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September 25, 2019

Women’s business From left, Esther Bartlett, Kate Jenkinson, Brooke Delahunty, Kara Puls, Vicki Thomas and Kathleen Puls join a celebration of women in agriculture at an Emmetts ‘Ladies Day’ at Longerenong. Story, page 35. Picture: PAUL CARRACHER

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Increased power, greater traction, more efficiency E

mmetts has just spent the last few weeks running demo’s of the new R4060 John Deere sprayer through the Wimmera and the Mallee. This week it will be at the Paskeville Field Days in South Australia on the Yorke Peninsula. John Deere is expanding the top end of its 4-Series Sprayers with the introduction of its biggest sprayer yet – the 6,057L R4060 Sprayer with the new CommandDrive™ powertrain. In addition, the existing R4045 Sprayer will come standard with CommandDrive beginning with Model Year 2020. CommandDrive is a new hydrostatic allwheel-drive powertrain that transfers more power to the ground while offering improved traction, fuel efficiency and a quieter ride for the operator. These two sprayers are designed for large, broad-acre cropping systems and high-volume applications. “This new powertrain will help farmers and ag service providers cover more acres quickly and efficiently,” Lindsey Pollock, product manager for sprayers for John Deere, said. “We know time is often the critical factor in most field applications, no matter the crop or season, with very tight application windows. The R4060 and redesigned R4045 can help operators traverse wide-ranging field

conditions and hilly terrain in order to make accurate applications faster and more comfortably than before.” CommandDrive is an intelligent powertrain that uses a single hydrostatic pump to power all four variable-displacement wheel motors. If one or more wheels lose traction, the system adjusts to slow the slipping wheels and directs more flow to the other wheels with traction in order to power the sprayer over the terrain. The powertrain helps the sprayer more easily handle hills, soft soil, and other conditions where additional traction is needed. In addition, CommandDrive works in tandem with the engine and entire sprayer system to automatically increase RPMs when more power is needed and to maintain proper spraying. With the powertrain’s Auto Mode setting, operators can maintain selected ground speed and application rate at lower engine RPMs, while the Auto Idle setting reduces the engine’s RPM to 900 when the machine is stopped. Both functions help reduce fuel/ DEF consumption and provide a quieter cab for the operator. Both sprayers come equipped with a multi-function hydro handle with six customisable control buttons, allowing the operator to easily select and control the most common

The John Deere R4045 Sprayer now comes equipped with the new hydrostatic allwheel-drive CommandDrive powertrain. operating functions. Headland Management System also is included, which takes the work out of making headland turns by resuming automated functions, such as AutoTrac™ and BoomTrac™ Pro, and stopping and starting spray applications. AutoTrac Vision and RowSense™ are optional technologies that help keep the sprayers

tracking accurately through fields during the growing season. The ExactApply™ nozzle control technology gives operators the ability to maintain consistent droplet size and pattern at different speeds across the entire width of the boom, while reducing the potential for overlaps, skips and drift. The optional Mobile Weather feature gives operators the ability to document weather, soil and field conditions as they move across a field. All Model Year 2020 sprayers now come standard with an expanded Precision Ag intelligence package. In addition to the existing integration of Generation 4 CommandCenter Displays, AutoTrac and documentation, customers now get JDLink™ with five years of connected service. JDLink enables the machine to easily and securely transfer data according to the customer’s needs, and for customers to monitor machine performance remotely. This expanded set of standard intelligence features enables customers to more easily realize the value of a connected machine. “Owners can leverage the power of Remote Display Access to monitor sprayer usage and performance from their home or office,” Pollock said. “If the sprayer is being underutilised or field operations are not being properly conducted, you can quickly put plans in place to improve productivity.”

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Numbers on the rise at grains park 95 Nelson Street, Nhill CALL 03 5391 2106

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mployee numbers at Horsham’s Grains Innovation Park are on the rise with an official welcome for more than 30 new starters at a lunch tomorrow.

knowledging a few people had left. “This 170 plus does not include the influx of casual staff and seasonal workers we employ throughout the year, including the very busy harvest and summer fire seasons,” she said. “The growth in employees is a fantastic scenario for the site and the region as the new starters are either locals taking up employment opportunities, or new residents moving to Horsham from across Victoria, Australia and internationally. “They bring great social, cultural and economic benefits to the region.” Ms Griffin said most of the new staff members had filled newly created roles, particularly within Agriculture Victoria.

New staff members based at the Horsham site have started roles with Agriculture Victoria, the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning and the Victorian Fisheries Authority. Grains Innovation Park has also welcomed two new business tenants – Grains Research and Development Corporation and the RSPCA. Site leader and Agriculture Victoria research director Traci Griffin said the last 12 months had seen employee numbers at Grains Innovation Park increase from 150 to more than 170, ac-

“This is great news for our senior research leaders who have the opportunity to grow and expand the agricultural research and innovation projects they are involved in,” she said. Ms Griffin said the welcome lunch would officially introduce newcomers to their new colleagues. “Partners and families have also been invited to attend, and if there is interest, they will have the opportunity to tour the site on the day,” she said. “It has been an exciting and busy 12 months at Grains Innovation Park, however before it gets really hectic with the harvest and the fire season, we wanted to take the time to meet and welcome our new colleagues and friends.”

DAY OUT: From left, Liam Trotter, Sara Trotter, June Werner, Michelle Reid, Derek Reid and Carling Henderson-Trotter enjoy an Emmetts Ladies Day at Longerenong.  Picture: PAUL CARRACHER

Celebrating the women in ag Farm machinery might have previously been regarded as a ‘blokey thing’, but an Emmetts Ladies Day has helped highlight the importance of women in agriculture. The farming supplier hosted its second Ladies Day at Longerenong’s Wimmera Events Centre earlier this month as a thank you to women in the farming industry. The event was last hosted in the Wimmera eight years ago. This year’s event provided more than 90 women an opportunity to learn about operating farming machinery, data and technology, as well as healthy living and self-care with Des Lardner Organics naturopaths. Emmetts’ Avril Hogan said the event recognised many women are heavily involved in their family

farm’s business. “Many farms are family businesses where mothers, spouses, daughters and daughters-in-law all contribute in a variety of ways, from in-paddock labour, bookwork, grain training, livestock work, marketing and agronomy to keeping everyone fed and healthy and happy,” she said. “This event was about providing a day to say thank you to those women.” The Ladies Day also helped raise almost $1000 through ticket sales for Australian organisation Beyond Blue. Ms Avril said the day’s success had organisers keen to host another Ladies Day in the Wimmera in the future. – Lotte Reiter

NEWCOMER: Agriculture Victoria animal health officer Brittany Price is one of more than 30 new starters at Horsham’s Grains Innovation Park.

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Experience the difference, Goldacres self-propelled sprayers with the direct drive system are efficient by design, durable by nature. The drive system operates at lower engine RPM which equates to lower cabin noise, less fuel usage and a less stressed drive line and direct power to the ground. Experience a sprayer built for your farming enterprise.

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f you don’t believe the climate is changing, and in large part due to us people on the planet, then skip this story and go straight to the deaths, births and marriages. No point in getting annoyed. Life is too short.

I’ve witnessed a quantum shift in farmer attitudes to climate change over the past decade. I’m sure there are plenty of climate sceptics, but it’s a bit like smokers: they tend to keep their habit pretty much to themselves and avoid the critical stares. Farmers tend now to talk about how to adapt what they do to more dry times by caring better for their soils and breaking some old bad habits. They do so because they have to and there’s little point in wasting their breath discussing whether climate change is man-made. So, what of this climate strike last Friday? My kids are now young adults but I would have supported their right to strike if they were still at school. Our politicians are not taking the lead on this and it’s our kids who will inherit the mess. I had pre-arranged an interview with Federal Environment Minister Sussan Ley for last Friday morning so we could run her response to the strike on Country Today, the radio show I present on 3WM. What was her message to students? “Thank you for caring for the future of the planet. Please don’t believe that the government doesn’t care because we do… Having said that I do not agree with characterising our situation globally as an emergency.”

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Let’s just allow that to resonate for a moment. Okay, so when does it become an emergency? And what is the government doing about it? “It needs to be carefully unpacked; the argument that says our government has done nothing. In terms of our proportion of global emissions, we are meeting our Paris targets – to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent by 2030 – in fact we’re going to exceed that by several years,” Ms Ley said. “While I’m not going to point the finger at other countries, not all countries are going to meet those targets. “And the other thing that often when I talk to students that they’re not aware of, is that per capita Australia has the highest investment in renewable energy in the world. So, we’re punching above our weight when it comes to our contribution to renewables.” And the clincher: “Clearly as a country, we are transitioning to more renewable energy… but we’re not going to crash the economy in the process.” There you have it, kids. It’s going to take a lot more to persuade our government that you are right and they aren’t doing enough.

INSIGHT: From left, Joylene Sutherland, Doug Laidlaw, Peter Armstrong, Richard Murphy and Michael Morgan discuss the use of unusual pipe fittings at a Tatyoon water reticulation workshop.

Farmer water workshops Three highly successful water reticulation workshops in Ararat, Tatyoon and Willaura involved about 60 district farmers gaining a better understanding of how water management could be improved on their farms. The aim of the workshops was to help farmers with some of the decisions they needed to make before connecting to the East Grampians Rural Pipeline. Issues they needed to consider included: how much extra water would they needed; where to locate their main storage tank;

and how to design an effective and efficient water-reticulation system. Each workshop ran for about six hours, with a mix of practical exercises and formal presentations. A highlight was a presentation by farmers Anthony Pola and Steven Start, who shared their experiences moving to a pipeline-fed farm water-reticulation system. Mr Pola and Mr Start stressed the importance of careful planning and systematically working through the design process.

They also acknowledged the importance of seeking professional advice when selecting pipes, pumps and other pipeline parts. Further workshops are planned for next year on completion of the design of the East Grampians Pipeline. People seeking more information or to register an interest can contact Clem Sturmfels, Agriculture Victoria, on 5355 0535, 0429 018 879 or Sarah Tottenham, GWMWater, on 5381 9610.

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Trespass laws welcomed by Tehan 95 Nelson Street, Nhill CALL 03 5391 2106

Strict new farm trespass laws to protect Australia’s farmers from the unlawful actions of animal activists have passed Australian Parliament. Member for Wannon Dan Tehan said the Criminal Code Amendment – Agricultural Protection – Bill showed Australia’s farmers that Australians were on their side. “Militant animal activists have invaded farms across the country trespassing, threatening and harassing farming families,” he said. “This bill makes it a criminal offence to publish material, via a carriage service like the internet, if you intend to incite trespass, proper-

PULSE INFORMATION: Southern Pulse Agronomy lead researcher Jason Brand.  Picture: BRAD COLLIS

Wimmera heart for pulse crops P

ulse crops will take centre stage in the Wimmera next month with an annual Southern Pulse Agronomy Field Day, part of an Australian Pulse Conference in Horsham.

Grains Research and Development Corporation PBSeeds, Seednet and Agriculture Victoria is supporting the October 15 field day. Southern Pulse Agronomy is a GRDC investment project and led by researcher and Agriculture Victoria pulse-research agronomist Jason Brand. Mr Brand said the field day would feature new-variety releases, a historic variety demonstration, chickpea and faba bean disease management, and advances in herbicide tolerance. “Researchers, industry agronomists and grain marketers will all be in attendance to answer growers’ questions,” he said. The field day will be just west of Horsham on the Wimmera Highway from 8.30am to 2pm, with a free lunch included. Supported by the GRDC, the Australian Pulse Conference will be in Horsham from October 15 to 17. The conference will bring together the Australian pulse industry to ‘discover and discuss the latest achievements and advances in pulse research and development’.

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Pulse production has quadrupled in Australian agriculture during the past 10 years. Exploring Taste and Technology, the threeday Australian Pulse Conference will highlight the growing range of technologies pushing research, production and trade boundaries to drive increases in pulse production and productivity. It will also examine the growing role pulses are playing in nutrition and the possibilities for their increased inclusion in Western diets. APC 2019 begins with a unique field day open to both conference delegates and the local pulse industry. The field day provides an opportunity to observe Australian research that increases pulse productivity and reliability through advances in breeding and agronomy. After a barbecue lunch, there will be tour options including the Grains Innovation Park Research Precinct and-or a range of seed-production and food-packaging companies. The conference program of ‘Innovation leading transformational change’ will focus on five key sub themes. They are: pushing pulse-yield boundaries; accessing new markets, value-adding pulses; expanding production – new crops and new environments; and smart farms and remote sensing. Further details about the field day are available from Jason Brand on 0409 357076 or emailing jason.brand@agriculture.vic.gov.au.

ty damage or theft on agricultural land. Animal activists who use the personal information of family farmers to incite trespass risk imprisonment of up to five years. “The government is serious about deterring those who want to disrupt and intimidate our farmers, fishers and foresters in their homes and on their properties.” Anyone convicted of the offence would face up to five years in prison. Mr Tehan said Australians expected the farmers who fed and clothed them – and many millions round the world – should not be harassed, or worse, as they went about their work.

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Cover-cropping workshop at Joel Joel 95 Nelson Street, Nhill CALL 03 5391 2106

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roject Platypus Landcare Network and Concongella Landcare Group will present a covercropping workshop at Joel Joel Hall today.

AGF Seeds sales and research agronomist Jade Killoran will be guest speaker at the Boosting Productivity with Cover Cropping event, from 3pm to 5pm. A paddock walk and talk about sum-

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

mer cover options will follow Ms Killoran’s address. Ms Killoran said cover cropping involved multi-species forages to boost production, profitability and sustainability. “Covers can be used to shorten feed gaps while improving soil health, which is a win-win for the farmer,” she said. Ms Killoran provided answers to common questions about cover cropping –

What machinery do I use? Anything. I’ve seen broadcasting-harrowing, spreading and rolling-airseeding, disc seeding-traditional heavy duty cultivation work. It depends on your machinery and your expertise. If you haven’t access to machinery, a contractor or friend will. Small seeds can be broadcast and rolled with better results than larger seeds. How do I prepare my paddock? A good seedbed always works well,

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but it depends on the cover crop. A simple blend with a mix of cereals and tillage radish is forgiving due to its vigour. It can be sown a little rough if necessary. What do I sow? A cover-crop options sheet and accompanying chart will give some ideas for sowing over spring and summer, and winter can be a blend of cereals and brassica to start. Should I sow mixes? Yes. Even just

having two species in a paddock can make a big difference to soil health and animal health. Keep it simple at first. Make a simple two-to-five species mix by thinking about what grows well in your area. Try a small area first with a low-cost cover to boost your confidence. People wanting more information abut the Boosting Productivity with Cover Cropping event can call 5358 4410.

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group fighting against serrated tussock’s march across the state has urged landowners to check their properties for the noxious weed.

Ivan Carter from Victorian Serrated Tussock Working Party said the weed had been spreading across western Victoria for the past decade. “The recent rain and warm winter in some parts of Victoria has been good for crops, but unfortunately, also good for the growth of serrated tussock,” he said. “Controlling serrated tussock before the plant goes to seed is critical to prevent further spread, lost productivity and increased control requirements.” The largest occurrence of serrated tussock in Victoria has been at Landsborough and Hamilton. “Infestations are also known to exist at Stawell, Ararat, Dunkeld, Lake Bolac and Glenorchy,” Mr Carter said. “The known infestations in western Victoria are mostly being treated by landowners, in coordination with Agriculture Victoria, but it is feared there might be many more infestations not yet identified across the region.” Analysts believe serrated tussock now covers more than 240,000 hectares in Victoria. Large infestations of the weed require ongoing management and an integration of several control techniques. Each mature serrated tussock plant can produce 100,000 seeds in a season, blowing up to 20 kilometres from the parent plant. The

NEED TO CONTROL: A large infestation of serrated tussock in a grazing paddock near Bacchus Marsh. conduct surveillance for serrated tussock and watch out for new infestations that might be blown in or introduced through fodder. Before flowering, serrated tussock has a lime-green appearance. When flowering the flowerheads have a distinctive purple colour developing as the seeds ripen in late spring and early summer. “These features help serrated tussock stand out from the native tussock grasses,” Mr Carter said. The VSTWP has developed an online video and information sheet, at www. serratedtussock.com, to help landowners identify the pest grass.

Victoria Serrated Tussock Working Party, VSTWP, has advised land managers that having competitive pasture and good ground cover was one of the most important aspects to weed management. “Serrated tussock is an example of a weed that does not like competition and well-established pastures,” Mr Carter said. He said controlling serrated tussock before the plant went to seed was critical in preventing further spread, lost productivity and increased control requirements. “Control can be achieved through the use of registered herbicide, manual removal or cultivation. “We advise land managers to regularly

Finger on the pulse Agricultural leaders have urged farmers keen to put their finger ‘on the pulse’ of different crops at this year’s Australian Pulse Conference. The event, in Horsham from October 15–17, will combine a field day and a conference program to give a snapshot of an important part of the cropping sector. Agriculture Victoria is a gold sponsor of the event and senior research scientist Garry Rosewarne said it was appropriate that the district was the venue for this year’s event. “The Wimmera is the centre of Victoria’s pulse-growing industry and visitors will have the opportunity to not only hear the latest about the industry but also see it,” he said. The three-day event starts with a Southern Pulse Agronomy Field Day, an annual event showcasing pulse research as well as new varieties and agronomic practices. There will also be an opportunity for people to visit Agriculture Victoria’s Grains Innovation Park. The second and third days of the conference will cover important issues for the pulse industry. A call for abstracts will centre on ‘Innovation leading to trans-

formational change’. Topic areas to be addressed include pushing up yields, smart farms and remote sensing, expanding pulse production, accessing new markets and value-adding. Keynote speakers from Australia and overseas have invitations to make presentations, including Dr Judith Burstin from the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, and Nevin Rosaasen from Alberta Pulse, Canada. As well as guest speakers, there will be poster presentations of key projects which could benefit the pulse industry. The field days and conference program are balanced by social events which allow networking with a range of scientists, producers, researchers and marketers who share a common interest in the future of the pulse industry. Croppers are encouraged to register, with various options available including a one-day pass or a three-day pass, which includes access to the field day, a ticket to the conference welcome reception and a ticket to the conference dinner. There is also a discounted rate for students. For more information and for registration people can visit website apc2019.com.au/.

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l/ h

1 0.3 k m

a 6 l/h 87.

l/ h

a

H-SELECT

17

0

With H-SELECT Turn Compensation

Without Turn Compensation

But by managing up to four nozzles per nozzle body, HARDI H-SELECT delivers tip-to-tip accuracy at almost any speed – turning, accelerating or just eating up the acres. H-SELECT also lets you set and adjust a precise droplet size via your in-cab run-screen, to minimise drift. It all adds up to more effective, efficient spraying under a wider range of conditions. PLUS order RUBICON today and we’ll fit H-SELECT as an added bonus worth up to $50,000 (inc. GST). Now that’s a big deal!

Wimmera Mallee Ag

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PTY LTD

Wednesday, September 25, 2019


Your Lucky Stars

1. What was the name of the polarising New South Wales police inspector who was a second baronet and renowned for his pursuit and clashes with notable bushrangers Frank Gardiner and Ben Hall and their gangs? 2. What is a lipid? A. A substance insoluble in water but soluble in alcohol, ether or chloroform. B. A terrestrial member of a group of amphibians closely related to newts. C. A type of long-lived virus-based infection that causes sporadic sores, such as herpes. D. An abnormal growth that can appear on the livers of mammals exposed to high levels of atmospheric benzine. 3. True or false? Discoveries have revealed that many parts of the Wimmera are home to intense geothermal energy?

4. What is the name of an optical instrument, often used as a toy, with two or more reflecting surfaces tilted towards each other in an angle, so one or more parts of the surfaces appear as regular symmetrical patterns when viewed from the other end? 5. The Australian Federal Government led by what leader in what year first introduced the publicly funded health-care system Medicare, originally called Medibank? 6. European foxes have had a devastating impact on wildlife and sheep farmers since their introduction to Australia in the 1870s. They were shipped from England for sport hunting and initially released into the wild in what two states? Too easy? What Australian state vigilantly tries to remain fox-free?

7. What British musical band from the 1960s Merseybeat scene and managed by Brian Epstein, shares a name with a medical device that helps control abnormal heart rhythms? 8. Name the primary characters from the Japanese fantasy television series ‘Monkey’, which attracted widespread international success in the late 1970s and early 80s despite being dubbed into English for Western audiences? 9. American folk hero Davy Crockett, the subject of legend, myth and movies, was a real person who died at the Alamo during the Texas Revolution. He was also a politician, representing what American state in the United States House of Representatives? 10. Bosisto, which produces eucalyptus-based products, can trace a large part of its history back to what Wimmera settlement and station?

with Kerry Kulkens

^    a  ARIES:

www.consortiumpw.com.au

For the week September 29 - October 5

(March 21 - April 20) Lucky Colour: Orange Lucky Day: Thursday Racing Numbers: 2-5-2-4 Lotto Numbers: 23-24-26-28-36-43 Caution around loved ones, they could be easily upset in any form of financial dealings. Pay very close attention to details or the fine print. Someone creating problems for you will have cause to regret it.

TAURUS:

(April 21 - May 20) Lucky Colour: Black Lucky Day: Saturday Racing Numbers: 3-7-2-5 Lotto Numbers: 3-7-25-27-44-45 You will have to be alert to a good opportunity in case you miss out. Temper will be harder to control, wiser to let off steam before the crunch. A contact from the past could surprise.

GEMINI:

(May 21 - June 21) Lucky Colour: White Lucky Day: Tuesday Racing Numbers: 9-1-9-2 Lotto Numbers: 9-19-22-30-38-41 A busy social time, a lot going on around you. New friends, new ventures, unexpected travel. Many singles finding the love of their lives. The married having family reasons to celebrate.

CANCER:

(June 22 - July 22) Lucky Colour: Purple Lucky Day: Wednesday Racing Numbers: 1-1-1-5 Lotto Numbers: 11-15-21-31-34-37 Don’t become involved in the schemes of people you do not know, or are unsure about. Wise to keep with those you know and trust. Social life could bring some memorable events.

LEO:

(July 23 - August 22) Lucky Colour: Pink Lucky Day: Monday Racing Numbers: 2-5-6-1 Lotto Numbers: 2-4-5-26-29-40 Disturbing influences are around you, some could be trying to take advantage. Don’t mix business with pleasure and routine matters should be dealt with for now. Important decisions left until later.

VIRGO:

(August 23 - September 23) Lucky Colour: Silver Lucky Day: Friday Racing Numbers: 8-2-2-2 Lotto Numbers: 8-22-25-27-32-42 A good period in which some of the things you thought impossible can happen. Although, career or financial dealings are favourable. Your lover needs special attention.

LIBRA:

(September 24 - October 23) Lucky Colour: Yellow Lucky Day: Tuesday Racing Numbers: 5-1-4-1 Lotto Numbers: 3-14-18-30-39-40 Be careful if signing documents and a careless attitude could get you in trouble. If you are travelling, old lovers could appear on the scene and could have their reasons for doing so.

SCORPIO:

(October 24 - November 22) Lucky Colour: Green Lucky Day: Sunday Racing Numbers: 7-1-7-2 Lotto Numbers: 7-17-21-33-36-38 For the Scorpio who is indulging in a bit on the side, you could be caught out. Not the time to step out of line. If you maintain a low-profile things will turn out better than expected.

KERRY KULKENS’ PSYCHIC LINE 1900 946 244 or 1300 246 244

SAGITTARIUS:

(November 23 - December 20) Lucky Colour: Burgundy Lucky Day: Wednesday Racing Numbers: 4-1-1-2 Lotto Numbers: 4-10-12-13-25-43 Don’t listen to gossip or pass it on and be selective in accepting social invitations. Most will be in a happier frame of mind than before and most obstacles will be clearing out of the way.

CAPRICORN:

(December 21 - January 19) Lucky Colour: Brown Lucky Day: Friday Racing Numbers: 5-9-3-4 Lotto Numbers: 5-9-34-35-37-44 Wiser to stay with the known, unrestrained optimism will cost you a lot. Avoid going to extremes, curiosity could lead you into situations better avoided.

AQUARIUS:

(January 20 - February 19) Lucky Colour: Mauve Lucky Day: Monday Racing Numbers: 6-9-1-5 Lotto Numbers: 6-9-12-34-27-44 Don’t push too hard to gain your way. Difficulties could be encountered with authority figures. However, valuable support tends to come from family connections.

PISCES:

(February 20 - March 20) Lucky Colour: Yellow Lucky Day: Saturday Racing Numbers: 2-1-1-2 Lotto Numbers: 2-11-20-29-38-42 Unexpected recognition for the hardworking Piscean. Too much optimism could get out of hand. Wiser to take loved ones into your confidence before starting on anything that involves more than you.

SMS 199 242 76 $4 send / receive By appointment 9754 4587

website: www-kerrykulkens-com-au

call cost $5-50 inc GST per min Mob/pay phones extra

Answers: 1. Sir Frederick Pottinger. He died from his wounds after accidentally shooting himself while boarding a moving coach. 2. A. With carbohydrates and proteins, lipids are the main parts of plant and animal cells. Cholesterol and triglycerides are lipids. 3. True. Geologists establishing a Victorian geothermal map about 10 years ago stumbled across a previously unknown ‘blanket’ of geothermal heat stretching from the Grampians into the Mallee. The heat is about three kilometres under the surface. 4. Kaleidoscope. 5. Gough Whitlam’s Labor Government introduced the scheme in 1975. It was limited to paying customers in 1976 by the Fraser Government and the Hawke Government reintroduced the universal system in 1984. 6. Victoria and South Australia. By 1883 they were considered a ‘pest’ and Victoria introduced its first fox-bounty scheme. Within 100 years foxes have spread to most parts of Australia but have failed to become established in Tasmania, where wildlife authorities maintain a high-alert status regarding the pest. 7. Gerry and the Pacemakers. They were responsible for songs including ‘I Like It’ and ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’. 8. Monkey, the monkey king released from 500 years imprisonment under a mountain, monk Tripitaka, Sandy, the water monster, and Pigsy, the pig monster. 9. Tennessee. 10. Antwerp. Felton Grimwade and Co distributed Bosisto’s Oil of Eucalyptus in 1865 before forming new firm the Eucalyptus Mallee Company and busying Antwerp Station near Dimboola, home of low-growing Mallee trees. The Antwerp company merged with Bosisto and J. Bosisto and Co formed.

Order before

December 14

Formerly Everun Australia

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FREE *

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99Rated 3000kg operating 99125Hp Turbo Diesel Motor 994400mm lift height 994 Speed Powershift Transmission 9936km/h Road Speed

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The Titan product range is supported by the Titan Tough, 2 Year / 2400 factory warranty

99Passive Boom Suspension 99Electronic Float Function 99Hydraulic Quick Hitch 994 in 1 Bucket 99Pallet forks 99Spare Wheel 99Reverse Camera 99Air Conditioned / Heated ROPS Cabin

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Discover the strength of Titan today, and why we made the switch from Everun at www.titanhi.com.au or call 03 9786 6363. * Free delivery is within a 300km radius of Horsham, Victoria. Wednesday, September 25, 2019

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AgLife - September 25, 2019 edition  

Read the September edition of AgLife online!

AgLife - September 25, 2019 edition  

Read the September edition of AgLife online!

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