved by a history faculty member

Preparation for Law School

Students planning to become lawyers must first complete a baccalaureate degree before enrolling in law school. Most law schools recommend against special programs for pre-law students at the college level. Instead, they suggest that pre-law students take any of several different majors, emphasizing the development of abilities that are typically associated with a good Arts and Sciences core. These include being able to write and think critically and clearly, communicate effectively, and analyze and weigh the elements of situations; having mature study habits and intellectual curiosity; and being broadly informed. Among the programs often recommended are those leading to majors in English, History, or Business, for example. Welch College has designated Mr. Matthew Bracey as pre-law advisor. Students interested in law school should plan their programs in consultation with him.

Department of Arts and Sciencesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;89


Department of Arts and Sciences

Psychology Programs Program Coordinator: Michael Oliver, M.Ed. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Psychology

This program is constructed primarily to prepare students for graduate study, either in psychology or in related fields such as social work and counseling. The curriculum is designed to meet the requirements of university graduate programs and meet professional organizational standards. Objectives of the program include those stated for the Theological Studies Major (see page 55) and for the Arts and Sciences Core (see pages 50-52). The graduate should also be able to: (1) Articulate a personal theory of the integration of Christian truth and psychology; (2) Develop an understanding of the spectrum of human thought, emotion, and behavior; (3) Exhibit an understanding of how people relate to one another; and (4) Demonstrate the methods by which psychologists gather and interpret new knowledge.

Requirements: 124 hours, with a 2.00 g.p.a. overall and in each segement of the degree.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 BIB elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 41 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Psychology Major, 41 hours: MAT 3011. Statistics I, 3 PSY 2001. General Psychology, 3 PSY 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 PSY 2302. Group and Interpersonal Relations, 3 PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3

90â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Arts and Sciences


PSY 3201. Physiology of Behavior, 3 PSY 3601. Christian Counseling, 3 PSY 3801. The Exceptional Child, 3 PSY 4001. Abnormal Psychology, 3 PSY 4106. Personality Theory, 3 PSY 4204. History and Systems of Psychology, 3 PSY 4305. Psychological Assessment and Research, 3 PSY 4402. Psychology of Adjustment, 3 PSY 4820. Psychology Practicum, 3 (4) Electives, 12

Minor in Psychology

Students may attach a Psychology Minor to any Welch College bachelor’s degree program. This program will prepare students minimally for graduate study in the psychology field. At least a master’s degree in the field is required for licensed service as a psychologist. The program is constructed to meet requirements for admission to a master’s program at most universities. The minor may not have more than one-third of the course-hours in common with the declared major. Program objectives will include those for the given major(s), as well as those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). Requirements: 21 hours

MAT 3011. Statistics I, 3 PSY 2001. General Psychology, 3 PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 PSY 3201. Physiology of Behavior, 3 PSY 4001. Abnormal Psychology, 3 PSY 4106. Personality Theory, 3 PSY 4402. Psychology of Adjustment, 3

Department of Arts and Sciences—91


Department of Arts and Sciences

Associate of Arts Degree This two-year program is, first, for students who desire some study in a Biblical framework but plan to pursue a collegiate major not offered at Welch College. It provides a solid basis of Biblical study plus a core of general education that should provide a good foundation for transferring to another college. Second, some students who sense no call to full-time Christian service and do not desire a four-year college degree still wish to attend a Bible College for the sake of general Biblical knowledge and personal spiritual growth. For such students, this program provides a good foundation for general, lay ministry in a local church. All graduates of this program should be able to: (1) Develop a broad comprehension of Biblical teaching, reflected in Christian character and a Christian worldview; (2) Demonstrate competency in the basics of reading, writing, and speaking; and (3) Develop foundational skills in personal and social relationships. Requirements: 62 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree. (1) Theological Studies, 16 hours: BIB 1011,1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 IDS 1902. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 2 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S) (2) Arts and Sciences, 41 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE activity elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Electives, 5 hours

Contact the Chairman of the Arts and Sciences Department or the Provost for more information about this degree program.

92â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Arts and Sciences


Music

Chairman: James Stevens, D.M.A.

Faculty:

James Stevens, D.M.A. Linda Shipley, Ph.D. Carol Butler, M.M. (adjunct) Mary George, M.S. (adjunct) Veronica Joines, M.A. (adjunct) Mark Lancaster, M.A. (adjunct) Luanne Mutsch, M.M. (adjunct) Carolyn Treybig, D.M.A. (adjunct)

The mission of the Music Department is to provide a program, faculty, and support that ensure music proficiency and success after graduation for students who wish to follow a career in music or enter graduate school upon graduation. More specifically, the department will provide proficiencies in vocal, keyboard, conducting, and instrumental performance. Each student is offered the opportunity to become acquainted with music theory, church music history, and music history to familiarize him/herself with the monumental artistic achievements of Western civilization. For the student who wishes to pursue music as a profession, course offerings will assist in preparation for a career in the ministry of music through church leadership, performance, or music education in a public school, Christian school, or private studio.

General Departmental Information

Students entering the music program are required to take Class Piano (see Placement Exam Information), followed by two semesters of Private Piano, concluding with the Piano Proficiency; students must continue to enroll in piano until proficiency is passed. (See keyboard requirements for students who pass the Piano Proficiency sooner.) If the music degree chosen requires student teaching or a recital, students must pass the Piano Proficiency requirement to be eligible to register for student teaching or a senior recital. Music majors, combination music majors, and music minors are required to take a jury at the end of each semester of private study. The jury at the end of the sophomore year will determine whether the student is eligible to continue in the music program, and must include the Piano Proficiency requirement, unless he/she has entered the program during the sophomore year. Music students may be put on a probationary standing during the freshman or sophomore year, but for no longer than two semesters. Music majors and minors, and any non-music students enrolling in private music lessons, are required to attend a fixed number of music recitals on and off campus. Music majors and minors are required to participate in music ensembles. (See degree Department of Musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;93


program for specific ensemble requirements.)

Placement Exam Information

MUSIC THEORY PLACEMENT EXAM All students will begin the MUS 1011. Music Theory I and MUS 1630. Class Conducting. However, if a student has substantial background in music theory or conducting, the student, at the music facultys' discretion, may be allowed to take an exam or advanced placement. CLASS PIANO PLACEMENT EXAM A student having prior study in piano may take a placement exam. The exam includes sight-reading, harmonizing and transposing simple melodies, and playing scales, arpeggios, and chords. If the student performs these skills successfully and demonstrates an understanding of basic musicianship, he/she may exempt MUS 1300 Class Piano (non-music major or minor) or MUS 1271, 1282 Class Piano (music major, combination majors or minor) and enter Private Piano. PIANO PROFICIENCY The Piano Proficiency is a demonstration of the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keyboard skills. It includes sight-reading, scales, arpeggios, chords, harmonizing, transposing, hymn playing, score reading, and repertoire representing two contrasting periods. The Piano Proficiency is scheduled at the end of the sophomore year (unless a student has just completed Class Piano), but may be attempted sooner; students must continue to enroll in piano until proficiency is passed. The Piano Proficiency is scheduled during juries, at the end of each semester. If the music degree chosen requires student teaching or a recital, students must pass the Piano Proficiency requirement to be eligible to register for student teaching or a senior recital.

Recital/Internship Requirements

Note concerning required program and recital attendance: All students with music concentrations are required to attend all repertoire recitals offered by the Music Department, all Sarah Lacey Nicholas Artist Series programs, and two off-campus recitals of art music each semester, as well as other programs that the faculty deems necessary. The two outside recitals of art music attended must be from an approved list provided by the music faculty or must be pre-approved. Students will submit copies of the programs of each outside concert attended as well as a one-page report on the concert for inclusion in their files. Grades in applied music courses are affected.

94â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Music


Department of Music

Music Performance Program Program Coordinator: James Stevens, D.M.A. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Music, Performance Emphasis

This program will prepare the student for a broader music ministry as a performing musician, music minister, and especially for graduate studies in music. Specific objectives include those stated for the Theological Studies Major (page 55) and for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). The graduate should also be able to demonstrate: (1) The music skills and techniques that are demanded in the various disciplines cultivated in this program of study; (2) Understanding and appreciation of the development of the music of the Western civilization as these relate to life in general and to the music of the church; (3) The ability to perform and teach on the major instrument with skill acceptable for graduate studies. Requirements: 135 hours, with a minimum of a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 BIB Elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 38 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE Activity Elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Music Major, 67 hours: MUS 1011, 1022, 2031, 2042. Music Theory I, II, 12 MUS 1111, 1122, 2131, 2142. Aural Theory I, II, 4 MUS 1271, 1282. Class Piano, 4 (students must enroll in piano until proficiency is passed) MUS 1630. Class Conducting, 1 MUS 2313, 2326. Diction for Singers , 2 MUS 3031, 3062. Music History and Literature I, II, 6

Department of Musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;95


MUS 3055. Form, Analysis, and Counterpoint, 3 MUS 3266. Choral/Instrumental Conducting, 2 or MUS 2650. Private Conducting, 2 NOTE: Students majoring in conducting do not have to take MUS 3266. MUS 4304. Choral Arranging and Instrumentation, 3 Major Applied Music: Voice, Piano, Instrumental, or Conducting, 10 Secondary Applied: Voice, Piano, Instrumental, or Conducting, 2 Ensembles: MUS 1040. Choral Union, MUS 3040. College Choir, MUS 4060. Chapel Choir, or Instrumental Ensembles (2 each semester), 16 (instrumental ensembles will only count as ensemble credit for students who are studying their instrument as an applied area) MUS 3337. Junior Recital, 1 MUS 4447. Senior Recital, 1

96â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Music


Department of Music

Worship Ministry Program Program Coordinator: James Stevens, D.M.A. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Worship Ministry

This program will prepare the music student for a broader ministry in the area of music and worship. The program is not designed as a foundation for graduate studies. Specific objectives include those stated for the Biblical Studies Major (page 55) and for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). The graduate of this program will be able to: (1) Articulate a philosophy of worship ministry that is Biblically based and philosophically sound; (2) Evaluate the musical and spiritual needs of a congregation and develop a music and worship program that will meet those needs; and (3) Integrate music and the arts with the total purpose of the church in its ministry goals. Requirements: 124 hours (131 hours with recital), with a minimum of a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in each segment of the degree.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 46 hours: BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 2601. Biblical Interpretation, 3 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosophy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core THE 3251. Systematic Theology I, 2 THE 3301. Systematic Theology II, 3 THE 3402. Systematic Theology III, 3 THE 4032. Eschatology, 2 THE 4253. Christian Worship, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the Worship Ministry Major) BIB/THE 3000 electives, 4 BIB 4000 electives, 3 (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 38 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE Activity Elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3

Department of Musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;97


(3) Worship Ministry Major, 40 hours: (a) Music, 23 hours: MUS 1011, 1022. Music Theory I, 6 MUS 1111, 1122. Aural Theory I, 2 MUS 1357, 1367. Class Voice (must pass proficiency jury), 2 MUS 1630. Class Conducting, 1 MUS 1271, 1282. Class Piano, 4 (students must pass proficiency based on 1 year or continue to enroll in piano until proficiency is passed) Ensembles, 8 (including MUS 2467. Orchestra or Instrumental Ensemble, MUS2700. Tr aveling Group Ensembles, and others) (b) Worship Ministry, 17 hours WMN 4205. Music and Worship Technology, 2 MUS 2650. Private Conducting, 2 (two semesters, waived for students taking Recital opt ion) MUS 3266. Choral and Instrumental conducting for Worship, 2 MUS 4407. Worship Music Ministry Internship, 1 MIN 1011. Local Church and World Missions, 2 MIN 2336. Church Growth: Theory and Practice, 3 MIN 3011. Christian Ministry, 3 MIN 4907. Research Project in Ministry Studies, 2 (appropriate music ministry topic)

Recital Option: Add Applied Music in Piano, Vocal or Instrumental, 8 hours; and MUS 4447. Senior Recital, 1 hour, for a total of 9 additional hours. If this option is taken though, students may waive MUS2650 Private Conducting, 2 hours, bringing the total additional hours for the Recital Option to 7 hours.

98â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Music


Department of Music

Music Education Program Program Coordinator: James Stevens, D.M.A. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Music Education

(May be used for licensure to teach either vocal, general or instrumental music) The College offers this program, which combines its music major with an Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52) and Professional Education Core (page 105) to prepare a student to teach music in the Christian, public, or private school, grades K-12, or to continue music education at the graduate level. This program is constructed to meet all requirements of the Tennessee State Department of Education for licensure to teach music in grades K-12. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, including the Specialty Area test in Music, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee State Department of Education. Given the full range of professional training included in this program (in music, education, Biblical studies, and general education), a student will need to plan for completion in five years, not four. This is not uncommon in music education, and the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program offers the added dimension of a Biblical perspective that serves to prepare the music teacher for an effective witness and ministry. The objectives of this program include those stated for the Biblical Studies Major, the General Education core, and the Professional Education Core common to all teacher education programs. The graduate should also be able to demonstrate: (1) The music skills and techniques that are demanded in the various disciplines cultivated in this program of study; (2) Understanding and appreciation for the development of the music of the Western civilization as related both to life in general and to the music of the school and church; (3) Ability to teach either vocal and general music, or instrumental music in grades K-12 and efficiently organize and direct elementary, middle, and secondary music programs in either Christian or public schools; (4) Ability to evaluate music needs and arrange or compose choral music to meet those needs; (5) Understanding of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations underlying music education in America, whether in public or Christian education; and (6) Ability to perform with skill.

Department of Musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;99


Requirements: 142 hours (vocal/general) or 145 hours (instrumental), with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 BIB Elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 38 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE Activity Elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Music Major, either 44 hours (vocal/general/conducting) or 47 hours (instrumental): (a) Vocal/General/Conducting, 44 hours: MUS 1011, 1022, 2031. Music Theory I, II, 9 MUS 1111, 1122, 2131. Aural Theory I, II, 3 MUS 1201. Introduction to Music Education, 2 MUS 1271, 1282. Class Piano, 4 ( students must enroll in piano until proficiency is passed) MUS 1630. Class Conducting, 1 MUS 2313, 2326. Diction for Singers, 2 MUS 3266. Choral/Instrumental Conducting, 2 or MUS 2650 Private Conducting, 2 Major Applied Music: Voice, Piano, Instrumental or Conducting, 8 Secondary Applied: Voice, Piano, Instrumental, or Conducting, 2 Ensembles: MUS 1040. Choral Union, MUS 3040. College Choir, MUS 4060. Chapel Cho ir, or Instrumental Ensembles (2 each semester), 10 (instrumental ensembles will only count as ensemble credit for students who are studying their instrument as an applied area) MUS 4447. Senior Recital, 1 (b) Instrumental, 47 hours: MUS 1011, 1022, 2031. Music Theory I, II, 9 MUS 1111, 1122, 2131. Aural Theory I, II, 3 MUS 1201. Introduction to Music Education, 2 MUS 1271, 1282. Class Piano, 4 MUS 3266. Choral/Instrumental Conducting, 2 or MUS 2650. Private Conducting, 2 (students majoring in conducting do not have to take MUS 3266) Major Applied Music: Instrumental, 8 Ensembles: MUS 1040. Choral Union, MUS 3040. College Choir, MUS 4060. Chapel Cho ir, or Instrumental Ensembles (2 each semester), 10 Secondary Applied: Voice, Piano, or Conducting, 2 MUS 4447. Senior Recital, 1 Required Belmont University Courses, 6 hours: MUE 221, 222. Brass/Woodwind Class Methods, 2 MUE 321, 322. String/Percussion Class Methods, 2 MUE 328. Marching Bnd. Lab (no credit, taken twice; not required for strings majors)

100â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Music


MUAI 206. Techniques/Literature for the Major Instrument, 1 MUAI 305. Instrumental Pedagogy, 1 (4) Professional Education Core, 30 hours: MUS 4242. Music Methods and Materials, 3 PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 EDU 3801. The Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4201. School Assessment, 2 EDU 4401. History and Philosophy of Education, 2 EDU 4450. Introduction to Student Teaching, 1 EDU 4500. Student Teaching Seminar, 2 EDU 4700. Enhanced Student Teaching, 10 Note: Post-baccalaureate students seeking teacher licensure in music will be required to take both MUS 1201 Introduction to Music Education and MUS 4241 Music Methods and Materials.

Minor in Music

Students may attach a Music Minor to any Welch College bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree program. This program provides opportunity for any degree candidate to develop general musical abilities and interests as much as possible within the limitations of a minor concentration. The minor may not have more than one-third of the course-hours in common with the declared major. Program objectives will include those for the given major(s), as well as those stated for the Arts and Sciences core (pages 50-52). Requirements: 28 hours:

MUS 1011, 1022. Music Theory I, 6 MUS 1111, 1122. Aural Theory I, 2 MUS 1271, 1282. Class Piano, 4 (or until student passes a proficiency based on 2 semesters of Class Piano) MUS 1630 Class Conducting, 1 MUS 3031. Music History and Literature I, 3 or MUS 3062. Music History and Literature II, 3 MUS Applied Music, 4 Ensembles: MUS 1040. Choral Union, MUS 3040. College Choir, MUS 4060. Chapel Choir, or Instrumental Ensembles (2 each semester), 8

Department of Musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;101


Teacher Education

Interim Chair: Etta Patterson, Ed.D.

Faculty:

Etta C. Patterson, Ed.D. Stephen Beck, M.Ed. John Carter, M.Ed. Greg Ketteman, Ed.D. Thurman Pate, Ph.D. Mary Holland, Ed.D. (adjunct) Kathy Murphy, M.Ed. (adjunct) Kathy Turner, M.Ed. (adjunct)

Welch College offers programs of study to help students develop into competent Christian educators, especially for Christian schools but also for licensure in Tennessee to teach in public or private schools. These programs' intended function is to train teachers who are equally prepared to serve in academic teaching, missions, literature, and church education. Programs emphasize quality academic and pedagogical preparation and practice that will also prepare the student for entry into graduate school.

Concept of Teacher Education

The primary objective in teacher education is to fulfill the College’s mission by preparing students to use teaching as a tool in serving Christ and His Church. More specifically, the College’s objective is to graduate well prepared teachers who exhibit a commitment to strong Christian standards and develop into reflective decision makers. This assumes a research-based body of knowledge and practice that provides a significant part of this preparation, and that God has created each person to function in the intellectual, emotional, and physical domains with spiritual character. Philosophically, the College and Teacher Education (TE) Department operate on the basis of belief that God created man as an innocent, spiritual being. By transgression, humanity lost that innocence and became separated from God, needing the restoration that results from regeneration and a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Thus, the TE programs emphasize the need to address man's spiritual, as well as his or her intellectual, emotional, social, and physical natures. Only the person who has experienced a restored spiritual relationship with the Creator can be truly prepared for successful living or service. In this way, the need of the whole man is met. When each domain is addressed, when preparation is founded on a Bible-based curriculum, and when such a research base of professional knowledge is incorporated into a program of teacher education, there is greater probability that the student will develop appropriate teaching skills. There is likewise a greater likelihood that the student will succeed as a Christian educator with quality and professionalism. 102—Department of Teacher Education


Teacher Education Programs

Teacher education (TE) programs that lead to state licensure build on an Arts and Sciences Core and majors. Each student is expected to demonstrate quality performance in a well constructed, rigorous degree program designed to add appropriate, research-based knowledge, skills, and supervised practice to these other components. Programs are thus constructed to prepare teachers for effective Christian service, enabling students to reach maximum spiritual, intellectual, emotional, social, and physical potential. In 1998, the U.S. Congress approved Title II of the Higher Education Act. Section 207 of Title II requires the annual preparation and submission of three reports on teacher education and licensing. Students must achieve a passing score on certain standardized tests before they may be admitted to a TE program. Other tests on teaching and subject area are required before licensure is granted. The pass rate on these tests must be reported to the state by April 7 for the previous year. The annual state reports must include quartile rankings for each reporting institution in the state based on its pass rate in each aggregate category of assessment and its summary pass rate. As the 41 institutions in Tennessee with teacher education programs were ranked for the most recent report to congress, our most recent completers passed 100% of all tests. The following licensure programs are offered: • Early Childhood Licensure (major in Early Childhood), PreK-3 • Elementary Education Licensure (major in Child Development and Learning), K-5 • Secondary Education Licensure (major in Bible, Biology, English, History, History/Economics, or History/Psychology), 6-12 • Physical Education Licensure, K-12 • Music Education Licensure, K-12

Teacher Education Post-Baccalaureate Licensure

As provided by the Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE), Welch College offers a program leading to teacher licensure for students who have already graduated with a baccalaureate degree. This program is offered either through the Adult Degree Program or through regular day courses. Requirements for participation, completion, and recommendation for licensure are: (1) A baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited college or university; (2) A major emphasis with at least 36 hours in an area approved for licensure by the TDOE; (3) Application to and approval by the TE Admissions Committee for licensure program admission prior to Professional Core enrollment; and (4) Maintenance of at least a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in the major, and in professional development core for all courses taken at Welch College. Upon application, the TE Department will review the student’s baccalaureate transcript(s) and determine the courses needed to complete all TDOE requirements and Welch College competencies expected. A program completion template will be developed and entered into the Registrar’s records software data base before the student registers showing all courses and activities required to complete the personalized licensure and major cores’ requirements. Department of Teacher Education—103


Admission To a Teacher Education Program

A student should apply for formal admission to one of these programs during the second semester of the sophomore year. The Teacher Education Admissions Committee considers these factors when deciding on an application: (1) personal adjustment, (2) character, (3) skill in communication, and (4) grade-point average (g.p.a.). Before admission to a program, the student must successfully complete the Praxis I Assessments. This should be taken during the first semester of the sophomore year. A student is exempt if he or she has made a composite score of 21 on the enhanced ACT or 1020 on the recentered SAT. For admission to student teaching, graduation, and recommendation for licensure, a g.p.a. of 2.75 must have been achieved overall in the major for which licensure is sought and in the Professional Education Core. This applies to all the College’s Teacher Education programs. Once a student has been withdrawn from eligibility to take courses in the TE Professional Core due to any reason including an inadequate g.p.a., he or she must reapply to the TE Admissions Committee before taking any further TE courses. Welch College will not recognize any professional courses from other schools during this suspension period. For more complete information, see the Teacher Education Handbook.

Approval for Student Teaching

The Teacher Education Admissions Committee must also give official approval before the student can engage in student teaching. The following are required: (1) The student must be formally admitted to the program, as described above; (2) The student must show progress in development as a student and person; a student who has been advised of the need for improvement in any area–in grades (2.75 g.p.a. overall in the major for which licensure is sought and in the Professional Core), speaking skill, personality traits, etc.–will be reevaluated before approval for student teaching and must demonstrate improvement; (3) The student must be classified as a senior and have completed all methods courses in the teaching field. The final step in approval for student teaching includes confirmation of assignment to a cooperating teacher and school; (4) The student must have completed all courses in his or her major core; and (5) The student must sign an official student teaching contract. Again, for more complete information, see the Teacher Education Handbook and the Student Teaching Handbook. Note: Before starting student teaching, all candidates must have completed all other academic course work and field experience degree completion requirements. Only in the event that a course was not offered during the previous two years will consideration be given to approving the student’s taking any academic work other than the Student Teaching Seminar, which must be taken concurrent with student teaching, during the student teaching experience. Permission to take such a course requires prior approval of the Teacher Education Admissions Committee and the Provost, and will be limited to no more than three hours.

104—Department of Teacher Education


Professional Education Core: Objectives Common To All Programs

By virtue of the Professional Education Core courses included in all teacher education programs, all graduates of teacher education programs should be able to meet the standards set forth in the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)'s Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC). These standards provide the basis for the Professional Education Core as prescribed by the Tennessee State Department of Education and therefore the Professional Education Core for Welch College Department of Education: (1) The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences; (2) The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards; (3) The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation; (4)The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content; (5) The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives too engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues; (6) The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and learnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision making; (7) The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context; (8) The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways; (9) The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his or her practice, particularly the effects of his or her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner; and (10) The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

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Department of Teacher Education

Early Childhood Programs (PreK-3) Program Coordinator: Etta Patterson, Ed.D. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Early Childhood

(May be used for licensure for grades PreK-3 or for non-licensure) Designed for those who desire to work with young children, this program places emphasis on early childhood development and the teaching of reading and mathematics. Upon successful completion of the major and Professional Education Core and the passing of required exit examinations (PRAXIS II), the student will be recommended for licensure for grades PreK-3 and for the certificate for early childhood teaching. This program may be taken for non-licensure by substituting another minor for the Professional Education Core. In addition to meeting the specific objectives stated elsewhere for Theological Studies Major (page 55), Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), and the Professional Education Core (page 105), the graduate will also meet specific Early Childhood obj.: (1) Exhibit an understanding of the developmental needs of young children; (2) Select appropriate materials for specific age groups; (3) Meet the educational needs of students with unique demands; (4) Demonstrate competency in the various methods of teaching reading, including phonics, whole language, and other approaches; (5) Demonstrate competency in the teaching of elementary mathematics; and (6) Implement training and/or theory with practical experiences in at least two different classroom settings. Requirements: 140 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3101. Christian Doctrines, 3 THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 BIB Elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (NOTE: If a 2.75 g.p.a. is obtained in this major, the student may receive licensure in Bible.) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 38 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4

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ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE Activity Elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Professional Education Core, 26 hours: EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 EDU 3312. Classroom Management, 2 EDU 4002. Teaching Strategies for the EL and Regular Classroom, 3 EDU 4201. School Assessment, 2 EDU 4401. History and Philosophy of Education, 2 EDU 4450. Introduction to Student Teaching, 1 EDU 4500. Student Teaching Seminar, 2 EDU 4650. Enhanced Student Teaching: PreK-3, 10 (4) Early Childhood Major, 34 hours: (a) Concentration in Early Childhood, 17 hours: PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 ECE 2702. Creative Development, 2 ECE 3251. Administering Children's Programs, 3 ECE 3411. Infants and Toddlers, 3 ECE 3512. Teaching Young Children, 3 EDU 3801. Teaching the Exceptional Child, 3 (b) Content Area Focus in Reading and Mathematics, 17 hours: LSC 3012. Literature for Children Through Elementary and Middle Grades, 2 MAT 2011, 2022. Mathematics Concepts I, II, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) EDU 3601. Methods of Teaching Reading, 3 EDU 4111. Language Arts Instruction, 3 EDU 4332. Content Area Reading/Writing, 3 (5) Emphasis in EL, 12 hours (24 total hours counted in this course group for content purposes) ICS 2202. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 3 LNG xxxx. Modern Foreign Language, 6 LNG/ENG/EDU 4012. Introduction to Linguistics and Second Language Acquisitions, 3 The following courses are shared with the Professional Ed. Core and Early Childhood Major: EDU 3601. Methods of Teaching Reading, 3 EDU 3801. Teaching the Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4002. Teaching Strategies for the EL and Regular Classroom, 3 EDU 4111. Language Arts Instruction, 3

The Associate of Science Degree: Early Childhood

Designed for those who desire to work with young children in childcare facilities or as an instructional aide, this program places emphases on early childhood development and working with young learners. Upon successful completion of the program, the student will qualify for the certificate for early childhood. In addition to meeting the specific objectives stated elsewhere for Theological Studies Major (page 55), Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), and the Professional Education Core (page 105), the graduate will also meet specific Early Childhood obj.: (1) Exhibit an understanding of the developmental needs of young children; (2) Select appropriate materials for specific age groups; (3) Meet the educational needs of students with unique demands; and Department of Teacher Educationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;107


(4) Work with teachers in the educational program of young children.

Requirements: 65 hours, with a C average (2.00 g.p.a.) overall and in all segments of the degree. (1) Theological Studies, 16 hours: BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 2 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S) (2) Arts and Sciences, 25 hours: ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MAT 2011. Math Concepts I, 3 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE Activity Elective, 3 (3) Concentration in Early Childhood, 24 hours: PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 PHE 3503. Psychomotor Development of Children, 3 EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2312. Classroom Management, 2 ECE 2411. Infants and Toddlers, 3 ECE 2512. Teaching Young Children, 3 ECE 2702. Creative Development, 2 EDU 3801. The Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4111. Language Arts Instruction, 3

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Department of Teacher Education

Child Development and Learning Program (K-5) Program Coordinator: Etta Patterson, Ed.D. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Child Development and Learning

(May be used for licensure for grades K-5) This program will prepare the student to teach with competence as a highly qualified teacher in an elementary school or kindergarten, whether in a Christian or public school. In addition to meeting the specific objectives stated elsewhere for Theological Studies Major (page 55), Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), and the Professional Education Core (page 105), the graduate will also meet specific objectives for Child Development and Learning: (1) Select appropriate materials for specific groups; (2) Meet the educational needs of students with unique demands; (3) Demonstrate competency in the various methods of teaching reading in the elementary classroom, and in the teaching of language arts skills; (4) Demonstrate an understanding of effective teaching of mathematical and science content and processes; and (5) Implement training and/or theory with practical experiences in at least two diverse classroom settings. This major requires a concentration in the area of how students develop and learn, as well as a content area focus on language arts and mathematics. Requirements: 139 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree.

(1) Theological Studies Major, 30 hours BIB 1100. Introduction to Biblical Studies, 2 BIB 1250. Evangelism and Discipleship, 2 BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062. Bible Survey, 10 IDS 1902, 3101, 4101. Christianity, Culture, and Worldview, 6 (for content purposes, these courses are shared with the A/S Core) PHL 3602. Christian Philosphy, 3 (for content purposes, this course is shared with the A/S Core) THE 3102. Christian Ethics, 3 THE 3601. Christian Doctrines, 3 BIB Elective, 1 (must be at the 4000 level) (NOTE: If a 2.75 g.p.a. is obtained in Bible Core, the student may receive licensure in Bible.) (2) Arts and Sciences Core, 42 hours: BIO 1001, 1011. Systems in Biological Science and Lab, 4 BIO 3103, 3113. Ecology and Lab, 4, or SCI 2204, 2214. Physical Science and Lab, 4

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ENG 1011, 1022. English Grammar, Usage, and Composition I, II, 6 ENG 2111, 2122. Masterpieces of World Literature I, II, 6 HIS 1011, 1022. History of Western Civilization I, II, 6 IDS 1001, 2001. Leadership and Calling, 4 MUS 1002. Music Introduction and Appreciation, 3 PHE 2100. Lifetime Fitness and PHE Activity Elective, 3 SPE 1000. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 SSC 3101. Marriage and Family, 3 (3) Professional Education Core, 23 hours EDU 2001. Introduction to Education, 2 EDU 2102. Educational Psychology, 2 EDU 3312. Classroom Management, 2 EDU 4201. School Assessment, 2 EDU 4401. History and Philosophy of Education, 2 EDU 4450. Introduction to Student Teaching, 1 EDU 4500. Student Teaching Seminar, 2 EDU 4620. Enhanced Student Teaching: K-5, 10 (4) Child Development and Learning Major, 32 hours (a) Concentration in Child Development and Learning, 12 hours: PSY 2401. Lifespan Development, 3 ECE 3512. Teaching Young Children, 3 EDU 3801. Teaching the Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4002. Teaching Strategies for the EL and Regular Classroom, 3 (b) Content Area Focus in Language Arts and Mathematics, 20 hours: LSC 3012. Literature for Children Through the Elementary and Middle Grades, 2 MAT 1101. College Algebra, 3 MAT 2011. Concepts of Mathematics I, 3 MAT 2022. Concepts of Mathematics II, 3 EDU 3601. Methods of Teaching Reading, 3 EDU 4111. Language Arts Instruction, 3 EDU 4332. Content Area Reading/Writing, 3 (5) Emphasis in EL, 12 hours (24 total hours counted in this course group for content purposes) ICS 2202. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 3 LNG xxxx. Modern Foreign Language, 6 LNG/ENG/EDU 4012. Introduction to Linguistics and Second Language Acquisitions, 3 The following courses are shared with the Professional Education Core and CDL Major: EDU 3601. Methods of Teaching Reading, 3 EDU 3801. Teaching the Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4002. Teaching Strategies for the EL and Regular Classroom, 3 EDU 4111. Language Arts Instruction, 3

110â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Department of Teacher Education


Department of Teacher Education

K-12 and Secondary Licensure Programs (6-12) Program Coordinator: Stephen Beck, M.Ed. Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Theological Studies

This program of study combines the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regular Theological Studies Major with an Arts and Sciences Core and a Professional Education Core and has the purpose of preparing students to teach Bible at the high school level. The primary purpose in offering this program is to provide for those who plan to teach in Christian schools. It leads to licensure by the Tennessee Department of Education to teach Bible in grades 6-12. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee Department of Education. Specific objectives for this program include those stated for the Theological Studies Major (page 55), Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), and those stated for the common Professional Education Core of all teacher education programs (page 105). Requirements: 124 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (Course requirements listed on page 59.)

Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Biology Education

This program is designed to prepare students to teach with competence as a highly qualified teacher in middle school science or secondary biological science in Christian or public schools. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, including the Specialty Area test in Biology: Content Knowledge, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee Department of Education. Graduates should be able to: (1) Demonstrate significant proficiency in areas of science which support the field of biology; (2) Apply scientific knowledge and principles in the context of the field of biology; and (3) Synthesize Biblical values, general knowledge, and scientific principles to support a career in biology education. Requirements: 141 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (Course requirements listed on pages 73-74.)

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Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in English

This program combines the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s English Major with an Arts and Sciences Core and a Professional Education Core and prepares students to teach English with competence in either Christian, public, or private high schools; it leads to licensure to teach English in grades 6-12 in the public schools of Tennessee. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, including the Specialty Area test in English, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee Department of Education. Specific objectives include those stated for the Theological Studies Major (page 55), those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), and those stated for the Professional Education Core common to all teacher education programs (page 105). The graduate should also be able to: (1) Define the characteristics and role of the teacher of English; (2) Select, read, interpret, and evaluate literature in a variety of genres; (3) Identify and follow the steps for writing a literary research paper; and (4) Demonstrate competency in the various methods of teaching English in the secondary school classroom. Requirements: 140 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (Course requirements listed on pages 81-82.)

Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in History

This program incorporates the History Major and the Arts and Sciences Core along with the Professional Education Core to prepare students to teach History skillfully in Christian, private, or public junior and senior high schools. The program leads to licensure in Tennessee which provides for students to be able to teach History in grades 6-12 in public schools. Licensure requires the successful completion of the PRAXIS II Assessments including the Specialty Area test in History, according to minimum scores determined by the Tennessee Department of Education. Specific objectives include those stated for the Theological Studies Major (page 55), those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), and those stated for the Professional Education Core which is characteristic of other Teacher Education programs (page 105). The graduate should also be able to: (1) Demonstrate competency in a variety of teaching methods; (2) Apply Christian virtues and ideas in the explanation and presentation of historical concepts; (3) Critically analyze modern emphases in the educational world; (4) Incorporate basic research tools and skills in order to write about and interpret history. Requirements: 138 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (Course requirements listed on pages 88-89.)

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Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Music Education

(May be used for licensure to teach either vocal, general or instrumental Music) The College offers this program, which combines its Music Major with an Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52) and Professional Education Core (page 105) to prepare a student to teach music in the Christian, public, or private school, grades K-12, or to continue music education at the graduate level. The objectives of this program include those stated for the Biblical Studies Major, the General Education Core, and the Professional Education Core common to all teacher education programs. The graduate should also be able to demonstrate: (1) The music skills and techniques that are demanded in the various disciplines cultivated in this program of study; (2) Understanding and appreciation for the development of the music of the Western civilization as related both to life in general and to the music of the school and church; (3) Ability to teach either vocal, general music, or instrumental music in grades K-12 and efficiently organize and direct elementary, middle, and secondary music programs in either Christian or public schools; (4) Ability to evaluate music needs and arrange or compose choral music to meet those needs; (5) Understanding of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations underlying music education in America, whether in public or Christian education; and (6) Ability to perform with skill. Requirements: 139 hours (vocal/general/conducting) or 142 hours (instrumental), with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (Course requirements listed on page 99-101.)

Bachelor of Science Degree: Major in Physical Education

This program, when it includes both the Physical Education Major and the Professional Education Core (as outlined below), will prepare students to teach Physical Education in grades K-12, whether in a Christian, public, or private school. The program is designed to meet all requirements for licensure to teach Physical Education in the public schools in Tennessee. Licensure also requires successful completion of the Praxis II Assessments, including the Specialty Area test in Physical Education, according to minimum scores set by the Tennessee Department of Education. Objectives of the program include those stated elsewhere for the Theological Studies Major (page 55), the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52), and the Professional Education Core common to all teacher education programs (page 105). The graduate should also be able to: (1) Design, implement, and maintain a physical education program for todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school; (2) Articulate a meaningful philosophy of physical education; (3) Design exercise programs using established principles and guidelines; and (4) Analyze the teaching act as a means of continually improving teaching skills.

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Requirements: Requirements: 130 hours, with a 2.75 g.p.a. overall, in all majors for licensure, and the Professional Core, which is required for admission to the program, admission to Student Teaching, graduation, and licensure. Otherwise, a minimum 2.00 g.p.a. is required in each segment of the degree. (Course requirements listed on pages 83-85.)

Minor in English Language (EL)

Students may attach an EL Minor to any bachelor program. Specific objectives of this program of study will be substantially the same as those stated for the program the student pursues. The minor may not have more than one-third of the course-hours in common with the declared major. Program objectives will include those for the given major(s), as well as those stated for the Arts and Sciences Core (pages 50-52). Requirements: 24 hours

EDU 3601. Methods of Teaching Reading, 3 EDU 3801. Teaching the Exceptional Child, 3 EDU 4002. Teaching Strategies for the EL and Regular Classroom, 3 EDU 4101. Language Arts Instruction, 3 ICS 2202. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 3 LNG xxxx. Modern Foreign Language, 6 LNG/ENG/EDU 4012. Introduction to Linguistics and Second Language Acquisitions, 3

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Adult Studies

Director: Allan Crowson, M.B.A. Assistant to the Director: Jena Simpson

The Adult Studies Department serves to extend Welch College's mission “to educate leaders to serve Christ, His Church, and His world through Biblical thought and life” to nontraditional students. The College extends opportunities for Christian higher education to nontraditional students through two primary means: (1) Online Learning courses and programs provide an opportunity for individuals who are not able to take courses on campus to receive a Bible-based education in their own home, through a flexible, interactive, online format. (a) Associate of Science: Ministry: This addresses the needs bivocational pastors, volunteer lay workers in the local church, and other individuals who want college education, taught from a Christian worldview, that will support and extend the ministry of the local church in their communities. (b) Associate of Science: Business: This helps students develop the character and skills necessary for efficiency as accounting clerks, office managers, or other office workers. (c) Associate of Arts: This degree serves as a good platform from which students can move into any number of other areas. (d) Bachelor of Science: General Christian Ministry: This is an excellent choice for pastors and other Christian leaders. Contact Jena Simpson (jenasimpson@ welch.edu) for more information. (2) The Adult Degree Program (ADP) offers regular classes on campus at nontraditional times (nights and weekends). These courses involve a format more suitable for adult learners. Although ADP courses may run as long as an entire semester, they ordinarily run six weeks. The ADP addresses the needs of: (a) Those who have completed the equivalent of an associates degree; and (b) Those who want to take college courses for personal enrichment or professional development. Some courses involve 10-week sessions. Usually these are courses requiring more detailed work (e.g., accounting). Lifetime Learning courses exist as a separate category, supplementing both the Online Learning and Adult Degree Programs.

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Online Learning Director: Allan Crowson, M.B.A. Mission

Welch College seeks to fulfill its mission â&#x20AC;&#x201C; "to educate leaders to serve Christ, His Church, and His world through Biblical thought and life" â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in ways that go beyond standard classroom situations.

Online Learning at Welch

Welch College seeks to take advantage of the possibilities offered by online course delivery, while retaining the advantages of its unique teacher classroom experience. Students enrolled in Welch's online courses access their course material via the Internet, at the time and place of their choosing, yet interact with other students taking the same courses via online discussions. Courses require broadband Internet service (e.g., cable, DSL, fiber, or high-speed satellite service) for an optimal experience. Currently, students may obtain the Associate of Science in Ministry, the Associate of Science in Business, the Associate of Arts, and the Bachelor of Science in General Christian Ministry degrees via online coursework. These online degrees require no campus time or coursework whatsoever.

Time Limits

Students in the online program must in most cases adhere to a similar semester as for courses offered on campus. However, the online program divides the semester into three six-week sessions. Session A begins slightly before the campus semester, and Session C extends just beyond the campus semester. The online learning semester begins before and ends after the traditional student campus semester. Three six-week sessions (A, B, and C) forms the online learning semester, with a one-week break between the close of one session and the beginning of the next.

Cost

The tuition rate for online and ADP courses is $348 per semester hour. Courses are typically two or three credit hours each. Textbooks average $30-$100 per course, and are available through http://www.welchcollege.ecampus.com.

Financial Aid

Online degree-seeking students are eligible to apply for institutional and federal financial aid. This aid requires an enrollment of at least six semester hours per semester. Students who receive federal student loans must begin repayment six months after completing college. Students registered for at least six semester hours of coursework in a given semester are not required to make loan payments. Students who are eligible for federal financial aid may also be eligible to receive not only federal student loans but also federal grants (e.g., Pell grants), as well as other grants and scholarships.

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Financial Obligations

• Student accounts are to be kept current each semester. • By the third week of the first session in which the student is enrolled, he/she must settle the account by exercising one or more of the following options: (1) Pay for the semester; or (2) Make arrangements with the Financial Aid Office for the semester’s financial obligations by either or both of Student Loans or Grants, or Short-Term Institutional Loan with Welch College. Students who do not pay according to FAO requirements may find themselves disenrolled from subsequent courses.

Enrollment

Students who wish to take a course for college credit at Welch College should begin the process by completing an Online Learning application. Former students need to complete an application for readmission.

Financial Withdrawals

• Withdrawals before the beginning of class receive a 100% tuition refund. • Withdrawals during the first week of class receive a tuition refund of 90%. • Withdrawal during the second week will receive a tuition refund of 45%. • Withdrawal after the end of the second week will receive no tuition refund.

Appeals

Students may register an appeal, following the procedure below: • Address an appeal regarding a grade to the Registrar, within one month of the final day of class. • Address an appeal regarding finances to the V.P. for Financial Affairs. • Address an appeal regarding discipline to the V.P. For Student Services • Address any other appeal to the Provost. All appeals must be in writing, must state the nature of the appeal, and must give a rationale, with all necessary documentation.

Student Services

Students enrolled in Online Learning programs at Welch College are eligible to receive the same services provided to on-campus students. These include, but are not limited to services of the Dean of Students, academic counseling, and library access. The directory at the end of this Catalog will include appropriate contact information.

Library

Students enrolled in Online Learning programs at Welch College have full access to the Welch Library, on campus and online. Students may contact the Welch Library to access a copy of an article from a periodical or to withdraw a book.

Syllabus and Textbooks

Each course in the Online Learning program will have its own syllabus. Please refer to the course syllabus for course objectives, schedule of activities, access to faculty, grading, course requirements, research paper style and requirements if applicable, and final completion dates. Address further questions to onlinelearning@welch.edu. Visit http://www.welchcollege.ecampus.com to order textbooks. Adult Studies—117


Adult Degree Program

Director: Allan Crowson, M.B.A.

Mission

Welch College has designed the Adult Degree Program (ADP) to extend its mission “to educate leaders to serve Christ, His Church, and His world through Biblical thought and life” to nontraditional students. The ADP offers regular classes on campus at nontraditional times (nights and weekends). These courses involve a format more suitable for adult learners. Although ADP courses may run as long as an entire semester, they ordinarily run six weeks. Two groups represent those whose needs the ADP addresses: • Those who completed the equivalent of an associate's degree; and • Those who want to take college courses for personal enrichment or professional development. Some courses involve 10-week sessions. Usually these are courses requiring more detailed work (e.g., accounting). ADP students may also include on-campus, online, or lifetime learning courses in their program. Students enrolled in four-year programs may find it especially helpful to supplement their scheduling possibilities in this way.

Entrance Requirements

Requirements for entrance into the Adult Degree Program are the same as for the traditional program (page 16). While students may be accepted as special students without having met all admission requirements, they may not enter a degree program until they have met all admission requirements. The combined number of FTE in the regular program and ADP cannot exceed 5% of the total student FTE.

Programs

The Adult Degree Program provides the following options:* • B.S. in Biblical Studies (General Christian Ministries Track, page 63) • Initial Teacher Education Licensure (undergraduate and post-baccalaureate)

*Completion of these programs depends on individual transfer credit granted (see page 18) and may require enrollment in some online or day courses.

Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Licensure Program

Welch College’s Adult Degree Program's Teacher Licensure program allows students with approved majors and a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university to obtain Tennessee licensure on a nontraditional schedule. Students entering this program must have at least a bachelor’s degree with an Arts and Sciences Major from an approved, regionally accredited college or university. Students must have maintained a grade point average of 2.75 or higher overall and in the major area of study. They must also submit a request to the Teacher Education Admissions Committee and be approved for entrance into a licensure program prior to course enrollment. The Teacher Education faculty will evaluate the transcripts. Teacher Education 118—Adult Studies


faculty recommendations regarding course and experience requirements will be forwarded to the Provost for his approval. Students will be expected to complete the Professional Educational Core as appropriate and the courses in the Arts and Sciences Core where deficits may occur. In the event the applicant has an associate’s degree, he/ she must meet all requirements as expected of any other student without a bachelor’s level degree. See the section regarding post-baccalaureate Teacher Education licensure shown in the Teacher Education section of this Catalog. Students may appeal transcript evaluations and program recommendations in writing. They should forward this appeal to the Teacher Education Chair within three weeks of notification of program completion needs. A conference will occur with the Admissions Committee. Any and all applicants seeking licensure should make application at least 30 days before the semester begins to give time for transcript analysis. The College will charge a $37 transcript analysis fee for students who have not yet made application to Welch College.

Cost

The tuition rate for online and Adult Degree Program courses is $338 per semester hour for students 24 and older. Courses are typically two or three credit hours each. Textbooks average $30-$100 per course, and are available through http://www.welchcollege.ecampus.com. The Financial Information section (page 23) and the chapter on Financial Aid (page 27) contain information on deferred payment plans and financial aid. Lifetime Learning courses taken for non-credit have a single $100 per course fee.

Enrollment

Adult Degree Program students may wish to take courses via Lifetime Learning, Online Learning, or campus courses in the traditional day program. Welch College does not require its students to enroll for only one specified area of content delivery.

Academic Drops

A drop occurs when a student decides not to take a class in which he or she has enrolled, and officially drops the course before it meets for the first class period. In this case, the student receives a 100% refund of tuition money.

Academic Withdrawals

Students who feel they will be unable to meet the course requirements may withdraw from the course without academic penalty before the fifth class meeting. Withdrawal after the fifth class meeting will result in a grade assignment of W/P or W/F. The student must withdraw by submitting the proper withdrawal form. The Adult Degree Program office will provide the appropriate form. Students who fail to complete a course for acceptable reasons within the given time frame stated for the course receive a grade of I (Incomplete), if, in the event of an emergency the professor approves the written request they have submitted. Students who fail to return for the next Session will have until eight weeks past the last day of the regular semester to complete all work. Students who enroll in another ADP course or a regular session course prior to this deadline will receive four weeks from the beginning date of course enrollment. • Drop prior to 1st class period: No grade Adult Studies—119


• Drop after 1st class, but before 5th class period: Grade W • Drop after 5th class period: Grade WP or WF

Financial Withdrawals

• Withdrawals before the beginning of class receive a 100% tuition refund. • Withdrawals after the course has begun but before the 2nd class period receive a tuition refund of 90%. • Withdrawal after the 2nd class period but before the 3rd class period will re ceive a tuition refund of 45%. • Withdrawal after the 3rd class period will receive no tuition refund.

Appeals

Students may register an appeal, following the procedure below: • Address an appeal regarding a grade to the Registrar, within 10 days of the final day of semester for which grades are appealed. • Address an appeal regarding finances to the V.P. for Financial Affairs. • Address an appeal regarding discipline to the V.P. For Student Services. • Address any other appeal to the Provost. All appeals must be in writing, must state the nature of the appeal, and must give a rationale, with all necessary documentation.

Student Services

Adult Degree Program students at Welch College are eligible to receive the same services provided to on-campus students. These include, but are not limited to services of the Dean of Students, academic counseling, and library access. The directory at the end of this Catalog will include appropriate contact information.

Library

Adult Degree Program students at Welch College have full access to the Welch Library, on campus and online. Students may contact the library to access a copy of an article from a periodical or to withdraw a book.

Syllabus and Textbooks

Each course in the Adult Degree Program will have its own syllabus. Please refer to the course syllabus for course objectives, schedule of activities, access to faculty, grading, course requirements, research paper style and requirements if applicable, and final completion dates. Visit http://www.welchcollege.ecampus.com to order textbooks.

Contact

For more information on the Adult Degree Program, email adultdegree@welch. edu, or call (615) 844-5226.

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Lifetime Learning Director: Allan Crowson, M.B.A.

Lifetime Learning courses are designed to supplement course offerings for students enrolled in the online or adult degree completion programs. They are especially designed for situations where students may have difficulties scheduling certain required courses in the programs in which they are enrolled. Lifetime Learning courses are delivered online or via optical media (CD/DVD), depending on the course. These materials contain audio recordings or videos of actual classroom sessions, providing students with the opportunity to hear and/or see the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highly qualified and respected professors. A qualified professor for the course will guide the student, evaluate student work, and assign grades. Lifetime Learning courses also require the same kind of Internet access as the courses in the Online Learning program. Course information such as syllabi, assignments, and other requirements are accessed and/or submitted via the Web.

College Credit

Students may enroll in a course for the purpose of receiving college credit. This requires them to complete equivalent requirements and achieve comparable outcomes when compared to students who engage in the same course on the campus of Welch College. Students will need to submit assignments on a scheduled basis, take proctored tests, and pay the same tuition as that which applies for the program in which they are enrolled. Successful completion of the course allows a student to apply the credits toward degree requirements, or because of the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regional and professional accreditation, transfer the credits to another institution (students should check with the other institution to determine if the course taken may be transferred).

Non-Credit

Individuals not seeking a college degree may take courses on a non-credit basis. Many individuals wish to further their Biblical knowledge for the purpose of selfenrichment; however, they do not wish to invest the time and efforts required to meet the requirements of a college-level course. Courses taken for non-credit provide the student with the same information and materials at a significantly reduced rate. The College does not upgrade a course taken for non-credit to credit status at a later date.

Time Limits

Lifetime Learning students receiving financial aid must complete their courses within the semester of enrollment, except as approved based on written appeal. Students facing emergencies may seek approval of a written appeal, and obtain up to eight weeks from the end of the semester to turn all work in to the Lifetime Learning office. The post-marked date or the date of online access will serve to verify that the course has been completed within the proper time.

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Exams

Courses taken for college credit through Lifetime Learning require that exams be administered by an approved proctor. An approved proctor will include a professional person holding a responsible position such as: pastor, teacher, administrator of local school or college, deacon, church secretary, supervisor associated with student’s employment, or others as approved by the Lifetime Learning faculty. The proctor may not be a current student, a relative, or live at the same address as the student. The student must submit a student/proctor agreement form, signed both by the proctor and student. Once the College has approved a proctor, he/she will receive information concerning the administering of tests. Most courses have online tests, and are conducted in an online format. The proctor therefore needs to have Internet access at his/her location, or be able to supervise the student’s test at the student’s home.

Cost

Courses taken for college credit receive the same tuition charge that applies for the program in which students are enrolled. Courses are typically two or three credit hours each. Textbooks average $30-$100 per course, and are available through http:// www.welchcollege.ecampus.com. Courses taken for non-credit receive a single $100 per course fee. This fee includes a copy of the course media (if applicable) and syllabi. The student will need to visit http://www.welchcollege.ecampus.com to obtain textbooks for the course.

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In Memory of Bert Tippett


Course Descriptions Courses in Biblical Languages

The College requires all 12 hours of language in B.A. programs to be taken in the same language. LNG 2013, 2026. BEGINNING KOINE GREEK I, II A beginning study of the Greek of the New Testament, including the fundamentals of the grammar, such as alphabet, vocabulary, pronunciation, accent, conjugations, and declensions, with emphasis on correct understanding of nouns and verbs, their cases, tenses, etc. Some attention to primary syntactical relations in preparation for making translation from the book of 1 John. Three hours each semester, offered fall semester odd years (2013) and spring semester even years (2026). LNG 3014. BEGINNING BIBLICAL HEBREW I Elementary study of the history, phonology, morphology, vocabulary, and grammar of Biblical Hebrew. Includes translation and analysis of selected passages from the Hebrew Old Testament. Three hours, offered fall semster even years. LNG 3025. BEGINNING BIBLICAL HEBREW II Continuation of Beginning Biblical Hebrew I, reinforcing basic principles of Hebrew grammar. Includes translation and analysis of selected passages from the Hebrew Old Testament, as well as introduction to resources for the study of Hebrew. Prerequisite: LNG 3014. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. LNG 3034, 3045. INTERMEDIATE KOINE GREEK I, II A more detailed review of the grammar of the Koine Greek, with most of the attention given to a proper understanding of the many syntactical arrangements in the Greek New Testament. Much time in actual translation. Prerequisite: LNG 2026 or equivalent. Three hours each semester, offered fall semester even years (3034), spring semester odd years (3045). LNG 4013. HEBREW EXEGESIS I Exegesis in the Hebrew text of selected passages from the Hebrew Old Testament. Includes introduction to the advanced study of the Hebrew grammar with a view toward homiletical application in the directed preparation of expository sermons and special studies. The course will count as a 4000-level Bible elective. Prerequisite: LNG 3025. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. LNG 4026. HEBREW EXEGESIS II Continuation of Hebrew Exegesis I, with concentration on exegetical techniques and further introduction to advanced grammar. The course will count as a 4000-level Bible elective. Prerequisite: LNG 4013. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. LNG 4037. GREEK EXEGESIS I: THE GOSPEL OF MARK This course consists of the translation and exegetical study of the Gospel of Mark. Attention is given to the principles of exegesis as well as to the details of translating the Greek text. The course is designed to increase the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skill in reading, translating, and interpreting the Greek text. The course may count as a 4000-level Bible elective. Prerequisites: LNG 2013, 2026, 3034, 3045. Two hours, offered fall semester on demand. LNG 4047. GREEK EXEGESIS II: SELECTED PASSAGES IN THE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT Selections from the various literary forms found in the New Testament will be translated and exegeted.

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Attention is given to theological and homiletical applications of the texts. The course may be counted as a 4000-level Bible elective. Prerequisites: LNG 2013, 2026, 3034, 3045, 4037. Two hours, offered spring semester on demand.

Courses in Biblical Studies BIB 1011. OLD TESTAMENT SURVEY: LAW AND HISTORY A survey of the Old Testament books of law (Genesis through Deuteronomy) and history (Joshua though Esther), emphasizing introduction, canonical context, theme, content, chronology, and other subjects pertinent to Biblical narrative literature. Required of all students during the freshman year. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BIB 1031. NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY: EPISTLES AND REVELATION A survey of the epistles of the New Testament (Pauline and General) and the book of Revelation. Emphasis will be placed on such matters as authorship, setting and purpose, themes, content, doctrine, and practical application. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BIB 1101. INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL STUDIES Provides a basic introduction to principles foundational for Biblical study. The course examines the doctrines of inspiration and canon and discusses principles of Biblical interpretation as well as transmission and translation of the Biblical text. It also provides necessary Biblical background information for the student including geography, chronology, history, culture, and doctrinal development. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. BIB 1250. EVANGELISM AND DISCIPLESHIP A Biblical study of the basics of the Christian life, designed to help students understand what it means to be Christ’s disciple, with primary attention given to such things as authenticity, cost, and the rewards of discipleship. Substantial time is spent discussing the methods, message, and means of personal evangelism, including the memorization of useful Biblical passages and attention to typical errors and difficulties faced by soul-winners. Other key topics include the disciple’s conversion, spirituality, worship, integrity, speech, thought life, stewardship, and witness. Two hours, offered each semester annually. BIB 2032. OLD TESTAMENT SURVEY: POETRY AND PROPHECY A survey of the Old Testament books of poetry and wisdom (Job through Song of Solomon) and prophecy (Isaiah through Malachi), emphasizing introduction, canonical context, theme and content, chronology, and other subjects pertinent to Hebrew poetry and to wisdom and prophetic literature. Required of all students during the sophomore year. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. BIB 2062. NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY: GOSPELS AND ACTS A survey of the four gospel accounts of the New Testament including (1) the political, social, and cultural background of first-century Palestine and the New Testament era; (2) the religious climate of the day, especially with regard to Judaism; (3) the chronological setting for the gospel events; and (4) introductory issues involved in the study of the Gospels, including authorship, date of writing, purpose and theme, and content with particular focus upon the life, ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ as portrayed by the Gospel writers. The course also provides a survey of the book of Acts focusing on (1) the growth of the early church, (2) the life and ministry of the apostle Paul, and (3) introductory issues involved in the study of the book of Acts including date, authorship, purpose, themes, and content. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. BIB 2601. BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION An introductory study of the key essentials for interpreting the Bible correctly. The classroom becomes a laboratory where the student is trained to discover the meaning of Biblical passages by applying correct principles and using proper tools, including word studies and paragraph analysis and how

124—Course Descriptions


to draw, from the truths learned, principles for application to contemporary needs. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BIB 2907. SEMINAR IN BIBLICAL STUDIES A guided seminar in Biblical studies presented in a modular format for all students, as approved by the faculty of the Theological Studies Department. The course is supervised by a faculty member with appropriate academic and experience qualifications in the content area. All seminars will require a research paper or application project. Such courses involve appropriate in-class faculty-to-student contact of at least 14 hours for a one-hour course, 26 hours for a two-hour course, and 39 hours for a three-hour course. Each seminar has at least one week of reflection for a one-hour course, two weeks of reflection for a two-hour course, and three weeks of reflection for a three-hour course after the classroom seminar, before final projects are due. All course materials, in an appropriate language and/ or other format, are delivered to students to be received at least one month in advance of the course. Students are encouraged to research or develop a research-based project related to their intended area of professional involvement. May be repeated only once and not to exceed a total of six hours credit. One to three hours, offered as approved on demand. BIB 3107. THE HOLY SPIRIT Involves students in a Biblical study of the Holy Spirit–Who He is and what He does, including some attention to His ministry during Old Testament times and more thorough investigation of the New Testament teaching regarding, for example, His relationship to the individual believer and to the Church as a whole. Emphasizes both the doctrinal and practical implications of the Holy Spirit for today’s world. Two hours, offered on demand. BIB 3907. SEMINAR IN BIBLICAL AND/OR THEOLOGICAL STUDIES A guided seminar in a modular or traditional format, as approved by faculty of the Department of Theological Studies. The course is designed to expose students to methods of Biblical and theological research and presentation. The course may also be used to examine recent trends and developments in the fields of Biblical studies and/or theology. Though specific topics will vary, the course material will serve as a model of research methods appropriate to the discipline. All seminars will require a research paper and/or an application project and presentation. May be repeated only once. Not to exceed a total of six hours of credit. Two to three hours, offered as approved on demand. BIB 4007. ISAIAH An inductive study of the background and message of the prophecy of Isaiah. Matters of introduction include an overview of the prophetic office, authorship, date, integrity, and setting for the book. Analysis of the book’s content focuses on exegesis and treatment of key themes, notably Isaiah’s messianic revelation. Geared toward helping the student make significant application of the text’s message to the ongoing process of spiritual formation. Prerequisite: BIB 2032. Three hours, offered on demand. BIB 4057. CHRIST IN THE OLD TESTAMENT An inductive analysis of predictive Old Testament material dealing with the person and work of Messiah. Areas addressed include key Old Testament Christological passages; methods of interpreting prophecy, typology, and Christophanies; messianic titles; and the history of Old Testament Christological interpretation. Prerequisite: BIB 2032. Two hours, offered on demand. BIB 4107. ROMANS Thorough attention to the first third of the book, including detailed exegesis of words, phrases, and units of thought as a means of understanding the development of thought. A less thorough treatment of the last two-thirds of the book. Prerequisite: BIB 1031. Three hours, offered on demand.

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BIB 4157 JOB AND ECCLESIASTES An interpretive analysis of the two Old Testament books, with special attention to the worldview they present as well as to how their messages apply to the modern age. Prerequisite: BIB 2032. Three hours, offered on demand. BIB 4207. FIRST CORINTHIANS An exegetical approach to the book, including a brief historical treatment of background and authorship, application of the message of First Corinthians to modern life and thought, and emphasis on doctrinal and ethical teachings. Prerequisite: BIB 1031. Three hours, offered on demand. BIB 4257. GENESIS AND EXODUS A detailed analysis of the first two books of the Pentateuch with special emphasis on the Biblical account of creation, the Abrahamic and Mosaic covenants, the exodus deliverance, the foundations of the nation of Israel, and the cultural setting of the periods in the ancient Near East. Some attention is given to critical problems such as the authorship of the Pentateuch and the date of the exodus. Prerequisite: BIB1011. Three hours, offered on demand. BIB 4307. HEBREWS An exegetical analysis of this important New Testament book with attention to the themes of the book–the superiority of Christ and the need for Christian growth–and to important problems of introduction such as authorship and date. Prerequisite: BIB 1031. Three hours, offered on demand. BIB 4507. THE BOOK OF PSALMS Two concurrent modules of study. On one level, the student receives guidance through an inductive analysis of various model psalms. Second, through this inductive study, the student is introduced to significant features in the study of Psalms as a whole, including important themes, introductory matters, special interpretive problems, and the relationship of the Psalter to the entire Old Testament. Also receiving special attention are the literary composition of the Psalms and the devotional and practical application of the Psalms to the student’s needs. Prerequisite: BIB 2032. Three hours, offered on demand. BIB 4607. EPHESIANS AND COLOSSIANS An exegetical study of the book of Ephesians, with special attention to key parallel passages in Colossians and emphasis on the great doctrinal and practical themes of both. Examines the value of Ephesians in gaining a true understanding of the organic nature of the Church. Students learn how to use correct principles of interpretation and how to draw from their findings principles for application. Prerequisite: BIB 1031. Three hours, offered on demand. BIB 4707. DANIEL AND REVELATION An inductive study of these Old and New Testament books with a focus on interpretive methodology and results, including analysis of (1) the historical and biographical narratives and prophetic and apocalyptic sections of Daniel, and (2) major interpretive readings of Revelation from the historicist, preterist, futurist, and symbolic perspectives. Incorporates application of eschatological literature to contemporary life and spiritual formation, and assists the student in formulating a position on the interpretation of key issues in the text. Prerequisites: BIB 1031, 2032. Three hours, offered on demand. BIB 4907. RESEARCH PROJECTS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES A guided research in Biblical studies for students at the junior or senior level as approved by the faculty of the Theological Studies Department. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member within the department. Requires a substantial research project. Involves regular meetings with the teacher and, where applicable, with other students in the course for sharing and exchanging ideas. May be repeated for a significant extension of the original study or for a separate study not to exceed

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a total of three hours. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand.

Courses in Biology BIO 1001. SYSTEMS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE A study of the major principles in biology including the scientific method, cell organization and characterization, energy production and consumption, genetics, characterization and classification of organisms, organ systems and processes, ecology and environmental science, and the theory of evolution and how the Christian worldview can be applied to scientific study. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Co-requisite: BIO 1011. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BIO 1011. SYSTEMS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE LAB One hour, offered fall semester annually. BIO 1101. BIOLOGY I An introduction to biological processes with emphasis in the scientific method, cell structure and function, energy production by photosynthesis, energy consumption, cellular reproduction, and genetics. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Co-requisite: BIO 1111. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BIO 1111. BIOLOGY I LAB One hour, offered fall semester annually. BIO 1202. BIOLOGY II Continued study of biological processes with emphasis in classification and characterization of living organisms, structure and physiology of plants, structure and physiology of animals, ecological systems, and evolution in relation to a Christian worldview. Prerequisite: BIO 1101 and 1011. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Co-requisite BIO 1011. This course is for biology majors. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. BIO 1212. BIOLOGY II LAB One hour, offered spring semester annually. BIO 2106. MICROBIOLOGY A study of microorganisms including their structure, metabolism, genetics, pathogenic properties, and methods used to control these organisms. This class will include both environmental and applied microbiology. Prerequisites: BIO 1001, 1011 or BIO 1101, 1111. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Co-requisite: BIO 2116. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. BIO 2116. MICROBIOLOGY LAB One hour, offered spring semester even years. BIO 2204. GENETICS An introduction and analysis of genetics with emphasis on Mendelian genetics and classical heredity. Prerequisites: BIO 1001, 1011 or BIO 1101, 1111. Three hours of lecture. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. BIO 2308. PRINCIPLES IN NUTRITION An analysis of proper nutrition for all times in life including infancy, adolescence, adulthood, and pregnancy as well as nutrition for certain disease states. An understanding of biological pathways that leads to nutritional needs will be covered. Prerequisites: BIO 1001, 1011 or BIO 1101, 1111. Three hours lecture. Three hours, offered summer each year.

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BIO 2401. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I A study of the major systems of the body with emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, neural, and sensory systems as well as cells and tissues necessary for these systems. Prerequisite: BIO 1001, 1011 or BIO 1101, 1111. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Co-requisite: BIO 2411. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BIO 2411. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LAB One hour, offered fall semester annually. BIO 2502. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II A continued study of the systems of the human body emphasizing the endocrine, cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, renal, and reproductive systems. Prerequisite: BIO 2401, 2411 or PHE 3104. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Co-requisite: BIO 2512. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. BIO 2512. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LAB One hour, offered spring semester annually. BIO 3103. ECOLOGY An analysis of the basics of ecology including plant and animal communities as well as overall ecosystems of the planet. Prerequisites: BIO 1202 and 1212. Co-requisite: BIO 3113. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. BIO 3113. ECOLOGY LAB One hour, offered fall semester odd years. BIO 3205. EVOLUTION AND ORIGINS A deep study of evolution and its implications for science and society. The Christian responses to evolution over the years will be studied with an emphasis on a literal interpretation of Genesis and a young earth creationist approach. Two hours of lecture. Prerequisites: BIO 1101, 1111 and BIO 1202, 1212. Two hours, offered spring semester, odd years. BIO 3303. CELL BIOLOGY A study of the inner workings of the cell including detailed analyses of transcription, translation, replication, protein trafficking, and cell specific processes. Prerequisites: BIO 1101, 1111 and BIO 1202, 1212. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Co-requisite: BIO 3314. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. BIO 3313. CELL BIOLOGY LAB One hour, offered fall semester odd years. BIO 4006. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY A study of the processing of information in the cell including detailed analyses of transcription, translation, replication, and the mechanisms of control. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: BIO 2106, 2116. Co-requsite: BIO 4016. Three hours, offered spring semester, even years. BIO 4016. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LAB One hour, offered spring semester, even years. BIO 4105. BIOCHEMISTRY A study of the functions of biological molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates with increased emphasis on enzymes and three-dimensional structures as well as their metabolism. Prerequisites: BIO 2106, 2116 and CHE 1105, 1115. Three hours lecture and three hours of lab per week. Co-requisite: BIO 4115. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years.

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BIO 4115. BIOCHEMISTRY LAB One hour, offered spring semester odd years. BIO 4502. BIOLOGY SEMINAR A senior class emphasizing understanding of recent research through journal articles, as well as a presentation. Some emphasis will be placed on understanding how the Christian worldview can be lived out in teaching and the research of science. Prerequisite: Must be a graduating senior. One hour, offered spring semester annually.

Courses in Business BUS 1150. MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS A student may be exempted from BUS 1150 by scoring 80 or higher on a proficiency test. The test will cover basic information over the Microsoft Office software package (including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint). The test will be two-fold. One portion will be objective multiple choice. The second portion will test the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proficiency in creating basic documents with the MS Office software package. Students who are not exempted from BUS 1150 must sign up for this lab each semester until they have demonstrated proficiency. Competency based, offered each semester. (Students may take BUS 1050. Microcomputer Ap plications for one hour). BUS 1201. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS An orientation course for all business students designed to provide a comprehensive introductory analysis of all aspects of the field of business, to increase their business vocabulary, and to prepare them for advanced study of business and economics. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. BUS 2001. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION Understanding and applying the principles of business communication, oral and written. Analysis of typical written communications (business letters, memos, reports) dealing with human relations and management situations including drafting, evaluation, editing, and preparation of letters and memos. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BUS 2211, 2222. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING Fundamental procedure and accounting theory, developed by use of study guides and problems: includes a study of the form, construction, and analysis of accounting statements; journalizing; posting; and work sheets for sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation forms of business. Prerequisite: BUS 2211 (for BUS 2222). Three hours each semester, offered annually. BUS 2405. MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS Design and analysis of managerial problems for computer applications, fundamental data organization, input/output design and layout, computer hardware and systems support, documentation, and testing procedures. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. BUS 3114. LEGAL AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS How law responds to the changing social, ethical, political, regulatory, and international environments through a study of the legal system, business crimes, law of torts and product liability, constitutional basis for business regulation, business organizations, and the regulatory process. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. BUS 3206. MARKETPLACE MANAGEMENT A survey of fundamental marketing concepts in the American economy. Topics include strategic marketing, marketing environment, segmentation, forecasting, consumer behavior, product life cycle, product mix, pricing, advertising, distribution, and promotion. Three hours, offered spring semester even years.

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BUS 3301. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT Introduction to basic principles involved in effectively managing a business. Topics include communication, planning and administration, strategic action, self-management, global awareness, and teamwork. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BUS 3401. BUSINESS FINANCE Introduction to the basic principles/concepts of financial supervision, including time value of money concepts, working capital administration, ratio analysis, forecasting, financial planning, security valuation, capital budgeting, and alternative financing sources. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. BUS 3506. PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS SYSTEMS Emphasis on supervision of manufacturing and service related concerns. Topics include strategic planning, quality control, job design, work measurement, decision support systems, and simulations. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. BUS/EDU 3651. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY Students will learn to use a variety of technology including the use of the computer, the internet, projectors, and data storage equipment. Various programs for instruction, assessment, and recordkeeping will be explored. Prerequisite: BUS 1050 or its equivalent. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. BUS 3805. ENTREPRENEURSHIP/SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Designed to teach students the mechanics and operational skill needed for organizing and operating an enterprise. Students will learn about startup and buy-out opportunities, franchising, how to develop a new venture business plan, and small business marketing and management. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. PHE/BUS 3853. SPORTS MANAGEMENT A study of the principles and processes for managing sporting and recreational training activities. Topics include program design, processes, staffing, training, compensation, supervision, athletic evaluation, and safety. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. BUS 3908. CONVENTION MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP Convention Management Internship (CMI) is an intensive, eight-day, hands-on intern experience that allows selected students to work behind the scenes at the Free Will Baptist National Convention. The preliminary course work provides an overview of basic convention and meeting management issues, concepts, and vocabulary. Course delivery will include prior assignments and a follow-up project. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to articulate the relationship between purposeful convention planning and operations with the specific purpose of the event. The on-site experience allows for a detailed experience in one of eight specific areas. Three hours, offered summer each year. BUS 4003. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT An examination of the functions performed by the Human Resources Department of a modern business organization. Topics include job design and description, staffing, training, discipline, and compensation. Includes attention to employee benefits programs and human resource concerns resulting from global business operations. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. BUS 4102. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS A study of international organizational structures and managerial processes, including cultural, political, economic, and legal environments of global marketing, world market patterns, and international trace theory. Three hours, offered spring semester annually.

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BUS 4202. STRATEGIC PLANNING A course to be taken at the conclusion of the business curriculum, designed to pull together the various business disciplines the student will have studied. Students will analyze a company from various viewpoints and prepare short- and long-term strategic plans for the company. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. BUS 4907. BUSINESS SEMINAR A series of seminars emphasizing Business/Career Development topics. Topics include career planning, resume development, interviewing, current issues, and discussion of education to actual business experience. One hour, offered each semester. BUS 4917. BUSINESS INTERNSHIP This course uses a minimum of 10 hours per week supervised and evaluated work experience to supplement academic training with on-the-job training relevant to the student’s career goals. Prerequisite: BUS 4907 (or concurrent with BUS 4907). Two hours, offered each semester. BUS 4920. CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE This course, designed to occur at the conclusion of the student’s educational experience, will facilitate integration and linkage of the various areas of study during matriculation in the business program. Much of the class is research and project driven, allowing the student additional experience in presentation and articulation necessary for a successful career. One hour, offered each semester. BUS/ECO 4947. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS This course is designed to allow for a course to be offered upon demand that deals with specific topics not covered in other courses offered. It includes an examination of a worthwhile topic related to business applications or a specific subject in business. Business Department faculty approval is required. Prerequisites may be required and would be provided when the course is announced. In the event of multiple departmental applications, this would require approval of all departments involved. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand. BUS 4967. BUSINESS PROJECT RESEARCH This course will be an independent study format in cooperation with an assigned thesis coordinator. The requirements for the project will be determined by the coordinator, with specific requirements depending on the number of credit hours requested. One hour credit will require research and a written presentation of the findings. Two hours credit will require a written presentation of more depth than the one-hour requirement. Three hours credit will require an oral presentation of the project in addition to the two-hour requirements. For four hours credit, the project must fulfill the three-hour requirement with an addition of a Biblical application/research component. Course may be repeated with change of subject matter with a maximum of nine credits. Prerequisite: Must have junior or senior status to take course. May be a substitute for BUS 4907/4917. One to four hours credit, offered on demand.

Courses in Chemistry CHE 1004. GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1 An introduction to chemical principles that include atomic theory, molecular theory, stoichiometry, acids and bases, organic chemistry, and gases. Lab will contain several experiments that demonstrate the principles learned in class. Pre- or Co-requisite: MAT 1101. Co-requisite: CHE 1014. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. CHE 1014. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LAB One hour, offered fall semester even years.

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CHE 1105. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II A continuing study in chemistry with emphasis on changes in states, solutions, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics and kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 1004, 1014. Co-requisite: CHE 1115. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. CHE 1115. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB One hour, offered spring semester odd years. CHE 2003. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I A study of organic chemistry with emphasis in bonding, reactivity, and stereochemistry of simple organic compounds. Further study of aromatic and non-aromatic compounds. Prerequisites: CHE 1004, 1014-1105, 1115. Co-requisite: CHE 2013. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. CHE 2013. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LAB One hour, offered fall semester odd years. CHE 2106. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II A continued study of organic chemistry with emphasis on bonding, reactivity, and stereochemistry of biomolecules. More emphasis will be placed on kinetics of biological molecules. Prerequisite: CHE 2003, 2013. Co-requisite: CHE 2116. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. CHE 2116. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LAB One hour, offered spring semester even years.

Courses in Early Childhood ECE 2411/3411. INFANTS AND TODDLERS This course examines various methods of basic care-giving skills needed in order to become effective, competent, and qualified childcare providers including establishing appropriate learning, emotional, social, and physical environments for young children. Emphasis is placed on establishing safe and secure intellectually stimulating, and physically inviting atmosphere for infants and toddlers. Important childcare issues concerning assessment, child development, developmentally appropriate practices, health, individual and cultural diversity, family relationships, safety, growth, nutrition, professionalism, and numerous early childhood programs, professional organizations, and available resources in the community are explored. ECE 2411 is designed for those in the Early Childhood Associate’s program. Assignments and field experience will be more stringent for those taking ECE 3411. Prerequisite: Completion of EDU 2001. Requires 15 hours field experience. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. ECE 2512/3512. TEACHING YOUNG CHILDREN This course investigates experiences and activities appropriate to young children and emphasizes procedures needed to meet children’s psychological, physiological, and social needs. Methods explored cover the planning and implementation of developmentally suitable learning environments (emotional, social, academic, physical, and the pre-production EL classroom), subject matter, schedules, and activities in language arts, math, and science. ECE 2512 is designed for those in the Early Childhood Associate’s program. Assignments and field experience will be more stringent for those taking ECE 3512. Prerequisite: Admittance into Early Childhood Associate’s program or 3512 into the Teacher Education program. Requires 15 hours field experience. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. ECE 2702. CREATIVE DEVELOPMENT This course addresses the knowledge and skills that are essential for creating and implementing curricula appropriate for young children. Emphasized are developmentally appropriate learning environments (emotional, social, academic, and physical), subject matter, schedules, and activities by

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integrating play with drama, art, and music for students PreK-3. Defined are the stages of development in childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creative abilities. Students will participate in and develop a collection of music, movement, and art activities appropriate for young children. Various teaching methods and techniques will be presented. Prerequisites: Completion of EDU 2001 and admission to Early Childhood (ASEC or BSEC). Requires 15 hours field experience. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. ECE 3251. ADMINISTERING CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS This course addresses various areas of managing and supervising quality childcare services and includes preschool, kindergarten, Head Start, and church programs. Emphasis is given to starting and maintaining childcare centers and explores issues that relate to the development of quality teaching and administrative abilities, staffing considerations, procedures and duties, finances, legal liabilities, local and state licensing standards, national accreditation, the emotional, social, intellectual, and physical growth of young children in a diverse society, and how all of these affect the relationships of family and community. Prerequisite: Admission to TE. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. ECE/EDU 3907. SUPERVISED RESEARCH IN EDUCATION A guided research in education approved by the Teacher Education faculty. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member in the department. Requires a substantial research or other project. May require presentation before a jury of qualified faculty. Involves regular meetings with the teacher, and where applicable, other students in the course for sharing and exchanging ideas. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and the permission of the faculty member and the TE faculty. One to three hours, offered on demand. ECE 4907. SEMINAR PROJECT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT All special projects require a significant and formal paper and/or project which shall be presented to the faculty-member-of-record. Students may be expected to present papers and/or projects to a juried panel of faculty and other professionals or to fellow upper-level students. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department. One to three hours, offered on demand.

Courses in Economics ECO 2411. MACROECONOMICS Provides a basic understanding of the operation of the U.S. economic system; demonstrates the role of money and its effects on the economy; explores why there are business fluctuations; shows the current method of economic analysis and the development of economic policies that are used to stabilize the level of economic activity; and introduces concepts of international economics. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. ECO 2422. MICROECONOMICS The theory of demand, production and cost, and resource allocation in a market economy; the varieties of competitive conditions such as pure and perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; the theory of factor pricing and income distribution in a free society. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. ECO 3714. HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY Economic development of the United States from the Colonial period to the present. Interrelated changes in economic performance, technology, institutions, and government policy. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. ECO 3732. HISTORY OF THE WORLD ECONOMY An introduction to world economic history employing an international approach that spans feudalism and the development of modern capitalism in different developing economies. Three hours, offered spring semester annually.

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ECO 4947. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS This course is designed to allow for a course to be offered upon demand that deals with specific topics not covered in other courses offered. It includes an examination of a worthwhile topic related to business applications or a specific subject in business. Business Department faculty approval is required. Prerequisites may be required and would be provided when the course is announced. In the event of multiple departmental applications, this would require approval of all departments involved. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand.

Courses in Teacher Education EDU 2001. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION An introduction to teaching as a life work and profession, and guidance in determining the personal qualifications and professional training necessary in elementary and secondary schools. Open to fall semester sophomores. Requires 15 hours of field experience. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. EDU 2057. FIELD EXPERIENCE A school-site assignment during which the student observes and assists classroom teachers in active learning experiences, requiring at least 15 hours in a formal school setting over a 15-week period. Primarily for students who have transferred courses without the required field experiences or have been assigned additional field experience by their advisor, department faculty, or the Teacher Education Admissions Committee. In some cases, professional experience may count toward field experience. One hour, offered on demand. PSY/EDU 2102. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Gives consideration to the learning experience in light of psychological findings, examining individual differences, hereditary and environmental factors, social characteristics, intelligence and testing. Emphasizes relationships between development and learning style, accommodating teaching strategies, and the use of technology in the learning environment. Includes a review of educational psychology in view of Biblical principles. Requires 15 hours of field experience. Transfer students will be expected to meet the field experience requirement through prior experience or a field experience course taken at this college prior to applying for the degree. Open to spring semester sophomores. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. EDU 2312/3312. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT This course introduces various methods related to methods of guiding the behavior of young children and includes “best practice” techniques in classroom management. EDU 2312 is designed for those in the Early Childhood Associate’s degree program. Assignments and field experience will be more stringent for those taking EDU 3312. Prerequisites: Completion of EDU 2001 and junior standing. Requires 15 hours field experience. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. EDU 3057. FIELD EXPERIENCE A school-site assignment during which the student observes and assists classroom teachers or professionals in his or her major area of study in active learning experiences, requiring at least 30 hours in a formal school or professional setting over a 15-week period. Primarily for students who have transferred courses without the required field experiences or have been assigned additional field experience by their advisor, department faculty, or the Teacher Education Admissions Committee. Prerequisite: Admission to a teacher education program. In some cases, professional experience may count toward field experience. One hour, offered when needed. EDU 3601. METHODS OF TEACHING READING Various approaches to the teaching of reading, including a study of developmental reading, methods and techniques, use of technology, teaching reading to an English Language Learner, and evaluation of reading. Provides opportunity to become proficient in the teaching of letter-sound relationships. Requires a demonstration of proficiency in applied phonics. Requires 15 hours of field experience

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including 5 hours in an EL classroom. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. EDU/PSY 3801. TEACHING THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD An introduction to the characteristics of exceptional children, including the English Language Learner, in light of psychological findings, student achievement, and teacher observations based on experience and education. Examines current research on exceptionalities and means to determine educational needs. Surveys developmental characteristics, emotional and environmental stimuli and resultant behavior, at-risk characteristics, and legal and educational requirements. Emphasizes learning styles and correlation to teaching strategy success, including techniques for the use of technology and classroom practices necessary for educating the exceptional learner in the regular classroom, focusing on optimum integration consistent with good educational application for all exceptionalities. Covers the processes for qualifying students to enter and exit special programs included EL. EDU Students: Requires 15 hours of field experience. Prerequisites: EDU students only: EDU 2001, 2102. PSY Majors: must be junior or senior. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. EDU/ECE 3907. SUPERVISED RESEARCH IN EDUCATION A guided research in education approved by the Teacher Education faculty. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member in the department. Requires a substantial research or other project. May require presentation before a jury of qualified faculty. Involves regular meetings with the teacher, and where applicable, other students in the course for sharing and exchanging ideas. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and the permission of the faculty member and the TE faculty. One-three hours, offered on demand. EDU 4002. TEACHING STRATEGIES FOR THE EL AND REGULAR CLASSROOM A presentation of current research-based teaching strategies, instructional design, materials, and technology emphasizing an interdisciplinary, constructivist, problem-solving design, especially for mathematics, science, social studies, and the EL classroom. Requires development of a 10-day thematic unit, with one lesson videotaped for classroom critique. Requires 15 hours of field experience including at least 5 in a PreK-5 EL classroom and 5 in a 6-12 EL classroom. Prerequisites: Admission to a Teacher Education program. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. EDU/ENG/LNG 4012. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION This course will introduce students to the complexity of human language including the nature of language, the grammatical aspects of language, and the applied areas of language. The class will focus on such things as how the brain and language are related, how language sounds are produced and formed into words and sentences, and how those words and sentences are used to convey meaning. This will also introduce second language acquisition, which will expose students to terminology and concepts specific to the field of language acquisition. Requires 15 hours of field experience in the EL classroom. Three hours, offered spring semester annually EDU 4111. LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION Designed to acquaint the prospective teacher with language arts instruction in both the K-5 grades and PreK-12 EL classrooms. Requires demonstration of proficiency in research, manuscript and cursive writing, spelling, appropriate teaching strategies, and technology applications Includes 15 hours field experience with visits to language arts classrooms for observation and analysis and teaching experiences (included minimum of 5 hours in an EL class. Prerequisite: Admission to a Teacher Education program. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. EDU 4201. SCHOOL ASSESSMENT An introduction to the theory and techniques of measurement as well as to the interpretation and application of such measures. Surveys a variety of professionally-prepared instruments for measuring such things as aptitudes, attitudes, achievement, personality characteristics, and intelligence, along

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with teacher-constructed instruments. Treats test factors such as validity, reliability, and standardization, and provides opportunities to practice evaluation of test scores. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. EDU 4302. TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY GRADES An application of principles of curriculum and instruction in various disciplines in the secondary classroom, with emphasis on a practical exposure to educational technology and its relationship to the teaching-learning process. Requires 15 hours of field experience. Prerequisite: Admission to a Teacher Education program. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. EDU 4332. CONTENT AREA READING/WRITING Various models and strategies for teaching reading and writing are presented to show how instruction in the reading skills can be incorporated into any subject area. Includes emphasis on techniques of diagnosis and individualization, and teaching English as a second language. Requires 15 hours of field experience. Prerequisite: Admission into a Teacher Education program. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. EDU 4401. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION Surveys the development of American education, including Christian education, from the earliest days of American history to the present. Also examines the nature and scope of the Christian philosophy of education, as well as the general philosophy of education. Prerequisite: Admission to a Teacher Education program. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. EDU 4450. INTRODUCTION TO STUDENT TEACHING Working with the two assigned cooperating teachers for two hours each week during the semester prior to enhanced student teaching. A minimum of five seminar sessions will be scheduled on campus. Prerequisites: Admission to Student Teaching, completion of all classroom work. Must take at least two PRAXIS sub-tests during this course. One hour, offered annually. EDU 4500. STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR Required in all Teacher Education programs during the semester when the student takes Enhanced Student Teaching. Gives the student teacher the opportunity to share experiences, reflect over student teaching activities, be involved in group problem solving, and review appropriate curriculum materials, especially those which include Christian principles. Must be taken concurrently with Enhanced Student Teaching. All required PRAXIS II tests must be passed satisfactorily before a passing grade will be awarded for this course. Prerequisite: Formal admission to Student Teaching. Two hours, offered each semester. EDU 4620. ENHANCED STUDENT TEACHING (K-5) Involves the prospective teacher in the full operation of an elementary classroom. After a period of observing and assisting, the Student Teacher will assume full responsibility for the classroom under the guidance of the cooperating teacher. A full semester of student teaching in approved Christian, public, or private schools includes two diverse assignments: one in grades K-2 and one in grades 3-5. For students seeking licensure in grades K-5. Prerequisite: EDU 4450. Ten hours, offered each semester. EDU 4650. ENHANCED STUDENT TEACHING (PreK-3) Involves the prospective teacher in the full operation of a classroom of PreK through third grade students. After a period of observing and assisting, the Student Teacher will assume full responsibility for the classroom under the guidance of the cooperating teacher. The 15 weeks of student teaching will take place in two diverse assignments in approved Christian and public schools. One placement will be in grade PreK-K and the other in grades 1-3. For students seeking licensure in grades PreK-3. Prerequisite: EDU 4450. Ten hours, offered each semester.

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EDU 4700. ENHANCED STUDENT TEACHING (K-12) Required of the student who is majoring either in Physical Education or Music Education and is seeking licensure in grades K-12 One placement will be in K-5 and the other in grades 6-12. See the description for EDU 4620. Prerequisite: EDU 4450. Ten hours, offered each semester. EDU 4800. ENHANCED STUDENT TEACHING (6-12) Involves the prospective teacher in the full operation of a grades 6-12 classroom. After a period of observing and assisting, the Student Teacher will assume full responsibility for the classroom under the guidance of the cooperating teacher. A full semester of student teaching in approved Christian, public, or private schools includes two diverse assignments: one in grades 6-8 and one in grades 9-12. Prerequisite: EDU 4450. Ten hours, offered each semester. EDU 4847. ADVANCED RESEARCH IN EDUCATION An advanced guided research study in education for the post-baccalaureate student, as approved by the faculty of the Teacher Education Department. Supervised by an appropriate faculty member. Requires a substantial research paper or application project. Involves regular meetings with the teacher-of-record, and where applicable, with other students engaged in like studies for sharing and exchanging ideas. Students are encouraged to research or develop a research-based project related to their intended area of educational involvement. May be repeated only once and not to exceed a total of six hours of credit. One to three hours, offered on demand. EDU 4907. ADVANCED RESEARCH IN EDUCATION A guided research in education approved by the Teacher Education faculty and supervised by appropriate Teacher Education faculty. If needed and approved, this may be taken in place of a regular EDU 4xxx course. Regular meetings with the supervising faculty will be required and appropriate senior level assignments completed. One to three hours, offered on demand. EDU 4957, 4967. FIRST-YEAR MENTORING A school-site assignment where the student is the teacher-of-record and teaching on an Alternative license. “Verification of successful completion of the professional education core by the institution(s) of higher education” is required. Each TSDE approved institution of higher education teacher education program must ensure student mastery of the 11 Tennessee Professional Education Core competencies. By registering for this course, the student (teacher) will receive approximately half of the required 50 hours of mentoring required by the State Department of Education. Attendance in EDU 4500 Student Teaching Seminar is included. Prerequisites: Documentation of employment or intent-to-hire form from a school or district and admission into the Post-Bac program. Two hours, offered on demand. EDU 4977, 4987. SECOND-YEAR MENTORING A school-site assignment where the student is the teacher-of-record and teaching on an Alternative license. “Verification of successful completion of the professional education core by the institution(s) of higher education” is required. Each TSDE approved institution of higher education teacher education program must ensure student mastery of the 11 Tennessee Professional Education Core competencies. By registering for this course the student(teacher) will receive approximately half of the required 25 hours of mentoring required by the State Department of Education. Prerequisites: Completion of EDU 4957 and EDU 4967. Two hours, offered on demand.

Courses in English Grammar, Composition, and Literature Note: All courses with an ENG prefix beyond ENG 1011 (except ENG 4006) require at least one lengthy, researched composition.

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ENG 1011. BASIC ENGLISH GRAMMAR, USAGE, AND INTRODUCTION TO COMPOSITION I A study of the fundamentals of English grammar and usage and an introduction to college composition. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. ENG 1022. BASIC ENGLISH GRAMMAR, USAGE, AND COMPOSITION II After a review of mechanics and sentence effectiveness, this course gives instruction on the fundamentals of writing effective paragraphs and essays, incorporating fundamentals of English grammar and usage. Considerable time is devoted to learning how to do a college-level research paper. Prerequisite: Grade of C in ENG 1011. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. ENG 2111. MASTERPIECES OF WORLD LITERATURE I A study of some of the greatest, most seminal works of literature in world history. The first semester will concentrate on great texts from the Sumerians, the ancient Hebrews, the Greeks, the Romans, the early Christian churches, the Middle Ages, the early Renaissance, and the Reformation. Prerequisites: ENG 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. ENG 2122. MASTERPIECES OF WORLD LITERATURE II A study of some of the greatest, most seminal works from the late Renaissance, the eighteenth century, Romanticism, and the modern and postmodern periods including select readings from the American founding and classics of economic thought. Prerequisites: ENG 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. ENG 2807. EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE I A detailed study of the literature of the European settlers in America during the period of colonization, the literature surrounding the American Revolution, and the literature of the Early American Republic. Three hours, offered on demand. ENG 2907. EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE I A survey of American literature from the Early American Republic to the late nineteenth century. Topics include authors of fiction, poetry, and prose, as well as the historical contexts which surround them. This is the second in a two-semester course. Three hours, offered on demand. ENG 3004. MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE AND CHAUCER After a brief study of Old and Middle English, students are directed in the reading of selections (both in the original and in translation) from such works as Beowulf, Ancrene Riwle, Piers Plowman, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and the works of Wycliffe. The last third of the course is devoted to the life, art, and works of Geoffrey Chaucer, particularly The Canterbury Tales. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Two hours, offered fall semester even years. ENG 3105. ENGLISH RENAISSANCE POETRY AND PROSE Reading of representative selections from the non-dramatic literature of the English Renaissance and Reformation. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Two hours, offered spring semester odd years. ENG 3204. SHAKESPEARE A thorough study of the life, art, and major works of William Shakespeare. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. ENG 3304. EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE The English-language literature of America from the early seventeenth century through the end of the Federal Period, including in particular the American Puritans, the writings attendant to the Revolution, and such early authors as Irving, Cooper, and Bryant. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Two hours, offered fall semester even years.

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ENG 3403. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE Focuses on the historical development of the English language, from its Anglo-Saxon origins, through its changes in the medieval period, to the forces that have produced modern British, American, and world English (including forces at work today). Prerequisites: ENG 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. ENG 3605. LITERARY CRITICISM A chronological study of the major literary critical approaches, with considerable attention given to such recent forms of criticism as Marxism, New Criticism, Feminism, and Deconstructionism. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2112. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. ENG 4006. ADVANCED ENGLISH GRAMMAR A detailed study of Traditional English grammar, with fair attention given to its historical development. Prerequisites: ENG 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. ENG/EDU/LNG 4012. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION This course will introduce students to the complexity of human language including the nature of language, the grammatical aspects of language, and the applied areas of language. The class will focus on such things as how the brain and language are related, how language sounds are produced and formed into words and sentences, and how those words and sentences are used to convey meaning. This will also introduce second language acquisition, which will expose students to terminology and concepts specific to the field of language acquisition. Three hours, offered spring semester annually ENG 4103. NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE A survey of the major writers of the latter half of the nineteenth century and the earliest part of the twentieth century (ending at 1914), including analysis of the influences on and the development of American literature up to the modern age. The lingering after-effects of the Civil War combined with the rapid industrialization of society culminate in a literature of disillusion and disbelief. Significant attention to the country’s first great novelists and poets making their appearance in this period. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Two hours, offered fall semester odd years. ENG 4205. TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE A survey of the major writers of the twentieth century in Great Britain and the United States, including analysis of the influences on and the development of the major themes of the century such as Marxism, feminism, atheism, and the continuing disaffection of the artist from society. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. ENG 4303. SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE AND MILTON Examines the poetry and prose of seventeenth-century England, with particular attention to the so-called “Metaphysical Poets.” The second half of the course is limited to the works of Milton, particularly Paradise Lost. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Two hours, offered fall semester odd years. ENG 4416. EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE AND ROMANTICISM A survey of the literature of both the “Enlightenment” and Romanticism in Great Britain, including examination of the major writers and themes of these two literatures and their interrelations, with particular attention to Pope, Johnson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, and Shelley. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Two hours, offered spring semester even years.

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ENG 4506. VICTORIAN BRITISH LITERATURE An examination of the major authors of poetry and prose in Great Britain during the Victorian Age, with particular attention to the rising religious skepticism and the influence of the Darwinian theory of evolution on the latter half of the nineteenth century. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Two hours, offered spring semester even years. ENG 4907. RESEARCH PROJECT IN ENGLISH An examination of a worthwhile topic related to the English language or the literature of the English language under the supervision of an English faculty member. Requires the approval of the chair of the English Department. All research projects require a significant and formal paper and/or project which shall be presented to the faculty-member-of-record. Students may be expected to present papers and/or projects to a juried panel of faculty and other professionals or to fellow upper-level students. ENG 4907 will be limited to students with junior or senior standing. Prerequisites: ENG 2111, 2122. Up to three hours, offered on demand.

Courses in History HIS 1011. HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION I A survey of the development of political, social, and religious cultures before 1600. The roots of Mesopotamian and Hebrew civilizations establish the sources from which Western Civilization springs. The course acquaints students with the foundation of Western history as it moves through the Greco-Roman and the Judeo-Christian worlds to 1600. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. HIS 1022. HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION II Continues the survey of western history from 1600 to the present. Attention is given to European political, social, and religious developments. Major topics include revolutions in science and industry, the Enlightenment, the Church, radical movements, imperialism, Darwinism, modern democracy, and totalitarianism. American heritage is included to incorporate its connection with the western world. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. HIS 2013. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES A study of the United States from earliest exploration and settlement through the present era, with attention to helping the student obtain an understanding of the development of American institutions and acquire a greater appreciation of the American heritage. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. HIS 2201. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF HISTORY Provides an introduction to the study of history as a discipline for History majors. Serves as an introduction to philosophies, terms, and methodologies appropriate to the field. Of particular concern to this course is an investigation of the following questions: What is history? What is a historian? What is the historian’s task? What are the historian’s tools? Prerequisites: None One hour, fall semester annually. HIS 2605. NON-WESTERN CULTURES AND PEOPLES A study of cultures and people groups of Asian, African, and Middle Eastern civilizations. Attention will be given to geography and natural resources; political, cultural, intellectual, and religious development; and imperialism, terrorism, and modern conflicts. Three hours, offered spring odd years. HIS/THE 3201. SURVEY OF CHURCH HISTORY The rise and growth of the Christian Church, including the beginning of the movement; its contact with Judaism, paganism, and Greek philosophy; its existence as the state religion of the Roman empire; the great doctrinal controversies; the Christianization of northern Europe; the rise of the papacy; the reformation and achievements of Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, and others; the period from the Reformation to the present; and modern denominationalism. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered fall semester annually.

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HIS 3104. EARLY MODERN EUROPE 1660's - 1700's A study of Europe in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the French Revolution, Napoleonic Era, the Enlightenment expansion of education, science, and philosophy; and social and economic developments, including the middle class, the rise of industrialization, and other relevant material. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered fall even years. HIS 3303. THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (1850-1914) A study of the precedents of the Civil War, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and Industrial America. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered fall odd years. HIS 3404. U.S., THE FOUNDING ERA A study of America's struggle to preserve its freedom within the British Empire and then to gain its independence from Great Britain. It will examine the formation and philosophical foundations of the American republic, along with their implications of the present survival of free government. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered fall even years. HIS 3606. HISTORY OF AMERICAN CHRISTIANITY A survey of Christianity in the United States from the first European settlers to the present. Attention will be given to primary forces and movements, such as Puritanism, pietism, revivalism, Protestant liberalism, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, denominationalism, ecumenism, and postmodernism. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. HIS 3706. HISTORY OF ANCIENT CIVILIZATION A study of ancient civilizations (to A.D. 500) as they relate to language, philosophy, literature, art, science, politics, and their development with the rise and fall of nations; points up their contributions to modern civilization and their meaning in light of the history of the Bible. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. HIS/THE 4305. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION A survey of the political, economic, social, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments occurring in Europe from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries. Special attention will be given to the men and movements that brought about developments and progress during this era. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. HIS 4357. HONORS RESEARCH PROJECT A research project supervised by two faculty members that provides the student the opportunity to pursue a special topic in history of his choice. Available to those with senior classification and with a minimum of a 3.0 g.p.a. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Hours are dependent upon project, offered as needed. HIS 4405. JACKSONIAN ERA 1814-1850 A study of American history from the Treaty of Ghent (1814) to the era of “Manifest Destiny” (1850) with attention given to widening sectional differences. Particular attention focuses on the presidency of Andrew Jackson and its impact on democracy. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered spring odd years. HIS 4606. WAR YEARS 1914-1945 The context of European and later Asian political and cultural issues which ushered in the world wars. The magnitude of such events is seen in relation to the international impact. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered spring even years.

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HIS 4706. POST-WORLD WAR II AMERICA 1945-PRESENT Traces the events immediately after the War, especially as America helps to rebuild Europe, to the present. Subjects include the Vietnam Era, Watergate, Y2k, 9/11, and other related subjects. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered spring, even years. HIS 4807. HISTORIOGRAPHY This course will provide a brief introduction to the philosophy of history, practice of history, and historical methods. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered as needed. HIS/THE 4854. FREE WILL BAPTIST HISTORY A readings seminar in the history of Free Will Baptists, including their background in the Magisterial, Radical, and Arminian expressions of the Reformation, their origins in the transatlantic English General Baptist movement of the seventeenth century, and their development in America from the eighteenth century to the present day. The course will emphasize the history of ideas within an overall structure of biographical and institutional history. (Ministry students may register for this course as a two-hour course to fulfill ministry program requirements.) Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Two (THE) to three (HIS) hours, offered spring semester even years. HIS 4907. SELECTED TOPICS IN HISTORY A variety of subjects will be offered by faculty members as opportunities are available. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Hours will vary, offered as needed. HIS/THE 4957. CREEDS AND COUNCILS OF THE EARLY CHURCH This course will trace the historical context and development of Christian thought as presented in the creeds and conciliar statements of the early church. Heavy emphasis will be placed upon the Biblical nature of these creeds and the way scriptural exegesis from the theological movements resulted in the church councils. The backdrop outlines for this study will be the dynamic nature of early Christianity and the way in which the tradition of the Church became more and more reified in dialogue and disagreement with heterodox Christianity and secular, Greco-Roman culture. Items receiving particular attention will be Trinity, Christology, free will and grace, and the development of the Christian canon of Scripture. This course will employ readings of primary sources in translation and problem-based learning exercises. Church History is recommended but not required as a prerequisite. Prerequisites: HIS 1011, 1022. Three hours, offered on demand.

Courses in Intercultural Studies MIN 1011. LOCAL CHURCH AND WORLD MISSIONS Introduces students preparing to be pastors, Christian educators, and youth ministers to a study of the Biblical basis of world missions, the missionary nature and task of the church, and the role of the local church minister in world missions. Outlines a program of missionary education in the local church and stresses the important relationship between the local church and the Board of International Missions and its missionaries. When possible, this course is taught as a seminar by qualified missions professionals. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. ICS 1102. BIBLICAL BASIS OF MISSIONS The teaching of both Testaments about the world mission of the church, focusing on the nature, task, and the agencies of world missions. Presents the dynamics of missions: the Kingdom, the Holy Spirit, spiritual warfare, and other missional themes. (This course can be used as a Bible elective.) Two hours, offered spring semester annually. ICS 2101. HISTORY OF MISSIONS Historical survey of missions from Pentecost to the present day, with emphasis on spiritual, social,

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and political elements and issues that have helped and hindered the progress of missions. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. ICS 2202. INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY An introductory study of the nature of missions as it relates to the purpose, function, and patterns of culture, including language and theory. Designed to give missionary candidates an orientation toward peoples and cultures of other lands for the sake of imparting the Christian witness in indigenous, rather than Western, forms. Will be equally helpful to others, including teachers, as they prepare to minister to those from other cultures than ours. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. ICS 2307. CROSS-CULTURAL PRACTICUM A domestic field experience working with persons whose first language and culture are significantly different from the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Seeks to aid the student in developing cross-cultural relationships and evangelism skills essential for international ministry. The student is assigned to a qualified supervisor and will work 3-5 hours per week with a Nashville-based, full-time, cross-cultural Christian ministry. Prerequisites: ICS 1102 and ICS 3001. One hour, offered on demand. ICS 2507. PERSPECTIVES ON THE WORLD CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT A 16-week comprehensive examination of missions from four perspectives: the Biblical foundation for mission theology; historical progress of the gospel; cross-cultural communication; and strategies for reaching unreached peoples. Hosted on campus (or in a local church) and taught by visiting lecturers. Three hours, offered as scheduled locally by the U.S. Center for World Missions. ICS 3111. CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION Communication theory and skills in the cross-cultural context, with emphasis on understanding major people groups and their corresponding worldviews, and including practical application of communication with non-Western peoples. Recommended that ICS 1102 and 3001 be taken first. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. ICS 3122. CROSS-CULTURAL CHURCH PLANTING The Pauline model of planting churches cross-culturally in the book of Acts, with consideration given to alternative models for multiplying growing indigenous congregations. Recommended that ICS 1102 and ICS 3001 be taken first. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. ICS 3132. PRINCIPLES OF CROSS-CULTURAL LEADERSHIP Examines the life and work of the cross-cultural Christian worker, including the missionary call, the qualifications and preparation for Christian cross-cultural service, spiritual walk, cross-cultural indigenous leadership development from biblical and contemporary models, and effective interpersonal relationships. It will challenge the student to think in new paradigms when considering the dynamics of applying biblical principles to spiritual leadership in different cultural contexts. It will encourage the student to become a more effective leader him/herself, as well as a trainer of effective leaders. Prerequisite: ICS 3122. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. ICS 3402. PREPARATION FOR SHORT-TERM OVERSEAS PRACTICUM Practical preparation for students planning for an overseas summer ministry or short-term service to enable them to obtain maximum benefit from experience or study in a cross-cultural environment. One hour, offered spring semester annually. ICS 3408. CROSS-CULTURAL PRACTICUM II In cooperation with the Free Will Baptist International Missions Department, approved junior or senior students are placed with missionaries for 7-10 weeks. Under the supervision of both the missionary and the program coordinator, the student experiences directed cross-cultural ministry. Includes reports on assigned reading and written evaluations by the missionary supervisor. Prereq-

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uisite: ICS 3402. Three hours, offered each summer. ICS 3452. SURVEY OF WORLD RELIGIONS A general understanding of the religions of the world, with emphasis on the founders, sacred writings, doctrines, strengths, and special characteristics of each. The student will compare man's own efforts to produce a religious system with the Christian system so that he may better understand the needs of others and how to approach them. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. ICS 4007. CROSS-CULTURAL SEMINAR SERIES A study of some of the special issues confronting the contemporary missionary, such as restrictedaccess nations, post-communist nations, Romanism, Ecumenism, syncretism, pluralism, economics, how to do area studies, and the “Christian cults,” with each subject presented by a lecturer with expertise in the field. One hour, as approved upon demand. ICS 4301. STRATEGY FOR WORLD OUTREACH Strategies for expansion in world evangelization and principles and methods of church growth, with special consideration to contemporary strategies in general, and past and current Free Will Baptist methods of outreach. Prerequisites: ICS 1102 and 3001. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. ICS 4907. GUIDED RESEARCH IN MISSIOLOGICAL STUDIES Guided research in missiological studies for students at the senior level as approved by the mission program. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member within the mission department. Requires a substantial research project. Involves regular meetings with the teacher, and where applicable, other students in the course for sharing and exchanging of ideas. The course may be repeated for a significant extension of the original study or for a separate study not to exceed a total of six hours. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand. ICS 4947. GUIDED RESEARCH IN PRACTICAL MISSIOLOGICAL STUDIES Guided research in missiological studies for students at the junior/senior level as approved by the mission program coordinator. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member within the mission program. Requires a substantial research project. Involves regular supervision with the missionary, and where applicable, other students in the course for sharing and exchanging of ideas. May be repeated for a significant extension of the original study or for a separate study not to exceed a total of six hours. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand.

Courses in Interdisciplinary Studies IDS 1001. LEADERSHIP AND CALLING: PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT This course, together with IDS 2001, will explore the interconnection of Christian virtue with the cultivation of responsible leadership. Emphasis will be given to such topics as lifelong learning, spiritual formation, self-management (including, e.g., time management and personal financial management), problem-solving, and personal and professional etiquitte. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. IDS 2001. LEADERSHIP AND CALLING: LEADERSHIP PRINCIPLES Building on the personal foundation of IDS 1001, through activities and readings, this course will engage students in reflection on their own calling and preparation to be intellectual leaders in their fields as well as in family, church, and society. Topics will include basic leadership principles, organizational and team leadership, problem-solving, organizational finance, lay leadership in the church, community involvement and leadership, spiritual leadership and witness, and creation care. Prerequisite: IDS 1001. Two hours, offered fall semester annually.

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IDS 1902. CHRISTIANITY, CULTURE, AND WORLDVIEW: INTRODUCTION* Two hours, offered spring semester annually. IDS 3101. CHRISTIANITY, CULTURE, AND WORLDVIEW: INTERMEDIATE* Prerequisite: IDS 1902 Two hours, offered fall semester annually. IDS 4101. CHRSTIANITY, CULTURE, AND WORLDVIEW: CAPSTONE* Prerequisite: IDS 1902, 3101. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. *These courses will focus on the critical tools and knowledge necessary to forge a basic Christian worldview for Christian leadership in the contemporary world. Each course will cover the same topics but at a basic, intermediate, and advanced levels, including such subjects as the relationship of the church and culture; cultural apologetics; apologetics for witness; modernity and postmodernity; Christian discernment in the arts, entertainment, and other cultural products, including popular culture; work, leisure, and sport; the benefits and limits of science and technology; contemporary bioethical issues; creation care; engagement in public and civic life; and economic thought. (Courses must be taken in numerical sequence.)

Courses in Languages

The College requires all 12 hours of language in B.A. programs to be taken in the same language. LNG 2113, 2126. BEGINNING SPANISH Establishes a thorough foundation in the language, emphasizing the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. First semester focuses on simple conversational patterns within a cultural context. The use of innovative methods, such as suggestopedia, encourages student participation. The spring semester increases proficiency in the various aspects of language, including control of language patterns, ability to use more verb tenses, reading and writing skills, and vocabulary base. Conversational practice and exercises in composition. Cultural enrichment through slides, authentic foods, and various realia. Three hours each semester, offered fall semester odd years/spring semester even years. LNG 2213. BEGINNING LATIN I The introductory course in Latin grammar and vocabulary, including, primarily, the accidence of nouns in the First, Second, and Third Declensions and verbs in the First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Third-io Conjugations. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. LNG 2226. BEGINNING LATIN II A continuation of the introduction to basic Latin grammar and vocabulary, including in addition to the accidence of nouns in the Fourth and Fifth Declensions, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, indirect statement, the subjunctive mood, participles, gerunds, and gerundives. Prerequisite: LNG 2213. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. LNG 3134, 3145. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH A continuation of Beginning Spanish with more emphasis on grammar, vocabulary, and conversational skills. Special topics include letter writing, the history of Spain, journalism, short stories, famous Hispanic people, and many topics for conversation are studied in Spanish. Prerequisite: LNG 2126 or equivalent. Three hours each semester, offered fall semester even years/spring semester odd years. LNG 3234. LATIN PROSE Designed to improve the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to translate original Latin, with reading selections from

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such major Latin prose selections as Caesar’s De Bello Gallico, Cicero’s De Officiis, the Vulgate Bible, and Bede’s Historia Ecclesiastica. Prerequisite: LNG 2226. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. LNG 3245. LATIN POETRY Designed to build upon the student’s ability to translate Latin prose exercised in LNG 3234, focusing upon translation of selections from such major Latin poets as Vergil, Ovid, Horace, Catullus, and the early Christian hymnwriters. Considerable time is devoted to Latin poetic meter and scansion. Prerequisite: LNG 3234. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. LNG/EDU/ENG 4012. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION This course will introduce students to the complexity of human language including the nature of language, the grammatical aspects of language, and the applied areas of language. The class will focus on such things as how the brain and language are related, how language sounds are produced and formed into words and sentences, and how those words and sentences are used to convey meaning. This will also introduce second language acquisition, which will expose students to terminology and concepts specific to the field of language acquisition. Three hours, offered spring semester annually

Course in Library Science LSC 3012. LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN THROUGH THE ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE GRADES Surveys children’s literature through grade 8, emphasizing its value, history, components, genres, and trends. Two hours, offered spring semester annually.

Courses in Mathematics MAT 0900. MATHEMATICS LAB Required of entering students who made less than 18 on the ACT Math (or equivalent SAT) score; designed as a co-requisite course to support successful enrollment in a credit-bearing mathematics course. Emphasizes the real number system, algebraic factoring, linear equations and inequalities, verbal problems, systems of linear equations, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, and graphing linear equations. Does not count toward degree requirements but must be satisfactorily completed during the first term of enrollment in the initial credit-bearing mathematics course. Must be repeated until successfully completed. One hour, offered each semester annually MAT 1101. COLLEGE ALGEBRA Designed especially for those anticipating a course in physical science or a program in business. Includes such topics as equations, inequalities, polynomials, scientific notation, and quadratic equations. Word problems are solved and applications made. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. MAT 2011. CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS I Designed to satisfy requirements in general education and teacher education. Topics include logic, elementary set theory, number systems, and number theory, with special attention to the basic operations and their properties for integers and rational numbers. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. MAT 2022. CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS II Topics include informal and coordinate (plane and solid) geometry, graphic representations of data, and basic probability and statistics, with attention to geometric construction and measurement. Three hours, offered spring semester annually.

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MAT 2202. CALCULUS A study of calculus with emphasis on integrals, derivatives, and vectors. Prerequisite: MAT 1101. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. MAT 3011, 3022. STATISTICS I, II An introduction to statistics, including topics and procedures which may be required in general education (e.g. psychology) and business. Basic focus on the fundamentals of statistical measurement and analysis, descriptive and inferential. Illustrative topics include probability, frequency distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, correlation, analysis of variance, and non-parametric techniques. Prerequisite: MAT 1101 or equivalent. Three hours each semester, offered annually.

Courses in Ministry MIN/ICS 1011. LOCAL CHURCH AND WORLD MISSIONS Introduces students preparing to be pastors, Christian educators, and youth ministers to a study of the Biblical basis of world missions, the missionary nature and task of the church, and the role of the local church minister in world missions. Outlines a program of missionary education in the local church and stresses the important relationship between the local church and the Board of International Missions and its missionaries. When possible, this course is taught as a seminar by qualified missions professionals. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. MIN 2336. CHURCH GROWTH: THEORY AND PRACTICE Emphasizes the history and theoretical foundations for church growth and the Church Growth Movement. Attention is given to the pastorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role in church growth. A broad, flexible, and multifaceted plan for growth designed to fit a wide range of church settings is presented. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. MIN 3011. CHRISTIAN MINISTRY This course is a basic introduction to all facets of Christian ministry in the local church, emphasizing the importance of a Biblical foundation and Biblical approach for ministry. This course deals with the qualities of an individual active in Christian ministry including his or her Christian character, call, personal life, family and ministry balance, and relationship to the community. The course will examine various components of Christian ministries including teaching, counseling, directing worship, administering the ordinances, weddings, and funerals. Three hours each semester, offered fall semester annually. MIN 3111, 3122. HOMILETICS Developing skill in the preparation and preaching of effective Biblical sermons. First semester is devoted to understanding and mastering the fundamental principles of sermon building. Second semester is a preaching laboratory where these principles are applied in the actual preparation and preaching of sermons. Prerequisites: BIB 2601; grade of C in MIN 1011 for MIN 3122. Two hours each semester, offered annually. MIN/PSY 3601. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING Acquaints the student with basic principles involved in Christian counseling, with attention to Biblical principles involved, the place of counseling in the local church, and problems facing the pastor and others as they attempt to help people through counseling. The student develops an understanding of counseling philosophy, skills, and technique appropriate to a local church setting. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. MIN 3907. MINISTRY SEMINAR This seminar will deal with ministry topics such as Christian theology, church history, Biblical studies, Christian counseling, and Christian leadership. A full description of the particular course topic, outline, and specific course objectives will be included in the syllabus used. One hour, offered as approved on demand.

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MIN/THE/WMN 4253. CHRISTIAN WORSHIP This course is designed to provide students with a study of corporate worship, giving attention to the Biblical foundations and elements of worship, the function of the minister of music in worship, and the production of materials for congregational worship. This course was designed with input from the Music Department and the Pastoral Training program. Three hours for Worship Ministry Majors, two hours for others, offered fall semester odd years. MIN 4907. RESEARCH PROJECTS IN MINISTRY STUDIES A guided research study in ministry studies (Christian education, youth ministry, missions, or pastoral ministry) for students at the junior or senior level, as approved by the faculty of the Theological Studies Department. Supervised by an appropriate faculty member. Requires a substantial research project. Involves regular meetings with the teacher, and where applicable, with other students in the course for sharing and exchange of ideas. Students are encouraged to develop a project, plan, and any accompaniments which they can use in the particular ministry for which they are preparing. May be repeated for a significant extension of the original study or for a separate study, not to exceed a total of three hours. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand.

Courses in Music MUS 1002. MUSIC INTRODUCTION AND APPRECIATION An introduction to the history, principles, and practice of music, including worship music. In addition to being introduced to the appreciation of the musical inheritance of Western Civilization, students will learn the basic principles of music, including how to read music for participation in church and community music programs. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. MUS 1007. BASIC MUSICIANSHIP An introduction to the basic materials and concepts of music: fundamental harmonic progression, pitch and notation, scales, key, mode, and intervals; and introduction to the piano keyboard. Includes elementary ear-training and dictation and basic conducting patterns. Music majors, combination majors, and minors must demonstrate competency in these areas before they take MUS 1011 (Music Theory I), therefore, all entering students are given an opportunity to test out of the course. Open to all students. Two hour, offered on demand. MUS 1011,1022. MUSIC THEORY I 1011: Study of the fundamental harmonies and tone relations used in musical composition, including elementary written and keyboard harmony, melody writing, voice leadings, functional tonality, and analysis. 1022: Study in principles of harmonization, form, diatonic seventh chords, modulation to closely related keys, secondary chord functions, binary principle, rounded binary and ternary forms, variation techniques, and concepts in the composition of common practice (Baroque) chorales. Taken concurrently with MUS 1111, 1122. Three hours, offered each semester annually. MUS 1040. CHORAL UNION This large choral group performs great classical works such as Handelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Messiah in the fall as well as Broadway type musicals in the spring. Members of the College Choir and all students pursuing a program of study with a concentration in music are required to participate in the fall semester. This is also open to all students not pursuing a music degree program. One hour, meets one time a week for 1.5 hours; offered each semester annually. MUS 1111,1122. AURAL THEORY I 1111: Introduction of the basic techniques of dictation, sight-singing, and rhythmic reading; mastery of the beginning techniques of Tonal Center Referencing, with dictation of harmonic progressions and error detection.

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1122: Continuation of the techniques of 111; singing and writing major and minor scales, intervals, triads, tonal and rhythmic groups, tonal melodies and canons. Taken concurrently with MUS 1011, 1022. One hour, meets once weekly; offered each semester annually. MUS 1201. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC EDUCATION This course is an overview of the historical and philosophical issues in education as they specifically relate to the teaching of music. Special emphasis on the relationship between music education as a life work, with guidance in determining personal qualifications and professional training necessary in the field. Requires 15 hours of field experience. Two hours, offered fall semester annually to music education majors. MUS 1271, 1282. CLASS PIANO (music major, combination majors or minor) 1271: Designed to prepare students for the Piano Proficiency. Emphasis is placed on keyboard skills, including sight-reading, scales, arpeggios, chords, harmonizing, and transposing. Open to music majors, combination majors, and minors. May be exempted through a placement exam (see page 94). Generally, the class will be composed of three to six students. Two hours, offered fall annually. Class meets twice weekly. 1282: A continuation of 1271. Prerequisite: MUS 1271 or teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approval after placement exam. May be exempted through a placement exam (see page 94). Two hours, offered spring annually. Class meets twice weekly. MUS 1300. CLASS PIANO (non-music major or minor) Designed for beginning students with little or no piano experience. Students may enter Private Piano upon completion of the course. Open to non-music majors and minors. May be exempted through a placement exam (see page 94). One hour, offered each semester. Class meets once weekly. MUS 1357, 1367. CLASS VOICE 1357: Designed for beginning vocal students, focusing on fundamentals of correct vocal production, and emphasizing the technique for producing a free and natural singing tone practiced in hymns and other literature. Generally, the class will be composed of three to five students. 1367: A continuation of 1357. One hour, offered on demand. Meets once weekly. MUS 1407, 1427. CLASS GUITAR This course focuses on acquisition of the fundamental skills required for playing guitar. This includes learning how to read notes and rhythms, developing proper technique, and understanding proper practice habits. 1422: A continuation of 1401. One hour, offered on demand. MUS 1630. CLASS CONDUCTING Designed for the beginning student with little or no conducting experience. Students may enter Private or Semi-Private Conducting upon conclusion of this course. Open to non-music students as well as music majors and minors. May be exempted by departmental faculty committee assessment and conducting demonstration. Generally, the class will be composed of three to five students. One hour, offered both semesters. Meets once weekly. MUS 1850. SEMI-PRIVATE VOICE This is a transitional course between class voice and private voice which is primarily designed for the non-music major, although music majors and minors may enroll as appropriate. Two students per class. Prerequisite: MUS 1357 or permission of the music faculty. One hour, offered each semester. Meets once weekly. MUS 2031, 2042. MUSIC THEORY II 2031: Study of diatonic and chromatic harmony, including four-part writing, analysis, and traditional

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compositional forms. 2042: Comprehensive approach to advanced harmony, song forms, short piano forms, instrumental writing, late 19th century forms, and 20th century style. Taken concurrently with MUS 2131, 2132. Prerequisites: MUS 1011/1022. Three hours, offered each semester annually. MUS 2106. CHURCH MUSIC HISTORY Designed to foster an appreciation for the unique approaches in each of the historical church traditions and the relationship each has with music of the contemporary church. Through writings of the early church fathers, explore the development of attitudes about church music as held by clergy and laity. Introduces the student to cultural changes that have influenced church music and exposes the student to representative works in church music. Familiarize the student with resource materials available for further exploration in the field of church music. Two hours, offered spring semester even years. MUS 2131, 2142. AURAL THEORY II 2131: Continuation of MUS 1131; singing and writing chromatic scales, tonal and rhythmic groups, more difficult tonal melodies, and two-part work. 2132: Singing and writing seventh and ninth chord outlines, tonal melodies, harmonic progressions with modulations, syncopated rhythmic figures and two-part work. Taken concurrently with MUS 2031, 2042. One hour, offered each semester. Class meets once weekly. MUS 2250. PRIVATE PIANO Emphasis is placed on keyboard skills and repertoire appropriate to the student’s level and ability. Regulated by a levels approach. Open to all students. Prerequisites: MUS 1300 (non-music major or minor), MUS 1271, 1282 (music major, combination major or minor), or teacher’s approval after placement exam (see page 94). One hour, offered each semester. One half-hour lesson weekly. MUS 2260. SEMI-PRIVATE PIANO This is a transitional course between class piano and private piano. Emphasis for the music major will be preparation for the Piano Proficiency assessment. Emphasis for the non-music major will be on keyboard skills and repertoire appropriate to the student’s level and ability. Two students per class. Prerequisites: MUS 1271 and 1282, 1300 or permission of the music faculty. One hour, offered each semester. Meets once weekly. MUS 2313, 2326. DICTION FOR SINGERS 2313: Latin, Italian, and English diction and song literature. 2326: German and French diction and song literature. One hour, offered each semester odd years. MUS 2350. PRIVATE VOICE Emphasis on the techniques of vocal production, including proper vowel formation, the correct use of consonants, tone color, and diction, using sacred and art song literature suitable for the individual. The voice faculty determines whether the individual has advanced sufficiently to merit the awarding of credit and to proceed to the next semester’s course. Regulated by a levels approach. One hour, offered each semester. One half-hour lesson weekly. MUS 2450. PRIVATE INSTRUMENT Private lessons for students with previous experience in brass, string, woodwind instruments, emphasizing techniques of performance with a variety of styles and literature, using sacred and classical literature. Credit awarded only on the basis of demonstrated proficiency. Regulated by a levels approach. One hour, offered each semester. One half-hour lesson weekly.

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MUS 2467. ORCHESTRA OR INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE Open to all instrumental music majors or minors. Open to all qualified students. Varied styles of literature will be performed. One hour, offered each semester as demand warrants. MUS 2550. PRIVATE ORGAN An introduction to organ playing that will include pedal techniques, registration, and hymn playing. Open to all students. Prerequisite: The student must have prior piano experience in hymn playing. One hour, offered each semester. One half-hour lesson weekly. MUS 2650. PRIVATE CONDUCTING A course designed for the non-music and music major in the principles of leading worship. The course is to provide opportunities for the student to gain a thorough understanding of conducting and to acquaint the student with the basic techniques and skills for conducting music, to instruct the student in music terminology, to conduct vocal and instrumental scores, and to begin establishing rehearsal techniques. Prerequisites: MUS 1630. One hour, offered each semester. One half-hour lesson weekly. MUS 2700. TRAVELING GROUP ENSEMBLES Designed for the student involved in traveling groups such as Rejoice, etc. The student must be a member of the College Choir and under contract as approved by the Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Chair of the Music Department. No credit will be awarded unless and until the student has completed the terms of the contract. This experience will emphasize music ministry in local churches, promotion and travel for the College, and appropriate public relations. One hour, offered each semester. Meets as arranged by the Chair of the Music Department in conjunction with the Vice President for Institutional Advancement. MUS 3031. MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE I This is a study of the history of music from Medieval Period through 1600. Students will be expected to listen extensively as well as keep a journal and write a formal paper. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. MUS 3040. THE COLLEGE CHOIR The College Choir is the premier touring ensemble of the Free Will Baptist National Association and members seek to gain an understanding of music and worship through choral music. Membership is by audition only and limited to students with high musical skill and strong moral character who are willing to be positive representatives of the College. One hour for each semester (meets twice weekly), offered annually. Note: As participation in the College Choir is a commitment for the entire school year, each choir member will be required to enroll in MUS 3040 for both Fall and Spring semesters. Spring withdrawal will result in a lowered Fall term grade. MUS 3055. FORM, ANALYSIS, AND COUNTERPOINT This course will offer harmonic, structural, and stylistic analysis of homophonic and contrapuntal forms of music. Prerequisite: MUS 2031. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. MUS 3062. MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE II This is a study of the history of music from 1600 through the 20th century. A continuation of MUS 3031. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. MUS 3266. CHORAL/INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING This is a study of basic techniques in conducting, analysis, vocal and instrumental score reading, instrumental and choral literature. Prerequisite: MUS 1630. Two hours, offered spring semester even years.

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MUS 3257. STYLISTIC HYMN PLAYING A course designed to develop practical skills in playing for a worship service. Topics included are accompanying congregational singing, modulations, transposition, and improvisation. Open to all students. Prerequisite: The student must have prior experience in hymn playing. One hour, offered each semester on demand. One half-hour lesson weekly. MUS 3337. JUNIOR RECITAL Required of all Music Performance majors, 25 minutes in length. The recital will include works from various style periods. A representative portion must be performed before the music faculty at least four weeks before the scheduled performance, which will be subject to approval at that time. Students must maintain regular weekly lessons while preparing for the recital. Prerequisite: Instructor’s approval. One hour, taken as applied music during the junior year. MUS 4060. CHAPEL CHOIR Open to all students. One hour, offered each semester annually. MUS 4205. CHURCH MUSIC METHODS AND MATERIALS This class introduces methods for developing adult, youth, and children’s choirs, including rehearsal techniques and vocal production for each, as well as an in-depth study of the graded music ministry program, including instrumental music. This class will also acquaint the student with musical and non-musical skills needed to successfully meet the needs of a music ministry position in a local church setting. Two hours, offered spring semester odd years. Meets twice weekly. MUS 4242. MUSIC METHODS AND MATERIALS This course provides the music education student with an overview of the methods, materials, and philosophies used in elementary and secondary music programs with special attention to: the teaching concepts of Kodaly, Orr, Dalcroze, and Suzuki, curriculum needs for various age groups and music combinations, effectively implementing a choral/instrumental program. Requires 30 hours of field experience. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. MUS 4304. CHORAL ARRANGING AND INSTRUMENTATION Techniques of composition and arranging for various combinations of vocal groups and instrumental ensembles with emphasis on skillful and practical rearranging of existing literature for use by small, volunteer church groups. Includes an introduction to the use of notation software. Prerequisite: MUS 2031. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. MUS 4407. WORSHIP MUSIC MINISTRY INTERNSHIP Approved junior or senior students concentrating in music, or a music and youth ministry combination, are given personalized supervision of field experience in youth and/or church music ministry. Students are placed with worship leaders for eight weeks during the summer or for a semester during the regular school year and led through a defined program of appropriate music ministry duties. Requires weekly reports by the student and written evaluation by the supervising pastor. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, and administering a music ministry while serving a local church. Prerequisite: MUS 3266 or Private Conducting. One hour, offered spring semester annually or as needed. MUS 4447. SENIOR RECITAL Required in all music major related programs: 45 minutes for majors in Music Performance, 25 minutes for all other music-related majors. The recital will include works from various style periods. The entire recital must be performed before the music faculty at least four weeks before the scheduled performance, which will be subject to approval at that time. Students must maintain regular weekly lessons while preparing for the recital. Prerequisite: Instructor’s approval. One hour, taken as applied music during the senior year.

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WMN 4205. MUSIC AND WORSHIP TECHNOLOGY This is an introduction to the use of sound systems, recording equipment, and lighting systems for use in worship settings. To introduce notation software and other computer programs to assist and enhance the overall music program. Two hours, offered spring semester odd years. WMN/PMN/THE 4253. CHRISTIAN WORSHIP This course is designed to provide students with a study of corporate worship, giving attention to the Biblical foundations and elements of worship, the function of the minister of music in worship, and the production of materials for congregational worship. This course was designed with input from the Music Department and the Pastoral Training program. Three hours for Worship Ministry Majors, two hours for others, offered fall semester odd years.

Courses in Pastoral Ministry PMN 3052. PASTORAL LEADERSHIP A continuation of MIN 3011 focused directly on the role of a pastor in leading the ministerial program of local church. The spring semester is devoted to the organizational structure of the local church. Primary attention will be placed on pastoral leadership, administration, governance of committees and groups, and lay ministry training in the local church. Prerequisite: MIN 3011. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. PMN/YFM 3302. CURRENT TOPICS IN PASTORAL MINISTRY These lectures cover such topics as expository preaching, church health and church growth, lay leadership development, Christian education, youth ministry, and current issues as identified and approved by the Theological Studies Department. Typically, two seminars are conducted each year utilizing guest pastors with graduate degrees in Bible, theology, or ministry. The lectures take place in a seminar format with guests coming to the campus for presentations from two to three times within a semester. Students must pre-register since syllabi, books, and assignments will be distributed several weeks prior to the first session. Advance reading and other assignments are due at the first class. No topic may be repeated for graduation credit. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. PMN 4007. EXPOSITORY PREACHING The methods of preparing expository sermons, directing the student in the preparation of various sermons, discussing techniques and evaluating students’ efforts. Audio and videotaped sermons by great preachers are used as teaching models. Prerequisites: BIB 2601, MIN 3111. Two hours, offered on demand. PMN 4208 (or 4211, 4222). PASTORAL INTERNSHIP Approved pastoral students, usually seniors, are placed with experienced pastors for 10 weeks fulltime during one summer (4208) or for two semesters (4211, 4222) to work under the pastor’s supervision. Pastoral interns are exposed to the various aspects of pastoral ministry. The student meets for weekly conferences with the pastor for instruction, guidance, and counseling and makes weekly reports to the designated faculty supervisor. The pastor submits written evaluations. Prerequisites: MIN 3011, 3111, 3122. Two hours, offered annually by individual approval. Note: In order to provide a supervised field experience for the student who is presently the pastor of a church in the area, the Coordinator of the Pastoral Studies Program serves as mentor to the student pastor to enable him to do his internship in his own church. PMN 4307. CHURCH PLANTING An introductory course in how to start a church, confronting the student with the urgent necessity of church planting in order to fulfill the Great Commission as well as to maintain the growth and vitality of the Church. Includes acquaintance with the literature on the subject and exposure to experienced church planters, evaluation of various contemporary models of church planting, stages in the church planting process. Attention to the gifts, abilities, and personality traits needed by church planters in

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order to help the student consider becoming a church planter. Two hours, offered on demand. PMN 4507 (or 4517, 4527). CHURCH PLANTING INTERNSHIP Approved pastoral students (usually seniors) work in conjunction with an approved home missionary or church planter/builder for two semesters, approximately 15 weeks each semester (4517 ,4527), or for 10 weeks full-time during the summer (4507). The semester internship entails approximately 14 hours per week. Students should plan their schedules so as to accommodate this level of involvement. Internship involves such things as consulting one hour per week with the faculty supervisor, being in the regular service times of the church when assigned responsibilities, setting aside appropriate preparation time, mentoring by the missionary, and on-the-job training with the missionary and program coordinator. The intern makes weekly reports to the faculty supervisor. The missionary and faculty supervisor cooperatively evaluate the performance of the intern. Prerequisites: MIN 3011, 3111, 3122, PMN 4307. Two hours, offered by individual approval. PMN 4602. FUNDAMENTALS OF EFFECTIVE PREACHING The course presumes a basic knowledge and skill in sermon preparation and Bible exposition. The focus of the course is on those elements that make for effective preaching. Physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual preparation are addressed. The course enables the student to build upon the skills already possessed in ways that make for more effective preaching. Opportunities are provided to hone preaching skills through observation of others, practice, and self-evaluation. Prerequisites: MIN 3111, 3122. (By special permission of the teacher, senior students may take MIN 3122 and PMN 4602 concurrently.) Two hours, offered spring semester annually.

Courses in Physical Education and Exercise Science NOTE: Only courses primarily consisting of physical activity can be used to meet general education physical activity course requirements. No course with the same number may be taken twice for credit except certain activity courses by departmental approval. PHE 2000. TENNIS Beginning course in tennis skills. One hour each semester, offered spring semester. PHE 2100. LIFETIME FITNESS Determines each student’s level of physical fitness in several areas and prescribes for each a fitness program to meet specific needs, acquainting the student with the requirements and methods for maintaining physical fitness throughout life. Meets three times weekly, with provision for instruction and supervised fitness activities. Required in all bachelor’s degree programs. Two hours, offered each semester. PHE 2200. WEIGHT TRAINING An activity course designed for individuals who have had some prior weight training instruction. Weight training routine and schedule must be approved by the instructor and each workout is to be recorded as prescribed by the instructor to determine progress. One hour, offered each semester. Note: Participants must obtain written permission from the instructor prior to enrolling in the course.

PHE 2301. GOLF Beginning level course, involving classwork as well as actual play. One hour, offered spring semester annually. PHE 2317. GOLF II This course is designed to further develop personal proficiency in cardiovascular endurance and weight management through a variety of skill activities, including, but not limited to golf. Prereq-

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uisite: PHE 2301. One hour, offered on demand. PHE 2400. AEROBIC EXERCISE A course designed to emphasize personal proficiency in the areas of cardiovascular endurance and weight management. This will be done through a variety of skill activities such as, but not limited to, bowling, badminton, table tennis, etc. One hour, offered each semester. PHE 2417. INTERMEDIATE AEROBIC EXERCISE This course is designed to further develop personal proficiency in cardiovascular endurance and weight management through a variety of skill activities, including, but not limited to bowling. Prerequisite: PHE 2400 (must be a follow-up to the same skill activity introduced in PHE 2400). One hour, offered on demand. PHE/REC 2455. FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION An introduction to the profession through a study of its history, philosophy, leadership, and organization. Includes a presentation of professional opportunities and qualifications. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. PHE 2550. VARSITY SPORTS Participation on the College’s intercollegiate teams. Must complete the entire semester before credit will be awarded. Enrollment during the semester of participation. First semester freshmen not eligible. One hour for each semester, offered annually. PHE 2606. PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES Theory and practice of the methods of preventing and caring for injuries incurred in physical education and athletic programs, with emphasis on the practical aspects of treatment, taping, and rehabilitation. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. PHE 2705. COACHING TECHNIQUES An introduction to the philosophy and techniques of coaching athletics successfully, with emphasis on coaching children and youth. Two hours, offered spring semester odd years. PHE 3156. ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION Principles of planning and conducting classes to meet the special needs and interests of exceptional students. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. PHE 3104. KINESIOLOGY Anatomical, mechanical, and neuromuscular concepts applied to human motion. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. PHE 3205. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE The conditions and factors affecting functional physiological changes of the human body brought about by exercise. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. PHE 3256. INSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPORTS This course is designed to introduce history, theories, safety precautions, teaching progressions, and skill development so the student can understand and aquire competency in individual and dual sports. Sports activities to be selected from the following: badminton, bowling, table tennis, golf, raquetball, tennis, and fitness activities. Two hours, offered spring semester even years.

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PHE 3264. INSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF TEAM SPORTS This course is designed to introduce history, theories, safety precautions, teaching progressions, and skill development so the student can understand the aquisition of competencies in various team sports. Sport activities to be selected from the following: basketball, field hockey, flag football, soccer, softball, team handball, and volleyball. Two hours, offered fall semester even years. PHE 3503. PSYCHOMOTOR DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN A comprehensive guide to planning and implementing a developmental physical education program for children from pre-school through the eighth grade. A field experience of 15 hours will be required. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. PHE 3704. MOTOR LEARNING Psychological and physiological factors associated with movement. Two hours, offered fall semester even years. PHE/BUS 3853. SPORTS MANAGEMENT A study of the principles and processes for managing sporting and recreational training activities. Topics include program design, processes, staffing, training, compensation, supervision, athletic evaluation, and safety. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. PHE 4006. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION The study of programs, class schedules, equipment, finances, facilities, and supervision of pupils and personnel. Two hours, offered spring semester even years. PHE 4103. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION Procedures for measuring school-age children’s body composition, neuromuscular achievement, cardiovascular condition, and performance levels using various activity skills. Includes the theory and techniques of measurement as well as the interpretation and application of such measures. Two hours, offered fall semester odd years. PHE/REC 4257. PHYSICAL EDUCATION/RECREATION LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP The primary vehicle for linking the knowledge, skills, and theories learned in academic courses to application in a professional setting. Although the internship may benefit students by helping them reach personal professional goals (e.g., finding a career direction, developing technical professional skills, gaining experience that will help obtain employment after graduation), its primary objective is academic. Students may work in any setting they wish, provided the site is approved by the instructor and a supervisor is available on site to work with the student. Two hours, offered on demand. PHE /REC 4357. PHYSICAL EDUCATION/RECREATION LEADERSHIP RESEARCH Serving as a senior project, this course will generate an original piece of work that should bear upon a problem identified by the student and the internship supervisor. The project should benefit the internship setting and contribute to the student’s professional development. Two hours, offered on demand. PHE 4707. TEACHING SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION Instruction in choice of materials, class management, lesson planning, and teaching techniques. Includes presentations of various games and sports for this age level. Two hours, offered fall semester on demand. PHE 4907. RESEARCH PROJECT IN EXERCISE SCIENCE A guided research in exercise science or a related area at the senior level as approved by the faculty in the General Education Department. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member within the department. Requires a substantial research project. May require presentation before a jury of quali-

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fied faculty. Involves regular meetings with the teacher and, where applicable, other students in the course for sharing and exchanging ideas. May be repeated for a significant extension of the original study or for a separate study not to exceed a total of six hours. Available to juniors and seniors only. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand. PHE 4947. GUIDED RESEARCH IN EXERCISE SCIENCE/PHYSICAL EDUCATION A guided research in Exercise Science/Physical Education which must be approved by the faculty of the Exercise Science department. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member within the department. This course will require a substantial research component and may include a presentation of the project before a panel of faculty members. Involves regular meeting with the teacher, and where applicable, other students in the course for sharing and exchanging ideas and course material. Available to juniors and seniors only. Two to three hours, offered as approved on demand.

Courses in Philosophy and Comparative Religion ICS 3007. INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM An overview of the beliefs and practices of Islam, including a comparative analysis with Christianity. An emphasis will be given to the unique contextualization issues encountered in communicating the gospel in an Islamic culture. Three hours, offered on demand. PHL 3602. CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY An introduction to the field of philosophical thinking, including the nature of philosophy, the methods philosophers use, the basic problems philosophers face, and the various worldviews held by the philosophers of history. Fosters appreciation for the Christian worldview. Three hours, offered spring semester annually.

Courses in Physics PHY 2003. GENERAL PHYSICS I An introduction to studies in physics with an introduction to mechanics and thermal physics. Concepts are applied using calculus. Prerequisite: MAT 1101. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. PHY 2013. GENERAL PHYSICS I LAB One hour, offered fall semester, odd years. PHY 2106. GENERAL PHYSICS II A continued study in physics with emphasis on wave motion, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear studies. Concepts are applied using calculus. Prerequisite: PHY 2003. Three hours, offered spring semester even years. PHY 2016. GENERAL PHYSICS II LAB One hour, offered spring semester, even years.

Courses in Psychology PSY 2001. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY The fundamental conditions and fact of conscious behavior, including emotions, sensations, feeling, learning, habit formation, memory, perception, and native traits. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. PSY/EDU 2102. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Gives consideration to the learning experience in the light of psychological findings, examining individual differences, hereditary and environmental factors, social characteristics, intelligence, and testing. Emphasizes relationships between development and learning style, accommodating teaching

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strategies, and the use of technology in the learning environment. Includes a review of educational psychology in view of Biblical principles. Requires 15 hours of field experience. TE students only. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. PSY 2302. GROUP AND INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS The course will focus on how individuals interact within a larger social context. Particular attention will be given to culture, subcultures, ethnicity, and their effect on the individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cognitions, emotions, and behavior. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. PSY 2401. LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT A survey of the biological and environmental factors influencing physical, spiritual, intellectual, social, emotional, and language development from conception until death. Explores child, adolescent, and adult stages of life. Includes causes and results of interruption in or interference with the developmental and learning processes. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. PSY 3201. PHYSIOLOGY OF BEHAVIOR This course is designed to take an in-depth view of how behavior occurs physiologically. Particular attention is given to anatomical and chemical causes of behavior. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. PSY/MIN 3601. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING Acquaints the student with basic principles involved in Christian counseling, with attention to Biblical principles involved, the place of counseling in the local church, and problems facing the pastor and others as they attempt to help people through counseling. The student will develop an understanding of counseling philosophy, skills, and technique appropriate to a local church setting. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. PSY/EDU 3801. THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD An introduction to the characteristics of exceptional children in light of psychological findings, student achievement, and teacher observations based on experience and education. Examines current research on exceptionalities and means to determine educational needs. Surveys developmental characteristics, emotional and environmental stimuli and resultant behavior, at-risk characteristics, and legal and educational requirements. Emphasizes learning styles and correlation to teaching strategy success, including techniques for the use of technology and classroom practices necessary for educating the exceptional learner in the regular classroom, focusing on optimum integration consistent with good educational application for all exceptionalities. EDU Students: Requires 15 hours of field experience. Prerequisites: EDU students only, EDU 2001, PSY/EDU 2102. PSY Majors: must be Junior or Senior. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. PSY 3907. RESEARCH PROJECT IN PSYCHOLOGY An independent study in psychology. May be approved for a related research area. Requires a significant research project or paper. May require a presentation before appropriate faculty. Must be approved by the Psychology program coordinator. Available to Juniors and Seniors only. May not exceed three hours total credit. Variable credit (one to three hours), offered on demand. PSY 4001. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY A descriptive and theoretical survey of the major forms of psychopathology. The course will examine current trends and research in the field of mental health and psychopathology. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. PSY 4106. PERSONALITY THEORY A study of personality development and structure and an analysis of the major theoretical approaches to the personality. Three hours, offered spring semester even years.

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PSY 4204. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY A study of the history of psychology from its roots in ancient Greek philosophy to contemporary theorists and systems. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. PSY 4305. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND RESEARCH A study of how psychologists gather and interpret data through empirical research methods and a study of various psychological tests and measurements. Student will become acquainted with the use of statistics, data analysis techniques, research designs, and psychological tests. Attention will be given to application of the subject matter in schools, therapeutic treatment, and ministry. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. PSY 4402. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT A psychological and theological study of life adjustments and crises such as illness, death, disasters, and accidents with an emphasis on personal adjustment and the functional aspects of the psychology of living. Attention will be given to the biological, cognitive, emotional, and spiritual aspects of adjustment. Attention will also be given to the management of emotion and stress and healthy interpersonal relationships. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. PSY 4820. PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM An experience in a local mental health setting gained by acquiring 20 hours per credit hour per semester in an approved practicum site. Each student will work in conjunction with his/her academic advisor and Psychology program coordinator to determine site placement. Course requirements include the experience hours, supervision, and reflection papers. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, and each student must have a valid emergency, first aid, and CPR certification through the Red Cross before accumulating practicum volunteer hours. One to three hours, offered each semester. PSY 4907. SEMINAR AND RESEARCH PROJECT IN PSYCHOLOGY A guided research in psychology at the senior level as approved by the faculty in the Department of Arts and Sciences. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member within the department. Requires a substantial research project. May require presentation before a jury of qualified faculty. Involves regular meetings with the teacher, and where applicable, other students in the course for sharing and exchanging ideas. May be repeated for a significant extension of the original study or for a separate study not to exceed a total of six hours. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand.

Courses in Recreation Leadership REC 2003. RECREATION ADMINISTRATION AND PROGRAMMING Planning, organizing, and evaluating recreation programs. This is a hands on course designed to train students to manage and implement recreational activities. Three hours, offered on demand. REC/PHE 2455. FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION An introduction to the profession through a study of its history, philosophy, leadership, and organization. Includes a presentation of professional opportunities and qualifications. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. REC 3007. OUTDOOR RECREATION AND CAMP ADMINISTRATION Techniques and resources for camping, hiking, and backpacking and outdoor observations of wildlife and nature uncovered. Program planning and administration for various types of camps and the development of skills required for effective camp leadership are provided. Three hours, offered on demand.

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REC 4007. CURRENT ISSUES IN RECREATION Current trends in recreation with attention given to senior adult leisure, facility management, and leisure activities in the church for all ages. This course also deals with theoretical concerns associated with sports, in relationship to prayer and spiritual influence. Two hours, offered on demand. REC/PHE 4257. PHYSICAL EDUCATION/RECREATION LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP The primary vehicle for linking the knowledge, skills, and theories learned in academic courses to application in a professional setting. Although the internship may benefit students by helping them reach personal professional goals (e.g., finding a career direction, developing technical professional skills, gaining experience that will help obtain employment after graduation), its primary objective is academic. Students may work in any setting they wish, provided the site is approved by the instructor and a supervisor is available on site to work with the student. Two hours, offered on demand. REC/PHE 4357. PHYSICAL EDUCATION/RECREATION LEADERSHIP RESEARCH Serving as a senior project, this course will generate an original piece of work that should bear upon a problem identified by the student and the internship supervisor. The project should benefit the internship setting and contribute to the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s professional development. Two hours, offered on demand.

Course in Natural Science SCI 2204. PHYSICAL SCIENCE SURVEY Designed to acquaint students with some of the important aspects of the history, meaning, and methods of science while developing within them an appreciation and understanding of the physical world. Includes elements from physics, astronomy, chemistry, and geology. Prerequisite: MAT 1101 or equivalent. Co-requisite: SCI 2214. Three hours credit (three hours lecture, one lab), offered fall semester even years. SCI 2214. PHYSICAL SCIENCE SURVEY LAB One hour, offered fall semester, even years.

Courses in Speech SPE 1000. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH The fundamentals of public speaking, with a large part of the work in platform exercises, such as informative and persuasive speeches, in which the student is given an opportunity to demonstrate the basic principles of effective speaking. The student also participates in panel discussions and symposia. Prerequisite: a score of 18 or above on the English section of the ACT Examination, or successful completion of ENG 1011, Basic English Grammar, Usage, and Introduction to Composition with at least a grade of C, a TOEFL score as indicated on page 19, or appropriate college transfer credit. Three hours, offered each semester. SPE 2002. ADVANCED ORAL COMMUNICATION The study of communication skills such as small-group communication, interpersonal skills, listening, as well as platform presentations. Prerequisite: SPE 1000. Two hours, offered spring semester annually.

Courses in General Social Studies SSC 2008. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY An introduction to the field of sociology: first an overview, then treatment of the segments of the whole social structure. Considers all phases of social organization, showing how each is a functional part as it acts and reacts upon others. Three hours, offered summer annually.

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SSC 3101. MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY Following an introductory survey of the fundamental themes of psychological study, this course will analyze the psychological, cultural, and religious factors that contribute to a successful marriage, with special attention to the premarital period and the early stages of marriage. Childrearing and the responsibilities of parenthood are of particular concern. A variety of resources will be examined. Special attention will be given to the mode of inquiry of the social and behavioral sciences examined from the perspective of Scripture and the Christian tradition. The course is designed to meet needs of college students as well as to provide them with information and resources for ministry to others. Three hours, offered fall annually. SSC 3401. WORLD GEOGRAPHY A survey of the geographic regions, inhabitants, resources, physical characteristics, and economy of the world. Two hours, offered fall semester annually.

Courses in Theology THE 2907. SEMINAR IN THEOLOGICAL STUDIES A guided seminar in Theological Studies presented in a modular format for all students, as approved by the faculty of the Theological Studies Department. The course is supervised by a faculty member with appropriate academic and experience qualifications in the content area. All seminars require a research paper or application project. Such courses will involve appropriate in-class faculty-to-student contact of at least 14 hours for a one-hour course, 26 hours for a two-hour course, and 39 hours for a three-hour course. Each seminar has at least one week of reflection for a one-hour course, two weeks of reflection for a two-hour course, and three weeks of reflection for a three-hour course after the classroom seminar before final projects are due. All course materials, in an appropriate language and/ or other format, are delivered to students to be received at least one month in advance of the course. Students are encouraged to research or develop a research-based project related to their intended area of professional involvement. May be repeated only once and not to exceed a total of six hours credit. One to three hours, offered as approved on demand. THE 3101. CHRISTIAN DOCTRINES A study of ten essential doctrines of the Christian faith from the perspectives of Biblical and historical theologyâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;the Bible, God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, man, salvation, the Christian life, the Church, angels, and last things. Attention is given to the doctrinal material in the Free Will Baptist Treatise. The student is helped to gain an understanding of these doctrines so as to reflect, in daily life, the Biblical passages from which they come. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. THE 3102. CHRISTIAN ETHICS An interdisciplinary study of Christian ethics from the perspectives of Biblical and systematic theology. A Biblically-based approach to the Christian value system, founded on the centrality and authority of the Bible, the nature of man, the doctrine of sin and redemption. The structure of thought built upon this foundation includes attention to basic values, basic relationships, and basic New Covenant principles. Contemporary worldview systems, as well as historic philosophies which have impacted contemporary ethics are examined in light of Biblical teachings. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. THE/HIS 3201. SURVEY OF CHURCH HISTORY The rise and growth of the Christian Church, including the beginning of the movement; its contact with Judaism, paganism, and Greek philosophy; its existence as the state religion of the Roman empire; the great doctrinal controversies; the Christianization of northern Europe; the rise of the papacy; the reformation and achievements of Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, and others; the period from the Reformation to the present; and modern denominationalism. Three hours, offered fall semester annually.

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THE 3251. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY I: CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY AND WORLDVIEW This course serves as an introduction to the discipline of theology. The course will define and outline the goals and methods of theology. It will also cover the philosophical issues of truth and epistimology with a goal of defining and defending a Christian worldview in the context of a pluralistic society. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. THE 3301. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY II: REVELATION, GOD, AND MAN This course is a topical study of Christian truth, with a view of seeing the parts as making up an integrated and harmonious whole. Topics covered in this section include the nature of Divine revelation, theology proper, and Christian anthropology. Prerequisites: THE 3251 must be taken before or concurrently with THE 3301. Three hours, offered fall semester annually. THE 3402. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY III: CHRIST, SALVATION, AND THE CHURCH This course is a topical student of Christian truth, with a view of seeing the parts as making up an integrated and harmonious whole. Topics covered in this section include soteriology, Christology, and ecclesiology. Prerequisites: THE 3251 must be taken before or concurrently with THE 3402. Three hours, offered spring semester annually. THE 3504. THEOLOGY OF MISSION Theology of Mission is a Biblical theology study of the Holy Scriptures with the purpose of demonstrating that the center purpose of God is to glorify Himself through His mission to save the lost world (Genesis 3-Revelation 22). The course will especially examine the Trinitarian work of God in the redemptive work of Christ to accomplish His mission. The course will examine the Biblical concept of salvation alone through Jesus Christ as a motive for world mission over against the religious pluralism of today's non-Christian worldviews. Prerequisites: THE 3101 or THE 3251, BIB 1011, 1031, 2032, 2062, and 2060. Three hours, offered fall semester even years. THE/BIB 3907. SEMINAR IN BIBLICAL AND/OR THEOLOGICAL STUDIES A guided seminar in a modular or traditional format, as approved by faculty of the Department of Theological Studies. The course is designed to expose students to methods of Biblical and theological research and presentation. the course may also be used to examine recent trends and developments in the fields of Biblical studies and/or theology. Though specific topics will vary, the course material will serve as a model of research methods appropriate to the discipline. All seminars will require a research paper and/or an application project and presentation. May be repeated only once. Not to exceed a total of six hours of credit. Two to three hours, offered as approved on demand. THE 4032. ESCHATOLOGY A study of end events, with some attention given to postmillennialism, but more to amillennialism and premillennialism as more commonly held today, focusing on the redemptive covenants and how they contribute to a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s view of eschatology. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. THE/MIN/WMN 4253. CHRISTIAN WORSHIP This course is designed to provide students with a study of corporate worship, giving attention to the Biblical foundations and elements of worship, the function of the minister of music in worship, and the production of materials for congregational worship. This course was designed with input from the Music Department and the Pastoral Training program. Three hours for Worship Ministry Majors, two hours for others, offered fall semester odd years. THE/HIS 4305. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION A survey of the political, economic, social, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments occurring in Europe from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries. Special attention will be given to the men and movements that brought about developments and progress during this era. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years.

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THE 4507. SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEOLOGY Seeks to introduce the student to a selection of spiritual classics from the Christian tradition. The student is exposed to works from different centuries and individuals in order to develop an awareness and appreciation for the rich theological heritage interwoven in classical Christian literature. Particular attention is given to interpreting the texts as well as forming plans for personal application of principles gleaned from the readings. One to three hours, offered on demand THE/HIS 4854. FREE WILL BAPTIST HISTORY A readings seminar in the history of Free Will Baptists, including their background in the Magisterial, Radical, and Arminian expressions of the Reformation, their origins in the transatlantic English General Baptist movement of the seventeenth century, and their development in America from the eighteenth century to the present day. The course will emphasize the history of ideas within an overall structure of biographical and institutional history. (Ministry students may register for this course as a two-hour course to fulfill ministry program requirements.) Two (THE) to three (HIS) hours, offered spring semester even years. THE 4907. RESEARCH PROJECTS IN THEOLOGICAL STUDIES A guided research in theological studies for students at the junior or senior level as approved by the faculty of the Theological Studies Department. To be supervised by an appropriate faculty member within the department. Requires a substantial research project. Involves regular meetings with the teacher and, where applicable, with other students in the course for sharing and exchanging ideas. May be repeated for a significant extension of the original study or for a separate study not to exceed a total of three hours. One to three hours, offered as approved upon demand. THE/HIS 4957. CREEDS AND COUNCILS OF THE EARLY CHURCH Traces the historical context and development of Christian thought as presented in the creeds and conciliar statements of the early church. Heavy emphasis is placed upon the Biblical nature of these creeds and the way scriptural exegesis from the theological movements resulted in the church councils. The backdrop outlines for this study are the dynamic nature of early Christianity and the way in which the tradition of the Church became more and more reified in dialogue and disagreement with heterodox Christianity and secular, Greco-Roman culture. Items receiving particular attention are Trinity, Christology, free will and grace, and the development of the Christian canon of Scripture. This course employs readings of primary sources in translation and problem-based learning exercises. HIS 3204 Survey of Church History is recommended but not required. Three hours, offered on demand.

Courses in Youth and Family Ministry YFM 1003. PHILOSOPHY OF YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRY A survey of the development of youth work from its beginnings to the present, including history of both church and para-church youth ministry. Strong emphasis on philosophy and principles for youth ministry. Students acquire the content and ability to develop and implement a comprehensive youth ministry that is based on a Biblical, sociological and familial model. Two hours, offered fall semester odd years. YFM 2002 EDUCATION IN THE LOCAL CHURCH Explores the factors essential to the effectiveness of a local churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christian education program: administration, organization, recruitment and training, goals and objectives, the giftedness of personnel, personality types in ministry, and facilities. YFM 1003 recommended. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. YFM 2106. SPIRITUAL DISCIPLINES This course provides a foundational overview of the spiritual disciplines in the formation of the minister and students. Particular attention will be given to individual spiritual disciplines with the aim of students learning practically how to incorporate them into their walk with Christ. Special

Course Descriptionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;163


attention will be given to the two most important disciplines of meditation and prayer. The course should enable the minister to effectively equip youth and youth leaders in the practice of spiritual disciplines in a youth ministry context. Two hours, offered spring semester even years. YFM 3004. CHILDREN'S MINISTRY A study of the physical, spiritual, and psychological development of children and the best means of providing proper Christian training. Considers instructional materials, teaching methods, evangelism, worship, and the administration of children’s work. The student develops a Biblically-based philosophy of children’s ministry. YFM 2002 recommended. Two hours, offered fall semester even years. YFM 3201. APOLOGETICS AND EVANGELISM FOR STUDENTS Targets students in both high school and college. Helps the student understand issues such as: the current trend and problem of young adults leaving the church, the impact of other world religions and philosophies in contemporary society, basic needs of older adolescent and young adult students, and a Biblical approach to apologetics and evangelism. Two hours, offered fall semester annually. YFM/PMN 3302. CURRENT TOPICS IN PASTORAL MINISTRY These lectures cover such topics as expository preaching, church health and church growth, lay leadership development, Christian education, youth ministry, and current issues as identified and approved by the Theological Studies Department. Typically, two seminars are conducted each year utilizing guest pastors with graduate degrees in Bible, theology, or ministry. The lectures take place in a seminar format with guests coming to the campus for presentations from two to three times within a semester. Students must pre-register since syllabi, books, and assignments will be distributed several weeks prior to the first session. Advance reading and other assignments are due at the first class. No topic may be repeated for graduation credit. Two hours, offered spring semester annually. YFM 3405. TEACHING METHODS An overview of the relationship of teaching and learning to the total Christian education program of the local church; the Biblical basis of teaching and learning; principles and methods involved in teaching and learning; the ministry of the Holy Spirit in Christian education, and the use of curriculum materials and instructional media. Prerequisites: YFM 2002, SPE 1000. Three hours, offered spring semester odd years. YFM 4303. THEOLOGY AND CULTURE: INFLUENCE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR YOUTH MINISTRY Explores the various ways that culture impacts and influences our thought patterns, our feelings, and our behaviors. Particular attention is given to the influence of media, materialism, and postmodernism. The student learns how to exegete the culture, form a healthy theology of culture, and form a healthy theology / philosophy for engaging the culture for Christ. Three hours, offered fall semester odd years. YFM 4508 (or 4511, 4522). YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRY INTERNSHIP Experience in a local church, either part-time during the school term (4511-4522) or full-time for 10 weeks during the summer (4508), leading to demonstrated ability to lead youth meetings, plan and work with other church staff, lead lay workers within the youth ministry structure, fit into an existing youth ministry program, grow spiritually and intellectually while ministering, and live godly while dealing with the pressures associated with ministry. Required either two semesters of 1 hour each or one summer of 2 hours. Prerequisites: 15 hours of YFM courses, a minimum g.p.a. of 2.0 in both Bible and Youth Ministry, approval of the youth ministry professor, and recommendation of the YFM committee. Two hours, offered on demand.

164—Course Descriptions


PART 4 PERSONNEL

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Personnel Board of Trustees Terms Expire 2016 Mr. Michael Armstrong, Educator, Wheelersburg, Ohio Reverend Billy Hanna, Pastor, First FWB Church, Albany, Georgia Reverend Terry Pierce, Pastor, Tupelo FWB Church, Tupelo, Mississippi Terms Expire 2018 Reverend Will Beauchamp, Pastor, First FWB Church, Seffner, Florida Reverend Ken Simpson (Vice Chariman), Pastor, Beacon FWB Church, Fenton, Missouri Reverend Mark Stripling (Secretary), Pastor, First FWB Church, North Little Rock, Arkansas Terms Expire 2020 Dr. Jeff Crabtree (Chairman), Pastor, Serenity FWB Church, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada Reverend Shiloh Hackett, Pastor, South Highland FWB Church, Muscle Shoals, Alabama Dr. Eddie Moody, Educator, Pastor, Tippett's Chapel FWB Church, Clayton, North Carolina

Administration and Staff

President: J. Matthew Pinson, B.A., M.A., M.A.R., Ed.D. Executive Assistant: Martha Fletcher Campus Relocation Task Force Project Consultant: Bob Bass Chairman: Mark Johnson, B.S., M.Ed., Colonel, Tennessee 118th Airlift Wing, retired Academic Affairs Provost: Greg Ketteman, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D. Registrar: Matthew Bracey, B.A., M.T.S., J.D. Administrative Assistant for the Academic Office: Rebekah Talbot Director of Adult Degree Program: Allan Crowson, B.A., M.B.A. Director of Christian Service: John Murray, B.A., M.A. Librarian: Carol Reid, B.S., M.L.S. Library Manager and Night Supervisor: Christa Hill Online Studies and Lifetime Learning/TE Associate: Jena Simpson

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Support Services Director of Institutional Planning and Assessment: Kevin Hester, B.A., M.Div., Ph.D. Director of Institutional Research: Wayne Spruill Business Administration/Physical Plant Operations Vice President for Financial Affairs: Craig Mahler, M.B.A. Senior Financial Counsel: Tom Sass Staff Accountant: Leigh Ann Smith Administrative Assistant: Brenda Spruill Director of Plant Operations: Sandy Goodfellow Financial Aid Coordinator: Angie Edgmon Financial Aid Assistant: Jill Ketteman Computer/Technical Support: Charles Wise Physical Plant Director: Bruce Bilbrey Maintenance: Mike Anderson Cleaning Operations: Ernest Thompson Common Grounds Manager and Cleaning Supervisor: Karen Edwards Dining Hall Director: Eric Hornbeck with Pioneer College Caterers Student Services Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students: Jon Forlines, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Dean of Women: Susan Forlines, B.S., M.Ed. Campus Pastor: Matthew McAffee, B.A., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D. Women’s Resident Director: Anna McAffee, B.S., M.B.A. Men’s Resident Director: Mike Edwards, B.A., M.A. Athletic Director: Gary Turner, B.S., M.S. Men’s Basketball Coach: Don Stevanus Women’s Basketball Coach: Larry Bryan Women’s Volleyball Coach: Ashley Lockert Public Relations/Development/Enrollment Vice President for Institutional Advancement: David Williford, B.A., M.A. Director of the Annual Fund: Mike Edwards, B.A., M.A., M.Div. Major Gifts Officer: Michael Oliver, B.S., M.S. Office Manager: Derek Altom, B.S. Former President/College Representative: Tom Malone Former President/College Representative: Charles Thigpen Field Representative: Earl Langley Director of Enrollment Services: Debbie Mouser Director of Marketing and Media: Josh Owens Enrollment Counselor: Daniel Armstrong Enrollment Administrative Assistant: Pam Buck Drama Director: AnnaGee Harris

Personnel—167


Faculty: 2016-2017 Stephen Beck, Teacher Education, Mathematics B.E., Vanderbilt University, 1997 M.M.A.T., University of the Virgin Islands, 2013 Administrator and Principal, Virgin Islands Free Will Baptist Christian School, 2007-2016 Associate Professor, University of the Virgin Islands, 2015-2016 Faculty, Welch College, 2016Matthew Steven Bracey, Registrar, History, Theological B.A., Welch College, 2008 M.T.S., Beeson Divinity School, Samford University, 2012 J.D., Cumberland School of Law, Samford University, 2012 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2012 Faculty, Welch College, 2013Ronald J. Callaway, Missions (Program Coordinator) B.A., Welch College, 1975 M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1997 D.Min., Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary, 2014 Additional studies, Amarillo Junior College, USN Electronics School, University of Madrid Missionary (Spain, Panama, Cuba), 1976-2003 Faculty, Welch College, 2003John L. Carter, Arts and Sciences, History (Program Coordinator), Teacher Education B.A., Welch College, 1973 M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University, 1975 M.S., Pensacola Christian College, 1978 Graduate Studies, College of William and Mary, 1980 Teacher and Principal, Christian schools, 1974-1981 Faculty, Welch College, 1981Jeffrey L. Cockrell, School of Theology (Graduate Program Coordinator) B.S., Liberty University, 1992 M.A.R., Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary, Liberty University, 1998 M.A.N.T., Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, 2005 Ph.D., University of Wales, 2010 Pastor, Free Will Baptist churches, 1986-2015 Free Will Baptist Historical Commission, 2006 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2008 Faculty, Welch College, 2016J. Allan Crowson, Business, Online and Adult Studies Director B.A., Welch College, 1973 M.B.A., Lipscomb University, 2002 Free Will Baptist International Missions, 1973-1993 Nortel, Inc., 1993-2010 Director of Adult Studies, Welch College, 2010 Part-Time Faculty, Welch College, 2010Rebecca W. Deel, Business (Program Coordinator) B.S., Welch College, 1986 M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1989 D.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1995 Certified Professional Secretary, Professional Secretaries, International,1988 Faculty, Welch College, 1988F. Leroy Forlines, Theology (Professor Emeritus) B.A., Welch College, 1952 M.A., Winona Lake School of Theology, 1959 B.D., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1962 Th.M., Chicago Graduate School of Theology, 1970 Faculty, Welch College, 1953 Jonathan Forlines, Vice President for Student Services, Dean of Men B.S., Welch College, 1980 M.S., Tennessee State University, 1994

168â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Personnel

Ph.D., Tennessee State University, 1998 Psychological Examiner, Tennessee Prison for Women, 1999-2001 Dean of Students, Welch College, 2001-

Susan R. Forlines, Dean of Women B.S., Welch College, 1981 M.Ed., Tennessee State University, 2003 Graduate studies, Liberty University Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Resident Director, Welch College, 1990-1998 Dean of Women, Welch College, 1998Ian C. Hawkins, Arts and Sciences (Chairman), Science (Program Coordinator) B.S. (biochemistry), East Carolina University, 2001 B.S. (chemistry), East Carolina University, 2001 M.S., Vanderbilt University, 2006 Ph.D., Middle Tennessee State University, 2013 Faculty, Welch College, 2006Kevin Hester, School of Theology (Dean), Director of Institutional Planning and Assessment B.A., Welch College, 1993 M.Div., Covenant Theological Seminary, 1997 Ph.D., Saint Louis University, 2002 Adjunct Faculty, Saint Louis University, 2000-2002 Teaching Consultant, Reinert Center for Teaching Excellence, Saint Louis University, 2000-2001 Faculty, Welch College, 2003Darrell Holley, English (on leave of absence) B.S., Pensacola Christian College, 1979 M.A., Florida State University, 1984 Ph.D., Florida State University, 1998 Graduate studies, University of Virginia, University of Georgia, University of Florida High school teacher, 1979-1994 Faculty, Welch College, 1994Greg Ketteman, Provost, Teacher Education B.S., Welch College, 1977 M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University, 1981 Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 2005 Evaluator, Tennessee Department of Education, Career Ladder Program, 1987 Teacher, Metropolitan Nashville Schools, 1977-1992 Principal, Metropolitan Nashville Schools, 1992-2006 Distinguished Administrator, Tennessee Association of Librarians, 2003 Board of Trustees, Welch College, 2002-2006 Provost, Welch College, 2006 Matthew McAffee, Theological Studies (Program Coordinator) B.A., Welch College, 1999 M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2002 M.A. University of Chicago, 2007 Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2015 Interim Pastor, Free Will Baptist church, 1997-1998, 2003-2006 Part-time Faculty, Welch College, 2003-2009 (Lifetime Learning program) Faculty, Welch College, 2010John Murray, Christian Service Director, Theological Studies B.A., Welch College, 1972 M.A., Grace Theological Seminary, 1993 M.Div. studies, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Missionary (France), 1977-1989 Faculty, Welch College, 1991Michael Oliver, Psychology (Program Coordinator) B.S., Welch College, 2011 M.A., University of Alabama, 2012 Pastor, Free Will Baptist Churches, 2003-2013


Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2012-2013 Faculty, Welch College, 2013-

Thurman M. Pate, Jr., Teacher Education B.A., Welch College, 1966 B.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1968 M.A.T., Middle Tennessee State University, 1970 Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1978 Consultant, Tennessee State Department of Education, 2000 Teacher/Principal, Nashville area schools, 1968-1999 Faculty, Welch College, 1999Etta C. Patterson, Teacher Education (Interim Chair) B.A., Welch College, 1976 B.S., Welch College, 1980 M.Ed., Tennessee State University, 1993 Ed.D., University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, 2013 Faculty, Guin Christian Academy, 1976-1977 Faculty, Woodbine Christian Academy, 1977-1980 Faculty, Metropolitan Nashvile Public Schools, 1980-1993 Curriculum and Instruction Director, Tennessee State Department of Education, 1993-2013 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 1999-2013 Faculty, Welch College, 2014- J. Matthew Pinson, President, Theological Studies, History Welch College, 1985-1986, 1988-1989 B.A., University of West Florida, 1990 M.A., University of West Florida, 1993 M.A.R., Yale University, 1994 Ed.D., Vanderbilt University, 2007 Graduate studies, Regent College, Vancouver Doctoral studies, Florida State University Adjunct Faculty, Bainbridge College, 1996-2002 Pastor, Free Will Baptist churches, 1990-1992, 1994-2002 President, Welch College, 2002Barry Raper, Pastoral Ministry (Program Coordinator) B.S., Welch College, 1999 M. Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2002 D.Min., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2012 Recruitment, Welch College, 1999 Youth Pastor and Associate Pastor, 2000-2003 Pastor, Free Will Baptist churches, 2003-present Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2005 Faculty, Welch College, 2006Carol Reid, Librarian, Arts and Sciences B.S., Welch College, 1977 M.L.S., Vanderbilt University, 1987 Library Assistant, Welch College, 1976-1977 Library Intern, Vanderbilt University, 1985-1986 Librarian, Greenville, South Carolina, Hospital System, 1986-1988 President, Association of Christian Librarians, 2012 Faculty, Welch College, 1988Linda Shipley, Music B.M., Carson-Newman College, 1974 M.C.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1976 Ph.D., Florida State University, 1978 Faculty, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, 1979-1994 Director, Allegro School of Music, 1996 Church Musician and Minister to Senior Adults, Inglewood Baptist Church, Nashville, Tennessee, 1995 Faculty, Welch College, 2001James M. Stevens, Music (Chairman) B.G.S., Samford University, 1985 M.C.M. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1995 D.M.A., University of Kentucky, 2004 Adjunct Professor of Church Music, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2002-2003 Frequent recipient of the ASCAP Standard Award in Composition

National Clinician for Shawnee Press Music minister in churches in Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, and Tennessee, 1985-2004 Senior Music and Culture Advisor, Christian Today, London, 2006Faculty, Welch College, 2004-

Christopher Talbot, Youth and Family Ministry (Program Coordinator B.S., Welch College, 2012 M.A., Grace College, 2014 Enrollment Counselor, Welch College, 2010-2012 Associate Pastor, Youth Minister, Free Will Bapitst Churches, 2011-2014 Faculty, Welch College, 2014 Online Instructor, 2015Frank Thornsbury, English (Program Coordinator) B.A., Welch College, 2013 Teaching Assistant, Valparaiso University, 2013-2014 M.A., Valpariaso University, 2014 Faculty, Welch College, 2014Tina M. Tolbert, Arts and Sciences, Speech, Freshman Coordinator B.A., Welch College, 1981 M.A., Western Michigan University, 1992 Faculty, Nashville State Technical Institute, 1995-1999 Faculty, Middle Tennessee State University, 1994-1999 Faculty, International Christian Academy, Ivory Coast, W. Africa, 1996 Freelance Trainer and Workshop Leader, 1997-1999 Director, Sunshine Day Care and Preschool, 1982-1994 Faculty, Welch College, 1999Gary Turner, Athletic Director, Physical Education (Program Coordinator) B.S., Greenville College, 1975 M.S., University of Western Illinois, 1980 Community Unit School District 205, Science Faculty, Tennis Coach, Basketball Coach,1975-1978 Faculty, Physical Education Department Chairman, Head Men's and Women's Basketball Coach, Head Men's and Women's Tennis Coach, Director of Enrollment and Financial Aid Athletic Director, Coach, Central Christian College, 1980-2001 Athletic Director, Head Men's and Women's Tennis Coach, Huntington University, 2001-2009 Faculty, Welch College, 2009-

Adjunct Faculty Scott Benton, Science B.S., Free Will Baptist Bible College, 1995 M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1998 B.S., Logan University College of Chiropractic, 2002 D.C., Logan University College of Chiropractic, 2004 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2004Sarah Bracey, Psychology B.A., Ball State University, 2003 M.S., Lipscomb University, 2010 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2015John Brumitt, Business B.S., Welch College, 2004 M.B.A., Tennessee Tech University, 2011 C.F.O., Free Will Baptist Board of Retirement, 2006 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2014J. Randall Corn, Theological Studies B.A., Welch College, 1978 M.Div., Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary, 1982 Graduate studies, Covenant Theological Seminary (ABD) Pastor, Free Will Baptist churches, 1978 -

Personnelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;169


Past President of Ashland City Ministerial Alliance Board member: Tennessee FWB State Home Missions Assistant Moderator: Northern Quarterly of the Cumberland Association Producer of weekly radio broadcast Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2000Online Instructor, Welch College, 2008-

M.A., Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, 1991 Renaissance program choral director, Adjunct percussion instructor, Bethel College, 2005-2006 Who’s Who in American Christian Leadership Award, 1989 Minister of Music, Christian Education, Youth at Baptist Churches in Florida, California, Virginia, and Tennessee, 1983Minister of Music, Inglewood Baptist Church, 2006 – Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2008-

Mary George, Music B.S, Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 1977 MS, Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 1978 Faculty, Trevecca Nazarene College, 1980 - 1992 Private Music Studio - 1978-present Metropolitan Opera Audition Finalist, 1978, 1982 Music career including Nashville Symphony, opera performance, extensive Nashville recording industry experience, 1988 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 1992-

Neil R. Gilliland, Psychology B.S., The Ohio State University, 1974 M.S., Tennessee State University, 1995 Ph.D., Tennessee State University, 2001 Missionary to Cote d’Ivoire, West Africa, 1980-1987 Director of Recruitment, Welch College, 1988-1995 Instructor, Tennessee State University, 1998-2000 Director of Member Care, Free Will Baptist International Missions, 2001 Faculty, Welch College, 1988-1989, 1995-1996 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2007-

Linda Marable, Mathematics B.A., Lipscomb University, 1967 M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1971 Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 1995 Adjunct Instructor of Mathematics, Belmont University, 1983-1999 Professor of Mathematics, Nashville State Community College, 1987-2013; Developmental Mathematics Coordinator, 1994-2006 Adjunct Instructor of Mathematics, Welch College, 1992-2002; 2013-

J. Lynn Griffith, Exercise Science A.S., Cleveland State Community College, 1974 B.S., David Lipscomb University, 1976 M.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1980 D.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1990 Faculty, David Lipscomb University, 1980 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 1994 -

Clint Morgan, Missions B.A., Welch College, 1972 Language Diploma, University of Nantes (France), 1987 M.A., Columbia International University, 1995 Missionary, Free Will Baptist International Missions, 1975-1994 Director, Free Will Baptist International Missions, 2012 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2005-

Emilee K. Hart, Music B.M.E., Welch College, 2004 Music Teacher, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, 2004 – 2013 Music Coordinator, Cross Timbers FWB Church, 2007 -2013 Private Piano Instructor, 2001 Private Voice Instructor, 2005 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2007Mary Holland B.S., Missouri Southern State College, 1989 M.A., Liberty University, 2007 Ed.D., Lipscomb University, 2012 Teacher, International American School of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1997-2002 Family School Coordinator, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, 2006-2013 Teacher, Norman Public Schools, 2013-2014 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, Spring 2016 Allen Jinnette, Business B.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1992 M.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1993 M.S., Georgia State University, 2000 Ph.D., The University of Mississippi, 2010 Graduate Assistant, Department of Accounting, MTSU, 1992-1993 Fiscal Analyst, MAXIMUS, Nashville, TN, 1994 Budget and Finance Committee, Oaklawn, FWB Church, 1992 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2006 Veronica Joines, Music B.S., West Virginia University, 2007 M.M., Belmont University, 2009 Private Violin Intructor, 2007 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2010Mark Lancaster, Music B.A., University of South Florida, 1986

170—Personnel

Jeff Manning, Pastoral Ministry B.A., Welch College, 1986 M.Div., Bob Jones University, 1990 D.Min., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2002 Pastor, Free Will Baptist churches, 1986 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2003 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2007-

Kathy Murphy, Teacher Education B.S., Welch College, 2000 M.Ed., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2002 Faculty, Woodbine Christian Academy, 2000-2006 Faculty, Welch College, 2006-2011 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2011Luann Mutsch, Music B.S., Pilsbury College, 1981 M.M., University of Southern Mississippi, 1993 D.M.A. , ABD, University of Southern Mississippi Private and class voice teacher, University of Southern Mississippi, 1997-1999 Opera and oratorio soloist, numerous performances Classic and sacred concert artist Faculty, Pensacola Christian College, 1990-2002 Music and speech Faculty, Lighthouse Christian School, 2005-2007 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2009Ahad S. Nasab, Mathematics, Science B.S., California State University, Northridge, 1980 M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology, 1981 Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, 1987 Research Engineer, University of Tennessee Space Institute, 1987-1991 Executive Vice-President, Technology Development Corporation, 1990-1993 Assistant Professor, Engineering Technology, Middle Tennessee State University, 1991 Adjunct Faculty, Belmont University, 1998 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 1999Jeff Nichols, Business B.S., Welch College, 1987 M.S., Treveca Nazarene University, 2004 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2015-


David Outlaw, Theological Studies, Missions B.A., Welch College, 1992 M.Div., Mid-America Baptist Seminary, 1995 Ph.D., Mid-America Baptist Seminary, 1998 Faculty, Mid-America Baptist Seminary, 2000 Missionary, Free Will Baptist International Missions, 2006-2013 Pastor, Free Will Baptist Churches, 1993 Missionary In Residence, Welch College, 2009 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2003-2006, 2012Stanley Outlaw, Theological Studies B.A., Welch College, 1962 M.A., Bob Jones University, 1964 Ph.D., Bob Jones University, 1975 Pastor, Free Will Baptist churches, 1957 Faculty, Welch College, 1966-1997 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2002Bruce Patterson, Music B.A., Heritage International Bible College Graduate Studies, Blair School of Music, Vanderbilt University, 2007 Minister of Music, 1990 President, Messiah Songs Publishing Company, 1990 Private Guitar Instructor, 2002 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2010- Eddie Payne, Missions B.A. Welch College, 1962 Additional language and cultural studies: Institute of Linguistics, University of Oklahoma, 1962; French Language Institute, Lausanne, Switzerland, 1963, 1964 Missionary, Free Will Baptist International Missions, 1964-1985 Free Will Baptist International Missions, 1985 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 1999Wesley Ramsay, Music B.M., University of Louisville, 1977 DipABRSM, Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music, 2012 Performing experience: Nashville Symphony, Charleston Symphony Orchestra, North Carolina Symphony, Guadalajara Symphony Orchestra Orchestrations and Collaborations: Tim Sharp, ACDA, Alfred Music, Shawnee Press, Kenneth Stein, Christ Church, Bowling Green KY Conducting Highlights: American Choral Directors, 2009, International Trombone Festival, 2011, First Prestyterian Church, Nashville, TN, 2013 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2014Kenneth Riggs, Psychology, Teacher Education B.A., Welch College, 1964 M.S., Old Dominion University, 1971 M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University, 1973 Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1978 Faculty, Welch College, 1971-1993, Adjunct Professor, Nashville State Community College, 1992 Administrator, Pleasant View Christian School, 20042010 Interim Faculty, Welch College, 2011-2013 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2013Jose L. Rodriguez, Theological Studies B.A., Welch College, 1994 M.A.R., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 2005 Pastor, Free Will Baptist Churches, 1992 - present Moderator, Hispanic Association, Miami, FL, 1995 - 2000 Member, Florida Mission Board, 2001 - 2008 Adjunct Faculty and Online Instructor, Welch College, 2008 Chris Snoddy, Exercise Science B.S., Lipscomb University, 1981 M.A., Appalachian State University, 1988

Baptist Hospital Sports Medicine Center, 1992Athletic Trainer, Welch College, 1996Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 1996-

James R. Sprouse, English B.A., Tennessee Temple University, 1980 M.A., University of Mississippi, 1983 Ph.D., The University of Tennessee, 1989 Faculty, Piedmont College, 1989 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2013Carolyn Treybig, Music B.M. and B.M.E., Baldwin-Wallace Conservatory of Music, 1991 M.M. Flute Performance, University of Akron, 1993 M.M. History and Literature, University of Akron, 1994 Private flute study, The Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, England, 1995 D.M.A., The University of Texas at Austin, 1999 Adjunct Faculty, University of Southern Mississippi, 2003 Adjunct Faculty, Southeastern Louisiana University, 2001-2003 Adjunct Faculty, Belmont University, 2005 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2006Kathy Turner, Teacher Education B.S., Greenville College M.Ed, Wichita State University, 1987 Post Graduate Studies, Ball State University, 20032007 Post Graduate Studies, Northcentral University, 2007-2008 K-8 Learning Disability Teacher, 1983-1999 Faculty, Huntington University, 2001-2009 Adjunct Faculty, Belmont University, 2011 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2010 Bethany H. Wagner, Science M.S. Nursing, Vanderbilt University, 2004 Family Nurse Practitioner, 2004 Consultant, Welch College, 2005Lori Westgard, Spanish B.A. Spanish, University of Georgia, 1994 M.Ed., Tennessee State University, 1996 Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Speech and Hearing Clinic, 1997, 1998 Spanish Teacher, Davidson County Schools, Loudon County Schools, Williamson County Schools, 2006-2013 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2013Steven Woodworth, History B.A., Southern Illinois University, 1982 Ph.D., Rice University, 1987 Faculty, Toccoa Falls College, 1994-1997 Director of Graduate Studies, Texas Christian University, 1997-2000 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College 2002-University, 1997-2000 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College 2002-

Online Instructors Aaron Baldridge, Theology, Bible, Ministry B.S., Welch College, 2003 M.A., Asbury Theological Seminary, 2004 M.A., Hillsdale Free Will Baptist College, 2007 D.Min. (in progress) Beeson Divinity, Samford University Pastor, Free Will Baptist Churches, 1999 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2010 Brian Donley, History, Theology B.A., Vennard College, 1971 M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary, 1974 Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1980

Personnelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;171


D. Min., Drew University, 1987 Professor of Church History and Theology, Executive Vice-President, and President, John Wesley College, 1980 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2008 -

Mike Edwards, Ministry B.A., Welch College, 1995 M.A., Indiana Wesleyan University, 2007 M.Div., Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary and Graduate School, Liberty University, 2011 Men's Residence Hall Director, Welch College, 19931997 Pastor Free Will Baptist Churches, 1997-2011 Director of Annual Fund, Welch College, 2011 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2011 Daryl Ellis, Theology, Bible B.A., Welch College, 1975 M.Div., Covenant Theological Seminary, 1980 Pastor, Free Will Baptist churches, 1976 -2012 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2012Richard Hendrix, Pastoral Ministry A.A., Northwest Alabama Junior College, 1989 B.A., Athens State University, 1992 M.Div., Beeson Divinity, Samford University, 1996 D.Min., Beeson Divinity, Samford University, 2003 Pastor, Free Will Baptist churches, 1976 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2002 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2008 Charissa Isaacs, Psychology B.S., Welch College, 2001 M.A., Spring Arbor University, 2010 Free Will Baptist Home Missionary, 2001-present Family Reunification Program, Michigan, 2007-2010 Outpatient Counselor, Christian Counseling Center, Michigan, 2009-2011 Outpatient Therapist, CMHSAS, Michigan, 2001-present Online Instructor, Welch College, 2013Randy Kinnick, Ministry, Psychology B.S., FreeWill Baptist Bible College, 1983 M.Ed., The College of William and Mary, 1995 Minister of Music and Youth and Pastor of Free Will Baptist churches, 1984 Guidance Counselor, Greenbrier Christian Acad emy, 1992 - 1999 Resident Counselor, Shepherd's Staff Counseling Center, 1995 - 1996 Resident counselor, Christian Psychotherapy Services, 1996 - 1999 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2008 Jared Martin, Music, Humanities M.Div., Southern Seminary, 2010 B.F.A., Columbus University, 2002 B.M., Columbus University, 2002 M.M., Austin Peay State University, 2005 M.A., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2012 M.A., Temple University, 2013 Instructor, Columbus State University, 2001-2003 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2003-2005 Part-time Faculty, Welch College, 2005-2010 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2010 Donald McDonald, Missions B.A., Welch College, 1978 M.A., Columbia Graduate School for Bible and Missions, 1984 Missionary, Free Will Baptist International Missions, 1984 Missionary in Residence, Welch College, 2008 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2008 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2012-

172â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Personnel

Jesse Owens, Theology, Bible B.A., Welch College, 2010 M.Div., Southern Theological Seminary, 2013 College Ministry, Teacher, Free Will Baptist Churches, 2006-Present Online Instructor, Welch College, 2014Lynsey Riggs, Business B.S., Welch College, 2008 M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 2012 Enrollment Management Department, Welch College, 2007-2010 Academic Office Administrative Assistant, Welch College, 2010-2013 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2013Timothy Sturgill, Psychology B.A., Welch College, 1976 M.A., Liberty University, 1985 Free Will Baptist Chaplain, U.S. Air Force, 1976 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2008David Williford, Ministry B.A., Welch College, 1979 M.A., Welch College, 1984 Graduate Studies, New Orleans Baptist Seminary Pastor, Free Will Baptist Churches, 1973 76; 1978-2002 Executive Secretary, FL Free Will Baptists, 2000-2002 Free Will Baptist International Missions Board Member, 1996-2008 Vice President for Advancement, Welch College, 2002 Adjunct Faculty, Welch College, 2014Tim York, Ministry Biblical Studies Certificate, Welch College, 1982 B.S. Liberty University, 2009 M.Th., Liberty University, 2013 Free Will Baptist Evangelist and Pastor, 1982-present Asst. Moderator, National Association of Free Will Baptists, 1997-2003 Moderator, National Association of Free Will Baptists, 2003-present Promotional Director, Kentucky Free Will Baptists, 1986-1987 Free Will Baptist Family Ministries, Board Chairman, 2008-present Director of Development, Free Will Baptist International Missions, 2005-2006 Online Instructor, Welch College, 2014-


Inquiries Questions pertaining to one of the areas listed below may be directed to the person indicated. Academic Affairs/Faculty Members Accreditation Admissions Initial and readmissions International student information Adult Degree Program Athletics Christian Service Donations to the College Financial Aid Library Online Program and Lifetime Learning Prospective Student Tours Relocation Staff Members Student Services Transcripts Transfer of Credit Veterans’ Affairs Welcome/Senior Days

Greg Ketteman gketteman@welch.edu Kevin Hester khester@welch.edu Debbie Mouser debbie@welch.edu Debbie Mouser debbie@welch.edu Jill Ketteman jketteman@welch.edu Jena Simpson jenasimpson@welch.edu Gary Turner gturner@welch.edu John Murray jmurray@welch.edu David Williford dwilliford@welch.edu Angie Edgmon finaid@welch.edu Carol Reid creid@welch.edu Allan Crowson acrowson@welch.edu Jena Simpson jenasimpson@welch.edu Debbie Mouser debbie@welch.edu Bob Bass bbass@welch.edu Craig Mahler cmahler@welch.edu Jon Forlines jforlines@welch.edu Matthew Bracey mbracey@welch.edu Rebekah Talbot rtalbot@welch.edu Matthew Bracey mbracey@welch.edu Greg Ketteman gketteman@welch.edu Jill Ketteman jketteman@welch.edu Debbie Mouser debbie@welch.edu

INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE: Employees who are available to assist enrolled or prospective students are: Matthew Bracey, Registrar (615-844-5233, mbracey@welch.edu) Rebekah Talbot, Admin. Asst. for the Academic Office (615-844-5232, rtalbot@welch.edu) Debbie Mouser, Director of Enrollment Management (615-844-5222, debbie@welch.edu) Josh Owens, Director of Marketing and Media (615-424-7313, jowens@welch.edu) Carol Reid, Librarian (615-844-5274, creid@welch.edu) Wayne Spruill, Director of Institutional Research (Accrediting information) (615-844-5078, wspruill@welch.edu) FINANCIAL INFORMATION: Angie Edgmon, Financial Aid Coordinator (615-844-5249, finaid@welch.edu) Craig Mahler, Vice President for Financial Affairs (615-844-5292, cmahler@welch.edu) Photos: © Harry Butler; © Peyton Hogue; © John Murray

Index—173


Index Academic Departments Arts and Sciences..............................................71 Associate of Arts Degree.............................92 Biology.....................................................73, 111 Associate of Science in Biology (Pre-nursing)......75 Pre-Health Sciences, Cell and Molecular.............74 Business...........................................................77 Associate of Science in Business.................79 Business Administration, International Business.....77 English.....................................................80, 112 Exercise Science and Physical Education........... 83 Human Performance.......................................85 Human Performance, Pre-Health Science.......86 Physical Education.............................. 84, 113 Recreation Leadership..................................... 84 Sports Management........................................85 History.....................................................87, 112 Psychology......................................................90 Music..................................................................93 Performance....................................................95 Worship Ministry...........................................97 Music Education.....................................99, 113 School of Theology ...........................................54 Combination Majors......................................58 E.T.A. Certificate............................................57 General Christian Ministries........................63 Associate of Science in Ministry...................64 Intercultural Studies (Missions)...................69 Pastoral Training............................................61 Youth and Family Ministry...........................66. Teacher Education..............................................102 Early Childhood...........................................106 Child Development and Learning..............109 Post-Baccalaureate Coursework.................103 Secondary......................................................111 EL Minor.......................................................114 Academic Load......................................................38 Academic Probation or Suspension....................38 Academic Standards.............................................36 Accreditation...........................................................8 Administration....................................................166 Admissions Policies..............................................16 Adult Degree Program.......................................118 Appeals of Grades.................................................37 Appeals of Academic Suspension.......................39 Application Procedure.........................................17 Attendance Regulations.......................................39 Bible Majors/Cores.........................................55, 56 Calendar of Events..................................................4 Campus Activities.................................................13 Chapel....................................................................11 Christian Service...................................................11 Classification of Students.....................................37 Conferences...........................................................12 Contents, Table........................................................3 Course Descriptions ............................................123 Costs.......................................................................23 Credit by Examination ........................................20 Credit for Military Training.................................21 Deferred Payments ..............................................24 Degrees Offered .............................................46, 47 Denominational Affiliation...................................9 Employment....................................................22, 30 Entrance Requirements........................................16 Faculty................................................................. 168 Financial Aid ........................................................27 Financial Aid Appeals and Aid Reinstatement...33

175â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Index

Financial Aid, Satisfactory Progress...................31 Financial Information..........................................23 General Information ..............................................7 Grading System ....................................................36 Graduate School Preparation .............................57 Graduation Requirements, Summary................43 Grants.....................................................................27 History of Welch College ......................................9 Honors.................................................................. 40 Inquiries...............................................................173 International Students..........................................18 Insurance, Student................................................26 Law School Preparation.......................................89 Library....................................................................49 Lifetime Learning...............................................121 Loans .....................................................................27 Location ..................................................................9 Lumen.....................................................................14 Map of Campus ......................................................6 Master of Arts in Theology and Ministry...........58 Mission of College..................................................7 Missionary-in-Residence ....................................12 Nursing (2+2 Partners in Nursing Program).........75 Nontraditional Courses........................................21 Notification of Grades..........................................37 Objectives of the College .......................................7 Online Degree Program.....................................116 Organizations .......................................................13 Payment Plans.................................................23, 24 Personnel.............................................................166 Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Message ................................................2 Privacy, Release of Information..........................42 Programs of Study ................................................47 Public Relations Personnel................................167 Purpose of College .................................................7 Re-enrollment.......................................................19 Refund Policy...................................................25,33 Registration...........................................................36 Repeating Courses .........................................32, 40 Report to Students and Prospective Students....10 Residence Requirements......................................20 Room Deposit ......................................................26 ROTC.....................................................................41 Scholarships...........................................................28 Scholarships, Merit-based....................................29 Scholarships, Requirements to Maintain...........30 Seminary Preparation..........................................57 Social Events .........................................................14 Special Courses.....................................................21 Spiritual Emphasis ...............................................11 Sports ....................................................................13 Staff.......................................................................166 Student Consumer Information..........................10 Student Services Personnel................................167 Student Residences...............................................22 Student Wellness Activities..................................14 Transcripts ............................................................25 Transfer Credit......................................................18 Tuition................................................................... 23 Trustees ...............................................................166 Veterans ................................................................21 Welch College Core..............................................50 Withdrawal Procedure, Refunds ..................25, 39 Withdrawal, Return of Unearned Funds............33 Yearbook................................................................14


Professional Organizations American Academy of Religion American Alliance for Physical Education, Recreation American Association for Health Education American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy American Association of Higher Education American Association of Christian Counselors American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers American Choral Directors Association American College of Sports Medicine American Guild of Organists American Harp Society American Red Cross Volunteers American Society for Church Growth Association for Challenge Course Technology Association of Business Administrators of Christian Colleges Association of Christian Librarians Association of Christian Schools International Association of Teacher Educators Christian Business Faculty Association Christian Camping International/USA Christian Library Association Christian Library Network Christian Stewardship Association College Music Society Conductors Guild Council for Advancement and Support of Education Evangelical Homiletics Society Evangelical Missiological Society Evangelical Theological Society Evangelical Training Association Institute for Biblical Research International Reading Association Metropolitan Council of Teacher Educators Middle Tennessee Reading Association Music Educators National Conference Music Teachers National Association Nashville Area Library Alliance Nashville Fellowship of Christian School Administrators National Association for Sport and Physical Education

174â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Organizations

National Association of Basketball Coaches National Association of Educational Buyers National Association of Free Will Baptists National Association of Professors of Hebrew National Association of Teachers of Singing National Council of Teachers of English National Christian College Athletic Association National Council of Teachers of Mathematics National Guild of Piano Teachers National Independent Colleges and Universities Association National Network of Youth Ministries National Speakers Association, Tennessee Near East Archaeological Society North American Patristic Society North American Professors of Christian Education Pencil Partners Phi Beta Kappa Phi Delta Kappa Religious Conference Management Association Society for Music Theory Society of Biblical Literature Southeastern Athletic Trainers Association Southern Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers Southern Association of Institutional Research Southern Association of Pre-Law Advisors Tennessee Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Tennessee Association of Colleges of Teacher Education Tennessee Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers Tennessee Association of Independent Liberal Arts Colleges of Teacher Education Tennessee Association of Institutional Research Tennessee Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Tennessee Association of Teacher Educators Tennessee College Association Tennessee Educational Association of Veterans Program Administrators (TEVPA) Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association (TICUA) Tennessee Reading Association Tennessee Society of Accounting Educators Tenn-Share Library Consortium


2016-17 Welch College Academic Catalog  

2016-17 Welch College Academic Catalog

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