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RIVERSIDE-BROOKFIELD Also serving North Riverside $1.00

Vol. 33, No. 41

October 10, 2018

Red-light cameras a go Riverside trustees OK contrac contract PAGE 10

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rblandmark.com @riversidebrookfieldlandmark

Riverside man’s estate sues property firm PAGE 3

@riversidebrookfield_landmark

Proviso Township agency chips in for special rec PAGE 8

@RBLandmark

Riverside Caucus won’t endorse in 2019 race

Members to focus on election board fines, future direction By BOB UPHUES Editor

For the first time in its roughly 90-year history, the Riverside Community Caucus will not interview or endorse candidates for the 2019 Consolidated Election, where voters will select three new village trustees. At a meeting on Oct. 3, members of the caucus decided to hit the pause button in order to sort out how to reconcile $17,275 in fines levied against the Riverside Community Caucus political committee by the Illinois State Board of Elections, which terminated the committee in July for failing to file quarterly campaign disclosure reports or filing them late. Jill Mateo, vice chair of the Riverside Community Caucus board and the only board officer in place at the moment, said the organization has hired an election attorney to help settle matters related to the fines. “We are all committed to the mission of the Caucus,” said Mateo, who is the wife of Riverside Village President Ben Sells, who was interviewed and endorsed by the Caucus in his runs for trustee in 2007 and 2011 and for village president in 2013. See CAUCUS on page 15

PROVIDED

ISLAND HOPPING: Terry Spencer Hesser (above right) is writer/director of the PBS series “Islands Without Cars,” currently in the midst of shooting the second season. Among the locations explored in Season 1 (above) was the Isle of Porquerolles off France’s Cote d’Azure.

Riverside filmmaker has global vision Mother-daughter team explore pedestrian-only islands in PBS series By JACKIE GLOSNIAK Contributing Reporter

Over the last several years, it seems as though Americans young and old have

caught the travel bug more than ever before. From Instagram-worthy moments and crossing off bucket list dreams, to celebrity television travel documentaries, most of us know someone or have

watched a show about someone who has recently traveled to an exotic, one-in-alifetime destination. See FILMMAKER on page 14

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12 E. Quincy St., Riverside, IL

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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

Estate of man who died in fall files suit Complaint claims negligence led to wrongful death

By BOB UPHUES Editor

The estate of a man who fell to his death while painting a wooden back porch at a Riverside apartment building in September has sued the property management company and the alleged owner of the building for more than $50,000. On Sept. 4, Randall Schirmer, 70, was painting a second-floor back porch at the Tower Apartments, 22-42 East Ave. and 25-39 Forest Ave., when a hand railing gave way, causing him to fall to the concrete below. He was discovered at about 8:45 a.m. by an employee of the property management company, who called 911. Paramedics arrived to find Schirmer unresponsive. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Schirmer was a tenant of the apartment building, and police reported that he had been hired on occasion to do odd jobs at the building in the past. However, according to the police, the man identified as the owner of the building, Ronald Kafka, denied hiring Schirmer to paint the rear porch at the Tower Apartments. The lawsuit states Kafka “owned, operated, managed, maintained and controlled” the building at the time of Schirmer’s death. Kafka has long denied owning the building, saying he is an agent or consultant to the real estate trust identified as the owner in Cook County property records. On Sept. 7, Brian Schirmer, who is Randall’s brother and administrator of his estate, filed suit in the Law Division of Cook

County Circuit Court, against Kafka and Property Rental Inc., the property management company for the Tower Apartments. The president of Property Rental Inc. is listed as Donna DiBrito in Illinois Secretary of State records. DiBrito for many years has been involved in companies associated with Kafka. She was not named individually as a defendant in Schirmer’s lawsuit. It was DiBrito, according to the Riverside Police Department’s death investigation report, who discovered Randall Schirmer on the ground near the back porch he had been painting. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of Brian Schirmer and Elise George, who are identified as Randall Schirmer’s siblings. Attorney Timothy Ocasek of the law firm Cooney and Conway represents the estate of Randall Schirmer. The suit claims Kafka and the property management company “carelessly and negligently” failed to maintain or repair the stairwell and railing and failed to warn tenants of its poor condition. It also states the defendants should not have allowed anyone to use the stairwell and should have known of its poor condition, and that Randall Schirmer wrongfully died as a result. The estate is asking a judge to order Kafka and the property management company to pay a sum in excess of the $50,000 jurisdictional amount, plus court costs. Judge Moira S. Johnson is hearing the case. Meanwhile, on Sept. 6, Property Rental Inc. filed a building permit application with

the village of Riverside to demolish and replace the three-story rear porch/stairwell structure Randall Schirmer was painting when he fell to his death. Sonya Abt, the village’s community development director, said the village has also ordered the property management company to give them a structural analysis of the other wooden stairwell at the building. Repairs to or replacement of that stairwell will depend on the results of that analysis, Abt said. On Sept. 26, the Riverside Preservation Commission held a special meeting to approve a certificate of appropriateness for the porch/stairwell replacement as well as a host of other exterior repairs to the building, which the village had ordered earlier this year. Those repairs include tuck pointing, painting, repair cracked windows and limestone lintels, repairing and replacing downspouts and gutters and building a dumpster corral, among other things. The company had applied for a certificate of appropriateness for those repairs back in June, but approval was delayed after the village asked for additional information. While the Preservation Commission approved certificates of appropriateness for all of the repairs, the village still has not approved the building permit for the rear porch/stairwell replacement. Abt said additional information about the work is needed and that a structural engineer needs to sign off on the plans before the village issues the building permit.

Riverside to install ‘speed table’ on Lionel Road Traffic calming device employed to slow down traffic By BOB UPHUES Editor

Riverside’s first “speed table,” a traffic-calming device that’s an alternative to speed bumps, will be installed on a stretch of Lionel Road and tested over the next six weeks or so to see if it slows down motorists who use the street as a cut-through. The high-impact recycled rubber “table” will be placed on Lionel Road between Delaplaine and Miller roads in response to complaints from residents

who say out-of-town motorists use Lionel Road as a shortcut during morning and afternoon rush hours. “We received many, many concerns from residents about traffic there,” said Police Chief Thomas Weitzel. Speed tables were among the trafficcalming measures recommended by the consulting firm that conducted a village-wide traffic study in 2017 and 2018. Other traffic-calming measures, such as striping to create parking lanes on See SPEED TABLE on page 10

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IN THIS ISSUE Big Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Kosey Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Editor Bob Uphues Sports Editor Marty Farmer Staff Photographer Alexa Rogals Editorial Design Manager Claire Innes Editorial Designers Jacquinete Baldwin, Javier Govea Advertising Production Manager Philip Soell Advertising Design Manager Andrew Mead Advertising Designers Mark Moroney, Debbie Becker IT Manager/Web Developer Mike Risher Advertising Director Dawn Ferencak Advertising Sales Marc Stopeck, Bill Wossow Inside Sales Representative Mary Ellen Nelligan Media Assistant Megan Dickel Event Coordinator Carmen Rivera Circulation Manager Jill Wagner Credit Manager Laurie Myers Front Desk Maria Murzyn, Carolyn Henning Publisher Dan Haley Associate Publisher Dawn Ferencak Business Manager Joyce Minich Chairman Emeritus Robert K. Downs

HOW TO REACH US ADDRESS 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302 PHONE 708-442-6739 ■ FAX 708-467-9066 E-MAIL buphues@wjinc.com ONLINE www.RBLandmark.com The Landmark is published weekly on Wednesday by Wednesday Journal, Inc., an Illinois corporation. The newspaper is available on newsstands for $1.00. A one-year subscription costs $25 within Cook County and $34 outside the county. Advertising rates may be obtained by calling our office. Periodical rate postage paid at Oak Park, IL (USPS 0019-585). Postmaster send address corrections to Landmark, 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302. © 2018 Wednesday Journal, Inc.

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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

P O L I C E

R E P O R T S

Five injured as van strikes Pace bus

Sts. Peter and Paul

featuring the

Five people were taken to an area hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries after a work van rammed into the rear end of a Pace bus, which was stopped at a red light on southbound Harlem Avenue at Addison Road on Oct. 8 at about 2:20 p.m. According to Riverside Police Chief Thomas Weitzel, the van was driven by a 36-year-old Hickory Hills man, who was not injured in the crash. He was ticketed for failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident. The van sustained extensive front-end damage. “It jolted the bus pretty good,” Weitzel said. Among those injured on board the bus was the driver, who was described as a 50-yearold Villa Park woman. Four bus passengers reportedly, all women, were also injured. Riverside Fire Chief Matthew Buckley described the injuries as “bumps and bruises” but also said that some passengers were thrown from their seats by the force of the crash. Three other passengers on board the bus were uninjured. Southbound traffic on Harlem Avenue was restricted to just one lane in the vicinity of the crash for more than an hour as paramedics and police investigators processed the scene.

(performing music from the Ballroom & Swing Era)

Dog bites boy in groin

Halloween Dance

Dick Elliott Orchestra Friday, October 26th, 6:30 pm

Costumes welcome. Light refreshments available for purchase. Admission $12.00

“Faith Active in Love”

250 Woodside Road, Riverside, IL 60546 Telephone (708) 442-5250 Rev. Dennis J. Lauritsen, Pastor www.stspeterandpaulriverside.org

Bring in this ad for a $2 discount on admission Proceeds to benefit the 60 for the 60th Repair and Restoration Fund

Sunday Worship

Liturgy of Holy Communion

10:15 a.m.

Saint Barbara Catholic Church

4008 Prairie Avenue, Brookfield • 708-485-2900 www.stbarbarabrookfield.org

Mass Schedule

Weekdays: 8:00am Monday - Saturday Weekends: 5:00pm on Saturday Sunday: 7:30, and 10:00am • 12:30pm Spanish Mass

Pray the Rosary

After 8:00am Mass – Monday – Saturday Tuesday Evenings – 6:30pm • Friday Evenings – 7:00pm Spanish

A 15-year-old North Riverside boy was hospitalized after he was bitten in “his groin” by a dog as he walked in the vicinity of First and Forest avenues in Riverside on Oct. 1 at about 9:20 p.m. According to the police report, the boy was walking home after playing basketball with some friends when he crossed paths with a Riverside man walking a dog, which bit the boy. Riverside Police Chief Thomas Weitzel described the dog as a 55-pound male Australian cattle dog. The dog walker reportedly drove the boy to his home and the boy’s mother took him to Loyola University Medical Center, where hospital personnel notified police. Police cited the dog’s owner for the dog bite, having no local dog license and for the dog failing to have received a rabies shot. As of Oct. 8, the dog was still being housed at a local animal hospital due to it not having been vaccinated for rabies. There was no additional information on the boy’s condition.

Eucharistic Adoration

Museum window shot with BB

Reconciliation

The chairwoman of the Riverside Historical Commission called police on Oct. 1 to report that sometime during the prior week, someone had damaged the north-facing window of the Riverside Historical Museum in Centennial Park by shooting a BB-type weapon at it. Police stated that Connie Guardi reported to them that the damage occurred between

2:00 – 9:00pm every Monday Saturday 8:45 – 9:30am

Please Call (708) 613-3362 to add a listing in the Church Guide

Sept. 22 and Sept. 29 and was described as a hole in the window, which was also cracked.

Vehicle break-ins ■ A resident of the 300 block of Lionel Road, Riverside, contacted police on the morning of Oct. 2 to report that his unlocked vehicle had been burglarized at about 3:45 a.m. on that date. A surveillance camera reportedly was able to capture the break-in and video was turned over to police. Among the items taken from the vehicle were an iPhone 8 Plus, an iPhone 7 Plus, an iPad Mini, a pair of Beats Studio 3 wireless headphones and three pairs of Jaybird wireless headphones. The victim was able to track the iPad to a location on Chicago’s Southwest Side, but it’s unclear whether police were able to follow up on that information. ■ Riverside police responded to the 100 block of South Delaplaine Road on Oct. 2 to report that during the overnight hours of Oct. 1-2, someone had entered her unlocked vehicle and removed a suburban school districtissued Lenovo laptop computer.

Wanted man arrested Brookfield police detained a 25-year-old man who was wanted for questioning by Berwyn police in connection with an attempted homicide in that city and turned him over to that agency. According to the police report, an officer on patrol observed the man standing on the porch of a home in the 4200 block of Maple Avenue on Oct. 5 at about 9 p.m. and had prior knowledge that he was wanted for questioning. After getting confirmation that Berwyn still sought the man for questioning, the officer took him into custody and turned him over to Berwyn police.

Bikes stolen A resident of the 3700 block of Maple Avenue, Brookfield, called police to report that on Oct. 5 at about 6:30 p.m. she had left her bicycle against a fence next to her driveway and left it there while she went inside her home for about a minute. When she returned her bicycle and another identical pink-and-white mountain bike had been taken from the property. The bikes were valued at about $380. These items were obtained from police reports filed by the Riverside, North Riverside and Brookfield police departments, Oct. 1-8, and represent a portion of the incidents to which police responded. Unless otherwise indicated, anybody named in these reports has only been charged with a crime. These cases have not been adjudicated.

— Compiled by Bob Uphues


The Landmark, October 10, 2018

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Brookfield hires interim public works director Former Rolling Meadows assistant inked to two-month deal

By BOB UPHUES Editor

Brookfield officials will meet with a representative from the recruiting firm GovHR USA this week to begin a search for a new public works director, following the departure of the former director, Amy Wagner, last month. In the meantime, village trustees voted unanimously on Oct. 8 to approve a contract with the company to hire Robert Hartnett as interim public works director for a twomonth period ending Nov. 30. The agreement can be extended by mutual agreement for another two months, through January 2019, if the village’s search for a

permanent replacement extends all know their jobs.” past November. Hartnett said he’s spent the past week wading through paHarnett, whose first day on the perwork, becoming familiar job actually was Oct. 1, is retired with infrastructure projects unfrom a long career with the pubder way in the village and getlic works department in the city ting a handle on the technology of Rolling Meadows. He spent 38 used by the village. years with the department, startHe has a bachelor’s degree ing out in 1977 as a laborer and in public administration from working his way through the Roosevelt University and is beranks to assistant director of ROBERT HARTNETT ing paid $70 per hour. Brookfield public works before retiring in Village Manager Timothy Wi2015. “I’m really here to help staff do what they berg said the interim position is a full-time, need to do to get their jobs done,” said Hart- 40-hour-per-week job, meaning Hartnett will nett, who is not applying for the open direc- earn $2,800 a week. The village will pay GovHR for Hartnett’s tor position. “The foremen are great; they

services on a bi-weekly basis, according to the terms of the agreement. GovHR owes the village of Brookfield a “free” employee search since Wagner, who was also recruited by Gov HR, left her position before 24 months. The village will only be billed for incidental costs related to the current public works director search. “I think this can be somewhat streamlined,” said Village President Kit Ketchmark of the new search for a public works director. Wiberg said he believed that a new permanent public works director could be hired by the end of 2018, though the holiday season might play a part in delaying when that person might actually begin the job.

Brookfield extends moratorium on special uses The village of Brookfield has extended a moratorium on accepting any special use applications for the Eight Corners or Station Area zoning districts while village staff and the Planning and Zoning Commission continue to examine just what uses they wish to permit in those commercial and mixed-use

districts. Initially imposed for six months back in April, the moratorium was extended another four months by village trustees in a unanimous vote on Oct. 8. Village President Kit Ketchmark said that with Village Manager Timothy Wiberg start-

ing in that position on Sept. 24, “We’re trying to give him a chance to get up to speed on this.” In August, the Planning and Zoning Commission put off a vote on a staff recommendation that would have made wholesale changes to the land use table in the C3 zoning district, which encompasses Eight Corners.

The proposed changes would have permitted only restaurants, bars, prepared food businesses, multifamily and mixed-use buildings, financial services businesses, healthcare offices, personal improvement See MORATORIUM on page 15


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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

BIG WEEK October 10-17

Why ERA?

The Riverside Branch of the AAUW and Riverside Public Library host “Legalize Equality: Why ERA?” on Sunday, Oct. 14 at 2 p.m. in the Quiet Reading Room of the library, 1 Burling Road. The Equal Rights Amendment was passed by Congress 40 years ago and ratified in Illinois in 2018, but is still one state short of becoming law. What is the law all about? The meeting is open to the public and refreshments will be served.

Painting by Andreas Fischer

Boo! at the Zoo returns

New show at RAC

Riverside Arts Center, 32 E. Quincy St., presents “Are you OK?” featuring paintings by Andreas Fischer in the Freeark Gallery from Oct. 14 through Nov. 17.and “We Are Beasts” featuring the work of Sarah and Joseph Belknap in the outdoor sculpture garden from Oct. 14 through December. An opening reception for both shows will be held Oct. 14 from 3 to 6 p.m. Free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday-Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m.

And more The League of Women Voters of the LaGrange Area are sponsoring the presentation “Medicare for All” by Dr. John Perryman, on Oct. 10 at 7 p.m. at the LaGrange Park Public Library, 555 N. LaGrange Road. Free and open to the public. The Blythe Park School PTA hosts an Adult Night Out fundraiser featuring standup comedian Jim Flannigan on Oct. 19 at the Riverside Township Hall, 27 Riverside Road, Riverside. Tickets (purchase at my.cheddarup.com/c/stand-up-comedian-jimflanagan-2018) are $25 each and the event is open to the public. The Frederick Law Olmsted Society hosts its next ■

Brookfield Zoo’s annual Boo! at the Zoo celebration of Halloween will take place on Oct. 13-14, 20-21 and 27-28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

for sweet treats, take photos at Halloween-themed backdrops, navigate the corn maze or hop on the Haunted Hayride.

Kids can bring treat bags to the zoo and visit five candy stations

Cheer the Pumpkin Smasher on the West Mall and get pumpkin

landscape workday on Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. to noon, collecting native seeds along Riverside Road. Bring a pair of work gloves and a water bottle. Snacks and other supplies are provided. Stay as long as you like. Look for the public works dump truck. The Riverside-Brookfield High School Class of 1973 will host its 45th year reunion on Oct. 20 at 7 p.m. at Irish Times, 8869 Burlington Ave. in Brookfield. Tickets are $25, appetizers included. For information, email to rbhsclassof73@comcast.net. ■

The Brookfield Chamber of Commerce will hold will hold its next 60-to-Win prize drawing on Oct. 11 at 4:30 p.m. at Joe’s Saloon, 9220 47th St. in Brookfield. Winner need not be present. ■

The chamber will hold its monthly business luncheon on Oct. 11 at noon at Fiesta Margarita, 3755 Grand Blvd. The Riverside’s Farmers Market continues every Wednesday from 2:30 to 7 p.m. through Oct. 10, in Centennial Park, 10 Pine Ave. Weekly scavenger hunt for kids, live music and more. ■

The Brookfield Farmers Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. through Oct. 13 in the parking lot of the village hall, 8820 Brookfield Ave. Weekly special events and live music. ■

Brookfield Public Library, 3609 Grand Blvd., hosts a History of Presidential China with historian Susan Casey on Oct. 11 at 7 p.m. and ■

Courtesy of Chicago Zoological Society

carving tricks from a pro. There will be a costume parade each day at 1:30 p.m. Regular zoo admission and parking frees apply. For more info visit www.CZS.org or call 708-688-8000. E-Sports@ the Library (all ages, 12-under with adult) on Oct. 12 at 6:30 p.m. Watch and play videogames. Bring your own device (or use the library’s). Register by calling 708-485-6917, ext. 140 or online at www.brookfieldlibrary.info. North Riverside Public Library, 2400 Desplaines Ave., hosts a Senior Drop-in on Oct. 12 from 10 a.m. to noon in the Meeting Room. Play cards and socialize every Friday. For adults, there’s Fleece Holiday Pillows on Oct. 11 at 6 p.m. Bring your own fabric, scissors and ruler; Trivia Night at Tipster’s Village Pub, 8839 Cermak Road on Oct. 12 from 7 to 9 p.m.; and Container Garden Secrets on Oct. 15 at 6 p.m. RSVP for pillow and gardening events at 708-447-0869. ■


The Landmark, October 10, 2018

KOSEY CORNER

21 years of columns, and counting

Credit: www.screenagersmovie.com

‘Screenagers’ film and discussion Riverside-Brookfield High School, 160 Ridgewood Road in Riverside, invites parents and the community to a screening of the award-winning documentary “Screenagers” on Tuesday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. The documentary explores the challenges of monitoring kids’ phone and computer use and how parents and educators can help kids achieve a healthy amount of screen time.

A talk-back session directed by assistant principals Dave Mannon and Kylie Lindquist will follow the movie. Register to attend by visiting www. rbhs208.net.

JOANNE KOSEY

Look for the Lions

The Riverside Township Lions Club will join Lions clubs around the state for their annual Candy Days, which will be held Thursday and Friday, Oct. 11 and 12. Candy Days annually raise more than $1 million to help the blind, visually impaired, deaf and hearing impaired. Volunteers will be posted at street corners and in shopping areas in Riverside and North Riverside accepting donations and giving away candy.

For kids, there’s Lapsit Storytime (toddlers thru 5) on Oct. 11 at 10:30 a.m.; Messy Mornings for Munchkins (ages 2-5) on Oct. 16 at 10:30 a.m.; Bilingual Storytime (ages 2-5) on Oct. 17 at 10:30 a.m.; and Tales and Treats (ages 2-5) on Oct. 13 at 10:30 a.m.; Pajama Storytime (all ages) on Oct. 16 at 6:30 p.m.; Bingo/Loteria on Oct. 12 at 4:30 p.m.; Music Club (teens/tweens) on Oct. 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. Bring your instrument to jam, enter a karaoke contest. Riverside Public Library, 1 Burling Road, hosts “Zoo News” with Jennifer Baader, VP of government affairs, on Oct. 11 at 7 p.m. in the Great Room; “Effective Communication Strategies for Alzheimer’s Caregivers” on Oct. 13 at 10:30 ■

W

ould you believe it this my 21st year of writing Kosey’s Corner? By my calculations that is approximately 1,039 columns -- 3 never made it to print for various reasons, and close to 20,000 words. Hard to believe. This occurred to me the other night as I was preparing to be the guest speaker at the Mater Christi Women’s Guild. The ladies were gracious enough to ask me to speak on my years at Mater Christi and being a columnist. Good group! I refer to the topic as “confessions of a columnist,” ones that didn’t require a priest or the sanctity of the confessional. The question I am most often asked, and it was that night, was, “Where do you come up with the ideas for columns?” Little did the ladies know I was listening carefully in case someone said something that would make a good column. That is sometimes the reason people are cautious when talking to me -- for fear they will be the next subject. I remind them it is a family newspaper so my column will only contain good things -- no fake news here, folks. I enjoy writing this column and appreciate the kind comments such as “I always read your column first.” There was a time when the paper was owned by another person people checked out the police beat first, since the publisher had a tendency to make something out of nothing. The fun times? At times, I have been referred to as a “celebrity.” Well, the only red carpet I walk on is in our son’s room, which is now my “office.” It also means I try not to go out without makeup in case I am recognized by strangers. Thank you, Bob, Dan and my readers as I get this column finished and out. Good thing they give me a deadline, because I am a procrastinator. Many more columns to write. Hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoy writing them. Watch for the Lions Candy sale Oct. 11-12. Trivia question to be answered next week: How many Navarros were in the Chicago Marathon on Oct. 7?

a.m.; and “Mary Shelley: My Monsters” with Megan Wells on Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. in the Great Room. The Brookfield Elks Lodge, 9022 31st St., hosts bingo every Monday night. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games start at 7 p.m. minimum cash payout of $2,275 a night, plus pull tabs, lightning, tic-tac and raffles. ■

CALENDAR EVENTS ■ If you would like your event to be featured here,

please send a photo and details by noon of the Wednesday before it needs to be published. Email calendar@wjinc.com.

brought to you by

Join Us Saturday, Oct. 20th:

McAdam Pumpkin Party It’s just around the corner: the McAdam Pumpkin Party is back on Saturday, October 20th, from Noon to 3 p.m. Hayrides, painted faces, a pumpkin Scott painting station, McAdam Jr. a spooky story time and sweet treats are the main ingredients. The Pumpkin Party is for kids of all ages and is open to the entire community—and it’s all free. During the event, we will also have huge fall discounts on all in stock trees, shrubs, and perennials. Want to know what you can still plant? Our professionals will be offering tips on how to winterize your garden. Particularly with plants that have been growing in the same containers all year long, this is a good time of year to landscape. They have gotten full-sized and are ready to plant. It’s very beneficial, before next summer’s heat, to give new plantings as many as six to eight months to get established. At 2001 Des Plaines Avenue, a half-mile south of Roosevelt Road, McAdam Nursery & Garden Center is open until at least the end of October. Weather permitting, it may remain open into early November as well. Questions? Call the Garden Center at 708-771-4903 or visit us online.

Follow us on

2001 Des Plaines Ave. Forest Park • 708-771-2299 www.mcadamlandscape.com

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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

Brookfield, Riverside host Solar Summit

More and more homeowners explore installing solar panels By BOB UPHUES Editor

Just how much interest is there in solar power options for single-family homes in Brookfield and Riverside? Judging from a special Solar Summit held in both villages on the morning of Oct. 6, more than anyone expected. Collaboratively organized by the building departments in both villages with the help of a local builder dedicated to sustainable construction practices and a pair of solar power system companies, the Solar Summit drew more than twice the expected number of attendees, said Nicholas Greifer, Brookfield’s community and economic development director. Greifer said he was expecting perhaps 30 or so people to turn out, but the event drew upwards to 75 people from both villages, who not only heard from industry experts about the costs and challenges of installing solar panels but also visited two homes – one in

Brookfield and one in Riverside -- where solar panels had been installed. “I think the main takeaway is that there is a lot of grassroots community interest in going solar,” Greifer said. Both villages in recent years have pursued policies that encourage sustainable building practices, from beefed-up storm water management rules to streamlining the permitting process for solar panel installation on residential homes. In 2008, Riverside voters approved an advisory referendum for the village to pursue a policy of encouraging sustainable building practices and conserving resources, which it has put into practice with the construction of a permeable paver public parking lot (with another on the way), permeable paver alleys and permeable paver streetscaping along East Burlington Street in downtown Riverside. In 2012, the Riverside moved to expand the ability of homeowners to install solar panels. “Ultimately, we all know what the stakes are,” said Riverside Village President Ben Sells during introductory remark at the Brookfield Village Hall. “If we don’t find ways to be environmentally responsible, the results are potentially catastrophic for our planet.” Brookfield recently earned recognition as

BOB UPHUES/Editor

HERE COMES THE SUN: Scott Sanders of BrightLeaf Homes, a company dedicated to sustainable building practices, points out solar panels on the roof of a house the company built in the 3600 block of Prairie Avenue in Brookfield, explaining the challenges and benefits of such systems. a “Sol Smart” community for its receptiveness to residential solar panel installation. The village has at least a half dozen homes where solar panels have been installed in recent years, and Greifer said his department has received permits for four more solar panel projects in the past five weeks. “I think it’s gotten to the point where you don’t have to be an environmentalist to

want to do this,” Greifer said. “It’s also for budget-conscious homeowners who want to lower the cost of homeownership.” Anyone interested in finding out more about solar panel rules and the permitting process can reach Greifer in Brookfield at ngreifer@brookfieldil.gov and Sonya Abt, community development director in Riverside, at sabt@riverside.il.us.

Proviso Township agency to help fund North Riverside special rec Mental health commission to earmark $15,000 for 2019 By BOB UPHUES Editor

When the North Riverside trustees voted a year ago to join the West Suburban Special Recreation Association (WSSRA), they did so believing the village would have to foot the entire bill for its membership. But a portion of the village’s 2019 membership in WSSRA, which provides recreation programs for children and adults with physical and mental disabilities, will be picked up by the Proviso Township Mental Health Commission, whose board voted to approve awarding the village $15,000 for it. “They put a proposal together and it looked like something that will really help the population we serve,” said Jesse Rosas, executive director of the Proviso Township Mental Health Board in a phone interview. The Proviso Township Mental Health Commission provides financial assistance in the form of annual grants to agencies which provide services “in the areas of mental health, developmental disabilities, substance use disorder and medical services as they relate to behavioral health,” ac-

cording to its website. The amount of money being earmarked for North Riverside’s membership in WSSRA is based on the number of people who live within the Proviso Township portion of the village. About one-third of North Riverside – from 9th Avenue to 19th Avenue – falls within the township’s boundaries. In 2019, the village’s membership fee to belong to WSSRA will be $52,000, so Proviso Township’s grant will cover a little less than one-third of the cost. According to the terms of the village’s five-year membership agreement, North Riverside’s contribution gradually increases so that it will begin paying its full membership amount of roughly $70,000 in 2020. Rosas said that it awards grants to agencies on a year by year basis, so if North Riverside desires mental health commission funding in future years, it will actively need to seek the money from the commission on an annual basis. “Every year our agencies have to reapply and demonstrate the numbers that they serve,” Rosas said. “That’s how we can make adjustments to payments.”

Rosas indicated that the mental health commission approved a letter of intent for funding WSSRA funding for North Riverside last month. The village still needs to complete a full application, which the board will consider before the year ends. “Once the village completes that, we’ll review it again” to ensure what’s being proposed for funding falls within the mental health commission’s mandate, Rosas said. North Riverside Mayor Hubert Hermanek Jr. thanked the mental health commission and Proviso Township Supervisor Michael Corrigan for being open to the village’s request and its argument that North Riverside taxpayers in Proviso Township already pay taxes to the mental health commission to support programs for the mentally and physically disabled and that funding through the township was appropriate. Hermanek and Riverside Village President Ben Sells earlier this year had tried to make the same argument to the Riverside Township Mental Health Board and Riverside Township Board of Trustees, asking them to support both villages’ membership in WSSRA on an ongoing basis.

However, the Riverside Township board resisted the request, though Riverside Township Supervisor Vera Wilt and mental health board President Tim Heilenbach (who is also a township trustee) said they’d be open to considering grant requests on a case-by-case basis. Heilenbach also had said the Riverside Township Mental Health Board’s attorney advised that funding Riverside’s WSSRA membership was not possible due to laws governing suburban mental health boards. Sells disputed that argument and said last week that the Proviso Township Mental Health Commission’s action on North Riverside proved him right. “This comports with the village’s view that the mental health board and township are not legally constrained from contributing to WSSRA if they wanted to,” Sells said. The village of Riverside in July approved joining WSSRA and decided to fund membership by levying a special recreation tax to fund the first year’s membership cost of about $40,000. After three years, Riverside will be paying nearly $80,000 for membership in WSSRA.


The Landmark, October 10, 2018

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District 96 to roll out online payment option Parents can pay for lunches, fees, field trips, activities and more

By BOB SKOLNIK Contributing Reporter

Pretty soon families with children in Riverside Elementary District 96 schools will be able to pay all school fees online. Trekking to the school or district office to pay a fee will be a thing of the past. The district is moving toward online payment of fees with a web-based system that is expected to be rolled out on Dec. 1 and fully implemented by Feb. 1, 2019, prior to registration for the 2019-20 school year. “We’re really looking at it as a convenience factor for families,” said District 96 Superintendent Martha Ryan-Toye. The district will use the vendor PushCoin, which has an online fee payment system designed specifically for education. The cost to the district is expected to be about $12,000 a year. “PushCoin really provided a comprehen-

sive solution,” said Don Tufano, the district’s director of innovation and instructional technology. “It really is an all in one solution.” PushCoin is also used by Brookfield-LaGrange District 102. All school fees will be able to be paid online including registration fees, lunch fees, yearbooks, locks, activity fees and field trip fees through the district’s online “store.” If parents pay by credit card, they will be charged a credit card processing fee of 2.9 percent plus 25 cents per transaction. There will also be a free e-check payment option. The system will allow parents to put money in a student’s account to pay for lunches, and it has extensive reporting features and parents will be able to see what a child has bought for lunch. “It will give us a lot of reporting, reminders, fee tracking,” Tufano said. Tufano said that system will allow automatic replenishment of the account when

balances run low. There will also be an app for smart phones. The system should increase the speed of lunch lines. “Kids are going to be able to go through the lines faster,” said Central School Principal Pete Gatz. “You won’t have to have people chasing lunch tickets down.” And parents might like seeing what their children are buying for lunch. “If they bought ice cream for the table, you know,” said Gatz, whose daughter goes to a school that uses the PushCoin system. According to Tufano, the system will allow the district to greatly reduce, if not eliminate, cash transactions, which will improve internal processes and controls. “We’ll probably be taking in less cash, which is always a good thing,” Tufano said. “We’ll have less cash floating around.” Some other area districts have allowed online payment of school fees for some time.

Riverside-Brookfield High School has permitted online payment of school fees since 2012, and Brookfield-LaGrange Park School District 95 has allowed online payment of fees for the past three years. “It’s clearly a convenience that’s long overdue,” said District 96 school board member Rich Regan, who chairs the district’s finance committee. In District 95, the district absorbs credit card fees for all purchases except for lunch accounts. “Any fees other than lunch the district absorbs the fees,” said District 95 Superintendent Mark Kuzniewski. District 95 uses a different vendor, MySchoolBucks. Kuzniewski estimated that about 90 percent of District 95 students who purchase lunch use the online system rather than paying for each lunch separately. He estimated that 98 percent of other fees are paid online.

Read it online at www.rblandmark.com

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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

Riverside trustees OK red-light camera contract SafeSpeed LLC will work with IDOT to review data, select locations

By BOB UPHUES Editor

Red-light cameras look to be on the way in Riverside, perhaps by late 2019, after village trustees voted 4 to 1 on Oct. 4 to enter into a four-year contract with SafeSpeed LLC, which provides and maintains red-light camera systems in a host of suburban Chicago communities. Trustee Elizabeth Peters was the lone “no” vote on the contract, though Trustee Doug Pollock, who was absent from the meeting, likely would also have voted against it. In his absence, Pollock had an email read into the record outlining a number of concerns with the contract, including his previously stated belief that the contract should have been subject to an open bid process. The agreement, which includes language that the program be cost-neutral to the village, still needs to be ratified by SafeSpeed, though local officials did not expect any roadblocks. Exact locations of the cameras and when they will appear on village roadways will be up to the Illinois Department of Transportation, which will review traffic and crash data to be submitted by SafeSpeed. Police Chief Thomas Weitzel said that review process could take as long as a year. SafeSpeed previously had identified the northbound and eastbound approaches at the

SPEED TABLE from page 3 Woodside Road, new stop signs and highvisibility crosswalks in key locations were implemented this summer. The decision to place the speed table between Delaplaine and Miller roads instead of between Delaplaine Road and Ogden Avenue, said Weitzel, was that there’s a stop sign at the intersection of Delaplaine and Lionel.

intersection of 31st Street and First Avenue and eastbound 26th Street at Harlem Avenue as locations where traffic counts would support installing red-light cameras. Weitzel previously told members of the village board that he believed the north and south approaches at First Avenue and Forest/Ridgewood, immediately adjacent to Riverside-Brookfield High School, likely would qualify as a red-light camera location in the future. That intersection is ineligible, currently, for the devices, since it remains an active work site as part of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago’s Salt Creek Intersecting Sewer No. 2 repair project. Trustees also agreed on Oct. 4 to earmark revenue collected from red-light citations for public safety initiatives, which according to discussion at the board table at the meeting, might include anything from installing surveillance cameras at village entryways to supplementing the village’s annual police pension obligation. “It seemed that made people more comfortable that were previously not comfortable with it, if in fact it was going to go to, say, buy signs to help slow traffic down on neighborhood streets,” said Trustee Scott Lumsden, referring to emails he said he received from residents on the subject. “If there is a positive revenue to that, if it goes toward those

initiatives that we want to get and had to defer them, I think, at least the people who have talked to me, they feel more comfortable with moving forward with that.” Lumsden voted for SafeSpeed contract, along with trustees Joseph Ballerine, Wendell Jisa and Michael Sedivy. According to the terms of the contract, Riverside will collect $60 for each citation successfully prosecuted, with SafeSpeed receiving $40, with additional fees for second notices and payments through collections. The village will also pay SafeSpeed $500 per month per camera for maintenance and repair of the camera, initial capture/screening of potential violations, violation processing and mailing and adjudication support services. The village is also responsible for paying for any LED or countdown signal upgrades at intersections where cameras are located. Riverside resident Lindsay Morrison questioned trustees on how the adjudication process for citations would work, and stated that in her view, citations handed out to people who turn right on red “are more about revenue than safety.” She also questioned whether the village could change the timing of lights to increase the number of citations or whether the salary of the person reviewing potential violations was dependent on volume of citations.

Weitzel explained that the person reviewing citations likely would be a retired police officer paid between $18 and $25 an hour and working 10 to 20 hours a week. Every month the village will be supplied with a breakdown of data on the number of violations reviewed, the number of citations issues, information on payments and ticket challenges, all of which can be posted on the village’s website. He also said that the village has no control of the timing of stop lights; that is controlled by IDOT alone, Weitzel said. As far as how the village will handle right turns on red, Weitzel said he would advise strictly following the state statute, which calls for vehicles simply to come to a complete stop. It does not specify for how long, just that the wheels stop turning. Trustee Joseph Ballerine dismissed complaints that right-turn violations were simply about revenue, saying the cameras change driving behavior and serve as a set of eyes for law enforcement when they aren’t around. “I think it’s policing, but more efficiently,” Ballerine said. “As long as it’s administered fairly and honestly, I have no problem with this.” Ballerine also reiterated his support for the cameras as an investigative tool 24 hours a day, year round. “That’s a very important part of this,” he said.

“From Lionel and Delaplaine, the next stop sign isn’t until Olmsted Road [a distance of about 2,000 feet],” Weitzel said. “We thought we’d put it on the longer stretch of road.” The speed table, which when fully assembled weighs about a ton, comes in segments that slope to a roughly 2-foot long “table” that is about 3 inches high. The width of the speed table can be adjusted depending on street width, keeping the street gutters clear to allow storm water to flow freely. The village purchased the speed table from Traffic Control Corporation for

$7,500, said Public Works Director Edward Bailey. It will be installed within the next couple of weeks, as soon as the village takes possession of signage associated with it. After about six weeks – just before snow starts to fall – public works will remove the speed table for the winter. It’s unclear if it will return to that location next spring or move to another location. Riverside police delivered notice of the speed table’s installation to Lionel Road residents earlier this week, stating it was a trial run for the device and that the goal

was to analyze how motorists react to it. Weitzel states in the notice that he welcomes feedback on use of the speed table and that resident comments “will be incorporated into any future placement of speed tables in the village.” Bailey said that most streets in Riverside could accommodate the speed table, since its width is adjustable. “I don’t see the speed table installed on sharp roadway curves, but other than that, one of the major influences of the installation location will be driveways,” Bailey said in an email to the Landmark.

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Opinion I

t’s been almost eight years since the village of Brookfield ordered the old Brookfield Bowl at 3415 Maple Ave. to close its doors after inspectors found it to be structurally unsound, seven years since a Cook County judge gave the OK for the building to be demolished and four years since the village of Brookfield acquired the building. Over the past several months, the village has been working with a development firm, Tartan Builders, on a deal for the firm to acquire the site and construct a multifamily residential building on the site. The village supports the plan conceptually. Both sides have been working out the details, and while things appear to be getting close, there’s been no news yet. While we certainly hope the village can quickly come to a solution for the property that’s beneficial to the Eight Corners business district and the Brookfield community as a whole, we’re becoming increasingly concerned about the old bowling alley itself. More to the point, we believe the Brookfield Bowl is unsecure and a potential serious safety hazard. Twice within the past couple of months, people have broken into the bowling alley. In August, an anonymous caller phoned police to report that the doors of the bowling alley were unlocked. Police found no one inside, but they did note the amount of general clutter left behind inside the building. On Sept. 22, a Brookfield resident who happened to be walking past the bowling alley at about 4 a.m. noticed someone leave the bowling alley. Sometime later, while walking past the bowling alley again, that person observed a “glow” visible through the glass front doors. The bowling alley was on fire. Had that resident not decided to take an early morning walk, the village could have had a terrible blaze on its hands. Police continue to investigate the incident and have released very few details about it. The Landmark has learned, however, that the fire did cause serious damage inside the bowling alley. The fire, we understand, was also not accidental. In short, the bowling alley needs to come down before the village has a tragedy on its hands. Perhaps a deal with Tartan Builders is imminent and the building can be demolished quickly as part of that deal. That would be the best solution. However, if negotiations with Tartan Builders drag on – and we’ve seen with respect to the former Brookfield Moose property in the 4000 block of DuBois Boulevard that sure deals can wither on the vine – the village needs to begin thinking seriously about demolishing the Brookfield Bowl in the interest of public safety.

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LETTERS

THE LANDMARK VIEW

Unsecure and unsafe

The Landmark, October 10, 2018

Thanks for your help, Ed I am writing to tell of the wonderful assistance I received from Ed of the North Riverside Public Works Department. I “bumped into him” at the gas station on 26th and Desplaines on Oct. 6. I was in search of help, because my dashboard warning sign indicated that one of my tires did not hold enough pressure. Not knowing how to add air to a tire, I asked Ed, who was leaving the station as I was entering if he could help me determine which of my tires needed air. He followed me to my car, inserted four quarters into the air machine and with the use of my tire gauge measured each tire until he found one of my tires with a nail in it. Having found the nail, he instructed me to have the tire patched or plugged at my earliest convenience. I followed his advice and had the tire repaired immediately. Ed’s help is to be acknowledged and I expect he will receive the recognition he deserves. Ed, thank you. You went above and beyond to help a North Riverside resident.

Barbara E Silvestri North Riverside

No wonder abuse victims stay silent At a rally last week, President Trump ridiculed and mocked Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s account of being sexually assaulted. While he did so, people at the rally laughed and cheered. If anyone wonders why victims of abuse are reluctant to come forward they need only watch the cruel and disgraceful conduct at that rally. We might never know what happened to Dr. Ford behind a closed door, but we do know what happened at that rally last week. We all heard that laughter. With their base conduct, the people at that rally tried to cover the mouths of countless victims of abuse who long to tell their stories. The question for the rest of us is whether we are going to be complicit in trying to silence those victims or step up to insure that they are heard. Regardless of whether we believe any particular allegation of abuse, surely we can agree that victims of abuse deserve the right to tell their stories without being ridiculed and mocked. Surely we can condemn such abusive laughter and demand that it be replaced with compassion and respect. Otherwise we become accomplices to abuse. Victims of abuse are often haunted by a fragment of a memory – a phrase, a smell, a sound – that coalesces their suffering into an indelible image. As long as these images remain locked away in the recesses of the soul, they remain

unaltered over time, ready to emerge at any moment painful as a fresh cut. These images cannot simply be dismissed by an act of will. Victims of abuse need our support to drive away their demons. It is extremely difficult for victims to reclaim what was taken from them, but we can help them to begin. First we say “tell us what happened.” And then we listen.

Ben Sells

Riverside

Good to know how funds are spent I appreciate the Landmark using the Freedom of Information Act to bring attention to the District 95’s Board’s recent $90,000 payment (and family health insurance for an additional year and a half) for the departure and silence of former teacher Deanne Ray (“District 95 pays teacher $90,000 to resign,” News, Sept. 26). It’s unlikely this information would have reached the public without your effort. Keep up the good work. As we citizens of Brookfield and LaGrange Park were the ones actually (unwittingly) funding this payment though our “educational” property taxes, I am concerned about how those taxes are actually being spent by the District 95 board and superintendent. How big an unaccountable “slush fund” do the school board and superintendent actually have and what else have they privately spent our money on? How often do they do this kind of thing? Who decides what to spend it on and when? Whatever the basis of this particular settlement I’m really not interested, nor, I’m sure, would the school board, ever tell us. Someone did someone or something wrong. Let’s stuff it under the rug. Politics as usual. But I am personally angry that my taxes, and those every other taxpayer in the district which are intended for educating our children, are being secretly misspent by the very persons we entrust with our children’s education.

Tom Kedzie

Brookfield Ed note: The school board voted in public at a special meeting on Aug. 14 to agree to the settlement with former teacher Deanne Ray. The agenda for the Aug. 14 special meeting stated that the board was convening in closed session to discuss “appointment, employment, compensation, discipline, performance or dismissal of specific employees of the district” and that public action following closed session could follow. The minutes of that meeting, which specifically mention action on the settlement agreement and the teacher’s name, were approved by the school board at their Sept. 13 meeting.

C O R R E C T I O N

In the article “Cancer risk from emissions cause for concern,” (News, Oct. 3), the Landmark wants to clarify that the EPA’s National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) map does not cite actual cases of cancer. The NATA map “estimates long-term risks -- those that may occur from breathing air containing elevated levels of air toxics continuously for many decades. It does not estimate short-term (acute) or intermediate risks. The corrected article online also now includes additional information and a comment from the owner of Willowbrook-Burr Ridge Sports Performance LLC in Willowbrook and corrects a misstatement about ethylene oxide. The gas is not odorless. According to the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the gas smells like ether at toxic levels.


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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

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Tech Sgt. Horace “Bud” Carlsen, 31 Marine KIA in 1943 identified in 2018 moved, gravesites obliterated Horace Arnold “Bud” and records lost. Carlsen, of Brookfield, who was In 1946, his unidentified re31 at the time of his death, died mains were moved to Hawaii’s on Nov. 20, 1943 in the WW II BatSchofield Mausoleum. In 1949, tle of Tarawa in the Pacific Thehis remains were reinterred at ater. Born on January 4, 1912, the National Memorial CemTech Sgt. Carlsen, who went etery of the Pacific at Hawaii’s by the name of “Harry” (famPunchbowl in grave E1212. ily members called him “Bud”) Due to extensive research came from a large family and, HORACE CARLSEN by William Niven, Rick Stone through the 1930s, worked as an auto mechanic for Mahoney (Chief Rick Stone and The & Sirvotka in Cicero. He was married to Family Foundation) and Mark Noah (HistoJarmila Fisera from 1933 to 1941. ry Flight), the search for Tech Sgt. Carlsen He enlisted in the Marine Reserves in focused on grave E1212. December of 1941 and rose to the rank of Work by Nancy Spellman, his niece, and technical sergeant, serving as the quarter- his great-nephew, Ed Spellman, led to the master maintenance chief for Company A exhumation of E1212 and the conclusive of the 2nd Marine Division’s 2nd Amphibi- identification of Tech Sgt. Carlsen in June ous Tractor Battalion. 2018. From August through December of 1942, Tech Sgt. “Bud” Carlsen is survived by he participated in landing assaults against his nieces and nephews, Barbara Rapp, several strongly defended enemy positions James Goodman, Richard Goodman and in the South Pacific including Tulagi, Gavu- Jane Hilmer; and his many great-nieces tu, Tanambogo, Florida and Guadalcanal, and great-nephews. British Solomon Islands. Visitation is on Friday, Oct. 12 from 5 to In November 1943, he was among the first 8 p.m. at Glueckert Funeral Home Ltd., troops to assault the heavily fortified enemy 1520 North Arlington Heights Rd. (4 blocks defenses of Red Beach One, on Betio Island, south of Palatine Rd.) in Arlington Heights. Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands as part of an On Saturday, Oct. 13 at 11 a.m., a committal advance team whose mission was to estab- service will be held at Abraham Lincoln Nalish a headquarters for tractor battalion tional Cemetery in Elwood. operations. In lieu of flowers, the family appreciates Tech Sgt. Carlsen was one of 550 Marines memorials be donated to nonprofit organikilled in the battle whose remains were not zations working to locate and identify the identified or recovered. Dog tags were re- remaining lost Tarawa Marines.

Robert Hall Sr., 69

William Wilhite, 74

Brookfield resident

Insurance underwriter

Robert “Bob” C. Hall, Sr., 69, of Brookfield, died on Oct. 1, 2018. Born on Oct. 18, 1948, he worked in sales in the printing industry. Mr. Hall was the husband of Barbara A. Hall (nee Janoch); the father of Robert ROBERT HALL SR. (Elizabeth) Hall Jr. and Rebecca (John) Tingley; the grandfather of Owen Hall and the late Madeline and Charlotte; the brother of Roy McCuan; the uncle of Tanya Janoch; and the brother-in-law of Joseph (Karen) Janoch. Services have been held. Interment was at Chapel Hill Gardens West Cemetery in Oakbrook Terrace. The family appreciates memorials to the Chicago Zoological Society, 3300 Golf Rd. in Brookfield, 60513. Hitzeman Funeral Home, Brookfield, handled arrangements.

William J. Wilhite, 74, of Naperville and formerly of Brookfield, died on Oct. 6, 2018. Born on Sept. 27, 1944, Mr. Wilhite was an underwriter in the insurance business. Mr. Wilhite was WILLIAM WILHITE the ex-husband of June Prescott; the father of James (Emily) Wilhite; the grandfather of William Wilhite and Theresa Wilhite; the brother of Ralph (Lynn) Wilhite; and the uncle of Donald Wilhite, Dane Wilhite and the late Elizabeth Wilhite. Visitation was on Tuesday, Oct. 9 from 3 to 8 p.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 10 from 11:30 a.m. until time of service at noon at Hitzeman Funeral Home, 9445 31st St. in Brookfield, followed by private interment at Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Hillside.


The Landmark, October 10, 2018

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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION (Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685) 1.Publication Title: Riverside-Brookfield Landmark 2. Publication no.: USPS 019-585 3. Date of filing: Oct. 10, 2018 4. Frequency of issue: Weekly 5. No of issues published annually: 52 6. Annual subscription price: $27.00 7. Complete mailing address of known office of publication: 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302, Cook Co. 8. Complete mailing address of headquarters or general business office of publisher: (same) 9. Names and complete mailing addresses of publisher, editor and manager editor: Publisher: Dan Haley, 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302 Editor: Bob Uphues, 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302 Managing Editor: Dan Haley, 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302 10. The owner is: Wednesday Journal, Inc., 141 S. Oak Park Avenue, Oak Park, IL 60302. Stockholders owning 1% or more of stock: Gary Collins, 1326 William St., River Forest, IL 60305-1135; Robert Downs, 924 N. Euclid., Oak Park, IL 60302-1320; Dan and Mary Haley, 1305 Clinton, Berwyn, IL 60402-1231; Andrew Johnston & Julie Bernstein 9828 Trillium Trail, Bridgman MI 49106; Matthew Panschar, 2636 2nd Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55408-1701; Alexander, Edward Panschar and Martha Panschar, P.O. Box 200279, Anchorage, AK 99520-0279; Ruth Levy, 77 Bleecker St., New York, NY 10012-1701. 11. Known bondholders, mortagees and other security holders owning or holding one percent or more of the total amount of bonds, mortgages or other securities are: None. 12. N/A 13. Publication name: Riverside Landmark 14. Issue date for circulation data below: Sept. 26,2018 15. Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months: A. Total no. copies printed (net press run): 3043 B1. Mailed outside-county paid subscriptions stated on Form 3541: 10 B2. Mailed in-county paid subscriptions stated on form 3541: 1,776 B3. Paid distribution outside the mails including sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other paid distribution outside USPS3: 125 B4. Paid distribution by other classes of mail through the USPS: 0 C. Total Paid distribution: 1,914 D1. Free or nominal rate outside-county copies included on PS form 3541: 0 D2. Free on nominal rate in-county copies included on PS Form 3541: 289 D3. Free or nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS: 0 D4. Free or nominal rate distribution outside the mail: 475 E. Total free or nominal rate distribution: 765 F. Total distribution: 2679 G. Copies not distributed: 364 H: Total: 3,043 I. Percent paid: 71% 15. No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: A. Total no. copies printed (net press run): 2,998 B1. Mailed outside-county paid subscriptions stated on Form 3541: 9 B2. Mailed in-county paid subscriptions stated on form 3541: 1,752 B3. Paid distribution outside the mails including sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other paid distribution outside USPS: 172 B4. Paid distribution by other classes of mail through the USPS: 0 C. Total Paid distribution: 1,933 D1. Free or nominal rate outside-county copies included on PS form 3541: 0 D2. Free on nominal rate in-county copies included on PS Form 3541: 214 D3. Free or nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS: 0 D4. Free or nominal rate distribution outside the mail: 475 E. Total free or nominal rate distribution: 689 F. Total distribution: 2,622 G. Copies not distributed: 376 H: Total: 2,998 I. Percent paid: 73% 16. Publication of statement of ownership will be printed in the Oct. 10, 2018 issue of this publication. 17. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner: Dan Haley, Publisher Oct. 10, 2018

FILMMAKER

Explore remote islands from page 1 Luckily, for Riverside resident Terry Spencer Hesser and her daughter, Kira Cook, traveling to offbeat destinations isn’t just a hobby — it’s a dream job. Hesser, a published novelist, screenwriter and three-time Emmy award winner who grew up in Cicero and lived in Chicago before relocating to Riverside this past spring, has built her career on creating documentaries on diverse people and unsung stories. Throughout the years, Hesser has told the stories of Golden Gloves boxing, worked alongside Audrey Hepburn and Oprah Winfrey, and has delved deep into the psychology behind obsessive-compulsive disorder. “I’ve been lucky enough to work in all different genres for the theater [and] for the screen, but it doesn’t matter,” she said. “I feel like I’m a great translator of taking real life and sort of connecting the dots to make stories out of them.” So, when Hesser and longtime friend and producer Melissa Sage Fadim were in the midst of working on a travel series about the charm behind Michigan’s Mackinac Island and its popularity as a car-free vacation spot, the two began thinking: How many other islands in the world are carfree, and what makes them the unique gems they are? From there, “Islands Without Cars” was born. The show is a series of 30-minute programs in which Hesser’s daughter, Kira Cook, serves as the host, exploring remote islands around the world with limited motor vehicle access and sharing the story of their locals. “It’s not a travel show so much as it is telling the stories of the people who live on these islands and what makes them unique,” Hesser said.

PROVIDED

TEAMWORK: During Season 1 of “Islands Without Cars,” the team of Executive Producer Melissa Sage Fadim (for left), Terry Spencer Hesser and the show’s host, Kira Cook (far right), met with residents on Inis Meain, one of the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland. Below, Hesser gets up close with a macaw during a visit to Croatia’s Dalmatian coast

Cook is a theater, TV, standup comedy volcano in Italy. “Basically, I feel like these people are and film acting veteran who may be bestknown to movie audiences for playing the welcoming enough to welcome us into role of Hortensia in the 1996 film “Matil- their houses, and I get to document their da.” customs and their courtesies,” Hesser said Hesser and Fadim, who have an exten- about the opportunity to visit locations sive working relationship with PBS, were around the world. able to successfully pitch the idea to the Hesser said that because the first season network, with WTTW Chicago serving as had strong ratings across the U.S., the crew the program’s presenting stais working on season two, tion to PBS affiliates throughwhich will air next spring. out the country. “Islands Without Cars” is In each episode, viewers are completely financed through whisked away to a different isFadim’s Sage Foundation, land by Cook as she provides a small family foundation a “lighthearted based in Michigan which look” at the hiswas started by Fadim’s tory of the island grandfather in the early and the unique en1950s. It provides grants to gagements of the a variety of charitable orgapeople who live on nizations and nonprofit filmthem. TERRY SPENCER HESSER makers. Additionally, Hesser “It’s [like] having said, the show recently acthis friend taking quired an international disyou on a journey,” tributor as well. Hesser said. “It’s Most importantly, Hesser for amateur travhopes local readers will tune elers and real travelers, but in to the show for a good time, no matter mostly, it’s just really a fast, what their travel experiences are. fun cultural show.” “It’s made by people from this area and In season one, which debuted definitely has Midwestern sensibility in earlier this year, the crew had terms of lack of pretension and a focus the opportunity to do watch on fun, and I think it has the right mix of seals play on a beach on an academics and comedy,” she said. “You’re island in the North Sea which going to learn something and have fun in was bombed during World War each episode.” II, sit for tea in England withFor more information and teaser videos out having the proper ritual from “Islands Without Cars,” visit islandmanners, and fly over an active swithoutcars.com. PHOTO BY AMANDA BOOTH

“It’s not a travel show so much as it is telling the stories of the people who live on these islands.”


The Landmark, October 10, 2018

15

Who’s running in Riverside? The ‘jury is still out’ One incumbent leans toward second term, others undecided

By BOB UPHUES Editor

With the Riverside Community Caucus sitting out the 2019 Consolidated Election, it will be up to individual Riverside trustee candidates to either collect signatures ahead of the mid-December filing period or band together with others to form a slate. As of Oct. 8, no other local political committees had been created to raise money to support any candidate’s campaign for office, according to the Illinois Board of Elections website. But at least one incumbent Riverside trustee, Michael Sedivy, confirmed over the weekend that he was considering a run for a second term despite the absence of the Cau-

MICHAEL SEDIVY

JOSEPH BALLERINE

cus, which supported his candidacy in 2015. “The Caucus historically has done an excellent job recruiting residents to serve the village,” said Sedivy in an Oct. 6 email in response to questions from the Landmark. “The organization’s assistance in the logistics of the electoral process is invaluable and will be sorely missed

CAUCUS

Remains active from page 1 “We wanted to have these issues straightened out,” Mateo added. “We literally don’t know what’s going to happen.” It remains unclear how the Caucus will pay the fines levied by the state. The Riverside Community Caucus political committee reported a cash balance of about $3,200 in its most recent filing. John Mathews, the former chairman of the Caucus, resigned from the caucus board and from the organization in an email sent out in the wake of a Landmark report on Sept. 19 about the organization’s predicament with the board of elections. Mateo was named vice chair in June. Two other board positions remained vacant. Mathews had opposed the caucus raising

SCOTT LUMSDEN

in this election cycle, as the requirements can be quite daunting.” Sedivy stated that he has had discussions with other residents, whom he did not name, on running as a slate “solely for efficiency purposes in navigating the electoral candidate logistical requirements.” The other two incumbent trustees are Joseph Ballerine and Scott

and spending money on political campaigns. In an interview in September, Mathews said, “I don’t believe the Caucus is a political committee. It doesn’t operate as a political committee.” The organization hadn’t collected any money since 2014, and it last spent funds – about $650 -- in 2015. Mathews also let the organization’s website and P.O. box lapse in addition to failing to file quarterly reports with the state board of elections. Because the committee was essentially dormant, Mathews said he figured the state board of elections would simply “roll up” the committee. But the committee still carried a cash balance and the organization was responsible for submitting campaign disclosure reports whether or not it raised or spent funds. In July the state board informed Mathews that the committee was terminated and of the fines. “I take complete and utter responsibility for this,” said Mathews, who between Sept. 24 and Oct. 2 filed seven quarterly reports for 2017

Lumsden, both of whom told the Landmark last week that they still have not decided whether or not to run for re-election. Both had the support of the caucus in 2015 and formed a slate with Sedivy to run that year. “The jury is still out,” Lumsden said of his prospects for running. “This job requires a lot of time, and you want to do it well. I certainly have enjoyed being a steward.” While Lumsden said the Caucus’ assistance was invaluable in recruiting candidates and navigating the process, their absence wouldn’t rule out a run for re-election. “That probably wouldn’t make my decision up,” he said. Ballerine also told the Landmark he’s undecided on running for a third consecutive term as a village

and 2018 with the state board of elections. Riverside Trustee Joseph Ballerine said it was Mathews who coaxed him into being interviewed by the Caucus for the 2011 election after Ballerine had been passed over by the Caucus in the 1990s and was then defeated by Caucus candidates when he ran independently. “John’s goal was to turn this into a true citizens’ group,” Ballerine said. “John talked me back into it [in the fall of 2010]. I think it’s a great organization and I think they’ll come back stronger.” The Riverside Community Caucus remains active as an organization, though its numbers are small. It includes about 20 active members, said Mateo, and about 60 members total. Membership in the Caucus is open to all Riverside residents, though it only actively operates for a few months every two years, prior to village elections, soliciting, interviewing and endorsing candidates for village president and trustee. Endorsed candidates can choose to run as

a slate or on their own. Most choose to run together as a slate, taking advantage of Caucus volunteers, who help collect signatures and assist with paperwork. The last time Riverside had a contested election for president and trustee was in 2009. “Our commitment to non-partisan local government has served us well,” Mateo said. “Going forward it’s unclear how we are going to be organized.” Two of the most important efforts for the Caucus, said Mateo, are to find new leadership and attract more residents to become members. “How do we make it a bigger tent?” Mateo said. “That is going to be job number one.” Mateo said the Caucus would also like to become more visible throughout the year and not just pop up at election time, which in the past has brought criticism that the organization operates behind closed doors. “We want to be seen more often,” Mateo said.

MORATORIUM

Broadway Ave. Some residents and business owners feared such a decision would lead to a church at Eight Corners, a district the village envisions as a pedestrian-oriented commercial district. Planning and zoning commissioners felt that the focus on limiting the ability of someone erecting a church at Eight Corners might have unintended consequences by eliminating businesses that would be desirable at Eight Corners. The Planning and Zoning Commission likely will resume its discussion of the proposed changes to the C3 land use table in November. The village board will have the final say on any changes that are made. —Bob Uphues

from page 5

RBlandmark.com

advertise • 708-442-6739

trustee. Unopposed in both 2011 and 2015, Ballerine previously served two years as a trustee in the 1990s when he was appointed to fill a vacancy. In addition, Ballerine spent 15 years as a member and past-chairman of the Riverside Parks and Recreation Board. “It’s 50-50 right now,” Ballerine said for another run. “I’m hoping Mike [Sedivy] and Scott [Lumsden] will.” Prior to the Caucus deciding to sidestep the 2019 election, Ballerine was not scheduled to be interviewed by the Caucus nominating committee, because of a Caucus by-law limiting their support of candidate to two consecutive terms. “There are a lot of great, qualified people in Riverside,” Ballerine said.

services (such as hair and nail salons) and pet-grooming businesses by right. But planning and zoning commissioners were uncomfortable with prohibiting other uses that would encourage public assembly, such as entertainment venues, like video arcades, for example. The moratorium was imposed in the wake of the village board granting a special use permit for religious assembly for two hours each Sunday to the owner of the Compassion Factory art gallery and studio at 9210


16

The Landmark, October 10, 2018

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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

NICE GOING, MCFLY

17

The Congress Park School PTO raised about $13,500 last week for flex seating in classrooms and other initiatives during its “Back to the Future”-themed walkathon on Oct. 5, which was held in the school gym because of rainy weather. In addition to kids doing laps around the gym (at left), Principal James Robinette dressed up as “Doc” from the 1985 film while Rich Weissensel and Hugo Kammerer (bottom right) supplied a pair of DeLoreans to complete the scene.

PHOTOS BY ALEXA ROGALS/Staff Photographer


18

The Landmark, October 10, 2018

Sports

@RBLandmark

Nazareth no match for Marist In conference showdown, Roadrunners struggle in first loss of season

File photo

Nazareth senior Michael Love is an explosive playmaker. He was held in check to a pair of catches for 41 yards in a 34-13 loss against visiting Marist on Friday, Oct. 5. By MARTY FARMER

O

Sports Editor

ff to a 6-0 record this year, the Nazareth football team faced its stiffest test against Marist Friday at Valenta Stadium in LaGrange Park. The RedHawks, who defeated the Roadrunners 42-0 in 2017, notched another impressive victory, 34-13, against Nazareth. While full credit belongs to Marist, Nazareth turned in an uncharacteristically flat performance. “I thought we really lacked energy and the enthusiastic attitude we have been playing with all season,” Nazareth coach Tim Racki said. “As the head coach, that falls on me. I did a poor job of getting the team in a proper mindset this week.” With the game pushed up to a 5 p.m. start

to avoid inclement weather, the Roadrunners played fairly well early. Nazareth led 13-10 midway through the second quarter before Marist scored 24 unanswered points en route to the East Suburban Catholic Conference win. The Roadrunners (6-1, 4-1 ESCC) scored first when Alex Carrillo returned a Marist fumble 97 yards into the end zone to take a 7-0 lead. Marist responded with a 41-yard field goal and 12-yard touchdown run by Billy Skalitzky to go up 10-7. Nazareth sophomore quarterback J.J. McCarthy threw a 29-yard TD pass to Michael Love. Nazareth missed the extra point but still led 13-10. The RedHawks scored a pair of touchdowns during the last two minutes of the second quarter. Senior quarterback Mike Markett threw a TD pass each to Jadon

Thomas for eight yards and to Denny Hogan for six yards as Marist pushed out to a 24-13 advantage at halftime. The RedHawks (6-1, 5-0) added another 41-yard field goal in the third quarter and a 15-yard touchdown run by Markett in the fourth quarter. “Marist did an excellent job of execution in all three phases,” Racki said. “Whenever

we had a glimpse of momentum, they were able to stymie it quickly. Losing the field position battle was also a key element. Their ability to convert third downs and our inability to convert added to this as well.” Markett accounted for three touchdowns and 315 yards of offense as an effective dual threat. Skalitzky chipped in his aforementioned touchdown and 42 yards rushing before leaving the game with an injury. Conversely, the Roadrunners’ potent offense struggled against a relentless Marist defense. McCarthy finished 4-for-12 passing for 73 yards with a TD and an interception. Consistently under pressure, he was sacked five times and Nazareth committed two turnovers. Despite his worst game as a varsity quarterback, McCarthy has completed 79 of 116 passes (68.1 completion percentage) this season for 1,568 yards, 21 touchdowns and one interception. His quarterback rating is 146. Against Marist, the Roadrunners couldn’t establish their ground game either with just 72 yards on 19 carries. Love and Breven Reifsteck caught two passes apiece for 41 and 32 yards, respectively. The RedHawks dominated in other categories as well. Marist amassed 451 yards of total offense on 76 plays, while Nazareth had 145 yards on 37 plays. Marist collected more first downs (21-7), converted 9 of 16 third downs (56 percent), and also went 3-for-3 on fourth downs. The Roadrunners used last year’s lopsided loss to Marist as motivation for the rest of the season, and the team reeled off six straight wins to make the Class 6A state final (28-21 loss against Prairie Ridge) and a 12-2 record overall. “Getting humbled this late in the season can be a good thing,” Racki said. “A team can refocus heading into the final two weeks of season and playoffs.” Nazareth takes on Joliet Catholic on Friday, Oct. 12 in its final home game of the regular season. Kickoff is 7 p.m.

Read sports online www.rblandmark.com


S P O R T S S P O R T S

The Landmark, October 10, 2018

19

R O U N D U P

Bulldogs tee off on golf playoffs While neither team advanced to sectionals, two boys and two girls qualified By MARTY FARMER Sports Editor

Neither Riverside-Brookfield High School golf team necessarily expected to win a regional team title. Nevertheless, a pair of top players came through for both the girls and boys teams. Sophomore Kiki Keen carded a 96 and senior Isabel Hughes shot 109 at the Payton Regional. Both advance to sectionals. The Bulldogs came in fifth with a score of 460. Oak Park and River Forest (382), St. Ignatius (391) and Fenwick (400) advanced to sectionals in the team standings. As for the boys, senior Chris Robertson and sophomore Jackson Fields shot 87 and 89, respectively, as advancing individuals to sectionals. The Bulldogs finished fifth with 365 points at the St. Ignatius Regional.

The Bulldogs had a tough week, losing matches to St. Edward and Immaculate Conception. The team resumes play this week at Rosary, Oct. 11, and then at the Maine West Invite (Oct. 12-13). A group of solid returners lead the team this year, including setter Leah Rettke, middle Kaiann Nash, outside hitter Joy Greco, defensive specialist/libero Audrey Santora and junior middle Julia Brom. Freshman Colette Barnes and sophomore Annalisa Cinkay are top newcomers. The state playoffs begin with the Friars (7-6-1) hosting a regional at the Priory between Oct. 17-19.

Trinity golf

RBHS football

The Blazers advanced to sectional play with a third-place showing at their own Class 1A regional. Junior Brianna Sullivan shot a 98 and sophomore Katarina Sheirok a 99 to lead Trinity to a score of 428. Elizabeth Laffey (114), Lauren Considine (117), Bridget Sturbis (122) and Faith Radford (138) also contributed. St. Francis scored 366 to win the regional, followed by Latin at 389.

The Bulldogs led host St. Francis 6-0 before the game was suspended Friday, Oct. 5 due to inclement weather. When play resumed Saturday in Wheaton, the Spartans dominated the action to post a 49-6 win. RBHS (2-5) hosts Wheaton Academy on Friday, Oct. 12 (7:15 p.m.). The Bulldogs will honor the military during the game.

Nazareth boys golf Medalist Anthony King carded a 71 to lead the Roadrunners to the Hinsdale South Regional title in the Class 2A state playoffs. Nazareth (306), Brother Rice (315) and St. Rita (326) advanced to sectionals. Nazareth’s Michael Rooney shot 73 while Jonathon Winters and Nicolas Longo both finished with a score of 81. Seniors John Hamilton (84) and Jack Keivan (91) also contributed for the victors.

Fenwick boys golf Josh Kirkham (one-over 72) placed third and Jackson Schaeffer (four-over 75) was fifth at the Lane Regional of the Class 3A state playoffs. Teammate Jake Wiktor carded a 77 on the Hilldale Golf Club course in Hoffman Estates. Fenwick finished second with a score of 309, trailing only regional champion York (298) from the West Suburban Conference. Lake Park (326) joined the Dukes and Friars as sectional qualifiers.

LTHS boys golf

Courtesy RBHS Athletic Dept.

Sophomore Kiki Keen carded a 96 at the Payton Regional, advancing to sectional play.

sectional play. Whitney Young edged Payton by a stroke, 309310, as the third sectional qualifier.

The Lions posted a score of 300, six strokes behind regional host and champion St. Ignatius (294). Four players shot under 80 for LTHS. Nick Panos led the way with a 72, followed by Mike Kozub (74), Griffin Pohl (76) and Max Rockrohr (78). Sophomore Trent Garrett scored 84 and senior Owen Figge 86 as the Lions move on to

RBHS girls volleyball

LTHS boys cross country Senior Jesse Lussier (16:22.9) and junior Luke Armstrong (16:27.5) placed first and second at the St. Charles North Invite. Teammate Sean McDermott followed closely with a fourth-place showing (16:30) as the Lions (48) came in second behind champion St. Charles East (38). Junior Sam Schafer completed the three-mile course in 17:03.3 and senior Joseph Trutenko finished at 17:09.1 as the Lions’ other top 25 runners.

RBHS boys cross country The Bulldogs finished 14th at the St. Charles North Invite with a score of 439. Seniors David Keen and Josh Ranft recorded the Bulldogs’ best times at 17:05.1 and 17:35.4, respectively, while Connor Raymond (17:41.3), Peter Kallas (18:00.9) and Chris Magno (18:01) also ran well for RBHS. Hosted by Elmwood Park, the Bulldogs will compete in the Metro Suburban Conference Championship on Saturday, Oct. 13. The meet starts at 9 a.m.

Trinity cross country Senior Alexis Cohn led the sophomore-laden Blazers to fourth place at the Pat Savage Invitational. She recorded a time of 19:03.54 to come in eighth. Sophomores Kate Foley (20:19.07), Sylvia Ritzler (20:25.5), Courtney Yungerman (21:15.89), Annabel Halloran (21:44.02), Jessica Hoffman (22:02.13) and Nora Clements (22:53.7), along with junior Alexandra Morelli (24:37.96), represented Trinity.


20

The Landmark, October 10, 2018

RBLANDMARK.COM New local ads this week

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OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT THERAPY OFFICES FOR RENT Therapy offices for rent in north Oak Park. Rehabbed building. Nicely furnished. Flexible leasing. Free parking; Free wifi; Secure building; Friendly colleagues providing referrals. Shared Waiting room; optional Conference room. Call or email with questions. Shown on Sundays. Lee 708.383.0729 drlmadden@ameritech.net

GARAGE/YARD SALES Oak Park

GARAGE SALE 1131 S. EUCLID SAT 10/13 9AM TO 1PM

Women’s clothes, video games, dvds, cds, toys, tools, foosball table Oak Park

LARGE GARAGE/ BACKYARD SALE 718 CLARENCE THU - FRI - SAT 10/11 10/12 10/13 9AM TO 3PM

Many household / kitchen items, wooden youth desk with shelves and chair, Brother laser printer; extension ladder, wall art, books, jewelry, men’s boots; women’s and young men’s clothing and shoes; and much more. Oak Park

GARAGE SALE 1130 S HARVEY enter thru alley

FRI 10/12 & SAT 10/13 2PM TO 4PM

Music CD’s, VHS Hit movies, Cd/ DVD storage unit, women’s large & plus size clothing, men’s clothing, shoes (new), small kitchen appliances, books (cooking, health, celebrity bio’s), bedsheet sets (new), umbrellas (new), pet supplies & pet outfits (small dogs), walker (for elderly), & more. River Forest

GARAGE SALE 1038 KEYSTONE FRI 10/12 8AM TO NOON

Assorted household items, sports equipment, CD’s,tools and painting supplies, women’s clothing among other items. Take a look!

ITEMS FOR SALE BOYS BUNK BED Solid pine bunk bed, full size bottom.bed .staircase storage. From the room place. In good condition. Asking $400, firm. Call 708.261.6949.

Find your new apartment this Saturday from 10 am – 4pm at 35 Chicago Avenue. Or call us toll free at 1-888-328-8457 for an appointment.

FURNITURE & MORE Oval Marble Dining Room Table with 4 chairs, Solid Oak Coffee Table, Carpet Shampooer, Roll Top Desk, Under Cabinet Dishwasher, Marble Top Pedestal Table, Lawnmower, Garden Tools, New Christmas Lights and other household items. Call 708-386-7998.

ITEMS FOR SALE

WANTED TO BUY

HOUSE ITEMS FOR SALE House is being sold, several items are for sale, Gas fire place with mantel, musical instruments (ideal for a young band) including drum set, 2 guitars, 1 bass guitar, 4 small amplifiers, computer desks, 6 foot Bar with 4 captains chairs and more

CHESTERFIELD SOFAS Looking for used Chesterfield Sofas. Call Ammon 312-320-9475.

PIANO MUSIC Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann piano concertos, ensemble piano music and piano trios. 708-488-8755 SWIMMING POOL 18 foot inflatable pool. Includes, ladder, 2 pumps, cover, skimmer. $250.00 firm. Call 708-261-6949.

CEMETERY PLOTS FOR SALE TWO CEMETERY PLOTS FOR SALE PARKHOLM CEMETERY LaGrange Rd, North of 31st St. Retired/Relocated

Call 608-647-8726

WANTED MILITARY ITEMS: Helmets, medals, patches, uniforms, weapons, flags, photos, paperwork, Also toy soldiers-lead plastic-other misc. toys. Call Uncle Gary 708-522-3400

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PUBLIC NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE Chertkow and Chertkow (22019) Attorneys for Petitioner 1525 East 53rd Street Chicago, Illinois 60615 STATE OF ILLINOIS) COUNTY OF COOK )ss Circuit Court of Cook County, County Department, Domestic Relations Division. In re the marriage of MARGARITA MENDOZA, Petitioner and JUAN CARLOS CAMACHO, Respondent, Case No. 2018D-007945. The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you, the above named Respondent, that a Petition has been filed in the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, by the Petitioner, for Dissolution of Marriage and for other relief; and that said suit is now pending. Now, therefore, unless you, the said Respondent, file your response to said Petition or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, Room 802, Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, in the City of Chicago, Illinois, on or before October 30, 2018, default may be entered against you at any time after that day, and a judgment for Dissolution of Marriage entered in accordance with the prayer of said Petition. DOROTHY A. BROWN, Clerk. Published in Wednesday Journal 9/26, 10/3, 10/10/2018

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT OF BIDDING Request of bids for a solar PV installation at the Oak Park Conservatory. Owner: Park District of Oak Park 218 Madison St, Oak Park, IL 60302 The Park District of Oak Park seeks bids related to the solar PV installation at the Oak Park Conservatory. Work includes installation of 19.8 kW solar PV system with racking, inverters, electrical work, panel and interconnection. The Park District of Oak Park will receive individual sealed Bids until 11:30 a.m. (CST) on Friday, October 26th, 2018, at 218 Madison St., Oak Park, Illinois. The bidding documents and requirements will be available on the Park Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website as of 10:00 am Wednesday, October 10th, 2018. A NON-MANDATORY pre-bid walk-thru is scheduled for Monday, October 15th at 10:30 am (CST), at 615 Garfield St., Oak Park, IL. Copies of the bidding specifications are available via the Park District of Oak Park website at: http://www.pdop.org/bids-and-rfps/ For additional information, contact Chris Lindgren at chris.lindgren@ pdop.org or (708) 725 2050. Only the bids prepared in compliance with the bidding documents will be considered. This project must adhere to the Prevailing Wage Act of 2018. The Park District of Oak Park encourages minority and women owned business firms to submit bids for this project.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

The Village of Oak Park will receive Bids from qualified Vendors for project 18-201, Uniform Laundry and Rental Services pursuant to this Request for Bids. Bids will be accepted at the Public Works Center, 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, IL 60302 Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. local time until 12:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 24, 2018. Bids will be reviewed and the results of the review will be presented to the Village.

The Village of Oak Park will receive sealed proposals at the Office of the Village Engineer, 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois 60302, until 12:00 P.M. on Thursday, November 1, 2018 for the following: Phase III Construction Engineering for the Madison Street Improvement Project. In general, the contract will require professional engineering services to oversee construction of a proposed project on Madison Street from Harlem Avenue to Austin Boulevard which includes street resurfacing, corner sidewalk ramp improvements, sewer improvements, spot safety improvements, and pavement markings which is proposed for construction during the summer of 2019.

Specifications and bid forms may be obtained from the Village starting on Wednesday, October 10th at http://www.oak-park.us/ bid or at the Public Works Center at the address listed above or by calling 708-358-5700. The Village reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids or to waive technicalities, or to accept any item of any bid. Information is available from the Budget and Revenue Analyst, Diane Stanislavski at 708-358-5700 or dstanislavski@ oak-park.us. THE VILLAGE OF OAK PARK Diane Stanislavski Budget and Revenue Analyst Published in Wednesday Journal 10/10/2018

Park District of Oak Park By: Kassie Porreca, Secretary Park District of Oak Park 218 Madison St. Oak Park, IL 60302

Owner: Park District of Oak Park 218 Madison St, Oak Park, IL 60302 The Park District of Oak Park seeks bids related to the rain water harvesting installation at the Oak Park Conservatory. Work includes installation of four 1100 gallon tanks, downspout tie-ins, pumps, filters, plumbing, water line to greenhouses and minor electrical. The Park District of Oak Park will receive individual sealed Bids until 11:00 a.m. (CST) on Friday, October 26th, 2018, at 218 Madison St., Oak Park, Illinois. The bidding documents and requirements will be available on the Park Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website as of 10:00 am, Wednesday, October 10th, 2018. A NON-MANDATORY pre-bid walk-thru is scheduled for Monday, October 15th at 10:00 am (CST), at 615 Garfield St., Oak Park, IL. Copies of the bidding specifications are available via the Park District of Oak Park website at: http://www.pdop.org/bids-and-rfps/ For additional information, contact Chris Lindgren at chris.lindgren@ pdop.org or (708) 725 2050. Only the bids prepared in compliance with the bidding documents will be considered. This project must adhere to the Prevailing Wage Act of 2018. The Park District of Oak Park encourages minority and women owned business firms to submit bids for this project. Park District of Oak Park By: Kassie Porreca, Secretary Park District of Oak Park 218 Madison St. Oak Park, IL 60302 Published in Wednesday Journal 10/10/2018

THE VILLAGE OF OAK PARK Bill McKenna Village Engineer Published in Wednesday Journal 10/10/2018

Published in Wednesday Journal 10/10/2018

PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT OF BIDDING Request of bids for the rain water harvesting installation at the Oak Park Conservatory.

Proposal forms may be obtained from the office of the Village Engineer starting on Thursday, October 11, 2018 beginning at 12:00 p.m. The Village of Oak Park reserves the right to issue proposal documents and specifications only to those consultants deemed qualified. Proposal forms will not be issued after 4:00 p.m. on October 31, 2018.

LEGAL NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING VILLAGE OF BROOKFIELD PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION OCTOBER 25, 2018 AT 7:00 P.M.

The Village of Oak Park will receive sealed proposals at the Office of the Village Engineer, 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois 60302, until 11:00 a.m. on Friday, October 26, 2018 and at that time will be publicly opened and read aloud for the following Village Project: 19-1, Water and Sewer Main Improvements. In general, the improvements consist of the installation of ductile iron water main, including valves, domestic services lines, fire hydrants, and precast valve vaults; installation of sewer main, sewer services, precast manholes and drainage structures; sewer main rehabilitation with cured in place pipe; temporary restoration of street pavements including bituminous pavements, curb and gutter, sidewalks, and pavement markings; and all appurtenant work thereto.

NOTICE is hereby given that the Village of Brookfield Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a public hearing on Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. in the Edward Barcal Hall located at 8820 Brookfield Avenue, Brookfield, Illinois to consider an application filed for variations of Chapter 62-Zoning of the Code of Ordinances, Village of Brookfield, Illinois and a map/text amendment to said Chapter 62. The proposed variations are regarding a property located at 3704 Grand Boulevard, Brookfield, Illinois (PINs 15-34-420002, -003, -004 and - 026).

Plans and proposal forms may be obtained from the office of the Village Engineer starting on Friday, October 12, 2018, at 10:00am. A non-refundable deposit of $50 is required for each set of plans and specifications. The Village of Oak Park reserves the right to issue plans and specifications only to those contractors deemed qualified. No bid documents will be issued after 4:00 p.m. on the working day preceding the date of bid opening.

The public is invited to attend the public hearing and present oral and/ or written comments.

All prospective bidders must prove they are pre-qualified by the Illinois Department of Transportation before receiving bid documents. The work to be performed pursuant to this Proposal is subject to the Illinois Prevailing Wage Act, 820 ILCS 130/0.01 et seq. THE VILLAGE OF OAK PARK Bill McKenna Village Engineer Published in Wednesday Journal 10/10/2018

Legal Description: Lots 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 in block 19 in Grossdale, a subdivision of the southeast ¼ of Section 34, Township 39, Range 12 East of the Third Principal Meridian, situated in the Village of Brookfield, in Cook County, Illinois.

The application including the proposed variations may be viewed at the Village of Brookfield Village Hall during normal business hours. Written comments may be provided prior to the public hearing to: Village of Brookfield, Planning and Zoning Commission c/o Nicholas Greifer, 8820 Brookfield Avenue, Brookfield, IL 60513. Please reference PZC Case 18-13. Individuals with disabilities requiring a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in any meeting should contact the Village of Brookfield (708) 485-7344 prior to the meeting. Wheelchair access is available through the front (South) entrance of Village Hall. By Order of Chuck Grund, Planning and Zoning Commission Chairman. Published in RB Landmark 10/10/2018

email us: classifieds@rblandmark.com


22

The Landmark, October 10, 2018

RBLANDMARK.COM

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In print • Online • Available to you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year RBLandmark.com | PublicNoticeIllinois.com PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to “An Act in relation to the use of an Assumed Business Name in the conduct or transaction of Business in the State,” as amended, that a certification was registered by the undersigned with the County Clerk of Cook County. Registration Number: D18155520 on September 24, 2018. Under the Assumed Business Name of D.M. BURTON STYLE with the business located at: 7208 HARVARD ST UNIT 1, FOREST PARK, IL 60130. The true and real full name(s) and residence address of the owner(s)/ partner(s) is: DARIEN T MARIONBURTON 7208 HARVARD ST UNIT 1 FOREST PARK, IL 60130. Published in Forest Park Review 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2018

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT– CHANCERY DIVISION HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE (THE TRUSTEE) FOR THE HOLDERS OF DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES, INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007RAMP1 Plaintiff, -v.ANDREA M. RANDALL, LOFTOMINIUMS OF FOREST PARK CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ILLINOIS HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 2018 CH 04590 7248 DIXON STREET #B FOREST PARK, IL 60130 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on July 30, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 5, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7248 DIXON STREET #B, FOREST PARK, IL 60130

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Property Index No. 15-12-420-0191010. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/ 18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE

ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-18-03595. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-18-03595 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 2018 CH 04590 TJSC#: 38-6342 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3099297

Commonly known as 1836 N. 21ST AVENUE, MELROSE PARK, IL 60160 Property Index No. 15-03-103-0480000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $290,919.14. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/ 18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure

sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719 Please refer to file number 564652104-FT. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Fax #: (217) 422-1754 CookPleadings@hsbattys.com Attorney File No. 564652104-FT Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 16 CH 11164 TJSC#: 38-7594 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3099790

INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION Selling Officer, (312) 444-1122 I3099882

(driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719 Please refer to file number 2120-14745. If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Fax #: (217) 422-1754 CookPleadings@hsbattys.com Attorney File No. 2120-14745 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 11 CH 42952 TJSC#: 38-6635 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I3096984

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT– CHANCERY DIVISION MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P. Plaintiff, -v.GINA CAMPA A/K/A GINA M. CAMPA, JESUS GARCIA A/K/A JESUS M. GARCIA, A/K/A JESUS H. GARCIA, MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO CAPITAL ONE BANK, STATE OF ILLINOIS, EQUABLE ASCENT FINANCIAL, LLC, PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES, LLC, CITIBANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) N.A. Defendants 16 CH 11164 1836 N. 21ST AVENUE MELROSE PARK, IL 60160 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 9, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 9, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate:

MORTGAGE DIRECTORY

MORTGAGE RATE DIRECTORY LENDER COMMUNITY BANK OF OAK PARK - RIVER FOREST

(708) 660-7006 1001 Lake St., Oak Park IL 60301 www.cboprf.com

AMOUNT

RATE/YR

80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80%

4.875% / 30 yr. fixed 4.750% / 20 yr. fixed 4.375% / 15 yr. fixed 4.750% / 5 yr. ARM 4.750% / 7 yr. ARM 4.875% / 10 yr. ARM

POINTS/ APP. FEE 0%/$550 0%/$550 0%/$550 0%/$550 0%/$550 0%/$550

A.P.R.

4.949% 4.851% 4.502% 5.059% 5.015% 5.040%

· Approved IHDA Mortgage Program Lender · Financing available up to 97% LTV Construction Loans and Home Equity Lines of Credit available – call for terms.

Mortgage rates are accurate as of Monday afternoon. Due to the fluctuation of mortgage rates, the rates may vary before publication. Contact your mortgage lender for complete details. Mortgage rates vary in APR and other qualifying factors.

To Advertise your Mortgage Rates, call Mary Ellen Nelligan: 708/613-3342

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT– CHANCERY DIVISION OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC; Plaintiff, vs. MARK JOSEPH COMETA; LOURDES LANSANG; CIRCLE TERRACE CONDOMINIUMS; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 18 CH 974 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, November 8, 2018 at the hour of 11 a.m. in their office at 120 West Madison Street, Suite 718A, Chicago, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 15-12-418-011-1003 and 1512-418-011-1062. Commonly known as 148 Circle Avenue, Unit 1W & P-27, Forest Park, IL 60130. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a condominium residence. The purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 of the Condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection For information call the Sales Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois 60603. (312) 3609455 W18-0030.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT– CHANCERY DIVISION US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS LEGAL TITLE TRUSTEE FOR TRUMAN 2016 SC6 TITLE TRUST Plaintiff, -v.JOHN J. RICE, DIANE C. RICE Defendants 11 CH 42952 1038 BELOIT AVE FOREST PARK, IL 60130 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 15, 2018, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on November 16, 2018, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 1038 BELOIT AVE, FOREST PARK, IL 60130 Property Index No. 15-13-418-0140000. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $499,902.60. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/ 18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act., which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on age, race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. The Illinois Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental or advertising of real estate based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informedthat all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. Restrictions or prohibitions of pets do not apply to service animals. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll free at: 1-800-669-9777. WEDNESDAY JOURNAL Forest Park Review, Landmark

email us: classifieds@rblandmark.com


The Landmark, October 10, 2018

RBLANDMARK.COM 

CLASSIFIED

(708) 613-3333 • FAX: (708) 467-9066 • E-MAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@RBLANDMARK.COM

local employees = happy employees!

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Hire Local. Place an ad on Landmark’s Local Online Job Board. Go to RBLandmark.com/classified today!

Contact Mary Ellen Nelligan for more information. (708) 613-3342 classifieds@rblandmark.com

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

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The Landmark, October 10, 2018

21 E. BURLINGTON ROAD, RIVERSIDE | MYBURLINGTONREALTY.COM | 708.447.7207

EN OP

N SU

1-3

2910 Lincoln Ave, North Riverside $475,000

4616 Maple Ave, Brookfield $159,900

8924 31st St, 1W, Brookfield $165,000

1322 Elgin Ave, Forest Park $265,000

3608 Wenonah Ave, Berwyn $269,900

1528 Harrison Ave, LaGrange Park $350,000

6502 Fairfield Ave, Berwyn $355,000

10E Burlington Unit 3J, Riverside $370,000

460 Shenstone Rd, Riverside $489,000

8748 Rockefeller Ave, Brookfield $564,000

372 Shenstone Rd, Riverside $650,000

468 Northgate Ct, Riverside $670,000

278 Northwood Rd, Riverside $675,000

100 Fairbank Rd., Riverside $699,900

177 Scottswood Rd, Riverside $809,000

Burlington Realty is #1! Our dollar sales volume in Riverside is more than the next four offices combined! List with the LEADER! *BrokerMetricsÂŽ 2015 for brokerage firms in the city of Chicago and Illinois including Residential (Detatched Single, Attached Single, 2 to 4 Units, Mobile Homes).

FEATURED HOME OF THE WEEK! 262 Longcommon Rd, Riverside SOPHISTICATED & SPRAWLING baltis built mid century modern ranch, on half acre lot in prime location across from Olmstedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Longcommon Park, has been architect/designer renovated & expanded w/ meticulous care in preserving its mid century character. Open floor plan w/ 3750 sq. ft of living space includes 5 large BRs, including master en-suite w/ steam shower, & 4.1 Baths (three new). Foyer w/ slate floor opens to grand step down living rm w/ wall of windows & fireplace, & formal living rm. Hardwood floors. Updated kitchen opens to huge, sunny, family rm, perfect for family living & entertaining, w/ french doors & 3 walls of windows w/ views of the patio & huge landscaped yard. Many built-ins, 1st floor laundry/mud rm, 2nd floor study, bedroom, & bath, plus finished lower level w/ huge recreation rm w/ fireplace, exercise rm, office, bedrm w/ bath, & great storage. 3 Hvac systems. 2 Car gar/circular drive. Close to metra, schools, & town.................$895,000

Landmark 101018  
Landmark 101018