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RIVERSIDE-BROOKFIELD Also serving North Riverside $1.00

Vol. 35, No. 3

January 15, 2020

Scottish Home gets multimillion-dollar boost PAGE 3

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Ogden Avenue businesses on the move PAGE 7

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North Riverside Library unveils ‘Build Guild’ PAGE 8

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WHO NEEDS SNOW?

St. Louise de Marillac School closing in June Low enrollment, large deficit prove hurdles too great to overcome By BOB UPHUES Editor

It’s been a stressful 12 months for the parishioners of Holy Guardian Angels Parish, which serves Roman Catholics in Brookfield and part of LaGrange Park. The name itself is new, adopted officially last summer after the Archdiocese of Chicago merged St. Barbara in Brookfield and St. Louise de Marillac in LaGrange Park into a single entity. While the new parish is still getting accustomed to that change, it had still had St. Louise de Marillac School as a rallying point. The school had welcomed families whose children had once attended St. Barbara School in Brookfield after that institution closed in 2012. But, now St. Louise de Marillac School finds itself on the archdiocese’s chopping block. On Jan. 13, the archdiocese announced that it was closing the school effective June 30, ending its 62-year run. St. Louise is one of five schools closing at the end of the school year. The others are St. Colette School in Rolling Meadows, St. Jane de Chantal School in Chicago, St. Joseph School in Round Lake and St. Maria Goretti School in Schiller Park. See SCHOOL CLOSING on page 14

ALEX ROGALS/Staff Photographer

SLIP -SLIDING AWAY: Tubers and toboggans find just enough slickness to get down the sledding hill at Village Commons in North Riverside. More photos on page 12.

Belmonte retiring as North Riverside administrator Mayor to appoint finance chief Scarpiniti as interim

By BOB UPHUES Editor

Guy Belmonte, who has served as North Riverside’s village administrator since 2001, has announced he’s retiring on March 6 after a 31-year career in local government.

“It was just time,” said Belmonte, who turned 70 last summer. “I think people need to know when it’s time to step down.” Mayor Hubert Hermanek Jr. said he intends to appoint Sue Scarpiniti, the village’s finance director, as interim administrator through the end of his

present term of office, which expires in spring 2021. The timing of Belmonte’s retirement poses something of a problem for Hermanek in terms of attracting a qualified permanent village adminSee BELMONTE on page 14

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020


The Landmark, January 15, 2020

‘Largest-ever’ gift to help fund Scottish Home renovation Foundation donates $2 million, plus a possible match, to North Riverside institution

IN THIS ISSUE Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Kosey Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

By BOB UPHUES

Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Editor

Caledonia Senior Living and Memory Care, 2800 Desplaines Ave. in North Riverside, is planning a multi-million dollar project to improve the oldest part of its campus later this year courtesy of the largest grant the organization has ever received. In December, Gus Noble, president of Chicago Scots, which operates Caledonia Senior Living, announced that the Negaunee Foundation had gifted the organization $2 million to renovate the Scottish Home, which was built in 1917 and was last updated about 30 years ago. “We really believe in this physical building and what it represents as far as our care,” Noble said. “The building has cared for hundreds of thousands of people, if you extend the care we provide out into the community and families. And now is the time for us to take care of the building.” The Negaunee Foundation, which ordinarily supports the arts and sciences, will give Caledonia Senior Living $1 million in both 2020 and 2021. In addition, the foundation has promised to match up to $1 million in additional donations raised by Chicago Scots during the next two years. “The people who run [the Negaunee Foundation] have become very good friends of ours, both personally and professionally,” said Noble, who has led Chicago Scots and Caledonia Senior Living since 2004. “They normally support the arts and sciences, but they recognized something in us at this particular moment that I think really hit home with them. They said, ‘We believe in doing the right thing.’” In addition to the Negaunee Foundation, said Noble, Caledonia Senior Living has also received gifts from Peter Georgeson, who has a wing already named after him at the nursing home, and an anonymous donor. Chicago Scots raised another $150,000 at their Feast of the Haggis event last month. “It’s set us on a path towards reimagining the tradition of the Scottish Home,” Noble said. Noble announced the grant at Chicago Scots’ annual gala. The improvement of the

Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Editor Bob Uphues Sports Editor James Kay BOB UPHUES/Staff

NEW CALEDONIA: The Scottish Home’s plans for renovation received a big boost from the Negaunee Foundation. oldest wing of Caledonia Senior Living will coincide with the charity’s 175th birthday in 2020. The Chicago Scots, formerly known as the Illinois St. Andrew Society, was formed in 1845 and is believed to be the oldest nonprofit organization in the state. Initial plans have been drawn up for the improvement project, said Noble, but work remains on final drawings. The organization is working with architect Heidi Wang of Worn Jerabek Wiltse and interior designer Martha Strong as well as the construction firm of Bulley and Andrews. The 1917 Scottish Home wing of Caledonia Senior Living houses the 49 rooms making up the “sheltered care” unit, an assisted-living wing where a nurse is on duty 24 hours a day. “It allows us to do more for people who need nursing care,” Noble said. Caledonia Senior Living also includes 14 intermediate care rooms in the MacMillan Wing, built in the 1960s and 22 skilled nursing rooms in the Georgeson Wing, built in the 1990s. The campus also is home to the McLean House, opened in 2016 and designed and built specifically to provide care to those living with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other forms of memory loss. The improvements to the Scottish Home wing of the campus will include revealing some long covered-over aspects of the original design by architect William Bryce Mundie – himself a life member of the Illinois St.

Andrew Society -- whose career started as a draftsman in the office of William LeBaron Jenney and would become Jenney’s partner in 1891. That design included such features as skylights and terrazzo floors, which will be brought back in the remodel, said Noble. “We want to help reinforce the Scottish identity of the building, but presented in a way that feels compelling to the generation of residents of today and tomorrow,” Noble said. Work will address hallways, provide new lighting, new wallcoverings, new flooring, new ceilings and a new security system. It will also include upgrades to resident bedrooms, bathrooms and the construction of two spas. The Scottish Home’s public rooms will also be renovated, according to Noble, and an effort will be made to better connect the main living room and dining room with the outdoor courtyard. Programming changes will also be part of the reimagined Scottish Home wing, to make better use of the upstairs Great Room. Noble said that he expects work to begin in the second half of 2020 “We’re all chomping at the bit, ready to go,” Noble said. “I want this to coincide with the 175th anniversary of the society. It’s an important opportunity for us to reimagine tradition of the past into the future. There’s no better time to put that mark in the ground.”

Staff Photographer Alex Rogals Editorial Design Manager Claire Innes Editorial Designer Scot McIntosh Advertising Design Manager Andrew Mead Advertising Designers Debbie Becker, Bobbie Rollins-Sanchez IT Manager/Web Developer Mike Risher Revenue & Advertising Director Dawn Ferencak Advertising Sales Marc Stopeck, Sales & Development Mary Ellen Nelligan Client Engagement Natalie Johnson Circulation Manager Jill Wagner Front Desk Maria Murzyn, Carolyn Henning Publisher Dan Haley Associate Publisher Dawn Ferencak Business Manager Joyce Minich

HOW TO REACH US ADDRESS 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302 PHONE 708-442-6739 ■ FAX 708-467-9066 E-MAIL buphues@wjinc.com ONLINE www.RBLandmark.com The Landmark is published digitally and in print by Growing Community Media NFP. The newspaper is available on newsstands for $1.00. A one-year subscription costs $25 within Cook County

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020

Before Hollywood, there was Chicago

Join Dave Clark, the “Windy City Road Warrior,” as he presents the rich history of motion picture production in Chicago during “From Chaplin to the Dark Knight: The Movie Industry in Chicago” on Thursday, Jan. 16 at 7 p.m. at Riverside Public Library, 1 Burling Road. Clark will talk about early cinema’s Essanay Film Manufacturing Company, which produced iconic films during the silent screen era starring legends like Charlie Chaplin’s and Gloria Swanson and the city’s film renaissance as a backdrop for films like “The Blues Brothers.” He’ll also touch on the city’s first great movie palaces by the firm of Rapp & Rapp and Chicago’s continued activity in motion pictures through studios like Cinespace on the West Side -- the largest film studio outside of Hollywood.

BIG WEEK January 15-22

Stuffed animal storytime and sleepover

Riverside Public Library, 1 Burling Road, invites kids to a Stuffed Animal Storytime and Sleepover, a special two-part event for kids of all ages. Bring your stuffed friend to a storytime program on Friday, Jan. 17 at 4 p.m. and then tuck your teddy (or kitty or elephant) in for the night. Come back the next morning, Jan. 18 at 10 a.m. for breakfast and to find out what your friend did overnight. Registration required by visiting the library or calling 708-442-6366.

Soup and Bread for BEDS Plus

The community is invited to BEDS Plus’annual fundraiser, Soup and Bread, a family-friendly gathering featuring great local food and a variety of craft beers on Sunday, Jan. 26 from 3 to 7 p.m. at Holiday Inn William Tell Banquets, 6201 Joliet Road in Countryside. Soups served this year include Mon Ami Gabi’s Vichyssoise as well as the stuffed green pepper soup from Saban’s Place and the chicken tortellini soup from Salerno’s Pizzeria and Bar. Other businesses will be serving food as well. Live music will be provided by guitarist/vocalist Honee Brown and the bands The Pigs and Crows of Furey. Tickets are $25 per person. Kids 11 and under admitted free. More at beds-plus.org/events/soupbread.

And more ■ Riverside Arts Center, 32 E. Quincy St., presents “Line,” featuring the work of artists Diana Gabriel and Azadeh Gholizadeh in the Freeark Gallery and “Energy, Frequency and Vibration” featuring drawings of Andrei Rabodzeenko in the FlexSpace Gallery through Feb. 22. Free. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. ■ Compassion Factory Art Gallery and Studio, 9210 Broadway Ave. in Brookfield, presents a solo show of work by glass artist Margieann through Feb. 1. Gallery hours are Thursdays from 4 to 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free. ■ “The Nerd,” a side-splitting, rollicking comedy

LTHS celebrates Martin Luther King Jr.

The Lyons Township High School Black and Multicultural Club will host a Martin Luther King Jr. celebration on Wednesday, Jan. 15 at 6:30 p.m. at the South Campus Performing Arts Center, 4900 S. Willow Springs Road in Western Springs. The free event, titled “Everybody Can Be Great,” is open to the public and will feature keynote speaker Rev. James Foster, the founding and senior pastor at Living truth of Christ Church in Lafayette, Indiana. Foster spent the bulk of his career at Purdue University as a residence hall general manager and as a diversity/community outreach manager. Throughout 30 years at the university, he facilitated diversity and inclusiveness workshops and advised the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity. He received several awards from Purdue, including the One Brick Higher President’s Award, a Special Boilermaker Award from the Alumni Office and the 2009 Dreamer Award.

perfect for the dark days of winter, runs Jan. 16-26 at Theatre of Western Spring, 4384 Hampton Ave. Tickets are $22 and $24. Call the box office at 708-246-3380 or go to theatrewesternsprings.com. ■ Get your tickets now for Pillars Community Health’s annual gala, “The Ball,” which will be held Saturday, Feb. 1 from 6 to 11:30 p.m. at Drury Lane in Oakbrook Terrace. Tickets are available at PillarsCommunityHealth.org/Ball. ■ Brookfield Public Library, 3609 Grand Blvd., hosts Cutting the Cable Cord on Jan. 16 at 7 p.m.; DIY Craft Time (ages 9-adult) on Jan. 18 at 3 p.m.; and DNA Part II: DNA Share Matches One Step Further with genealogist Suz Bates on Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. Register for events at 708-485-0869 or at brookfieldlibrary.info.

■ Riverside Public Library, 1 Burling Road, invites kids to a School’s Out Movie matinee on Jan. 20 at 11:30 a.m. for a screening of “Toy Story 4.” Adults can join Koru meditation teacher Gina Barsotti for Mindful Meditation on Jan. 16 from 10 to 11:15 a.m. and Pokemon for Parents on Jan. 19 at 2 p.m. ■ North Riverside Public Library, 2400 Desplaines Ave., invites adults and seniors to join Margaret Coffee as she discusses the world of professional book publishing at Book Publishing 101 on Jan. 16 at 6 p.m. There will also be a Device Advice Q&A on Jan. 21 at noon and Safe Surfin’: Internet Security on Jan. 21 at 6:30 p.m. To sign up for senior and adult events, call 708-4470869 or visit www.northriversidelibrary.org/events. For kids there’s Lapsit Storytime (thru age 5) on

Volunteers sought for Meals on Wheels

Community Nutrition Network/Meals on Wheels of North Riverside invites you to make a difference in your community by volunteering to help deliver meals to homebound senior citizens, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, contact Linda at 312-207-5290.

Jan. 16 at 10:30 a.m.; DIY Craft Hour (ages 3-6) on Jan. 17 at 4 p.m.; and Messy Mornings with Munchkins (ages 2-5) on Jan. 21 at 11:30 a.m. ■ The Brookfield Elks Lodge, 9022 31st St., hosts bingo every Monday night. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games start at 7 p.m. minimum cash payout of $2,275 a night, plus pull tabs, lightning, tic-tac and raffles.

The community is invited to jog, walk or run inside on the indoor track at the Lyons Township High School South Campus fieldhouse, 4900 S. Willow Springs Road in Western Springs from 6 to 7 a.m. on days when school is in session through March 20. Free. ■


The Landmark, January 15, 2020

P O L I C E

R E P O R T

Burglary crew rams fence, steals two cars from dealer A burglary crew reportedly stole three cars from a service garage at Zeigler Ford, 2100 Harlem Ave. in North Riverside, at about 8:10 p.m. on Jan. 5, and then used one of the vehicles to ram open a gate along the north fence line of the lot, allowing the other vehicles to flee the scene. One of the vehicles, a 2017 Ford Fusion, was recovered unoccupied and undamaged by Chicago police in the 1800 block of South Washtenaw Avenue on the following day. Several items were reported missing from that vehicle, however, including a child’s car seat. Police said that security cameras reportedly showed four people wearing black hooded sweatshirts enter the service garage at 8:01 p.m. after breaking the glass window of the garage door. One minute later, three vehicles are seen exiting the garage door and heading toward the west end of the lot. By the time police arrived on the scene at about 8:08 p.m., two of the stolen vehicles, the Ford Fusion and a Ford Escape, were gone. The third, a white Ford Focus, had apparently been used to ram the gated fence and was found abandoned on top of a section of fence, which was lodged underneath it.

Best Buy burglarized Police are still trying to determine just what was stolen during a break in at Best Buy, 2358 Harlem Ave. in North Riverside, during the early morning hours of Jan. 11. Officers responded to the store to investigate an active burglar alarm, which was tripped at 3:51 a.m. Offenders had left the building by the time police arrived at 3:55 a.m., and police observed that the door to the rear installation garage had been pried open. Police said there were wet shoeprints on the carpet. The offenders also tried to pry open the door leading to the main store, but were unable to gain entry, according to police. Because the rear garage typically contains many products and tools, it was unclear what exactly was missing at that time.

Driving on the grass Riverside police charged a 39-year-old Cicero woman with drunken driving and cited her for several traffic offenses after she allegedly drove her white 2018 Dodge Durango eastbound through the stop sign at Washington Avenue and Golf Road and then over the curb at Golf Road, across the entire lawn in front of Riverside-Brookfield High School before reentering Ridgewood Road

near First Avenue on Jan. 11 at about 1:25 a.m. A tow truck driver reportedly witnessed the incident and called police, who stopped the truck near East Quincy Street and South Cowley Road. No one was injured and no trees were damaged, according to police, but the tires left ruts in the grass. The driver reportedly failed field sobriety tests and refused to submit to a breath test.

Sts. Peter and Paul

Vehicle break-in Brookfield police responded to a residence in the 4100 block of Arthur Avenue on the morning of Jan. 8 after a 41-year-old LaGrange resident called to report that his van, which was parked on the street, was burglarized during the overnight hours. The victim told police he’d left the van parked on the street the previous night at about 9 p.m. When he was dropped off the next morning to retrieve it, the victim noticed a front passenger window was shattered and both the driver and passenger side doors open. Missing from the vehicle were a Rand McNally GPS unit, a bag filled with various tools and nearly $5,800 in cash, which had been left in the center console.

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Car spins out into zoo fence An 18-year-old Brookfield resident was cited for driving too fast for conditions, leaving the scene of an accident and operating an uninsured vehicle after he reportedly lost control of a 2002 Pontiac while driving eastbound on 31st Street and crashed it into a tree and a fence on Brookfield Zoo property at about 10:40 p.m. on Jan. 11. According to the police report, neither drugs nor alcohol factored into the crash. The driver reportedly told police he was going about 37-40 mph on a night when it was snowing and the streets were slick. The car spun out and left the roadway before hitting the tree and fence south of 31st Street. The driver told police he crawled out of the shattered rear window of the car and fled the scene, because he was scared and didn’t know what to do. These items were obtained from police reports filed by the Riverside, North Riverside and Brookfield police departments, Jan. 5 to Jan. 12, and represent a portion of the incidents to which police responded. Unless otherwise indicated, anybody named in these reports has only been charged with a crime. These cases have not been adjudicated.

— Compiled by Bob Uphues

Call Jill at 708-442-6739 or visit RBLandmark.com and click subscribe

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020

Home School teacher tapped as middle school dean Some D103 board members irked at hiring process By BOB SKOLNIK Contributing Reporter

The administrative team at George Washington Middle School in Lyons is now fully staffed but some school board members are unhappy about how it was done. Last week, Sarah Torrejon, who had been an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher at Home School in Stickney began working at the middle school as a dean. Torrejon is working on an interim basis until the school board can vote on creating the position of dean and hiring her for the job, at its next meeting on Jan. 28. Some school board members are not happy about the move prior to the board officially taking action. “It doesn’t follow the rules,” said board member Shannon Johnson. Last year, and for many years before that, there were three administrators at GWMS: a principal and two assistant principals. Last summer Assistant Principal Rubi Or-

tiz was promoted to a new position as bilingual program director for Lyons-Brookfield School District 103. In September, Superintendent Kristopher Rivera was set to recommend that the school board hire a Chicago Public Schools teacher, Socorro Mendoza, to replace Ortiz as an assistant principal at GWMS. But the job offer was suddenly withdrawn without a full explanation. School board President Jorge Torres said at the time that the offer to Mendoza was withdrawn because of concerns about the budget. School board member Marge Hubacek said that she didn’t understand why Rivera acted before the school board formally created the new position of dean. “I don’t quite know what the hurry was at this point, because he dragged his feet this whole time,” Hubacek said. For the first four months of the school year, GWMS Principal Don Jones and Assistant Principal Gary Wheaton have been the only administrators at the school, which serves 750 students. “That’s a lot of work for two people,” Rivera said. Changing the position from assistant principal to dean will save the district a little money. The dean position, which will

focus on student discipline, will be a 38-week position while assistant principals work a 42-week year. Rivera is recommending that Torrejon be paid an annual salary of $76,000. Wheaton and Ortiz were hired in 2018 at starting salaries of $80,000. For now, Torrejon is being paid a stipend in addition to her teacher’s salary. Torrejon worked for 15 years as a bilingual teacher in Chicago before coming to Home School. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Chicago State University and has earned two master’s degrees, one in curriculum and instruction from Indiana Wesleyan University and one in educational leadership and administration from Concordia University. Torrejon says that starting at a new school in the middle of the school year has been great, but challenging. “I’m learning a new routine and new faces, but everybody has been so wonderful,” she said. Rivera said that he, HR Director Brian Towne, Jones, and Wheaton interviewed three candidates last month for the dean’s position, two of whom did not work for District 103. Rivera said that Torrejon was the clear top choice.

“She was the best candidate of the individuals we interviewed,” Rivera said. Torrejon also fills gaps on the GWMS administrative team. It helped that Torrejon was female and bilingual since both Jones and Wheaton are men who don’t speak Spanish. “It’s just a big bonus to have somebody who is bilingual, because that was one of the things Mr. Jones was having concerns about,” Rivera said. “It’s just such an asset to have somebody who can help translate some of the written documentations and notices that go home.” Rivera said the job description for the new position of dean will match the job description of assistant principal. “We didn’t change the job description, but it could be managed differently onsite,” Rivera said. Rivera said the district is looking into how to fill Torrejon’s position at Home School. A new hire, possibly a new graduate, or a long-term substitute are both possibilities, Rivera said. “That’s going to be tough, but filling an administrative position in the middle of the year was tough, too,” Rivera said.

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020

Daycare looks to locate on Ogden Avenue Would take over former Carquest Auto Parts store By BOB UPHUES Editor

A Cicero-based child care business is looking to open what would be its fourth west suburban location in Brookfield inside an Ogden Avenue commercial property that most recently housed an auto parts store. The owner of Let’s Play Child Development Center has applied for a special use permit to allow the daycare center to operate out of the building at 9109 Ogden Ave., formerly Carquest Auto Parts. The site is in the village’s C-1 commercial district. The Brookfield Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on the special use permit application on Jan. 23 at 7 p.m. in the council chamber of the Brookfield Village Hall, 8820 Brookfield Ave. Any member of the public wishing to provide input on the application can do so at the hearing or in writing prior to the hearing. Whatever recommendation the Planning and Zoning Commission makes will go to the Brookfield Village Board for final approval or denial. If the daycare center is allowed to locate on Ogden Avenue, its existence would trigger a 100-foot buffer for any adult-use cannabis dispensary that wished to move to that area. “It would create another zone on Ogden Avenue where a dispensary would be prohibited,” said Village Planner Elyse Vukelich.

School and daycare centers already prohibit a dispensary from locating on the west end of Broadway Avenue, on part of the 3400 block of Maple Avenue and a portion of the 3700 block of Grand Boulevard. The roughly 6,100-square-foot, one-story building will need to be completely built out to accommodate the daycare center, said Vukelich, who added no work would take place unless the company received the special use permit. According to the application on file with the village’s Community and Economic Development Department, the pole sign on the property no longer conforms to the sign code and will either have to be brought into compliance or be removed completely. Let’s Play Child Development Center presently operates three locations – one in Cicero and two in North Riverside. The business’ website states that it serves children from 6 weeks to 12 years old and provides “a variety of child developmental activities that focus on reading, writing, fine motor activities, math and science, language building skills and art activities.” All three locations operate Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. While it’s unclear how many children the Brookfield location might serve, Vukelich said the building’s capacity would allow up to 78. Children arrive in the morning between 6 and 9:30 a.m., according to the company’s application. Parents also pick children up at different times throughout the day. “This is done to alleviate traffic congestion that is caused by having a set arrival and/or dismissal time,” the application states. Because there is no parking on Ogden Av-

brought to you by ALEX ROGALS/Staff Photographer

FROM CARS TO KIDS: Former Carquest Auto Parts building at 9109 Ogden could become a daycare center. enue in front of the business and because the village does not want vehicles pulling up onto the public parkway, Let’s Play Child Development Center is in the process of working out an arrangement to rent 11 parking spaces in an existing off-street lot at 4111 Park Ave. Parents can also use existing public parking spaces on Park and Elm avenues and walk their children to and from the location. The school also has the use of a driveway located between the former auto parts store and Merrick Animal Hospital, at 9115 Ogden Ave. Vukelich said the business planned to use that space for employee parking. The location does not provide any onsite outdoor recreation space, as required by state law. However, Let’s Play Child Development Center reportedly is seeking a waiver from that rule due to the proximity of Ehlert Park, just two blocks to the south. “They would make field trips to Ehlert Park,” Vukelich said.

Ogden Avenue businesses on the move

Ambulance service seeks to expand, Al’s Radiator closes By BOB UPHUES Editor

An Ogden Avenue ambulance company is looking to expand its footprint on the commercial strip this year, moving its billing offices to the old Roy Wahlstrom & Co. property at 9317 Ogden Ave. Cook County property records indicate that a company called 9317 Ogden LLC purchased the property for $130,000 a year ago. The manager of that LLC is Candace Truty, whose address is listed at 8940 Ogden Ave., the home of Advanced Critical Transport, an ambulance service. Truty is also listed as the president of Ad-

vanced Critical Transport by the Illinois Secretary of State. Brookfield Village Planner Elyse Vukelich indicated that Advanced Critical Transport submitted a business license application for 9317 Ogden Ave. in December and that approval of the application is pending village inspections. An employee of Advanced Critical Transport told the Landmark that only the company’s billing department will be moving into the new space. The emergency medical service staff and ambulances will remain at the 8940 Ogden Ave. location. The former Wahlstrom property at 9317 Ogden Ave. was acquired by a firm called Sniper Team Investments in a tax sale held by the Cook County Clerk in April 2018. Prior to the business closing around 2013, Roy Wahlstrom & Co. had been a fixture at that address since 1969. The company, which had its start in Brookfield in the 1950s, moved there from its original home across the street.

Another legacy business leaves Ogden Al’s Radiator, a company that repaired and installed automobile heating and air-conditioning systems for at least 40 years at 9521 Ogden Ave., has closed its doors. Last week, the property was purchased by Steven Campbell in a deal whose terms weren’t disclosed. The longtime owner of Al’s Radiator sought to retire from the business, Campbell said. Campbell owns a number of properties along Ogden Avenue, most prominently the buildings that house the Galloping Ghost video and pinball arcades and several of Galloping Ghost’s related businesses. The transaction included the building on Ogden, which is suitable for reuse as an automobile repair business, as well as a vacant lot south of the alley behind the building, which is used as a parking lot. Campbell said he is working on landing a tenant for the building. The property transaction closed on Jan. 7, he said.

The Hidden Cost of Unlicensed Operators “When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.” ~ John Ruskin, 19th Century Scott art critic McAdam Jr. In the landscaping industry, cheap pricing is a big temptation with a hidden (and potentially much bigger) cost. Oftentimes, these operators are unlicensed and uninsured, which is how they “pass along the savings” to the customer. But the largest risk is when they do not operate with liability or worker’s compensation insurance. So, when you hire them, they effectively become your employee and it is your responsibility to provide a safe working environment and coverage in the event of an injury. If an unlicensed and uninsured contractor gets injured while working for you, they can sue for damages, including medical expenses, legal fees, and lost wages. Think your homeowner’s policy will cover this? Think again, as this type of incident is not usually covered. Be sure to ask any contractor about licensing and insurance coverage-and do it before they start work. As the adage goes: If a low price seems too good to be true, it probably is. “If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better.” ~ Ruskin

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020

North Riverside Library unveils new maker space ‘Build Guild’ allows patrons to engage their creative sides

“We’re trying to go towards the small classes,” Starosta said. “That way people get to know each other and they’re working with the staff member as well. But, they also get to lean on each other and work together.” The Build Guild is operated by one staff member during open lab hours on Tuesdays, Thursday and Saturdays. Staff members will help operate the machines and public usage is a first-come, first-served basis. Starosta said that a set of standards are being written up so those who wish to work independently may go through the training to do so. Group demonstration sessions are also being planned. The idea of people coming together and being creative is Starosta’s vision for the room. “I am hoping people come in and make a day of it -- hang out with their friends and work on some of these projects that they’ve always wanted to do,” Starosta said. The laser engraver is among one of the more popular machines. It can scan documents or recipes and imprint them onto a piece of wood, engrave a monogram on a laptop or cut designs on wedding invitations. Starosta said a second laser engraver and a 3D printer are the next items to add to the Build Guild. “People seem really excited,” she said. “The only downside everyone has told us is they would like [the room] to be bigger. But the only way to do that is to take out my office [next door].” The Build Guild will be open on Tuesdays from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

By ANTHONY LANDAHL Contributing Reporter

If library books and movies don’t suit your fancy, then maybe a laser engraver will. And, you can give it a spin at the North Riverside Public Library, which opened its maker space, dubbed the Build Guild, in December. The room features a laser engraver, embroidery machine, poster printer, button maker and digital music equipment, to name a few. The Build Guild offers patrons access to use the equipment, and the library will offer group classes beginning in the spring. The equipment and furniture for the room were funded through several grants that the library received. Library Director Natalie Starosta said maker spaces are a growing national library trend. She said in the short time since the Build Guild’s inception, many have expressed their surprise that libraries could offer a space like it. Starosta implemented a similar idea at a previous job in 2013, called Maker Kits. Those kits were stocked with various expensive items and tools that could be checked out. At North Riverside, the Library of Things service offers hotspots, gaming systems and exercise equipment for checking out. Now on a grander scale, Starosta said the Build Guild will serve the community in a new way.

Provided

“We love it,” she said. “We are really excited to be able to appeal to more people, to be able to meet the needs in our communities that are changing. All of our needs are always changing.” In the past, any technological instruction was completed one-on-one in an appointment with a library staff member. The library is now using the space for teen DIY and music classes and technology help classes.

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District 95 officials eye new, improved website Staff vetting vendors, anticipate summer 2020 launch By BOB SKOLNIK Contributing Reporter

A new and improved website will be coming later this year for Brookfield-LaGrange Park Elementary School District 95. District officials are now in the early stages of making plans to replace and improve their website, which hasn’t been updated an about a decade. “We can clearly make it better than it is,” said District 95 Superintendent Mark Kuzniewski. “We want something that’s a little more modern. Our website is about 10 years old, so, from a function standpoint, it doesn’t look and feel like a lot of the other websites that people are reaching out to. We also believe that there is going to be some level of integration of social media. We do not have that capability right now. It just doesn’t exist with our current website.” The district would like its new website, which probably won’t appear until next summer, to be easier to use and able to link to social media accounts, which schools increasingly use to transmit information. “We don’t have the ability to do that today,” Kuzniewski said. “I’m going to get a Twitter account and tweet something.” The district hopes that a new website also will be more engaging. Currently, the average visit to the District 95 website lasts for only about 90 seconds. “We’re hopeful that it will be a little bit easier and quicker for us to disseminate our information,” Kuzniewski said. At the school board’s December meeting, Kuzniewski told the elected officials that it is difficult and cumbersome to add information or items to the district’s current website.

District officials have begun evaluating four different vendors to create and maintain a new website. The district’s contract with the company that manages its current website, SchoolPointe, expires at the end of June, and staff have reached out to three other companies that create and manage websites for schools: Edlio, CampusSuite, and Blackboard. Last week, Kuzniewski and some other district officials met with representatives of the vendors. “I think it’s a cursory review to get a little more detail how user-friendly on the back end those systems are,” Kuzniewski said. According to a preliminary analysis, the five-year cost with a company could range from about $12,000 to $22,500. But capability and ease of use will be as important, or more important, than price as the district decides which company to hire to create a new and improved website. “Four thousand dollars will not dictate what website we use,” Kuzniewski said. It seems unlikely that the district will renew with SchoolPointe because of the difficulty in adding information to the website. Kuzniewski told the school board last month that the administration would like to get a new vendor.

Board meetings now at Brook Park In other District 95 news, the school board has decided to hold all future school board meetings, starting in January, in the Brook Park School multipurpose room. Previously, meetings had alternated between Brook Park and S.E. Gross Middle School. Before the renovation of S.E. Gross last year, school board meetings were in the former cafeteria, which wasn’t so easy to find. At Brook Park School, an exterior door leads directly into the multipurpose room and the room is brighter and more modern. “It’s a little bit nicer environment, more conducive to meetings,” Kuzniewski said.

9

Riverside police arrest alleged drug dealer

Reportedly ran operation out of downtown apartment raided in November

ban Major Case Assistance Team (MCAT), the Northern Illinois Police Alarm System (NIPAS) SWAT team and a dog-handling expert, executed the search warrant at 8 p.m. on Nov. 2, staying on scene until past midnight. While Silva was not at the apartment at the time of the raid, police took the three By BOB UPHUES dogs into custody, where they have remained Editor since. Police also reportedly recovered cocaine, hydrocodone and alprazolam (Xanax) Riverside police have arrested a man they pills, cannabis, equipment and paraphernasay ran a drug operation out of a downtown lia used to package drugs, drug-sale receipts apartment until late last year, when police and $12,500 in cash. raided the residence and recovered drugs, Silva reportedly never returned to the cash, paraphernalia and three large pit apartment following the raid, and bulls. police had been trying to find him Detectives arrested Michael for the past two months. When A. Silva, 29, as he exited the they learned his girlfriend had a Maybrook courthouse on the Jan. 8 traffic court date, detectives morning of Jan. 8. He reportstaked out the courtroom in case edly had accompanied his girlSilva happened to show up. friend to the courthouse. She reportedly was there for an According to Weitzel, the invesappearance related to a traffic tigation revealed that Silva had offense. been subletting the apartment ilSilva was charged with three legally from the leaseholder. He counts of possession of a conMICHAEL SILVA reportedly told police that he did trolled substance, one count so, because he assumed the buildof possession of a controlled ing management company would not rent to substance with intent to deliver and posseshim due to his criminal background, which sion of drug paraphernalia. He remains free includes several prior arrests, and because while awaiting trial after posting bond folhe owned three large dogs. lowing Jan. 9 hearing at Maybrook. Silva, who police say is a self-admitted Riverside police had been looking for street gang member, allegedly did not sell Silva since Nov. 2, 2019, when they executed a search warrant at an East Avenue apart- narcotics directly out of the apartment, ment, where he’d been staying with his but would arrange to have “runners” pick up the drugs at the apartment and then use three pit bulls. On the morning of Nov. 2, Weitzel said rideshares to deliver them. He used the dogs, said police, to protect police had received information of a drug operation being run out of the building at the drug operation. When police served the 22 East Ave. and obtained a search warrant search warrant, one of the dogs roamed freely inside the apartment, while the other that same day. Riverside police, aided by the west subur- two were in cages.

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020

11

Czech stalwart gives way to pancake house in Riverside Little Bohemia closes after 30+ years downtown By BOB UPHUES Editor

If you have a hankering for Bohemian food and don’t want to make it yourself, you’re going to have to seek it outside of Riverside. Last month, Little Bohemia Restaurant at 25 E. Burlington St. in downtown Riverside, closed its doors after a 34-year run, that last 27 under the most recent owner. The closure follows on the heels of the Riverside Restaurant closing on Harlem Avenue last spring, severing the last local culinary link with the village’s once-powerful Czech and Slovak heritage. Little Bohemia’s owner reportedly sought to sell the business in order to retire from the long hours required by the restaurant business. The downtown stalwart will be replaced by Michael’s Pancake House, which will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner – in the great tradition of Chicago diners, it’ll serve breakfast items all day – seven days a week from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. “We’re known for our Denver omelet, with ham, onion, green peppers and cheese,” said Orlando Guadalupe, who will manage the restaurant in partnership with his father, Miguel. It’ll be the second location of Michael’s Breakfast House, following in the footsteps of the original location in south suburban Worth, which has been in operation for almost

BALEX ROGALS/Staff Photographer

CHANGING MENU: Restaurant manager Orlando Guadalupe, outside of the new Michael’s Pancake House on Burlington Street in Riverside. two decades. The Riverside restaurant will have the same menu as the Worth location, said Guadalupe. That menu, as you might expect, is heavy on traditional diner breakfast classic like

omelets, skillets, pancakes and waffles and a half dozen variations on Eggs Benedict. The menu also includes about a dozen chicken sandwiches, burgers and other classic diner sandwiches, like clubs, tuna salad, ham and cheese and more. There are also several salad selections. While the Worth location is more breakfast/lunch/ brunch, the menu also includes dinner items that will also be served in Riverside, like catfish, roast chicken, pork chops, steak, shrimp and breaded veal cutlets. Guadalupe said there’s no firm opening date yet for the Riverside restaurant, but he said he hoped it might be able to open its doors early in February. The family is making updates to the existing restaurant to make sure it’s up to code. It’s no accident that the Guadalupe family chose Riverside to open a second location for Michael’s Pancake House. The family lives in Brookfield and Orlando is a graduate of Lyons Township High School. “We’ve been searching for a space, and as soon as we saw the one in Riverside, we knew,” Guadalupe said. “Riverside has always been known for their hospitality. Once you get in, the community comes together.” The restaurant, which has room to serve about 40 customers, brings to the village’s downtown, something it hasn’t had for many years – a full-service restaurant that serves breakfast. It’ll also be located close to the downtown Riverside Metra stop, making it a convenient spot for commuters to get a bite to eat and a cup of coffee before hopping on the train for work.

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020

G L I D E

P A T H

ALEX ROGALS/Staff Photographer

LOOK OUT BELOW: (Left to right) Sliding on thin ice, a sledder evolves downhill at Village Commons in North Riverside. Two kids link up to intensify the gravitational pull. Aiden O’Brien of Riverside tries surfer style.

Gonzalez steps into role as a Riverside state rep 23-year-old will represent 21st District in state House By BOB SKOLNIK Contributing Reporter

Residents of Riverside south of the BNSF railroad tracks are now represented by the youngest member of the state legislature. On the evening of Jan. 10, ward and township Democratic committeemen from the 21st District of the Illinois House of Representatives met at the headquarters of the Lyons Township Democratic Party in Summit to elect 23-year-old Harvard graduate Edgar Gonzalez Jr. to replace Celina Villanueva, who earlier this month was selected by Democratic Party officials to replace Martin Sandoval in the state Senate. The 21st District stretches from the Little Village neighborhood of Chicago to Summit. Gonzalez was a unanimous choice to serve out Villanueva’s term and appears to be lock to be elected to full two-year term in November, since he was the only candidate who filed to run for the office in the March primary. Similarly, Villanueva appears certain to be elected in November to fill out the final two years of Sandoval’s term, because she was the only candidate to file for that office in the primary. “I’m completely honored, I’m completely humbled,” said Gonzalez. “I’m from Little Village, I’m a neighborhood guy, born and raised. I live two blocks from Cook County Jail.” Gonzalez is not quite the youngest mem-

ber to ever serve in the General Assembly. In 2015, Republican Avery Bourne was appointed to fill a vacancy in the state House when she was just 22 years old. In 2004, Aaron Schock was elected to the state House at age 23. But Gonzalez, who just turned 23 on Christmas Day, apparently will be the youngest Democrat and certainly the youngest Hispanic to ever serve in the Illinois state legislature. Gonzalez, like Villanueva, has a close connection to 4th District Congressman Jesus “Chuy” Garcia, who has emerged as a power broker on the Southwest Side of Chicago. Since graduating from Harvard, Gonzalez has worked as a community services liaison in one of Garcia’s Chicago offices, concentrating mostly of Social Security and veterans’ issues. “Edgar, in despite of his youth, has been involved in many community issues and causes for several years even while he was going to Harvard,” Garcia told the Landmark. “He is a very bright and capable individual with lots of promise.” Gonzalez said that he became interested in politics when Garcia ran for mayor of Chicago in 2015, when Gonzalez was a senior at Whitney Young High School. “I think I was very inspired by Chuy, his fight for working class people, for families like my own and the fact that he came from an immigrant family like my own,” Gonzalez said. Since 2015, Gonzalez has worked on a number of campaigns on the Southwest Side for candidates supported by Garcia and other Hispanic progressives. Despite living with his parents in the 12th Ward, Gonzalez serves as the vice president of the 22nd Ward Independent Political Organization and has worked on the campaigns of 22nd

BOB SKOLNIK

IN THE HOUSE: Edgar Gonzalez Jr. now represents the 21st District in Springfield. Ward alderman and committeeman Michael Rodriguez. Gonzalez’s parents immigrated to Chicago from Mexico about 25 years ago. His father works as a repair technician at UIC and is a member of International Union of Operating Engineers Local 399. His mother is a former school aide who was a member of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU). “I’m proud to say that I’m part of a union family. I would say that I definitely want to advocate for labor, for unions, for working class individuals like my father, like my mom, down in Springfield,” Gonzalez said. Gonzalez said he wants to fight for equitable school funding and make sure that the criminal justice system treats people from all communities fairly. “I want to make sure that the criminal justice system is working for all of our communities, for everyone across the district,

and I want to make sure that our schools are properly resourced, properly staffed, properly funded,” Gonzalez said. State Sen. Steve Landek (D-Bridgeview), who also serves as the committeeman for the Lyons Township Democratic Party, voted for Gonzalez and said that he will bring a fresh voice to the legislature. “I think he’s serious about the work he wants to do in Springfield, and I think he’ll be a unique addition to the group,” Landek said. Landek knows something about starting young in politics. In 1975 at age 19, Landek was elected to Bridgeview Park District Board of Trustees, becoming the thenyoungest person ever elected to be a park district commissioner in Illinois. Gonzalez had options to perhaps work in finance or consulting as a graduate of Harvard, but he said that he has always wanted to return to his community and work to make it better. “I knew I wanted to serve my neighborhood; I knew I wanted to serve my community,” Gonzalez said. “I was raised to look out for my neighbors, to look out for my family. I just want to make sure that I’m in the best position to serve my community.” Gonzalez now has to find a place to live while he is in Springfield. He said that the state legislature will reconvene on Jan. 28. He said that he thinks that in some ways serving in the state legislature will be like being back in college. “I’ll be working with a bunch of colleagues, I’ll be having to go to briefings and seminars and taking notes, just like in college,” Gonzalez said. “It’s going to be a familiar setting in some ways. I’m really looking forward to it.”


The Landmark, January 15, 2020

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The Landmark, January 15, 2020

SCHOOL CLOSING

One of five in archdiocese from page 1 “School closures are difficult and complicated and we realize the impact it has on students, their families and our staff,” said Jim Rigg, superintendent of Catholic schools for the Archdiocese of Chicago in a press release. “We are committed to making the transition caused by these closures as seamless as possible. The archdiocese will be working with each affected student and employee to assist them in finding places at other Catholic schools.” The news was not unexpected. Even before Holy Guardian Angels Parish was officially formed, one of the options brought forward by the Renew My Church team was closing St. Louise School after the

BELMONTE

Announces retirement from page 1 istrator, since the village’s code limits the administrator’s term to a minimum of one year or for no longer than the term of the mayor. “By putting her in there, I think it’s a better solution,” said Hermanek. “It’s going to be difficult to get a highly qualified person [with no guarantee of long-term employment].” At any rate, Scarpiniti is about as qualified a candidate as Hermanek was likely to find. Scarpiniti, who was named finance chief in 2001 after working for about two years on a contract basis for the village, has master’s degree in public administration with an emphasis in city management from Northern Illinois University. She is a certified public accountant and serves as the village’s treasurer. “I’m very excited for the opportunity, and it’s actually where my formal education is at,” Scarpiniti said. “I’m looking forward to a lot of the new challenges facing the village in the upcoming year.” Whether or not Scarpiniti will be the permanent administrator depends somewhat on the result of the 2021 mayoral election in North Riverside. Hermanek indicated he was thinking about running for a third term next year and that he viewed Scarpiniti as a candidate for the permanent job as administrator. “It’ll depend on how things turn out in April [2021] to go to the next step,” Hermanek said. Details of Scarpiniti’s shift into the administrator’s role, including compensation, still need to be worked out, said Hermanek.

The front entrance to Saint Louise De Marillac School in La Grange Park. 2018-19 school year and the using the school to house an early childhood education program. Enrollment has been dropping for years, with some grade-level enrollment in the school reaching just single digits. A Dec. 11,

According to the village website, Scarpiniti was paid a salary of $143,000 for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2019. Belmonte’s salary was $155,000. Because Scarpiniti will be holding onto her position as finance director, the village could see some savings as a result, an amount Scarpiniti pegged at between $27,000 and $32,000, depending on other impending moves within village hall. The transition of Scarpiniti into the administrator’s role has already started, and it includes a reorganization of some village hall staff. While Scarpiniti would remain the village’s finance chief, she said she intends to hire an accountant or accounting manager to supervise village hall clerical staff and handle day-to-day accounting duties. That person likely will be hired after the beginning of the next fiscal year, in the second half of 2020. With a recent retirement and a move by longtime village hall administrative assistant Sherri Belmonte, Guy Belmonte’s daughter, to the police records division, there will be other new hires, which are already in the works and should be in place by the beginning of February. Scarpiniti intends to hire two new customer service employees, one full-time and one part-time, to handle front desk duties and answer calls that come into village hall. Callers will no longer be greeted by an automated attendant when they call village hall. In addition, Scarpiniti said front counter hours would be expanded to include evenings and that at least one of the new hires would be bilingual. “Better customer service is our number one objective right off the get-go,” Scarpiniti said. Scarpiniti said she will reclassify an existing utility billing clerk position into a financial analyst post, hiring someone capable of also handling tasks like business license ap-

2019, letter sent to parishioners explaining the situation with the school indicated that for the present school year, St. Louise’s enrollment was just 59 students across grades K-8. According to the archdiocese’s press release announcing the school’s closure, St. Louise de Marillac’s enrollment had dropped by 38 students since last school year. According to that letter, the school this year lost a kindergarten class to the neighboring public school, Brook Park School, which launched its full-day kindergarten program. Also troubling for 2019-20, the preschool program did not reach maximum capacity this year. “As a result, we are at risk for closure at the end of this school year,” the Dec. 11 letter to parishioners stated. Last week, Holy Guardian Angels Parish publicly announced on its Facebook page that it had until Jan. 10 to obtain $300,000 in pledges to address a $250,000 school operat-

Guy Belmonte

FILE PHOTO

plications as well as utility billing. Pam Foy, who previously served as financial analyst has been promoted to the role of senior financial analyst and will take on a larger role, including managing the village’s social media presence – currently non-existent outside of the Recreation Department – and serving as a communications point person. “I feel this is an important step the village needs to move into immediately,” Scarpiniti said. “Residents look to those avenues to get information.” With the planned launch of a new village website this year, Scarpiniti said the plan is for the village to begin offering recordings of village board business and committee meetings online within 24 hours of those meetings. “I anticipate that happening by the beginning of the next fiscal year [which begins May 1],” Scarpiniti said. Even if she ends up not being the permanent administrator past April 2021, Scarpiniti said she wanted to begin aggressively making changes. “Even if it’s not myself once the mayor’s term is up, the village will have a nice foundation to finish off some of those areas,”

ing deficit. The archdiocese also directed the parish to meet enrollment benchmarks and to draft a plan to increase enrollment within three years to 200. Parish and school officials directed all inquiries by the Landmark to the archdiocese. Social media posts by St. Louise de Marillac School indicated that the parish had been able to raise about $90,000 in pledges after a five-day fundraising blitz last week. “We were given a monumental task,” St. Louise officials posted on the school’s Facebook page Monday evening. “We worked tirelessly to achieve the goals set forth to us. Despite our best efforts, it wasn’t enough. “The students and families of St. Louise School are forever grateful to the hundreds of individuals and businesses who stepped up to pledge $90,291 in support of our efforts over the past 5 days. Words cannot express our thanks!” With news that the school is closing, those pledges will be voided.

Scarpiniti said. Belmonte was appointed by former Mayor Richard Scheck to the role of administrator in 2001, after the retirement of Wayne Pesek. One of Scheck’s trusted political lieutenants and fellow VIP Party member, Belmonte actually got his start in local politics running for trustee on an opposition slate of candidates in 1989, led by mayoral hopeful Joe Mitchell. Belmonte was the only member of that slate to win election and after that political party folded, Scheck asked Belmonte to join VIP. Belmonte would be elected again as a trustee in 1993 and 1997. Raised in an Italian neighborhood on the Near West Side next to the University of Illinois at Chicago, Belmonte worked for 13 years as a purchasing agent for the university before retiring in November 2000. A month later, he resigned as village trustee to clear the way for someone to be appointed to his seat and run as an incumbent in the 2001 election. Scheck appointed Joan Sargent as Belmonte’s replacement on the village board and, after the election, he elevated Belmonte to administrator. Over the years, the primary tasks associated with being village administrator haven’t changed much. “You still have to keep the residents happy, make sure their garbage is picked up and the streets are plowed and the streets are swept,” Belmonte said. “That’s what the residents want.” The biggest change for the local political scene is the rise of social media, according to Belmonte. “People sit at their kitchen table and just say whatever they want and have no facts or anything,” said Belmonte, who says he steers clear of social media entirely. Belmonte said he’ll remain involved as a member of the VIP Party, though he is stepping away from a leadership role.


The Landmark, January 15, 2020

15

PEOPLE

Riverside Arts Center welcomes new gallery directors

R

iverside Arts Center in late November announced the appointment of Liz Chilsen as director of the FlexSpace Gallery and Stephanie Brooks as director of the Freeark Gallery and Sculpture Garden. Brooks is a conceptual artist, writer, and educator living in Oak Park. She earned her fine arts degree in studio art from the University of Illinois-Chicago and exhibits her artwork locally, nationally and internationally. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Whitney Museum of American Art and many private and public collections. Her publications include The Virginia Quarterly Review, Green Lantern Press, Perennial Currents/Harper Collins Press and

Stephanie Brooks and Liz Chilsen Whitewalls. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of Sculpture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is an avid gardener. She succeeded Claudine Ise, who is own-

Riverside Juniors name 2020 board officers The Riverside Junior Woman’s Charity, an 82-year-old philanthropic organization focused on local causes, charities and individuals, has announced its board officers for 2020. The board for 2019/2020 includes Ashley Prosser, president; Renee Coover, vice president of community outreach; Lauren Lendman, vice president of operations; Joanne Schiemann, vice president of fundraising; Kelly Rehmer, vice president of membership; Jenn Dvorak, treasurer; and Sarah Magner, secretary. Upcoming events in 2020 include

Happy Health New Year on Jan. 25, Brews Cruise on April 4 and “The Little Mermaid” at the Children’s Theater of Western Springs on April 18. Prospective members are welcome to attend the club’s general meetings on the second Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in Riverside Town Hall. Last year, with support from individual donors and businesses and more than 450 member volunteer hours, the Juniors raised more than $27,000 for local causes and families in need.

er/director of Goldfinch, a gallery in East Garfield Park. Chilsen is a Chicagoland artist and educator and recipient of numerous awards including the Illinois Arts Council’s Individual Artist Fellowship. Her work is held in permanent collections in the U.S. and abroad. Chilsen’s photographic study of endangered places in Illinois was funded by Illinois Humanities and published in Illinois Humanities’ “Forgotten Illinois” and Landmarks Illinois’ “Endangered 25.” She has directed exhibitions large and small including at City Gallery in Chicago’s historic water tower, InTransit Gallery at the Merchandise Mart and Chicago Artists’ Coalition’s Chicago Art Open.

Forester talks trees in China Last fall Riverside Village Forester Michael Collins visited Shanghai, China, to participate in an exchange promoting urban tree research and management as part of a partnership between the Morton Arboretum, MICHAEL COLLINS Shanghai Municipal Landscape Management and Instructional Station and the Shanghai Engineering Center for Urban Tree Ecology and Applications. He was invited to speak about the forest program in Riverside and provided technical support regarding tree injections, urban forest management and other arboricultural practices. “We are all interested in maximizing tree benefits to provide a healthy urban forest for future generations to enjoy,” said Collins in a press release. “A better understanding and care of our urban forest will help to provide a better quality of life for our residents.”

Hot shot Former Lyons-Brookfield School District 103 Superintendent Mike Warner in late 2019 launched the website GreatBirdPics. com, the result of about a year’s worth of work and a repository of photographs of birds taken both by him and like-minded bird enthusiasts. “Like many amateur bird photographers, I have hunMIKE WARNER dreds of beautiful pictures of birds

stored on my computer with limited ways to share them with others,” Warner explains on the website. “So I decided to create GreatBirdPics.com. I designed it for all amateur bird photographers who would like to share their pictures with the world. Once a member (it’s free) uploads their images they will have their own online gallery (My Flock) for all to enjoy.”

Riverside cop honored Riverside Police Officer Joseph Mahanna was honored by the Alliance Against Intoxicated Motorists (AAIM) with Certificates of Appreciation for his outstanding DUI enforcement in removing impaired drivers from Illinois roadways. Mahanna has removed 100 imJOSEPH MAHANNA paired drivers from our roadways. This includes both DUI alcohol and DUI drug offenders. He is a state-certified Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) officer. Currently, Illinois has just 159 DRE Officers statewide.

On campus

Riverside residents Anais Diaz (public health), David Suriano (interactive media game design) and Jocelyn Navarro (communication); North Riverside residents Isabelle Echevarria (English) and Johnathan Wells (music education); and Brookfield resident Anthony Landahl (communication) were named to the 2019 fall semester dean’s list at Bradley University in Peoria for achieving a grade-point average of at least 3.5 on a 4-point scale. ■ Riverside resident Abigail Freel and Brookfield resident Michele George-Griffin were named to the 2019 fall semester dean’s list at Belmont University in Nashville for attaining a GPA of at least 3.5. ■ St. Norbert College in De Pere, Wisconsin, has named Riverside residents Gregory Bernasek and Matthew Pilewski to its 2019 fall semester dean’s list. The two attained GPAs of at least 3.5. ■ Riverside residents Jacob Douglas (College of Engineering), Aidan Kaiser (College of Letters and Science), Isabel Rurka (College of Letters and Science) and Cathy Yuen (College of Letters and Science) were named to the 2019 fall semester dean’s list at University of Wisconsin-Madison. Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais announced that Brookfield resident ■

See PEOPLE on page 16


16

The Landmark, January 15, 2020

PEOPLE

SONG AND DANCE MAN Jackson Beatty, of Brookfield, captures the holiday spirit with a high-energy dance performance to “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” during SEASPAR’s 13th Annual Holiday Spectacular, a showcase of talents for Southeast Association Special Parks and Recreation participants with disabilities, on Dec. 20 at Theatre of Western Springs. More than 100 performers took the stage in 15 performances. Videos of the night can be viewed on SEASPAR’s YouTube channel.

PEOPLE from page 15

Jeremy Kolasa and North Riverside resident Kailyn Ngo were named to the 2019 fall semester dean’s list for attaining a semester grade point average of at least 3.5. ■ Brookfield resident Patrick Hickey, a freshman at Lyons Township High School, was among the 12 LTHS Robotics Team members taking top honors at the Huntley High School Vex Tournament in December. Hickey was part of the seven-person team that won the tournament championship and qualified for the Illinois state championship in March. Vex competitions involve designing robots built and programmed using an inte-

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grated system of wheels, motors, metal and sensors. ■ Brookfield resident Alfonso Fernandez, a senior at Lyons Township High School and member of the Lion newspaper staff, won honorable mention in Spot News Photography at the national high school journalism fall convention in Washington, D.C., hosted by the Journalism Education Association and the National School Press Association in late 2019. ■ Brookfield residents Benjamin Mathis, August Duwell, Cameron Trimborn and Faith Wyant were among the 212 Lyons Township High School students named Illinois State Scholars, Students ranking in the top 10 percent of the state’s high school graduating seniors are names Illinois State Scholars, Grace Acosta, of Brookfield, was one of 35 Nazareth Academy students also named Illinois State Scholars.

Knights of Columbus raise funds for local groups The St. Barbara Knights of Columbus on Jan. 3 presented checks for $1,382 each to Community Support Services and Helping Hand Center to support those organizations in their work providing social services to the people of Brookfield and surrounding suburbs. The money was raised during the group’s intellectual disabilities drive in 2019. The Knights of Columbus will join

See what all the buzz is about.

with the St. Louise de Marillac Men’s Club on Feb. 7 to host a corned beef and cabbage dinner. The keynote speaker will be former Chicago Bears kicker and current Illinois Supreme Court Justice Bob Thomas. The dinner will be held at the north (formerly St. Louise) parish center of Holy Guardian Angels Parish, 1125 Harrison Ave. in LaGrange Park.

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Opinion T

o say that the village of North Riverside is in a period of transition would be putting the situation mildly. While many municipalities look with envy at the village’s huge commercial engine – and all of the sales tax revenue that comes with it – its low property taxes and cozy, familial vibe, they might not see what local residents and officials see. The retail sales engine is coughing, and while it still accounts for the vast majority of the village’s operating revenues, it’s increasingly seen as unreliable, too volatile. And, the services the village provides aren’t cheap. Though a village of just 6,000, the commercial district and the buildings that come with it means it has a police department and fire department more suitable to a town twice that size. The operating costs of such public safety departments are high enough without adding in the ever-increasing obligations for police and fire pensions – a situation aggravated by a now-abandoned policy of underfunding those obligations. North Riverside can be a surprisingly volatile town politically, as well. Longtime residents used to the old days when sales taxes subsidized trash pickup and water service are sometimes resentful of the new reality. When someone comes along and promises a return to the days of super services and low resident costs, it’s attractive. Add in a reputation for North Riverside government policy benefiting a long-established political power structure and favored vendors and you have a recipe for some discontent. The past two elections have shown that voters may be ready for change in local government. Now, there’s change at the highest levels of the administration. Guy Belmonte, who has been a part of the local political power structure as an elected trustee and later as village administrator, is leaving the post he’s held for the past 19 years. We wish him the best in his retirement, but we also note that this is a critical juncture for the village. Mayor Hubert Hermanek Jr. has turned to Finance Director Sue Scarpiniti to fill the role as administrator, at least until the April 2021 election, when his term is up. With the village code preventing him from searching for a long-term replacement, he could not have picked a better person for the job. More than that, though. Scarpiniti is not only the most qualified person in North Riverside government to move into the role, she’s been the most qualified for some time. Because she has been employed by a village government controlled by the VIP Party since 1999, Scarpiniti may be seen by some as part of that power structure. But, Scarpiniti has a clear independent streak and has not been afraid to point out to elected officials – repeatedly – that the present policies need to change. This has been especially the case with respect to the village’s avoidance of confronting its pension obligations. She has time and again urged elected officials to think more strategically about pensions and how they are funded. North Riverside finds itself in a pivotal moment, one in which an entrenched, old-school political organization realizes that it needs to change the way it approaches governance. Now they need to hear their new administrator and move the village fully into the 21st century.

17

KOSEY CORNER

THE LANDMARK VIEW

Pivot point

The Landmark, January 15, 2020

P

Don’t kick that habit, embrace it

eople are certainly creatures of habit, whether we admit to it or not. We have a tendency to repeat many of our actions without even realizing we are so committed to doing the same thing. An example I have noticed is that, in church, people tend to sit in the same pews on the same side of the church week after week. Being regulars at 8 a.m. Mass on Sundays at St. Mary’s, I notice these things. Yes, sometimes my mind does wander from the service. Our vantage point, last pew in the back, lets me see if everyone is in their usual spot and, if they’re not, where they are. People who attend the Mass and aren’t what I will call “regulars” at 8 a.m. Mass may not be aware they are sitting where a regular usually sits. Not that the regulars have ownership to a particular seat, but it is a habit and we become comfortable with it. Go to a restaurant, Connie’s for example. On Sunday after Mass, have breakfast at Connie’s, where you will find a number of people who have just attended Mass at St. Mary’s. If they said Mass there, it would save everybody a step. It’s a habit. Thursday evening go to Chew Chew for oysters.

There you will find a group of diners who tend to sit at the same place or at the bar in the same seats. It’s a habit. For four years there was a man who had his place at the bar at Chew Chew; I’ll call it bar stool No. 1. His name was Lou Schauer, Riverside resident, lawyer, man of many artistic interests, former village president of Western Springs. A regular, dining alone or sometimes with friends, Lou passed away in December at age 91. It was his habit, the Chew Chew. He will be missed. Seeing him was a habit. Habits, we all have them, some good some bad. I like to think we have more good ones than bad. Magic is his habit! Brookfield’s ‘”Magic Man,” Trent James, is appearing at the Chicago Magic Lounge on Wednesdays through March 25. His comedic presentation of magic will amaze and mystify you as you try to figure out: How does he do that”? If you haven’t seen his act, now is the time. Some nights are already sold out. The lounge is located at 5050 N. Clark St. in Chicago. For more info go to chicagomagiclounge.com. Shazam!

JOANNE KOSEY

LETTERS

Thanks to a Good Samaritan On Jan. 4, late in the afternoon, I had a flat tire at the roundabout in town while on my way to the Jewel in LaGrange. I was on my way to purchase some things for my son Joshua’s send-off party for basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia, as a cavalry scout in the U.S. Army. I pulled over to the side to begin preparations to repair the flat when I soon discovered, at 68 years of age, I am not as strong as I used to be and was unable to loosen the lug nuts. I struggled for a while, and when I was just about ready to throw in the towel, a car pulled up out of

nowhere and the driver asked if I needed help. When I said yes, he pulled over and went right to work. He loosened the lug nuts, assisted me when he saw me struggling with the jack, pulled off the flat and put on the spare. In other words, he did it all. All that he would tell me was that his name was Luis. And with that I reached out my hand and gave him a hug. I was on my way again to complete my important mission. I just wanted to express my heartfelt appreciation to Luis, who took time from his day, his family and his own responsibilities to reach out to a total stranger in need. He was my “angel” in my time of need, an answer to a prayer from one who firmly believes that God’s blessings are delivered to us through His faithful children among us.

John G. Brokopp Brookfield

To run an obituary Please contact Bob Uphues by e-mail: buphues@wjinc.com, or fax: 708/524-0447 before Monday at noon. Please include a photo if possible.


18

The Landmark, January 15, 2020

OBITUARIES

Jerome Gaydusek, 78 Ultimate fixer and volunteer Jerome M. Gaydusek, 78, of Bolingbrook and formerly of Brookfield, died on Jan. 10, 2020. Born on April 29, 1941, he worked as a machinist for 34 years at the William Wrigley Jr. Company in the machine JEROME GAYDUSEK construction department. Mr. Gaydusek was president of CSA Fraternal Life Lodge, DuPage Pioneers/Edison #409, the Treasurer of Cultural Division of District Council #12 and Delegate of District Council #12. He was also a longtime “Wednesday volunteer” of the Bohemian National Cemetery, Board of Directors of Friends of Bohemian National Cemetery, and the co-chair of special projects. A Jack of all trades, master of some, Mr. Gaydusek could fix anything and, after his retirement, lived by the belief that he got up in the morning with nothing to do and went to bed at night not getting it all done. He was also a U.S. Army veteran. Mr. Gaydusek was the husband of Helen-

ka E. Gaydusek (nee Prager); the father of Karole (Phil Arnone) Gaydusek and James (Sandra) Gaydusek; the step-grandfather of Jackie Hanson, Philip (Adrienne) Arnone III, and Ryan Arnone; deda of Jadalyn Dawn Hanson and Giovanna Rae Arnone; the brother of John (the late Eleanor) Gaydusek and Judy (Walter) Cudecki; and an uncle, cousin and friend to many. A funeral service was held Jan. 15 at Sts. Peter and Paul Lutheran Church in Riverside, followed by interment at Bohemian National Cemetery, Masaryk Mausoleum, in Chicago. Hitzeman Funeral Home, Brookfield handled arrangements.

Luba Hajdani, 71 Brookfield resident Luba Hajdani (nee Marcis), 71, of Brookfield, died on Jan. 4, 2020. She was the wife of Peter; the mother of Patricia (Richard) Dosek and Robert Peter Hajdani; the grandmother of Wyatt, Rebecca, Rachel and Clayton, Peter and Aiden; and the sister of Tanya and the late Miro and the late Kamko. A memorial visitation will be held on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020 at Conboy-Westchester Funeral Home, 10501 W. Cermak Rd., Westchester from 3 to 8 p.m., with a chapel service at 7 p.m. Interment will be Private.

2020 SOFTBALL ASSESSMENTS

FARM, MINOR, MAJOR, JUNIOR & SENIOR DIVISIONS The purpose of Assessments is to assess each player’s skill level to ensure an equitable distribution of talent across all teams within a Division. Players will be assessed on their ability to run, throw, catch and bat. To be eligible for Little League All Stars, a player is required to attend one of the two Assessments at the RBHS Fieldhouse. Players must be registered for the 2020 season in order to participate in Assessments. Returning Majors players must assess!

February 1st & February 8th

Riverside Brookfield High School Fieldhouse Saturday 2/1 • Farm & Minors 3:45-5:00pm • Majors & Up 4:45-6:00pm Saturday 2/8 • Farm & Minors 9:45-11am • Majors & Up 10:45am-12:00pm

In lieu of flowers, the family appreciates memorial donations to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (www.stjude.org). Arrangements were handled by The Original Kuratko Family, Brian D. Kuratko, director.

Casimir L. Orawiec, 92 Manufacturing supervisor Casimir “Kip” L. Orawiec, 92, of Brookfield, died on Jan. 7, 2020. Born on Feb. 26, 1927, he worked as supervisor in the manufacturing field. Mr. Orawiec was the husband of Helen Keeffe–Orawiec CASIMIR L. ORAWIEC (nee Kluchenovich) and the late Irene Orawiec; the father of Joanne (Larry) Moleski; and the grandfather of Michael (Sandi) Moleski and Lisa (Brady) Schyler; the stepfather of Kathleen (Ed) Krajniak, Michael Keeffe, Dennis (Dawn) Keeffe, Mary (Barb Clish) Keeffe, Patrick (Pam) Keeffe, Jean (Mike) Maves and Nadine Keeffe; and the grandfather and great-grandfather of many. He was predeceased by one sister and five brothers. A funeral Mass was celebrated Jan. 11 at St. Barbara Church in Brookfield. Interment was private. Hitzeman Funeral Home, Brookfield handled arrangements.

Marlene O’Shaughnessy, 74 Brookfield homemaker Marlene O’Shaughnessy (nee Arrigo), 74, of Brookfield, died Jan. 13, 2020. She was born Jan. 22, 1945 and was a homemaker. Ms. O’Shaughnessy was the wife of the late Hilery W. O’Shaughnessy; the mother of Louise (Jerry) O’Connor, Louis Settino, John Settino, Sam Settino and Dawn (Nick) LaGreco; the

grandmother of Nicholas and Amanda LaGreco and Kayla, John Jr. and Zachary Settino; the sister of the late Robert (Laverne) Arrigo, the late Anna “Sis” (Vince) Velez, the late Angeline “Honey” (Jack) Riedl and the late Salvatore “Ding” MARLENE (Sherry) Arrigo; and O’SHAUGHNESSY the former spouse of Louis J. Settino. Visitation is on Thursday, Jan. 16 from 3 to 9 p.m. at Johnson-Nosek Funeral Home 3847 Prairie Ave., Brookfield. A funeral Mass will be celebrated on Friday, Jan. 17 at 10 a.m. at St. Barbara Church, 4008 Prairie Ave., Brookfield, followed by interment at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Alsip. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Aging Care Connections LaGrange or Parkinson’s Foundation would be appreciated.

Arpanik Sakzianfard, 86 North Riverside homemaker Arpanik Sakzianfard (nee Sarkissian), 86, of North Riverside and formerly of Chicago, died on Jan. 7, 2020. Born on June 22, 1933 in Iran, she was a homemaker. Ms. Sakzianfard was the wife of the late Emanuel AbraARPANIK hamian; the mother SAKZIANFARD of Scarlet (Bernie) Meany, Homer Abrahamian and the late Henry (Anita) Abrahamian; the grandmother of Ursula and Nina; and the great-grandmother of Sean and Isaac. Graveside service and interment were held Jan. 10 at Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Hillside. Kuratko-Nosek Funeral Home, North Riverside, handled arrangements.

Softball Divisions of Play Farm (Ages* 7-8)** Farm is a split season with 1/3 coach pitch, 1/3 coach and player pitch, and 1/3 player pitch. This Division provides the foundation for game fundamentals and skills. The Farm Division is focused on development versus being competitive.

Minor League (Ages* 9-10)** Minor League play is competitive play. Most players have completed at least one season in any of the lower leagues, but there is always time to instruct girls who have an interest and knowledge of the game. Minor League is player pitch only.

Major League (Ages* 11-12)** Major play is competitive play. Most players have completed seasons in any of the lower leagues, but there is always time to instruct girls who have an interest and knowledge of the game.

Junior (Ages* 12-14) and Senior (Ages* 13-16)** Junior and Senior League is a bridge from Little League to Senior League and is an extension to provide a continuing activity within the framework of Little League.

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*players age at 12/31/19 **exceptions can be made based on skill level and National Little League guidelines

Additional Info:

• Little League requires a copy of a certified birth certificate & Proof of Residence

Register online for 2020 softball & baseball at www.brookfieldlittleleague.org

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@RBLandmark

Sports

The Landmark, January 15, 2020

19

LTHS girls hoops blank Hinsdale Central

SHANEL ROMAIN/Contributor

BALL CONTROL: LTHS’ guard Lindsay Hahn (No. 10) tiptoes on the baseline during the Lions’ game versus Hinsdale Central on Jan. 10. The Lions raised awareness around cancer through their “Pink-Out” event.

Lions boys b-ball gets first conference win By MELVIN TATE, LAUREN RECCHIA Contributing Reporters

The Lyons Township High School girls basketball team put together one of its best efforts this season on Jan. 10 at home as the Lions roared past Hinsdale Central 69-42 in the annual “Pink-Out” game. The purpose of the event is to raise awareness about cancer. Proceeds from the sale of baked goods went toward charities and or-

ganizations that serve as support groups for cancer victims and their families, while at the same time raising money towards finding a cure for this dreadful disease. For LTHS coach Meagan Hutchens and her team, this game took on added meaning. “This year, it hit close to home,” said Hutchens. “One of our captains, Elli Kosanovich, lost a close family friend, and this was to bring awareness to the ovarian cancer she had. There were a lot of community members here tonight to support her.” The game itself was never in doubt as LTHS scored the first eight points and never trailed. The Lions used an aggressive de-

fense to force Hinsdale Central out of many of its offensive sets, which led to rushed shots along with numerous turnovers. LTHS led the Red Devils 20-9 after the first quarter and maintained a double-digit lead the rest of the way. “We were coming off a rough game (a 38-37 victory over Schaumburg on Jan. 7), so we wanted to have fun, shut them down defensively, and just let our offensive game come,” said Hutchens. “We knew we could approach them inside, (but) we wanted to hit from outside. When our outside game is working, we’re a hard team to stop. Tonight, our shots were falling; it felt good

and I’m proud of the girls for bouncing back.”

Courier reaches 1,000 career points LTHS senior forward Lily Courier reached 1,000 career points with a three-point basket at the 3:26 mark of the first quarter. The game was paused for a brief ceremony as Courier was presented with a poster symbolizing the achievement, and afterwards she was gracious. “It’s pretty exciting,” said Courier, a Lewis University signee. “I feel I’ve worked hard, See HOOPS on page 20


20

S P O R T S

The Landmark, January 15, 2020

HOOPS

Second half surge from page 19 and it’s finally paid off. We’ve been waiting for this game, and it’s nice it happened.” “A lot of family and friends came out to support Lily,” Hutchins added. “I’ve had her in the program since she was a freshman, and it’s been special to see her grow over the years.” Courier and junior guard Lindsey Hahn each finished with a game-high 17 points for LTHS. Kosanovich added 13 points and 4 rebounds, while sophomore Izzy Lee contributed 9 points off the bench for the Lions (10-7 overall, 5-2 in West Suburban Silver). Lanie Randle was the only Red Devil player to reach double-digit scoring, finishing with 12 points. Kendall Butler added 9 points and Tessa Howe 7 for Hinsdale Central (2-9, 0-5). After seeing several players - including Courier - miss time due to injury, it appears that LTHS has returned to full strength and poised to have a strong second half of the season. Hutchens feels having a deeper roster will make a difference, particularly when facing league teams the second time around. “We’re approaching the second half of our conference season,” Hutchens said. “We faced injuries and missed Lily [Courier] through much of the first half, but now it’s going to be exciting to see how much we’ve grown when we face these teams again.”

LTHS boys hoops gets back on track The Lions (7-5, 1-3) got past the Red Devils

SHANEL ROMAIN/Contributor

AT THE RIM: Lions’ Lily Courier (center) recorded her 1,000th career point versus the Red Devils on Jan. 10. (5-8, 1-2) 52-44 on Jan. 10 at Hinsdale Central to notch their first victory in the West Suburban Silver conference. After ending the third quarter down 38-35, Lions senior forward Michael Shay opened an 8-0 run in the fourth with a basket from the right side on a pass from senior guard Grant Niego. Niego followed Shay with a basket to give the Lions a 39-38 lead with 6:19 to play in the game. The run was capped off with a steal and layup on the right by Niego with 3:57 to go. The Lions would keep their lead for the rest of the fourth quarter. “I was just trying to make plays,” said

Niego. “If I wasn’t making plays, if there were two or three guys on me, I was just trying to hit an open person and give it to a teammate to make a great shot.” Niego led the way for the Lions with 22 points (10 of which came in the fourth quarter). Senior guard Michael Niedermeyer notched 10 points, while Shay and senior forward Ben Engels combined for 13 points. “We kept it close in the first half,” said Lions head coach Tom Sloan. “In the first half, most of our guys were feeling out how to play in an environment like this. Keeping it close allowed us to play really hard in the second half

and take command in the fourth quarter.” Engels put up a basket from the left side and was fouled with just under a minute to play in the game and gave the Lions even more of a cushion by making his free-throw to get the Lions up 48-42. He would then make his next two free-throws after getting fouled with just under 30 seconds left, and Niego would seal the victory with two freethrows of his own with 20 seconds left. “When we had free-throw opportunities late, we made most of them,” Sloan said. “Making free throws, making layups, and making open shots are key parts of the game. When we had layup opportunities, we made them too, and that’s what decides close games.” The rivalry game did not disappoint the fans that packed the gym, and the players took it all in during the important West Suburban Silver matchup. “Last year we had a big game (at Hinsdale), but I wasn’t playing much,” Engels said. “This year was a lot different. It was fun to experience.” The Lions know that they can build off their win and take their momentum into some more challenging conference games as well. “We’re just going to try to take this and keep going,” Niego said. “It’s always a great win when we can steal one at (Hinsdale’s) place. We’re just trying to string these West Suburban conference wins together. Every team is tough.” “It’s huge,” Engels said. “We’re focused on the future and our next game.” The Lions were also victorious in their game against Proviso West at home Saturday, by a score of 62-55.

WHAT COACH SAID...

This week in girls basketball We are introducing a new section this week called, “What Coach Said.” The section covers a different sport each week and include interviews with varsity-level coaches. This week, we’re highlighting girls basketball. While we will cover Riverside-Brookfield, Lyons Township, and Fenwick high schools, we are focusing on RBHS’ girls basketball program (18-3) in this edition of The Landmark. Here is what Bulldogs’ assistant coach Mark Ruge had to say about the team’s success so far, as they continue to stampede their way to the playoffs. On what has made this team so successful this season… “We emphasize a team concept. It sounds cliché but we score a lot of points and they are all happening within the flow of our system. We like to play fast. We push the ball in transition and try to get out on the break before other teams can set up on defense. We continually attack the basket and we have done very well MARK RUGE RBHS despite not having a traditional

rim protector. We are athletic and fast and have to play to our strengths and that has helped us get to this point.” On what the recent stretch of games has provided for the team… “We won both of those games but we did struggle a little bit earlier on. We were forced to change up defenses which was a really good test for us since we are 18-3 and we’ve been in the position where we are up 10-15 points and we can use our bench a little bit more. What happens with these games in December is that we come out of winter break having played so many games since we have two tournaments and start our conference play. I mean we had a stretch where we played six games in seven days if you can believe that. We give them a couple days off around New Years and it just takes a couple days to get back into the swing of things” On exceeding expectations… “We had a solid foundation in place with Brenna [Loftus] and Sarah [Jnobaptiste], and what we needed to do was integrate the other kids. Cassie Hines was a key piece last year and she has done a lot of things for us this year. I thought Hannah [Organ] was going to be outstanding on the boards too.

To be honest with you, [Ruge and head coach Dallas Till] think we have overachieved at this point. We knew we would be good since we won conference last year but we lost a few pieces. We are at a point with the team where we have to strategize about how other teams are going to try to stop us. We have 18 wins. There aren’t a lot of teams in the state that have 18 wins right now. We are very happy with where we are at.” On Brenna Loftus continuing her remarkable career at RBHS… “What she is doing this year is incredible. Based on what she is doing this year, she is on pace to score 2,000 points for her career. The biggest thing about her is her quickness. She can run up and down the court and other teams have tried to do more to defend her but when we get the ball to her in the half court and she beats everyone. She’s so fast. With her we have really emphasized inside scoring and using the backboard instead of settling for jump shots. This season, she’s scored around 330 points in the paint this year. It’s crazy.”

James Kay


The Landmark, January 15, 2020

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Part Time Positions Available for After-School Recreation / Day Care Worker Youth Development Specialist on site at Oak Park public schools The Day Care Program of Hephzibah Children’s Association is accepting applications for nurturing individuals to provide care and supervision of 5-11-year-old children in the After School Day Care program on site at Oak Park public schools. The days and hours are Mon – Fri from 2:30-6:00 PM and 2:00-6:00 PM on Wednesdays.

NETWORK SPECIALIST The Village of Oak Park is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Network Specialist in the Information Technology Department. The ideal candidate will need to be knowledgeable and capable to apply the principles and procedures of computer systems, such as, data communication, hierarchical structure, backups, testing and critical analysis.Hardware and software configuration of computers, servers and mobile devices, including computing environments of Windows Server and Desktop OS and applications, Unix/Linux OS, VMware, IOS/ Android. Network protocols, security, configuration and administration, including firewalls, routers, switches and wireless technology. Cabling and wiring, including fiber network, telephone, serial communication, termination, and punch-down. Telecommunications theory and technology, including VoiP, serial communication, wireless protocols, PBX, fax, voicemail and auto-attendant. Interested and qualified applicants can visit our website at http:// www.oak-park.us/ for more details. PARKING RESTRICTION COORDINATOR The Village of Oak Park is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Parking Restriction Coordinator in the Development Customer Services Department. This position will plan and coordinate all activities and operations associated with the Village of Oak Park Parking Restrictions Program and provide assistance to the Parking & Mobility Services Manager and the Director of Development Customer Services in coordinating the provision of such services to the public. Applicants are encouraged to visit the Village of Oak Park’s website http://www.oakpark.us/. Interested and qualified applicants must complete a Village of Oak Park application no later than January 17, 2020. PART-TIME BUS DRIVER The Village of Forest Park has immediate opening for a responsible part-time PACE Bus Driver to transport senior citizens, disabled residents and school children. Must have a valid Illinois C Class CDL license and attend PACE training. In addition, must be physically fit and submit to criminal background check, annual physical exam and drug and alcohol testing. $12$14.00/hour DOQ. Apply in person at Howard Mohr Community Center, 7640 Jackson Blvd., Forest Park. 708-771-7737

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Plan and supervise arts and crafts, indoor & outdoor play, games, sports, homework help and more. Requirements include: - previous experience working with children - 6 semester hours in education, recreation, social work or related college courses Immediate openings available for the current school year. Contact MJ Joyce at mjjoyce@hephzibahhome.org Equal Opportunity Employer PARKING ENFORCEMENT OFFICER FOREST PARK, IL The Forest Park Police Department, seeks a Part-Time Parking Enforcement Officer. Eligible candidates will be required to pass an aptitude test and an extensive background check. Qualifications include high school diploma (or equivalent), a valid driver’s license, knowledge of basic parking regulations, and good verbal and written skills. EVENING AND OVERNIGHT HOURS ARE MANDATORY. Open until filled. Applications are available at Village Hall, 517 Desplaines Ave. or at www.forestpark. net and should be returned Attn: Vanessa Moritz, Village Clerk, Village of Forest Park, 517 Des Plaines Avenue, Forest Park, IL 60130. Email: vmoritz@forestpark.net. RECEPTION/VETERINARY ASSISTANT Reception/Veterinary Assistant. Full time. Apply in person at Melrose Park Animal Hospital 1815 W. North Avenue 708-345-7640

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SUBURBAN RENTALS CICERO Lg 3 RMS, 1BR. $795/mo. No pets. Sec. dep. Incl. heat, water, appl., etc. Blvd Manor area. BROKER 312-780-9257

FIRST MONTH RENT FREE! GIANT BALCONY & HEATED GARAGE AVAILABLE FOREST PARK 1 BR $1100/MONTH ARISTON REALTY 708.771.5000 FOREST PARK 2 BR GARDEN APT Newly remodeled, new appliances, etc. Pay own heat and utilities. Close to transportation. Security. 1 year. No pets. 1 car garage. Avail. immediately. $1000. 630-279-8111 RIVERSIDE 5RMS 2 BR incl. heat, water, parking, appl., etc. $995/mo. Sec. dep. Lease. Parking area, close to train, bus & shopping. BROKER 312-780-9257 SOUTH BERWYN APT So. Berwyn 1-bed Apts. Avail. Feb. 1 both feat. hardwood floors, modern kitchens, heat included 2nd Floor unit near Metra OR 1st Floor unit near Ogden Ave. Alicia ALI Snyder RE/MAX Partners 708-514-4949

CITY RENTALS AUGUSTA & HARDING Beautiful 2-bedroom condo-like apt, in a sunny, safe, secure 8 unit bldg. Large newly tiled kitchen & bath, hardwood floors, central air, appliances included, tenant pays utilities, rent $830.00, for more information call 773-838-8471.

ROOMS FOR RENT AUSTIN CLEAN ROOM With fridge, micro. Nr Oak Park, Super Walmart, Food 4 Less, bus, & Metra. $116/wk and up. 773-637-5957

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT THERAPY OFFICES FOR RENT Therapy offices for rent in north Oak Park. Rehabbed building. Nicely furnished. Flexible leasing. Free parking. Free wifi; Secure building; Friendly colleagues providing referrals. Shared waiting room; optional Conference. Call or email with questions. Shown on Sundays. Lee 708.383.0729 drlmadden@ameritech.net SELLING YOUR HOME BY OWNER? Call Us For Advertising Rates! 708/613-3333

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COMMERCIAL RETAIL SPACE RETAIL SPACE–FOR LEASE A 1600 Sq Ft. Retail Space for Lease in Strip Mall: 321 S. Harlem Ave., Forest Park, IL. 60130. Vacated. Available Now. Upgraded. Formerly a Cleaners. End space. Heavy foot/road traffic area. 45-Space Parking Lot! For more details: Serious Inquiries ONLY: EMAIL: poppygator@yahoo.com CALL/TEXT: PB at: (708)250-7997

COMMERCIAL SPACE BERWYN FOR RENT/LEASE STORE OR OFFICE App. 750 sq ft. Great loc. 2 or 3 mo. sec. dep. Imm. poss. $2750/mo CENTURY 21 HALLMARK, LTD CHRIS T. 708-788-2800 CICERO FOR RENT/LEASE Vic. 35th St & Austin Blvd App. 900 sq ft. 2 exits. Add’ storage/ warehse avail in rear. Seller open to all ideas and remodeling. $1100/mo. 2 or 3 mo. sec. dep. Imm. poss. CENTURY 21 HALLMARK, LTD CHRIS T. 708-788-2800

WANTED TO BUY WANTED MILITARY ITEMS: Helmets, medals, patches, uniforms, weapons, flags, photos, paperwork, Also toy soldiers–lead, plastic–other misc. toys. Call Uncle Gary 708-522-3400

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PUBLIC NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Board of Education of Oak Park Elementary School District #97 will receive sealed audio visual equipment and the installation of said equipment bids at the Administrative Office located at 260 Madison Street – Oak Park, IL, 60302, until 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 29, 2020. At this time sealed responses will be publicly opened and read. Copies of specifications may be secured at the Oak Park Elementary School District #97 District Office, 260 Madison Street, Oak Park, IL 60302. Cut-off date for picking up scope of services is 4:00 pm, Friday, January 24, 2020. Responses mailed or delivered shall be marked to the attention of: Oak Park School District 97 Attn. Mr. Michael Arensdorff 260 Madison Street Oak Park, Illinois 60302 The front of the envelope should be clearly marked “Audio Visual Bids Hatch, Irving and Mann Elementary Schools”. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Mr. Michael Arensdorff at (708) 5243015 or marensdorff@op97.org . Faxed or electronically submitted bids will not be accepted. Any faxed or electronically submitted bid will disqualify vendors. Responses Due Date: Wednesday, January 29, 2020 at 4:00 P.M. Only those responses complying with the provision and specification of the response will be considered. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive any informalities, qualification or irregularities and/or reject any or all responses, when in its opinion, such action will serve the best interest of the Board of Education of Oak Park Elementary School District 97. Sheryl Marinier Board Secretary Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15/2020

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PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE PUBLIC HEARING

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to “An Act in relation to the use of an Assumed Business Name in the conduct or transaction of Business in the State,” as amended, that a certification was registered by the undersigned with the County Clerk of Cook County. Registration Number: Y20002922 on Januar 8, 2020 Under the Assumed Business Name of GPTETREV POTTERY with the business located at:159 SOUTH OAK PARK AVENUE, OAK PARK, IL 60302. The true and real full name(s) and residence address of the owner(s)/partner(s) is: GABRIEL PAUL TETREV 127 SOUTH TAYLOR AVENUE OAK PARK, IL 60302.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trustees of the Village of Brookfield will hold a public hearing at 6:30 P.M. on January 27, 2020 at the Village Board Room in the Municipal Building of the Village of Brookfield, 8820 Brookfield Avenue, Brookfield, Illinois 60513 on the Village’s proposed appropriation ordinance, which will serve as the basis for the Village’s 2020 Annual Appropriation Ordinance. The proposed appropriation ordinance will be on file in the Village Clerk’s Office for at least ten (10) days prior to January 27, 2020 and copies thereof will be conveniently available for public examination and copying.

Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15, 1/22, 1/29/2020

RBLandmark.com | PublicNoticeIllinois.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

Lynette Welter Scheduling and Records Secretary Special Education Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15, 1/22/2020

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to “An Act in relation to the use of an Assumed Business Name in the conduct or transaction of Business in the State,” as amended, that a certification was registered by the undersigned with the County Clerk of Cook County. Registration Number: Y2002921 on January 8, 2020 Under the Assumed Business Name of POWERS & SONS CARPENTRY with the business located at: 711 FOREST AVE, RIVER FOREST, IL 60305. The true and real full name(s) and residence address of the owner(s)/partner(s) is: TERRENCE POWERS 711 FOREST AVE RIVER FOREST, IL 60305. Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15, 1/22, 1/29/2020

LEGAL NOTICE The Village of Oak Park will receive sealed Bids from qualified vendors at the Public Works Center, 201 South Blvd., Oak Park, IL 60302 Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. local time until 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday January 29, 2020 for the following: Village of Oak Park 2020 Water & Sewer Repair Parts and Materials Bid Number: 20-107 Bid forms may be obtained from the Public Works Customer Service Center by calling 708-3585700 or by stopping by the office located at 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Information is also available from the Budget Revenue Analyst, Diane Stanislavski, dstanislavski@ oak-park.us and the Village’s website http://www.oak-park.us/ bid. The Village of Oak Park reserves the right to issue proposal documents and specifications only to those vendors deemed qualified. No proposal documents will be issued after 4:00 p.m. on the working day preceding the date of proposal opening. For more information call the Public Works Service Center at 708.358.5700. Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15/2020

WEDNESDAY CLASSIFIED:

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PUBLIC NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

The Village of Oak Park will receive sealed bids at the Public Works Service Center, 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois 60302, until 4:00 p.m. on Friday, January 24th, 2020 for the following

The Village of Oak Park will receive sealed bids at the Public Works Service Center, 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois 60302, until 4:00 p.m. on Friday, January 24th, 2020 for the following

BID 20-113 VILLAGE OF OAK PARK 2020 UPM COLD MIX ASPHALT PATCH MATERIAL REQUEST FOR PRICES

BID 20-114 VILLAGE OF OAK PARK 2020 STONE & SAND MATERIALS REQUEST FOR PRICES

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the Zoning Board of Appeals of the Village of Oak Park on Wednesday evening, February 5, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the Village Hall, 123 Madison St., Oak Park, Illinois on the following matter:

Bid forms may be obtained from the Public Works Customer Service Center by calling 708-3585700 or by stopping by the office located at 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Information is also available from the Streets Superintendent, Scott Brinkman, sbrinkman@oak-park. us or on the Village’s website http://www.oak-park.us/yourgovernment/finance-department. The Village of Oak Park reserves the right to issue proposal documents and specifications only to those vendors deemed qualified. No proposal documents will be issued after 4:00 p.m. on the working day preceding the date of proposal opening. For more information call the Public Works Service Center at 708.358.5700.

Bid forms may be obtained from the Public Works Customer Service Center by calling 708-3585700 or by stopping by the office located at 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Information is also available from the Streets Superintendent, Scott Brinkman, sbrinkman@oak-park. us or on the Village’s website http://www.oak-park.us/yourgovernment/finance-department. The Village of Oak Park reserves the right to issue proposal documents and specifications only to those vendors deemed qualified. No proposal documents will be issued after 4:00 p.m. on the working day preceding the date of proposal opening. For more information call the Public Works Service Center at 708.358.5700.

THE VILLAGE OF OAK PARK

THE VILLAGE OF OAK PARK

Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15/2020

Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15/2020

Village of Oak Park 2020 Water & Sewer Emergency Repairs Bid Number: 20-108 Bid forms may be obtained from the Public Works Customer Service Center by calling 708-3585700 or by stopping by the office located at 201 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Information is also available from the Budget Revenue Analyst, Diane Stanislavski, dstanislavski@ oak-park.us and the Village’s website http://www.oak-park.us/ bid. The Village of Oak Park reserves the right to issue proposal documents and specifications only to those contractors deemed qualified. No proposal documents will be issued after 4:00 p.m. on the working day preceding the date of proposal opening. For more information call the Public Works Service Center at 708.358.5700.

Published in RB Landmark 1/15/2020 PUBLIC NOTICE For any person who was a Special Education Student at Oak Park & River Forest High School and graduated in 2012-2013, you will have 30 days to contact Lynette Welter at Oak Park & River Forest High School at 708.434.3806 or lwelter@ oprfhs.org to request your records. On February 28, 2020, the Special Education student records for the 2012-2013 school year will be destroyed.

PUBLIC NOTICES

The Village of Oak Park will receive sealed Bids from qualified contractors at the Public Works Center, 201 South Blvd., Oak Park, IL 60302 Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. local time until 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday January 29, 2020 for the following:

Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15/2020

Brigid Weber, Village Clerk

PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Sealed separate bids will be received by the Board of Education, Oak Park Elementary School District 97 (the “Board”) for the following project: OAK PARK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT 97 D97 SUMMER 2020 RENOVATIONS BROOKS, HATCH, IRVING, JULIAN, LONGFELLOW, MANN OAK PARK, IL 60302 BID GROUP 1 – DEMOLITION, MASONRY, GENERAL TRADES, ROOFING, GLAZING, DRYWALL, FLOORING, PAINTING, CASEWORK, FIRE SUPPRESSION, PLUMBING, HVAC, and ELECTRICAL Bids will be received until 2:00 p.m. CST on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 at the Oak Park Elementary School District 97 Administrative offices, 260 Madison Street, Oak Park, IL 60302, and will be publicly opened and read at 2:30 p.m. CST on that date. Bids shall be submitted in an opaque sealed envelope clearly marked:

suppression, plumbing, HVAC, and electrical. All bids must be submitted in accordance with the bidding instructions contained in the Bidding Documents for the project. Bid security in the form of a bid bond in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the base bid amount shall be submitted with the bid. Should a bid bond be submitted, the bond shall be payable to the Board of Education, Oak Park Elementary School District 97, 260 Madison Street, Oak Park, IL 60302. All documents and information required by the bidding instructions contained in the Bidding Documents for the project shall be submitted with the bid. Incomplete, late or non-conforming bids may not be accepted. No bids shall be withdrawn, cancelled or modified after the time for opening of bids without the Board’s consent for a period of ninety (90) days after the scheduled time of bid opening.

Oak Park Elementary School District 97 260 Madison Street, Oak Park, IL 60302 Attention: Bulley & Andrews Project: D97 SUMMER 2020 RENOVATIONS - BID PACKAGE 1

The Bidding Documents for the project (which include the bidding instructions for the project and other related documents) will be available Monday January 13, 2020 and are available for viewing/download online without cost or purchase on the Bulley & Andrews, LLC One Drive, located at the following link. No username or password is required.

Scope of work for Bid Package 1 generally includes, but is not limited to: demolition, masonry, general trades, roofing, glazing, drywall, flooring, painting, casework, fire

h t t p s : / / b u l l e y a n d r e w s - m y. sharepoint.com/:f:/g/personal/ jkraft_bulley_com/EqkJvLuKNtVEuy1RTbbOFDUB4n1U-NgcMEdKceoMFlynzQ Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15, 1/22/2020

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids or parts thereof, or waive any irregularities or informalities, and to make an award that in the Board’s sole opinion is in the best interest of the District. The site will be available for visits by appointment to be coordinated with Bulley & Andrews, LLC. Interested parties may inspect the existing conditions. Schedule an appointment with John Kraft of Bulley & Andrews in advance if you wish to visit the sites. All bidders must comply with applicable Illinois Law requiring the payment of prevailing wages by all Contractors working on public works. If during the time period of work, the prevailing wage rates change, the contractor shall be responsible for additional costs without any change to the contract amount. All bidders must comply with the Illinois Statutory requirements regarding labor, including Equal Employment Opportunity Laws. For additional information on the project, contact John Kraft of Bulley & Andrews, LLC at jkraft@bulley. com or 312-914-0351. Future Bid Package 2 – General Trades 2, is expected to be available on or around February 10, 2020: with a bid opening date March 3, 2020; Dated: 01/13/2020 John Kraft Bulley & Andrews, LLC

Cal. No. 02-20-Z: 1110 South Blvd. Property Index Number: 16-07-125-020-0000 The Applicant, Centunum, LLC, seeks a variance from Section 8.3 (Table 8-1: Use Matrix) of the Oak Park Zoning Ordinance, which section prohibits medical/ clinic uses from being located within the first 50 feet of the street lot line at grade level or on the ground floor of any building within the DT-1 and DT-2 Sub-Districts of Downtown, to allow an medical/clinic use (Life Speed: Behavioral Support Services, LLC) on the ground floor within 50 feet of a street line at the premises commonly known as 1110 South Blvd., Oak Park, Illinois. Those property owners within 500 feet of the Subject Property and those persons with a special interest beyond that of the general public (“Interested Parties”) wishing to cross-examine witnesses must complete and file an appearance with original signatures with the Village Clerk no later than 5:00 PM on the business day preceding the public hearing. All papers in connection with the above matter are on file at the Village of Oak Park and available for examination by interested parties by contacting the Zoning Administrator at 708.358.5449. The Zoning Board of Appeals may continue the hearing to another date without further notice by public announcement at the hearing setting forth the time and place thereof. DATED AT OAK PARK, ILLINOIS, this 15th Day of January, 2020 Published in Wednesday Journal 1/15/2020

PUBLIC NOTICE A neighborhood meeting will be held Friday, January 24 at 1:00pm at the Oak Park Main Public Library, located at 834 Lake St., Oak Park, IL 60301. The meeting will take place on the First Floor - Community Engagement Space in Main Library. The meeting will be to discuss the proposed Pete’s Fresh Market project located at 640 Madison Street, Oak Park, IL 60302. Published in Wednesday Journal 01/08, 01/15/2020

Starting a New Business in 2020? Call the experts before you place your legal ad! Publish your assumed name legal notice in • Wednesday Journal • Forest Park Review • Riverside/Brookfield Landmark • Austin Weekly News Call Mary Ellen: 708/613-3342


The Landmark, January 15, 2020

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT CHANCERY DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF SEPTEMBER 1, 2005 ABFC ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005WMC1 Plaintiff, -v.DARYL SATCHER, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., OAK PARK TERRACE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants 2018 CH 08851 914 NORTH AUSTIN BOULEVARD UNIT #C-8 OAK PARK, IL 60302 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on February 7, 2019, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 24, 2020, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at a public sale to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 914 NORTH AUSTIN BOULEVARD UNIT #C-8, OAK PARK, IL 60302 Property Index No. 16-05-320-0401025 The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial Sale fee for the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common

interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file, CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL, 60527 (630) 794-9876 THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE IL, 60527 630-794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-18-07459 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 2018 CH 08851 TJSC#: 39-8067 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Case # 2018 CH 08851 I3141155

Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial Sale fee for the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL, 62523 (217) 4221719. Please refer to file number 321472. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR IL, 62523 217-422-1719 Fax #: 217-422-1754 E-Mail: CookPleadings@hsbattys. com Attorney File No. 321472 Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 18 CH 05792 TJSC#: 39-7333 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Case # 18 CH 05792 I3139989

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT CHANCERY DIVISION WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST, NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST Plaintiff, -v.KAREN RONEY, GUL RONEY, WEST SUBURBAN BANK AS TRUSTEE UTA DATED 10/24/94, KNOWN AS TRUST NO. 10237, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 10 CH 50958 1039 ELGIN AVENUE FOREST PARK, IL 60130 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 2, 2019, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 3, 2020, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at a public sale to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 1039 ELGIN AVENUE, FOREST PARK, IL 60130 Property Index No. 15-13-422-0300000,15-13-422-031-0000 The real estate is improved with a two story single family home with a two car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial Sale fee for the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building

and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. MCCALLA RAYMER LEIBERT PIERCE, LLC Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200, Chicago, IL, 60602. Tel No. (312) 346-9088. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. MCCALLA RAYMER LEIBERT PIERCE, LLC One North Dearborn Street, Suite 1200 Chicago IL, 60602 312-346-9088 E-Mail: pleadings@mccalla.com Attorney File No. 9558 Attorney ARDC No. 61256 Attorney Code. 61256 Case Number: 10 CH 50958 TJSC#: 39-8122 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Case # 10 CH 50958 I3141813

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 24, 2019, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 14, 2020, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at a public sale to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 500 W. WASHINGTON BLVD. APT. 403, OAK PARK, IL 60302 Property Index No. 16-07-415-0271024 The real estate is improved with a condominium. The judgment amount was $91,575.96. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial Sale fee for the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at

the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125, Chicago, IL, 60606 (312) 541-9710. Please refer to file number 18-6534. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. JOHNSON, BLUMBERG & ASSOCIATES, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite #1125 Chicago IL, 60606 312-541-9710 E-Mail: ilpleadings@johnsonblumberg.com Attorney File No. 18-6534 Attorney Code. 40342 Case Number: 2019 CH 07779 TJSC#: 39-7382 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Case # 2019 CH 07779 I3141842

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT CHANCERY DIVISION TIAA, FSB D/B/A EVERBANK Plaintiff, -v.ROSEMARY NASH, THE 720 N. AUSTIN CONDOMINIUM Defendants 18 CH 05792 720 N. AUSTIN BLVD., UNIT 101 OAK PARK, IL 60302 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 13, 2019, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 14, 2020, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at a public sale to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 720 N. AUSTIN BLVD., UNIT 101, OAK PARK, IL 60302 Property Index No. 16-08-105-0211002 The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $100,942.18.

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT CHANCERY DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST FOR REGISTERED HOLDERS OF LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-7, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-7 Plaintiff, -v.JEANNE L. EDWARDS, SCOVILLE COURT CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LONG BEACH MORTGAGE COMPANY, MIDLAND FUNDING LLC Defendants 2019 CH 07779 500 W. WASHINGTON BLVD. APT. 403 OAK PARK, IL 60302

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