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RIVERSIDE-BROOKFIELD Also serving North Riverside ONLINE AT rblandmark.com

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Vol. 32, No. 2

January 11, 2017

@R @RBLandmark

Riverside looks for help for reforesting PAGE 3

Brookfield playwright earns theater residency

North Riverside hires deputy fire chief PAGE 7

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By BOB UPHUES Editor

Riverside’s village board has been asked to tighten up local laws concerning vicious dogs after two incidents, one injuring a resident and another killing another dog, last August involving two dogs belonging to the same family. Last fall, Keith Altavilla, a resident of Leesley Road who said he was bitten by one of the same dogs in 2015, pleaded with village trustees to amend its ordinance regarding vicious dogs to make it easier to take action against them and to prevent owners whose dogs have been declared vicious from being able to house any animal of the same species in Riverside. Since that August attack, Altavilla told village trustees on Dec. 15, the family whose dogs were declared vicious had already gotten a new dog and that it was barking at people on walks. “This owner does not have a clue as to how to raise a dog and how to properly socialize it,” Altavilla said. “And when people just don’t get it, there needs to be something involved to protect the community from folks that either aren’t willing to be responsible or aren’t capable of being responsible.” See DOG LAW on page 3

NORTH RIVERSIDE

Will lower threshold for investigation; could limit number of dogs per home

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B E R W Y N

Riverside looks to toughen ‘vicious dog’ law

HARLEM AV E.

On stage

N

ILLUSTRATION BY JAVIER GOVEA

ADDING UP: The intersection of Harlem Avenue and Cermak Road, which spans both North Riverside and Berwyn, has four red-light cameras that have produced more than $20 million in citations since Jan. 1, 2014. Right turns on red account for 91.2 percent of that figure.

A street paved with gold

$26.5 million in red-light camera tickets issued along Harlem Avenue since 2014 By BOB UPHUES and BRETT McNEIL Senior Editor and Contributing Reporter

Harlem Avenue is a busy road. Everyone knows that. But thanks to all that traffic, it’s recently become something else: A gold mine.

Between January 2014 and October 2016, more than $26.5 million in red-light camera citations were issued to motorists on Harlem between North Avenue and Cermak Road. Based on those numbers, compiled as part of a Riverside-Brookfield Landmark analysis, that stretch of Har-

lem may be the most lucrative four-mile length of road in the entire state. The two red-light cameras on Harlem Avenue in River Forest -- at North Avenue and Lake Street -- have issued more See RED-LIGHT CAMERA on page 9

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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

Riverside seeks help in reforestation effort Village will plant a tree for free in exchange for help with maintenance By BOB UPHUES Editor

Riverside’s village forester is seeking the help of residents in repopulating the village’s public parkways with trees by offering to plant new ones for free in front of homes whose owners promise to water the young specimens for up to three years. This will be the third consecutive year that Forest Michael Collins has focused efforts on reforesting the village’s parkways, whose ash trees have been ravaged by the emerald ash borer since it first made its appearance in Riverside back in late 2011. Last year, Collins selected the locations for planting new trees, working in certain “zones” of the village and, after identifying good spots, he contacted homeowners to enlist their help in making sure the new trees survived. Not everyone wanted to. This year, he’s casting the net a little wider to see if he can both address areas that need reforesting and find willing resident participants. “It’s a new approach,” Collins said. “I’m just trying to improve the efficiency in getting the word out and reforesting.” Residents who would like a parkway tree and are committed to watering it are encouraged to contact the village’s Public

DOG LAW Cat licenses? from page 1 Also on Dec. 15, Michael Perricone, whose dog was killed in one of the August attacks, described what he called a “life altering” incident in which his dog died. Perricone said he was knocked flat by the 80-pound pit bull, which had broken free from the person walking it and sprinted 100 yards to get at Perricone’s 18-pound Havanese, Max. “Max did not deserve to die such a horrible death, but he might have saved the life of a child,” Perricone said. “Then Max will not have died in vain. … I don’t want something like this to happen to anyone else.” On Feb. 2, village trustees are expected to continue discussing the matter and could enact changes in the law. One thing sure to change is the number of bite incidents it takes to have a dog declared vicious. Dogs can’t be declared vicious in Riverside under the present law until a third bite incident. And while Police Chief Thomas Weitzel says it’s possible for police to open a vicious dog investigation after just one serious incident, the present law is unclear on that subject.

Works Department by calling Administrative Assistant Maribeth Reimer at 708442-3590 and requesting an evaluation. Collins will evaluate each request based on space available for planting, potential underground utility issues and resources available. Requesting a tree is no guarantee one will be planted. Anyone interested in participating in the program is asked to contact the Public Works Department by Jan. 31. In the past four years, crews have removed about 800 ash trees from Riverside’s parkways – that doesn’t include the dozens more cut down in places like Indian Gardens. It also doesn’t include the 300 or so parkway ash trees that remain standing or the ones in the more out-of-the-way, forested edges of the village where ashes continue to succumb to infestation. Beginning in 2015, the Riverside village board has earmarked $52,000 annually for reforestation efforts. In the past two years, the village has planted 418 trees on public parkways, in order to combat the loss of so many ash trees. In addition to the money the village has set aside for reforestation, private citizens and community organizations such as the Olmsted Society, Garden Club and Juniors have made sizable donations to-

ward the cause. In 2012, alone, a Girl Scout fundraising effort paved the way for more than 100 trees to be planted on parkways. “The community is very vested in the urban forest,” Collins said. As the ash borer infestation neared Riverside in 2008, Collins warned that the cost for removing and replanting trees could approach $1.1 million. The numbers show that he was pretty much on target. Through 2016, the village has spent about $700,000 for removals and reforestation, and there’s still some work to do. “We’re on the back end of the infestation,’ said Collins, “but we’re not quite there yet.” Resident help with the reforestation effort is essential, said Collins, due to the sheer number of trees involved. In addition to the 418 trees planted on parkways by the village since 2015, the forestry department cared for another 160 trees in Riverside parks last year. It takes a seasonal worker about three-and-a-half days to water and maintain those trees, said Collins. If the area is experiencing drought conditions, the watering cycle may need to be repeated often, Collins said. As a result, said Collins, “Support for watering trees on parkways is vital.”

He would like clear language in the amended law that states an investigation can be opened immediately following an attack that kills another pet or involved “mauling” a human. Just what a “mauling” is would be determined by medical personnel treating the victim, Weitzel said. Weitzel has recommended that the trigger for launching a vicious dog investigation be lowered from three incidents involving unprovoked attacks on humans or other pets to two. The incidents also must occur away from the dog owner’s property, unless it involved mail carriers or family members. An incident involving a dog bite won’t always count toward the number needed to declare a dog vicious. There are circumstances in which dogs may nip other pets or people, because they are being bothered, for example. “There would be discretion by the chief at each level to determine whether a bite is a qualifying bite or not,” said Village Attorney Lance Malina. “That’s what the due process is all about.” Weitzel said that several residents have asked him whether the village could prohibit certain breeds of dogs, such as pit bulls. However, Weitzel pointed to state law, which states that “local government is prohibited from adopting animal control ordinances or regulations that are breed specific.” But with respect to restricting the right of

dog ownership, that might be more difficult to introduce, according to Malina. “I don’t know of any ordinance that attempts to create a disqualification,” Malina said. “The only real way to do it effectively would be in an extreme case that you’d actually bring an injunctive action at the circuit court and prove up the repeated problems and then ask for an order.” Village President Ben Sells asked how denying someone the ability to own a dog was any different than the village taking away a resident’s ability to raise chickens or keep bees if they are found not to be responsible. Malina said keeping bees and chickens had a zoning component to licensing that dogs didn’t. “They involve more than just having an animal that sleeps in your bed at night and goes out in the yard during the day,” Malina said. Trustees in February will also consider a recommendation to limit the number of dogs per household to three (two per unit in a multifamily structure); presently there’s no restriction. In addition, there’s some talk of perhaps requiring cats to be licensed, though officials acknowledged that it might be difficult to enforce such a law, since cats are very often kept indoors all the time. “I’ve never seen an unlicensed cat ticket,” Malina said.

IN THIS ISSUE Big Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Kosey Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Editor Bob Uphues Sports Editor Marty Farmer Staff Photographer William Camargo Editorial Design Manager Claire Innes Editorial Designers Jacquinete Baldwin, Javier Govea Advertising Production Manager Philip Soell Advertising Design Manager Andrew Mead Advertising Designers Mark Moroney, Debbie Becker IT Manager/Web Developer Mike Risher Advertising Director Dawn Ferencak Advertising Sales Marc Stopeck, Joe Chomiczewski Media Coordinator Kristen Benford Inside Sales Representative Mary Ellen Nelligan Circulation Manager Jill Wagner Distribution Coordinator Caleb Thusat Comptroller Edward Panschar Credit Manager Laurie Myers Front Desk Maria Murzyn, Carolyn Henning Publisher Dan Haley Associate Publisher Dawn Ferencak Business Manager Joyce Minich Chairman Emeritus Robert K. Downs

HOW TO REACH US ADDRESS 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302 PHONE 708-442-6739 ■ FAX 708-524-0447 E-MAIL buphues@wjinc.com ONLINE www.RBLandmark.com The Landmark is published weekly on Wednesday by Wednesday Journal, Inc., an Illinois corporation. The newspaper is available on newsstands for $1.00. A one-year subscription costs $25 within Cook County and $34 outside the county. Advertising rates may be obtained by calling our office. Periodical rate postage paid at Oak Park, IL (USPS 0019-585). Postmaster send address corrections to Landmark, 141 S. Oak Park Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302. © 2017 Wednesday Journal, Inc.

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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

North Riverside Players translate Shakespeare into awards “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” advances to regional theater competition By JACKIE GLOSNIAK

state level, they will now be moving on to the American Association of Community Theatre’s Midwest regional competition, where While the small North Riverside Players they will compete against nine other groups theater company has brought top-notch from Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Wisconquality productions to local audiences sin and Ohio. Roughly 30 cast members and over the last 28 years, the group has always crew will travel to the regional competition, looked for a way to share their talent with a which will be held in Champaign in late April. wider audience. In order to help raise funds for the cast This past fall, the Players were able to do that and more as they clinched five theater and crew’s travel and meal expenses for the awards at the state level and are now pre- festival, the Players will be accepting donaparing to advance to a regional competition tions from now through April 27 either via against production companies from across check or through online donation set up through crowd funding website Crowdrise. several Midwestern states in April. In November the Players showcased their com. Additionally, the Players will be staging fall production of Shakespeare’s comedy A Midsummer Night’s Dream to the Illinois the abridged version of the show at, the North Riverside Village ComTheatre Association’s Festival mons, 2401 Desplaines Ave., in community theater competiApril before the competition as tion in Streator. a way to help raise funds for the The Players won not just the trip. top prize for outstanding proAl Meyer, president of the duction but also awards for Players’ board of directors, says outstanding ensemble, most the group’s chance to compete creative use of a set and two and succeed helps affirm the outstanding performer awards. quality of productions of the It was the first time the Playsmall, local community theater. ers entered the state associa“I think we’re doing really tion’s competition. good shows and people really Before the entire cast put on OLIVIA LANDA enjoy them,” Meyer said. “Then, the show in North Riverside, NR Players actor when [people] learn we won this actors were told by director and longtime Players member competition, they go, ‘Oh, they Jay Fontanetta that he hoped must really be good.’” to enter the show in the comLanda agrees with Meyer that petition just to see how the the competition will only add group would do. credibility to the Players. Once all involved in the pro“It’s one of those things that’s duction agreed, applied to coman asterisk on your resume,” she pete and were found qualified, it was up to explained. “It’s also just a really great perFontanetta to edit down the nearly two-hour sonal achievement, because we’re a small production to the 60-minute production re- theater company from a small town and to quirement of the competition. know that ourselves as artists were able to As Fontanetta condensed monologues and achieve something of that magnitude really scenes to form a new, abridged version of says a lot about our community and what A Midsummer Night’s Dream, he was able we’ve created.” to ensure that all actors involved would reBryant Rouleau, vice president of the main on stage for the entire hour. When not Players’ board of directors and co-producer acting, the characters became part of the of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, says regardless of how the regional competition show’s background scenery itself. Olivia Landa, a longtime Players actor goes, the experience has been invaluable to who performed as a fairy named Cobweb, the group. “It’s another way for us to take [the Playsaid before the cast performed for the competition audience, they were really unsure ers] to another level of how we run,” he said. “It’s a cool way to grow our theater and how their abridged version would go over. “We really weren’t sure what was going to say we took it to another level and were good happen, because we were a small fish in a enough.” For more information about the Players big pond,” Landa said. “When we went, the show went well and we ended up doing re- and to donate money to assist in crew travel expenses, visit www.NRPlayers.com or ally well.” Now that the company has won at the www.Crowdwise.com/NRPlayers. Contributing Reporter

Please Call (708) 613-3362 to add a listing in the Church Guide

Sts. Peter and Paul

Sunday Worship Liturgy of Holy Communion 10:15 a.m.

Saint Barbara Catholic Church

4008 Prairie Avenue, Brookfield • 708-485-2900 www.stbarbarabrookfield.org

Mass Schedule

Weekdays: 8:00am Monday - Saturday Weekends: 5:00pm on Saturday Sunday: 7:30, and 10:00am • 12:30pm Spanish Mass

Pray the Rosary

After 8:00am Mass – Monday – Saturday Tuesday Evenings – 6:30pm • Friday Evenings – 6:30pm Spanish

Eucharistic Adoration

2:00 – 9:00pm every Monday

Reconciliation

Saturday 8:45 – 9:30am

“[It] really says a lot about our community and what we’ve created.”


The Landmark, January 11, 2017

Brookfielder named resident playwright at theater 16th Street Theater to stage Steinhagen’s “Blizzard ‘67” By DOUG DEUCHLER Contributing Reporter

Author, actor, musician and playwright Jon Steinhagen is talking about his play Blizzard ‘67 which opens Jan. 12 at the 16th Street Theater, 6420 W. 16th St., in Berwyn. The show opens exactly 50 years after the January 1967 event. “This is a human story, not just a historical story,” said Steinhagen, a longtime Brookfield resident. “It’s set in a very tight time period -- during the big blizzard of early 1967. But it focuses on four human beings -- business men who carpool -- and foolishly attempt to drive home from downtown. It’s about their relationships. The play focuses on these gentlemen and their different stresses and choices.” This year, for 16th Street Theater’s 10th Season, Steinhagen was chosen as their resident playwright. They are now mounting his Blizzard ‘67, which was first performed at Chicago Dramatists in 2012. The cast of Blizzard ‘67 includes Mark Pracht, Noah Simon, and Christopher Stokes. “I did a lot of interviews before I actually started writing,” Steinhagen said. “So I heard lots of stories. I was not born in 1967 so I have no memories of the event. But I got a lot of wonderful material. I have dedicated this play to my mom and dad.” Steinhagen, a highly prolific freelance artist, grew up in Brookfield, went to high school at Fenwick, and worked on his early shows in Oak Park and Forest Park. Down through the years Steinhagen has been constant, gifted figure in the theater. His plays and musicals have been produced nationally. His short fiction is published widely, in literary journals and in books as well as online. He’s an actor with great depth and skill, playing leading roles like Felix in The Odd Couple, Big Daddy in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, J.J. Hunsecker in Sweet Smell of Success, Mack Sennett in Mack and Mabel, and Sheridan Whiteside in The Man Who Came to Dinner. Steinhagen recently portrayed Judy Garland’s piano player in Studio 773’s End of the Rainbow for which he had to play piano, lead the band and act as well. “This was a very intense but exhilarating process,” he says. Steinhagen has won four Joseph Jefferson Awards and his work has been performed from Chicago to New York, from Los Angeles to various festivals across the country. Among his many honors and awards, Steinhagen won the Julie Harris Playwriting Award for his comedy The Analytical

When it comes to great care, your child comes first. Jon Steinhagen

Photo by Bogdan Nastase

Machine. He seems especially attracted to historical subjects. His musical The Teapot Scandals (for which he wrote the book, music, and lyrics) was set in the early 1920s during the corrupt Warren G. Harding presidency. The show was produced by Porchlight Music Theater and was nominated for a Jeff Award in the Best New Work category. He also received an After Dark Award of Best New Work for The Teapot Scandals. He received a producer-author initiative grant from National Alliance for Musical Theater. “Writing for the theater definitely influences one’s acting,” Steinhagen said. “And acting clearly influences one’s insight into the writing process. They both affect one another.” In 2008, Steinhagen was chosen as the resident playwright of Chicago Dramatists. “I was always making things up,” Jon says. “When I was a child in elementary school I wrote a little piece of poetry called ‘Toast’ and I won an award for it. I was reading a lot and went to the library all the time. We had an old Carnegie Library in Brookfield in those days. I loved it.” More recently, Steinhagen has been developing a series of plays set in 19th Century Chicago history. “It will be a cycle generated out of Chicago’s forgotten past,” Steinhagen said. “I have begun with a play set in 1837 when Chicago was just chartered as a city. … This series of plays will cover the period of the 1800s but will stop at 1900 -- about the time when the Chicago River was reversed so that the water would be pure and not polluted.”

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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

BIG WEEK

January 11-18

Edith Wilson

The woman in charge

When President Woodrow Wilson suffered a debilitating stroke in 1919, his wife, Edith Bolling Wilson, essentially became the first woman president of the United States, whose authority, now largely forgotten, was acknowledged in Washington, D.C., circles at the time. On Wednesday, Jan. 18 at 7 p.m., the Riverside Public Library, 1 Burling Road, hosts William Hazelgrove, former Ernest Hemingway Writer in Residence, who will present “Madam President: Edith Wilson.” The talk will take place in the Great Room of the library. Admission is free.

And more North Riverside Public Library, 2400 Desplaines Ave., hosts Messy Mornings for Munchkins for ages 2 and up every Tuesday in January at 10:30 a.m. Enjoy short, active stories and messy fun in this hands-on program. The Youth Service Department will also host Lapsit Storytime for babies and toddlers with an adult on Thursdays in January at 10:30 a.m., beginning Jan. 5. And on Wednesdays in January at 3:30 p.m. kids in first grade and older (kindergarteners may attend with an adult) can attend the LEGOs Club (LEGOs provided). On Thursdays from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. beginning Jan. 12, kids 2nd grade and up can be part of the After School Book Club. Books will be provided. Call 708-447-0869 to register. On Jan. 13 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. kids 2nd grade and up (K-1st may attend with adult) are invited to Crafts & Cookies to make fun, seasonal crafts. On Jan. 17 at 3:30 p.m. kids 1st grade and older are invited to Mad Science. Please dress for mess. Riverside Public Library, 1 Burling Road, hosts Felted Animal Making on Tuesdays, Jan. 17 and 31 at 7 p.m. in the Public Meeting Room. Join Diane Ruzevich and learn how to make adorable felted animals. There’s a $10 fee per animal. Attend one or more sessions to finish your project. Trinity High School, 7574 Division St. in River Forest, will host its eighth-grade entrance exams on Jan. 14. The test begins at 8 a.m., so arrive early. Bring two No. 2 pencils and a $25 fee (cash or check). Call Mary Tansey, director of admissions, at 708-453-9374 with questions. North Riverside Parks and Recreation hosts a supervised open gym for teens every Sunday from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Village Commons, 2401 Desplaines Ave. Concession available. $5 fee at the door. The Brookfield Elks Lodge, 9022 31st St., hosts bingo every Monday night. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games start at 7 p.m. minimum cash payout of $2,275 a night, plus pull tabs, lightning, tic-tac and raffles. ■

District 96 Faculty Music Concert

Riverside Elementary School District 96 faculty will present a recital on Thursday, Jan. 12 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of Hauser Junior High, 65 Woodside Road in Riverside. A suggested $10 adult donation will be accepted for the Hauser Composition Commission project. For more information, call 708-447-7933.

Ray Milland in Lost Weekend

Let’s get ‘Lost’

Riverside Township continues its weekly Thursday Afternoon at the Movies series on Jan. 12 with the 1945 classic Lost Weekend, starring Jane Wyman and featuring an Academy Award-winning performance by Ray Milland in a story about a man struggling with alcohol addiction. Movies are at the Riverside Township Hall, 27 Riverside Road in Riverside at 12:30 p.m. Admission is free.

Natalie Jacobson, “Self Reproducing Triangle,” 2014, acrylic on canvas, 14-by-16 inches.

Arts Center debuts new exhibition Riverside Arts Center, 32 E. Quincy St. in Riverside, presents a new group exhibition, “A Certain Slant of Light,” from Jan. 15 through Feb. 25. The show features the work of Bill Conger, Natalie Jacobson, Shona Macdonald, Melissa Randall, Dawn Roe, Pete Schulte, Buzz Spector and Dustin Young and the work in the show encapsulates the lyricism, fragility and foreboding in Emily Dickinson’s poem “There’s a Certain Slant of Light.” Conger and

We’re in the money

Stop by the I-Cash table in the lobby of the Northh Riverside Public Library, 2400 Desplaines Ave., on Saturday, Jan. 14 between noon and 4 p.m. and staff aff from the Illinois Treasurer’s Office will check to see if there’s unclaimed property owed to you. Questions? Call 708-447-0869 or visit www. northriversidelibrary.org/events.

Macdonald curated the exhibition. Members of the public are also invited to an opening reception for the show on Sunday, Jan. 15 from 3 to 6 p.m. Admission to the Freeark Gallery of Arts inside the RAC is free. Hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. and Fridays from 1 to 4 p.m. Closed Sunday and Mondays. For more information, visit www.riverersideartscenter.com.

CALENDAR EVENTS ■ As you’ve likely noticed, our Calendar has changed to Big Week. Fewer items, higher profile. If you would like your event to be featured here, please send a photo and details by noon of the W Wednesday before it needs to be published. We can’t publi publish everything, but we’ll do our best to feature the week’s highlights. Email calendar@wjinc.com.


The Landmark, January 11, 2017

North Riverside hires deputy fire chief Basek puts retirement on hold until after April election

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By BOB UPHUES Editor

Brian Basek thought he’d be comfortably retired from his job as North Riverside fire chief right now, but it looks like he’ll be on the job full time until at least May. With a dispute between village management and union firefighters dragging into a third year and a contested election looming in April, Mayor Hubert Hermanek Jr. has found it hard to find a fire chief candidate willing to take a possible short-term gamble. “I’ve found it very, very difficult to find a qualified replacement with such a short guarantee on how long the job will last,” Hermanek said. So, Hermanek has chosen a different strategy, one that required him convincing Basek to stay on the job about six months longer than he’d anticipated. On Jan. 3, Hermanek hired Thomas Gaertner as the department’s new deputy chief. Gaertner, 53, who retired in 2015 as fire chief in neighboring Broadview and had served since that time as deputy director of the Northeastern Illinois Public Safety Training Academy (NIPSTA), is considered a potential replacement for Basek down the road, Hermanek said. “I was very pleased to be able to get such a highly qualified and respected person,” said Hermanek. “He’ll be a tremendous asset to the village. I’m very excited about it.” Gaertner’s first day on the job was Jan. 4. He’s working full time on what is now a month-to-month contract that pays $7,000 per month, according to Hermanek. North Riverside’s fire department has operated without a deputy chief for about seven years. The position was eliminated during the economic downturn that saw a number of belt-tightening measures undertaken by the village. As part of his agreement to stay on as chief, Basek requested a deputy to help with the day-to-day operations of the department.

De-Icer Debate: Pros, Cons & Protecting Our 4-Legged Friends BOB UPHUES/Staff

ON BOARD: Thomas Gaertner takes the oath of office from North Riverside Clerk Kathy Ranieri as Fire Chief Brian Basek looks on during Gaertner’s swearing-in ceremony as the village’s new deputy fire chief on Jan. 3. Gaertner, who previously served as coordinator of the NIPSTA Fire Academy, will also help with training. “He’s been swamped,” said Hermanek of Basek. “It’s too much for one person.” Basek was supposed to retire Nov. 30, 2016 after 35 years as a member of the North Riverside Fire Department. He was named chief in 2013. But after a search for candidates to replace him stalled, Basek said he got a call from Hermanek 10 days before he was set to retire, asking him to stay on a while longer. With village management and union firefighters continuing to negotiate a new contract, Basek said he didn’t want to leave the village without anyone in place. “I agreed to stay on and postpone my retirement,” Basek said. Gaertner spent 29 years with the Broadview Fire Department, serving for five years as chief before retiring. He began his association with NIPSTA, which provides public safety training for more than 20 north suburban municipalities, in 2009 as its fire academy coordinator. After retiring from Broadview in 2015, he was tapped as NIPSTA’s full-time deputy director, the No. 2 administrator for the agency.

In that role, said Gaertner, he was responsible for day-to-day operations of the academy. About 400 instructors reported to him. “It’s a busy place,” Gaertner said. But Gaertner said he missed the fire service and felt that if the right opportunity came along, he’d consider moving back to a municipal department. North Riverside fit the bill. “This was a good fit for me,” Gaertner said. “In my gut it felt like the right thing to do.” Asked if the rocky relationship between Basek, the village administration and the union firefighters concerned him, Gaertner said he was up for the challenge. “Hopefully we can come to some kind of compromise and get beyond some of that turmoil,” Gaertner said. “I want to work with the union and also give Brian some support that I’m sure he desperately needs.” Although Gaertner lives in Mount Prospect, he’s familiar with North Riverside. While a firefighter in Broadview, he lived in the Beverly section of that village. His two daughters attended Komarek School and one of them attended Riverside-Brookfield High School. The Broadview and North Riverside fire departments also have a mutual aid agreement and respond to incidents in each town.

School board petition challenges move ahead A pair of challenges to the nominating petitions of two people seeking seats on local school boards have moved forward but won’t be resolved until at least next week. Sharon Anderson, an incumbent seeking re-election to the Lyons-Brookfield District 103 school board, filed a motion to dismiss the complaint against her petitions on Jan. 9. The objector, James Koc, of Brookfield, has until Jan. 13 to file his reply to the motion. Meanwhile, on Jan. 11 at 1:30 p.m. at the

Cook County Administration Building in Chicago, election officials will review signatures on Anderson’s petitions whose authenticity are being challenged by Koc. In his objection, Koc claims that 16 signatures on Anderson’s petitions should be invalidated, which would drop the number of valid signatures under the 50 that are required. A ruling on Anderson’s case could be made at a hearing scheduled for Jan. 17.

Also on Jan. 17, a determination may be made regarding the candidacy of William Cassidy, the lone non-incumbent running for a seat on the Lyons Township High School Board of Education. Cassidy’s petitions are being challenged by Burr Ridge resident Robert Brogan, who claims Cassidy did not file a statement of economic interest in the same year as his nominating petitions as required by law. — Bob Uphues

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Woman charged with hit-and-run Riverside police cited a 23-year-old woman with several traffic citations, including leaving the roadway, leaving the scene of an accident and damage to village property after she allegedly plowed her 2003 Mazda Tribute into a tree at the intersection of Park

Place and Kimbark Road during the early morning hours of Jan. 6. Officers responded to the scene of the crash at 3:05 a.m. after a resident who called to report the incident also stated a subject was seen fleeing down Woodside Road. Police could not locate any subject in the area but they did observe the Mazda, abandoned and smoking, on the sidewalk and parkway. The vehicle was registered to a woman who lived on Forest Avenue, about a block away from the crash scene. When police went to the address, they observed a man in the courtyard of the building and located three female subjects in the foyer. After interviewing the subjects, police learned that the group had been at a bar in Forest Park and were headed to the Forest Avenue apartment when the Mazda left the road and struck a tree. The owner of the vehicle reportedly would not admit to driving the vehicle, saying that she remembered going to the bar and then realizing she was in the lobby of the apartment building, police said. However, according to police, the group traveled back from the bar in two vehicles. The Mazda, with the owner and another male subject, was in the lead. A second vehicle, with a driver and two passengers, was following. After the crash, the owner of the Mazda reportedly got into the second vehicle and left the scene. The male subject fled on foot.

Burglary ■ A resident of the 3200 block of Vernon Avenue, Brookfield, called police on the morning of Jan. 4, saying that her car, which was parked inside her locked garage overnight, had been broken into. Items from the glove box were found on the floor of the garage and two sets of car keys were missing from the center console. ■ A resident of the 4300 block of Blanchan Avenue, Brookfield, reported to police on Jan. 2 that his garage had been burglarized sometime in the past couple of days. The service door had been forced open and a generator, a welder and a circular saw were taken.

These items were obtained from police reports filed by the Riverside, North Riverside and Brookfield police departments, Dec. 30, 2016 and Jan. 8, 2017, and represent a portion of the incidents to which police responded. Unless otherwise indicated, anybody named in these reports has only been charged with a crime. These cases have not been adjudicated.

—Compiled by Bob Uphues


The Landmark, January 11, 2017

REDLIGHT CAMERA Right-hand turns from page 1 than $5.2 million in citations since the start of 2014. And at the intersection of Harlem Avenue and Cermak Road, North Riverside and Berwyn have combined to issue more than $20.7 million in red-light camera tickets. A pair of cameras operated by Forest Park at Roosevelt and Harlem has contributed another $550,000 to the Harlem Avenue citation totals. Fines paid by those caught on camera have poured into local municipal coffers, and the money has enriched the owners of a privately held Chicago company that operates six of the eight Harlem cameras between North Avenue and Cermak Road. And almost all of that money -- and all of those $100 tickets yet to be paid -- is from violations that traffic safety experts do not recognize as significant threats to public safety. Ticket data show that in River Forest, North Riverside and Berwyn, 91.2 percent of citations were issued for improper righthand turns on red. These are usually slowrolling turns. This offense, while illegal, generally does not lead to dangerous accidents, according to traffic studies, and crash data provided

by the local municipalities does not suggest the lucrative red-light cameras have had any meaningful effect on collisions involving motorists making right-hand turns. That’s in part because there were few such crashes in these intersections to begin with. All of the local communities where redlight cameras operate publicly sold the devices as traffic-safety measures that had ancillary benefits as revenue-generating machines. But a review of internal records provided by Berwyn and River Forest shows municipal officials chose their red-light camera vendor based on projected revenues. Moreover, in mandated traffic studies prior to installing the cameras at Lake Street and North Avenue, records show police and village officials in River Forest were aware that almost all traffic violations at either intersection were for right-turn infractions. But in promoting red-light cameras to the village board, and in making a public case that red-light cameras were primarily about safety, police officials in River Forest referenced traffic studies showing the devices were sometimes successful in lowering the incidence of head-on and T-bone crashes. They made no mention of right-hand turns. That omission is striking as records show that since installing red-light cameras River Forest has issued almost $4.6 million in tickets for right-turn violations. Down the road in Berwyn, they’ve issued $8.9 million in right-turn violations. And in North Riverside, that number is a whopping $10.1 million.

Harlem and Cermak: A citation supernova The intersection of Harlem Avenue and Cermak Road, where North Riverside and Berwyn have combined to place four red-light cameras, has generated more than $20.7 million in red-light camera citations since the start of 2014. No government office or private organization maintains authoritative revenue numbers for red-light cameras in Illinois but the Landmark was unable to identify, during a review of published reports, another intersection in the state where citations were so aggressively issued. All four of the cameras at Harlem and Cermak are controlled by SafeSpeed LLC, a politically connected business that has received relatively little public scrutiny despite its work in about a dozen suburban municipalities and despite records that indicate the company’s cameras produce citations at startlingly high rates. SafeSpeed’s red-light camera at North and Harlem in River Forest has averaged $1.37 million in citations annually since the start of 2014. That performance would place the North Avenue camera among the top four redlight cameras in the entire city of Chicago, according to a Chicago Department of Transportation 2015 annual report on the city’s redlight camera program. But the SafeSpeed cameras in Berwyn and North Riverside are in a different league altogether. The company’s camera on the

northwest corner of the Harlem and Cermak intersection has averaged more than $3.4 million in annual citations since 2014. Across the street in Berwyn, the SafeSpeed camera on the southeast corner of the intersection has averaged $2.4 million in tickets during that same time period. Those two red-light cameras may well be the most lucrative in Illinois. None of the cameras in Chicago -- where the city’s sprawling red-light camera program has been the source of controversy for more than a decade -- even come close to the annual ticket averages generated at Harlem and Cermak. The most lucrative red-light camera in the city, according to CDOT figures, is located at Lake Shore Drive and Belmont Avenue. In 2015, that camera issued $1.6 million worth of citations, in what appears to have been a down year. According to Chicago Sun-Times reporting, the Lake Shore Drive and Belmont camera between 2011 and 2015 averaged about $1.9 million in citations annually. Either way, that camera is a junior-varsity performer compared to the red-light cameras at Harlem and Cermak. In fact, three of the four SafeSpeed cameras at Harlem and Cermak generate more tickets than any camera in the city of Chicago. The fourth SafeSpeed camera at the Harlem and Cermak intersection generates more citations than all but two of Chicago’s cameras. See RED-LIGHT CAMERA on page 10

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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

REDLIGHT CAMERA Public safety from page 9

Red-light cameras in River Forest

SMILE: Eight red-light cameras on Harlem Ave. between North Ave. and Cermak Rd. have issued $26.5 million in citations since Jan.1, 2014.

River Forest officials inked their first red-light camera contract in 2011, and the village today operates cameras on Harlem Avenue at North Avenue and Lake Street. The North Avenue camera is the village’s real moneymaker, issuing almost $3.8 million in citations since the start of 2014. That’s an average of $1.374 million in tickets per year. That number would have placed the North Avenue camera among the top four redlight cameras in Chicago in 2015. Before the village installed red-light cameras, River Forest officials ordered internal studies from the office of Village Administrator Eric Palm and another from the police department. Police officials were tasked with assembling “a synopsis of research relating to the safety impact on the use of red light cameras,” while Palm’s office focused on the potential revenues to the village based on contract deals with several possible red-light camera operators. River Forest Police Chief Gregory Weiss in June 2011 reported the results of his department’s review of nationally published red-light camera research. “Based on a literature review,” Weiss wrote, “there appear to be studies that suggest the installation of red-light cameras do eventually have a safety impact through the reduction of accidents, especially the more dangerous side impact types.” Weiss’ memo to village officials included no details of a traffic safety study that referenced right-hand turns or the safety effects of heavily ticketing this activity. The police department memo acknowledged that critics argue red-light cameras function primarily as revenue generators, and that Schaumburg officials removed cameras in that village “due to negative public sentiment.” The memo also noted that other observers contend traffic engineering is a more effective remedy for accidentprone intersections. Still, the chief concluded, “The installation of red-light cameras are a viable option to enhance the effectiveness of police traffic enforcement.” Prior to completing his memo, Weiss and his staff in the spring of 2011 collected crash data for several River Forest intersections. That crash data showed the Harlem Avenue intersections at North and Lake were the most accident-prone in the village. Between 2009 and 2010, there were a total of 21 reported accidents at Lake and Harlem, and 11 accidents at North Avenue and Harlem.

WILLIAM CAMARGO/Staff Photographer

FINE TIME: Motorists making illegal right turns on red accounted for more than 90 percent of all red-light camera tickets issued along Harlem Avenue between North Avenue and Cermak Road between Jan. 1, 2014 and Oct. 31, 2016. These numbers did not include a breakdown of accident type, but earlier traffic records submitted for internal review by the police department indicated about 60 percent of wrecks at North and Harlem were rear-end crashes, while about 44 percent of accidents at Lake and Harlem also involved rear-end collisions. No numbers from either data set detailed crashes involving motorists making a right-hand turn.

Few right-hand turn accidents But crash data submitted by River Forest and SafeSpeed in a pair of “justification reports” filed with the state in late 2011 provides a detailed look at accidents in both the North Avenue and Lake Street intersections. Those records show that in 2010, the year before River Forest implemented its red-light camera program, not one crash at North and Harlem involved a motorist making a right-hand turn. Only one such crash was recorded between 2008 and 2009.

The story was similar on Lake Street -- zero accidents in 2010 involving motorists making right-hand turns from Harlem. And between 2008 and 2009, there were a total of two such accidents at Lake and Harlem. Moreover, internal traffic studies performed in the fall of 2011 showed the vast majority of all traffic infractions in both the North Avenue and Lake Street intersections were rightturn violations. These 24-hour traffic studies were a requirement for the village’s application to the state for permission to install the red-light cameras. At North Avenue, 87 percent of all noted violations were for improper right-hand turns. On Lake Street, 97 percent of violations were related to right-hand turns. Crashes involving vehicles turning right at Harlem and Cermak in Berwyn and North Riverside have not been a particular problem, either. A 2013 report issued by SafeSpeed to Berwyn for the camera at northbound

Harlem and Cermak showed that between 2009 and 2012 there were 103 total crashes at the intersection. Only eight involved vehicles turning right, representing a little less than 8 percent of the total.

Revenue versus safety While Weiss and the River Forest Police Department were reading traffic studies and compiling accident data, Palm was examining potential annual revenues from a red-light camera deal. In a February 2011 memo titled, “Redlight Camera Vendor Price Comparison,” Palm compared projected revenues from five potential red-light camera vendors. In his memo, Palm indicated he spoke with three vendors, which he identified as the “most prominent in the Chicagoland area.” These were SafeSpeed, RedFlex and RedSpeed. The latter company currently operates cameras at Harlem Avenue and Roosevelt Road in Forest Park.


The Landmark, January 11, 2017

Red-light cameras by the numbers The figures below represent red-light camera operations in River Forest, Forest Park, North Riverside and Berwyn along Harlem Avenue from North Avenue to Cermak Road between Jan. 1, 2014 to Oct. 31, 2016.

Berwyn Northbound Harlem at Cermak

Not all of the cameras in this analysis operated the full length of this time period. The most profitable North Riverside camera, for instance, began operation in May 2014, according to village records.

Westbound Cermak at Harlem 30,393 tickets issued $3,039,300 worth of citations issued $1,654,605 in collected revenues

Total tickets issued: 265,301 Value of total tickets issued: $26,530,100 Total collected revenues: $16,297,902.62 (not including Forest Park) River Forest North Avenue and Harlem Ave. 37,785 tickets issued $3,778,500 worth of citations issued $2,685,904.36 in collected revenue Lake and Harlem 14,237 tickets issued $1,423,700 worth of citations issued $1,088,670.33 in collected revenue Total tickets issued: 52,022 Value of total tickets issued: $5,202,200 Total collected revenue: $3,774,574.69 North Riverside Eastbound Cermak at Harlem 25,401 tickets issued $2,540,100 worth of citations issued $1,485,689.51 in collected revenue

69,053 tickets issued $6,905,300 worth of citations issued $4,422,207.41 in collected revenues

Total tickets issued: 99,446 Value of total tickets issued: $9,944,600 Total collected revenue: $6,076,812.41 Forest Park Southbound Harlem & Roosevelt 2,618 tickets issued $261,800 worth of citations issued Unknown amount in collected revenue* Eastbound Roosevelt at Harlem 2,939 tickets issued $293,900 worth of citations issued Unknown amount in collected revenue* Total tickets issued: 5,557 Value of total tickets issued: $555,700 Total collected revenues: Unknown* Right turn on red (RTOR) figures River Forest North and Harlem Total citations: 37,785 RTOR citations: 32,769 Percentage of citations issued for RTOR violations: 86.7 percent

RTOR citations: 24,820 Percentage of citations issued for RTOR violations: 97.7 percent Southbound Harlem at Cermak Total citations: 82,875 RTOR citations: 76,407 Percentage of citations issued for RTOR violations: 92.2 percent Berwyn Northbound Harlem at Cermak Total citations: 69,053 RTOR citations: 65,787 Percentage of citations issued for RTOR violations: 95.3 percent Westbound Cermak at Harlem Total citations: 30,393 RTOR citations: 23,884 Percentage of citations issued for RTOR violations: 78.6 percent Forest Park No data available from village or its red light camera vendor. Percentage of citations issued at all intersections for RTOR violations: 91.2 percent *Forest Park did not provide data breaking out collected revenues by camera. The village operates two cameras at Harlem and Roosevelt Road and another at Desplaines and Roosevelt. Records provided by its vendor, RedSpeed Illinois, show a total of $545,372 in collected revenues for the three cameras between January 2014 and September 2016.

Southbound Harlem at Cermak 82,875 tickets issued $8,287,500 worth of citations issued $4,960,826.01 in collected revenues

Lake and Harlem Total citations: 14,237 RTOR citations: 13,166 Percentage of citations issued for RTOR violations: 92.4 percent

Total tickets issued: 108,276 Value of total tickets issued: $10,827,600 Total collected revenue: $6,446,515.52

North Riverside Eastbound Cermak at Harlem Total citations: 25,401

Forest Park also was unable to provide a breakdown of citations issued for right-turn violations. Collections data provided by RedSpeed show Forest Park receives only about 30 percent of all collected red-light camera revenues, or about half of what its neighboring communities receive.

Palm said River Forest officials chose SafeSpeed in part because it was the only company surveyed that charged a fee based on the village’s own determination of whether a violation had been committed. “Other companies took fees from all the tickets they (the companies) believed were violators,” Palm wrote. “Meaning, even if a municipality rejected a violation from the company, the fee was still paid. We preferred SafeSpeed’s model.” As Berwyn officials worked toward installing cameras in October 2009, a police detective who served as a liaison between the city and SafeSpeed suggested company officials also consider studying the intersection at Harlem and Roosevelt Road. “This intersection is heavy traffic and near the 290 expressway exit, so we feel that it could be a worthwhile spot for a camera,” Det. Mi-

chael Ochsner wrote in an email to a SafeSpeed official. That December, as the city contemplated approaching the Illinois Department of Transportation to approve cameras on Harlem at both Roosevelt and Cermak, Ochsner wrote another email seeking revenue projections in order to justify installation costs the city would incur. “What I need from you is an estimate of the revenue (city of Berwyn revenue) that will be generated at each intersection for the first year of operation based on traffic volume and amount of violations per day,” Ochsner wrote to SafeSpeed. “I’m sure [then-Police Chief William Kushner] will sign the letter … if we can show sufficient potential revenue and get a cost estimate.” But the public face of the redlight camera pitch was all about safety.

In Palm’s revenue chart, SafeSpeed came out on top as returning the most ticket money to River Forest -- $8,700 for every $14,000 in tickets. Runner-up RedFlex Traffic System Inc., the scandal-plagued former red-light camera operator in Chicago, yielded $8,165. The third-place firm offered final net revenues of just $6,475. While the village administrator did not make a recommendation for any particular firm, he wrote that “[t]he purpose of this analysis is to show the ‘true cost’ of operating a red-light running camera between vendors.” By those standards, SafeSpeed, in offering more revenue per ticket, made sense and village officials voted in April 2011 to approve a deal with the company. River Forest renewed that contract in 2014. In an email response to written questions from the Landmark,

Police department records show Ochsner drafted letters for the chief that were required by IDOT. In one, he referenced the city’s existing red-light camera program and claimed, without proof, they prompted a “dramatic decrease in traffic crashes” in the city. Urging IDOT officials to approve additional cameras in Berwyn, Ochsner claimed they would “provide an immediate improvement in motorist safety” and he dubbed the new cameras “an urgent need.” In the end, Berwyn installed Harlem Avenue cameras only at Cermak. The Berwyn camera monitoring northbound lanes of Harlem Avenue at Cermak Road went live June 10, 2011. According to a SafeSpeed analysis, there were 24 crashes reported there in 2010. In 2011, the year the camera was installed, there were 25 crashes. In 2012, the first full year after the camera was installed, there were 27, records show.

Steep cost of cameras to motorists The true cost to motorists of red-light cameras on Harlem Avenue has been steep: More than $26.5 million in total citations and almost $16.3 million in paid tickets along the four-mile Harlem stretch in less than three years. Under the terms of the contracts each municipality maintains with SafeSpeed, 60 percent of revenues is allocated to the towns and 40 percent flows to SafeSpeed. Forest Park could not provide revenue data for tickets issued by village cameras in the Harlem and Roosevelt intersection, and the totals referenced in this story do not include Forest Park collections. Based on figures through the end of October 2016, River Forest’s take of red-light camera revenues since 2014 was more than $2.6 million. That money has been earmarked for capital improvements for the village, according to Palm. Palm defended the program, saying the Landmark’s analysis didn’t take into account factors such as pedestrians or changes in traffic volume over time, factors he called “two very relevant and contextual areas of information.” “In terms of red-light cameras, all citations issued by any governmental entity are done so with the goal of changing people’s behavior,” Palm said. In North Riverside, the village has used more than $3.86 million in collected revenues to fund its annual police and fire pension liabilities. Berwyn Mayor Robert Lovero did not respond to written ques-

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tions from the Landmark, and the city’s 2016 budget does not indicate a specific purpose for red-light camera funds.

Expert: Enforcement at odds with camera design, purpose Dominique Lord is a Texas A&M University civil engineering professor specializing in traffic safety. He has 20 years of experience and has performed numerous academic and real-life traffic safety studies -- including a 2002 study regarding right-turn laws in his native Quebec. He also was responsible for a 2014 analysis of Chicago redlight camera data commissioned by the Chicago Tribune. Lord told the Landmark that redlight cameras were not designed for the kind of traffic enforcement currently practiced in River Forest, North Riverside and Berwyn -- namely, high-volume ticketing of right-turn violations. From a traffic safety perspective, red-light cameras were designed to prevent drivers from running red lights while traveling straight through the intersection, and to prevent drivers making dangerous left-hand turns in front of oncoming traffic, according to Lord. “They should be focused on left turns and running red lights. If they are being used to make money, it’s not right because people won’t believe in them” as safety devices, Lord said. Asked about the dangers of right-hand turns, including slowrolling right-hand turns, Lord said the maneuver is not recognized as a significant traffic safety hazard. A right-hand turn “is not high-risk compared with other maneuvers in intersections,” he said. “The rolling stop, even if you include that, the risk is not the greatest at intersections.” The greatest dangers at intersections, he said, are blown red lights and blind or reckless left-hand turns. These lead to head-on and T-bone collisions, which generally are much more dangerous and deadly than accidents involving right-hand turns. Lord ended the interview with a story from College Station, Texas, where he lives. Years ago, a motorist there received a red-light camera ticket and began to challenge its existence. Those efforts eventually led to a 2009 ballot initiative that banned red-light cameras in the city. If the purpose of red-light camera enforcement is primarily revenue-based, Lord said, “then it’s why people won’t like them and try to take them out.”


12

The Landmark, January 11, 2017

2017 SOFTBALL ASSESSMENTS

FARM, MINOR, MAJOR, JUNIOR & SENIOR DIVISIONS The purpose of Assessments is to assess each player’s skill level to ensure an equitable distribution of talent across all teams within a Division. Players will be assessed on their ability to run, throw, catch and bat. To be eligible for Little League All Stars, a player is required to attend one of the two Assessments at the RBHS Fieldhouse. Players must be registered for the 2017 season in order to participate in Assessments.

January 14th & January 28th • 12-4PM

Registration is OPEN through 1/15/17

Riverside Brookfield High School Fieldhouse

Farm: 12-1:30pm - Minors: 1:30-3pm - Majors: 3-4pm • No try-outs for T-Ball & Prep

Softball Divisions of Play T-Ball + Prep (Ages* 4-6)** Farm (Ages* 7-8)**

Farm is a split seasons with 1/3 coach pitch, 1/3 coach and player pitch, and 1/3 player pitch. This Division provides the foundation for game fundamentals and skills. The Farm Division is focused on development versus being competitive.

Minor League (Ages* 9-10)**

Minor League play is competitive play. Most players have completed at least one season in any of the lower leagues, but there is always time to instruct girls who have an interest and knowledge of the game. Minor League is player pitch only.

Major League (Ages* 11-12)**

Major play is competitive play. Most players have completed seasons in any of the lower leagues, but there is always time to instruct girls who have an interest and knowledge of the game.

Junior (Ages* 12-14) and Senior (Ages* 13-16)**

Junior and Senior League is a bridge from Little League to Senior League and is an extension to provide a continuing activity within the framework of Little League. *players age at 12/31/16 **exceptions can be made based on skill level and National Little League guidelines

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• Little League requires a copy of a certified birth certificate & All fees are due before February 15, 2017

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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

THE LANDMARK VIEW

Need to prevent repeat ‘vicious dog’ offenders

T

he vast majority of dog owners are responsible. They walk their dogs on a proper leash. If their dogs are jumpy around other pets, they take pains to avoid contact. They train their dogs humanely, and the dogs respond with loyalty. And when there’s a hint of a potential problem, a responsible dog owner responds to warning signs. You know when you’ve got an aggressive dog; you don’t need a citation from the village after your dog has bitten a person or another pet to convince you of the problem. And most people, once in possession of a citation would be mortified and would take pains to make sure it doesn’t happen again. That’s why two incidents of a dog biting a human or a pet, or one incident of a serious attack, is plenty of precedent for opening a vicious dog investigation. No one deserves three strikes. The village of Riverside is in the midst of a process to amend its law regarding vicious dogs, and the measures proposed to tighten the law are good ones. However, resident Keith Altavilla – a victim of a dog bite himself and someone who has really pushed for tighter controls on vicious dogs – has a point about people who simply don’t seem to be able to train and socialize a dog properly and whose pets seem to be neighborhood problems. In the most recent case last summer, two different dogs belonging to the same family had to be euthanized after repeated attacks – one of which killed a small dog. It’s remarkable enough when there’s one dangerous dog in a household. But two? That would seem to point to a different problem. And, according to Altavilla, after the two dogs were destroyed, the same family got another dog who he said has begun showing aggressive tendencies. Village officials and the village board’s attorney are rightly reluctant to outlaw certain breeds or to disqualify residents from owning pets despite past history. But if that’s the case, then the village needs to make a point of closely monitoring residents with records of housing vicious dogs, and officials need to make sure that if such a resident appears incapable of properly training or caring for a dog, other residents deserve protection for themselves and their pets. If there’s some way to try to get a court to issue an injunction, the village might want to try that route. We’re not sure how a busy court system such as Cook County’s is going to look on such cases, but dog attacks can be very serious matters. Repeated attacks by different dogs belonging to the same family are public safety issues. While changes to the vicious dog law will give the village quicker recourse, there needs to be that extra step of making sure past offenders don’t become repeat offenders.

Opinion KOSEY CORNER

Would Babson Estate be subdivided today?

S

ometimes reading about one thing can bring back reminders of similar things. That is what happened for me when an article in the Tribune about an architecturally significant home that had been purchased with the prospect of being razed to construct new homes. The article told many stories of those for and those against, preservationists being the strongest. The outcome still hasn’t be decided. And so it reminded me of the Babson Estate, which was located on Longcommon Road near Delaplaine and was razed in 1960. Built in 1907 for Henry Babson by famed architect Louis Sullivan, the house was the pride of Riverside with its 25 rooms sitting on 25 acres. After the original owners left the home, it was even occupied by a group of nuns. Finally, an offer was made to the village to accept the house for a nominal fee. Arguments were raised by those for and those against. Some of the “against” points bordered on fear-mongering as to what it could mean to the village. Needless to say, I would have been in favor of keeping the building and I believe that if the situation were to occur now, a motion to demolish it would not pass and the building would have been preserved.

In today’s Riverside, I can only imagine the main house remaining and serving as a center for use by the residents. With sufficient land surrounding it to maintain the beauty of the house, the remaining land would be portioned off into sufficient size lots, similar to what was done to form the Gatesby-Uvedale circle, where a couple of service for the estate (now local landmarks) still stand. Subdividing land can be a difficult thing. Apportioning land to make them buildable lots without destroying the character of the area can result in some strange lots. The land where our home is on Selborne Road was built on a portion of land owned by Edith McCormick. It was subdivided in 1935 to make four lots of unusual shape to accommodate the building code. Today it would not have happened and the question remains if it ever should have happened. As I pass the site on Longcommon I can still see the Babson Estate, and when there is snow I can remember seeing the nuns outside playing in the snow, a nice memory. So while I know there must be progress, I believe it wise to move cautiously, for once it is gone it can’t come back. Hopefully, the house I read about will remain and be a part of the history of the area where it stands.

LETTERS

residents. We will be interviewing key community leaders to gain more in-depth information about current demand for mental health and related services and trends they are noting. The third part of our process is an online, anonymous survey. We invite all readers of this publication who live in Riverside Township to participate; the link to the survey is https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RSMHBsurvey For residents who may wish to complete this survey on a paper form, please contact John Shustitzky at 708-302-6920 and he will arrange to send you a survey and a postage-paid return envelope. When we have reviewed the community’s input and summarized their ideas, we will share the results with the community and make copies available to all who are interested. Thank you again to those who attended our community forum, and for those of you who are willing to share your ideas with us through the survey.

JOANNE KOSEY

Mental health board survey now online On behalf of the Riverside Township Mental Health Board, I am writing to thank the community for supporting our efforts to assess our community’s needs and to plan for the most important mental health and related services in the future. In November of 1972, the voters of Riverside Township approved a referendum creating a special tax, the purpose of which is to fund community-based services for the mentally ill, developmentally disabled (including autism), and the chemically dependent citizens of Riverside Township. The RTMHB was created soon after to plan, fund and monitor the provision of these services. Since that time, it has supported an array of community-based, cost-effective and non-duplicated services in the township. RTMHB supports those programs which sustain and improve the well-being of individuals, their attitude toward themselves and their adjustment to the community and each other and acts as a source of mental health information and as a representative of the community. The members of the Riverside Township Mental Health Board are now inviting our neighbors to share their opinions and priorities as we plan for the future. On Saturday, Nov. 5, we held a successful community forum to discuss the community’s needs and to gain perspectives from local

Timothy Heilenbach, president Riverside Township Mental Health Board Brookfield

Show gratitude for law enforcement Most Illinoisans know someone whose life has been in one way or another affected by the scourge of society that is methamphetamine. Meth can destroy families and ruin lives, so National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, on Jan. 9, is a great opportunity to thank those who work so hard to fight our state’s meth problem. See LETTERS on page 16


The Landmark, January 11, 2017

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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

OBITUARIES

Christ Iatropulos, 62 Metallurgist Christ J. Iatropulos, Ph.D., 62, of LaGrange Park, died on Dec. 29, 2016. Born on March 13, 1928, Dr. Iatropulos was the owner of Kieh Co., a metallurgical testing lab in Bellwood, which he founded in 1979. Dr. Iatropulos was the husband of Darlene Iatropulos (nee Kerr); the father of Michelle and Jamie (Mitch Melton) Iatropulos; the son of the late James P. Iatropulos and

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Beulah C. Iatropulos (nee Fasseas); and the brother of the late Peter Iatropulos. A celebration of life gathering will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 11 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the William Tell Holiday Inn, 6201 Joliet Road in Countryside. Hitzeman Funeral Home, Brookfield, handled arrangements.

Marian Laurie, 88 Retired bus driver Marian G. Laurie (nee Blum), 88, of Wilmington and formerly of Brookfield, died on Jan. 4, 2017. She was born on Aug. 22, 1928 and worked as a bus driver for a transportation company. Ms. Laurie was MARIAN LAURIE the wife of the late David Laurie; the mother of Bonnie Pelland, Melinda “Lindy” (William) Breymeyer and David E. Laurie; the grandmother of Jason (Angie) Pelland, Joshua (Tomoko) Pelland, Amanda (John) Schmid, Loralee (Joseph) Segreti, Monica (Daniel) Gola and William Breymeyer Jr.; and the great-grandmother of Kobe Pelland, Ariana Pelland, Elsa Schmid, Charlotte Gola, Brynn Gola, Joey Schmid, Massimo Segreti, Madelyn Breymeyer, Logan Brey-

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meyer, Mila Segreti and Marco Segreti. A chapel service was held on Jan. 6 at Ridgewood Cemetery. The family appreciates memorials to St. Paul Lutheran Church, 9035 Grant Ave., Brookfield, 60513. Hitzeman Funeral Home, Brookfield, handled arrangements.

Christopher Legan, 48 Software engineer Christopher K. Legan, 48, of Riverside, died on Jan. 2, 2017. He was a software engineer at HERE in Chicago. Mr. Legan was husband of Christine Legan (nee Hale); the father of Olivia, Sophie and Isabelle; the son of the late Kenneth E. and late Mary (nee Engler); the brother of Diana (Peter) Miller and Kenneth II (Rebecca); the uncle of Richard Miller, James Miller, Hope Legan, Gracie Legan and Zoe Legan; the son-in-law of Richard (Linda) Hale; and the brother-inlaw of James Hale. Services have been held. Ivins/Moravecek Funeral Home, Riverside, handled arrangements.

LETTERS Continued from page 14 Our law enforcement officials are risking their lives day in and day out to keep meth off our streets and away from the good people of Illinois. With so much meth coming into our country from Mexico, this is a tough battle. But our police also have proactive tools to aid them in the fight against domestic meth production. The National Precursor Log Exchange (NPLEx) is a real-time stop-sale system that prevents illegal purchases of overthe-counter cold and allergy medications containing pseudoephedrine that could be used to “cook” meth. With NPLEx, police and other law enforcement officials can proactively stop criminals from making meth. So this week, let’s all make sure we do everything we can to show our gratitude for all that law enforcement officers do to protect us. We’re lucky to have law enforcement officials dedicated to making sure we’re safe and keeping meth off our streets.

State Rep. Mike Zalewski (D-23rd) Riverside

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Sports

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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

19

Full speed ahead for LTHS swimming Reigning state champs look as formidable as ever against rival Hinsdale Central

“We’re pleased with where we’re at with our team.” SCOTT WALKER LTHS coach

Photos by Alison Credit

Spencer Walker won the 100 backstroke (51.76) and the 500 freestyle (4:45:43) against Hinsdale Central. (Right) Sprint swimmer Ryan Hammond won the 50 free (21.42) and 100 free (47.85). By MATT LE CREN

T

Contributing Reporter

he winter break is a welcome respite for most high school students, but for swimmers it is a grueling grind, filled with exhausting training. That’s why the Lyons Township boys swimming team was eager for a meet to kick off the New

Year. The Lions began 2017 with a bang by knocking off rival Hinsdale Central 102-82 in a key West Suburban Conference Silver Division dual meet Jan. 6 in Hinsdale. LTHS, the defending state champion, thus remained unbeaten in dual meets and has the inside track at the conference championship. “It was a good win,” LTHS coach Scott Walker said. “We’re pleased with where we’re at with our team. “It seems like the last couple weeks over winter break we had been training for three months without a swim meet. You’re like, ‘is it ever going to end?’ “The training can get so monotonous, so it was nice to see them get up and race.”

The Lions had competed only once since Dec. 17, winning the HomewoodFlossmoor Pentathlon on Dec. 27. That meet features a roster of 10 swimmers who each compete in five events. The dual against Hinsdale Central, which finished third in the state, was of much greater significance. The Lions won nine of the 12 events, including two of the three relays. Most impressively, LTHS did it without one of its top swimmers, junior Henry Claesson, who is out with a shoulder injury. “Henry has had extensive rehab and I thought it was a good idea to rest him,” Walker said. “I don’t think it’s worth risking a promising swimming career. I think it’s a good decision.” Claesson has missed two weeks of training and Walker hasn’t decided when he’ll return to the lineup, but the goal is to have him healthy for the state series in February. “I think he’ll be fine,” Walker said. “He’s still come to every practice and still done all the training except (swimming). He’s done everything possible and we’re just now getting him back into the water.”

The Lions, as it turned out, didn’t need Claesson against the Red Devils. They won the 200-yard medley relay in 1:38.12 and the 400 freestyle relay in 3:16.54. Spencer Walker, Michael Walsh, Jeff Vitek and Matt Linden swam the medley relay, while Ryan Hammond, Vitek, Linden and Walker comprised the 400 free relay. The 200 free relay of Hammond, Rak, Walsh and Linden was second in 1:28.36. “To be able to beat Hinsdale without Henry (is impressive),” Scott Walker said. “It’s given some other people opportunities to step up and they have.” Hammond was the most notable of those taking advantage. The senior won both of his individual events in impressive fashion, capturing the 50 freestyle in 21.42 and the 100 free in 47.85. Hammond defeated Hinsdale Central senior star Franco Reyes by .38 in the 50 and knocked off sophomore Donovan Lahmann, who swam on Hinsdale’s state championship 200 free relay last season, in the 100. Spencer Walker, the coach’s son, also won two events, taking the 100 backstroke in 51.76 and the 500 free in 4:45.43. He won the 100 back by over five seconds. “What was special about that was it was after he swam a season-best in the 500,” Scott Walker said. “He didn’t have a lot of rest between them. The only event between the 500 and the backstroke is the 200 free relay. I was happy with that. He also had a good anchor on the 400 free relay.” In other results, Walsh took the 100 breaststroke in 1:00.23 and senior David Rak triumphed in the 200 individual medley in 2:01.92. The Lions swept the diving, with senior Seamus Scotty easily winning with 304.85 points. Sam Dillon was second in 184.10 and Nick Perez third with 161.75. The 100 butterfly was one of only two individual races the Lions did not win. Ben Johnston and Vitek finished second and third, respectively, behind Reyes, who is the two-time defending state champion in that event. Johnston was third in the 200 free behind two Red Devils. While the Red Devils and Lions will meet again at conference, sectional and state meets, the Lions have gained some early confidence in their bid to repeat as state champs. “The rivalry has become such a class act,” Scott Walker said. “It’s a very positive environment but the kids are going to go after each other. It gets the best out of every single kid.” The LTHS helmsman noted that both teams share the same philosophy. Both race in drag suits and without caps and train hard during the regular season. “It’s a stepping stone,” Walker said. “It holds you accountable and you can walk out knowing we’re right where we need to be.”


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The Landmark, January 11, 2017

S P O R T S

RBHS makes its mark on mat Senior-laden, 2A-ranked Bulldogs excelling under new head coach Curby By MARTY FARMER Sports Editor

Considering the Riverside-Brookfield High School wrestling team returned several talented seniors this season, it’s not altogether surprising the Bulldogs are flourishing under new head coach Nick Curby. RBHS is No. 23 in Class 2A in the Illinoismatmen.com. rankings, has a 14-4 dual match record and is undefeated in the Metro Suburban Conference. Of course, Curby brought plenty of accolades to the mat as well with 13 seasons, collectively, of coaching experience at Plainfield East and Providence Catholic. The 1998 Lyons Township graduate was an all-state fifth at 189 as a senior and wrestled at Illinois. “I let our wrestlers know I came to RB to win,” Curby said. “We’re not taking any steps backward.”

The Bulldogs are definitely headed in the right direction, led by an impressive group of seniors including Josh Contreras (18-3 record at 120 pounds), Julian Blanco (15-3/145), Joey Swallow (11-2/160) and Chris Colvin (19-2/220). Junior Joey Giurini has also wrestled well at 126 with an 8-1 record. Other contributors include R.J. Martinez, Louis Garcia and Amanda Martinez, one of a half-dozen girls in the program. The Bulldogs won two of three duals at their own quad Jan. 6. RBHS also placed seventh out of 16 teams at the Wheaton Warrenville South Invite Dec. 28. Contreras and Blanco each won an individual title at WW South. “We are a pretty senior-laden team this year,” Curby said. “Hopefully, these guys really wrestle well as we approach the end of the regular season and then into the postseason. Curby cited Contreras and Blanco as hard working wrestlers who have their sights set on not only qualifying for the

state tournament but placing high. He’s also very pleased with the progress of Swallow and Colvin. “Joey is a gamer,” Curby said. “He just had a real big win over a tough kid from Johnsburg.” At 6-foot-5, 225 pounds, the sky’s the limit for Colvin. “Chris loves weightlifting and he put on about 25 pounds during the offseason,” Curby said. “He’s making a name for himself Josh Contreras in Class 2A. Some college programs are talking with him.” RBHS has six events remaining in the regular season before the postseason begins Feb. 4. “It’s really more about fine tuning now,” Curby said. “We also need to make sure we are physically healthy so we can wrestle our best when it matters most.”

Brooks, Clanton lift Bulldogs

S P O R T S

R O U N D U P

RBHS hoops in contention for 16th straight conference title By MARTY FARMER Sports Editor

After losing four of five games at the Jack Tosh Holiday Classic, the Riverside-Brookfield High School boys basketball team started off 2017 in better fashion with a 67-55 win against visiting Wheaton Academy Jan. 6. Senior guards Jalen Brooks (17 points, 4 rebounds) and Jalen Clanton (15 points, 9 assists, 4 rebounds) paced the Bulldogs. A.J. Meindl scored 13 points and pulled down four rebounds, while Zach Vaia contributed 12 points. Junior guard Ryan Cicenas was the fifth RBHS player to reach double figures scoring with 10 points. While the Bulldogs struggled at Tosh, they closed out the tourney with a convincing 74-55 victory against Elk Grove. RBHS pulled away in the second half with strong efforts again from Brooks (19 points, 6 rebounds) and Clanton (16 points, 4 rebounds, 4 steals). Vaia chipped in 10 points. Despite losing two starters who left the team this winter and a four-game losing streak, RBHS (7-8, 3-2 Metro Suburban 3-2) can still contend for a 16th straight conference championship in head coach Tom McCloskey’s final season. The Bulldogs visit St. Edward Friday, Jan. 13 (7:30 p.m. tip off) in Elgin. RBHS returns home against Glenbard South Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 7 p.m.

RBHS girls basketball Since senior guards Sam Bloom and Lyndsey Hoyd took over the Bulldogs’ backcourt as freshmen in 2013, the team has won 20-plus games and been a

MAX HERMAN/Contributor

RBHS guard Zachary Vaia dribbles down court in the second quarter against Wheaton Academy on Jan. 6, 2017. The Bulldogs defeated the Warriors 67-55. contender in the Metro Suburban Conference on an annual basis. However, Glenbard South has been the Bulldogs’ nemesis the past four seasons. The Raiders dealt Bloom, Hoyd and the rest of the Bulldogs another frustrating conference loss, 44-32, on Jan. 3. “Ugh, Glenbard South. I have seven losses to [Glenbard South] in my career and it stinks,” Bloom said. “Every time we have played them, we have had our chances. We always give it our all. We had the perfect game plan [this year] but we didn’t finish.” Hoyd scored a team-high 10 points and Bloom finished with seven points. Sophomore Maddie Meehan added six points, four rebounds and two blocks. Unfortunately for the Bulldogs, they made only 11 of 41 field goal attempts, including 6-for-26 from beyond the threepoint arc. With only two points off turnovers and two fast

break points, RBHS couldn’t force a faster tempo either against the taller Raiders. At 15-5, the Bulldogs are looking for a strong finish to a satisfying season. “Our season has gone way better than expected,” Bloom said. “We have played very well with some big wins. Our record proves it. “Our coaching staff is amazing. They always go above and beyond. Coach Till and Coach Ruge have helped me so much in becoming the player I am.”

RBHS girls gymnastics The Bulldogs roll into 2017 with plenty of momentum after winning three duals and a triangular to close out last year. Upcoming home events include a Senior Night conference dual against Fenton in the East Gym on Wed., Jan. 11 at 6 p.m. and the RB Invite on Sat., Jan 21 at 8 a.m.


The Landmark, January 11, 2017

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BY PHONE: (708) 613-3333 | BY FAX: (708) 524-0447 | BY E-MAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@RBLANDMARK.COM HELP WANTED ADMIN ASST. PART TIME Lagrange Park real estate office needs part time administrative assistant to help answer phones, set appointments, greet clients and handling web based real estate platforms. Must be knowledgeable in Microsoft Word. Hours Thursday & Friday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Send resume to C21lja@aol.com or call 708 267 5374 for confidential interview. Assistant Vice President–Actuary sought by Aon Risk Services Central, Inc., an Aon co., in Chicago, IL to serve as subject matter expert on complex actuarial valuation projects in Health & Benefits segment. Must have Bachelor’s deg in Econ, Finance, Math or Actuarial Sci. + 8 progressive yrs of health & benefit actuarial analysis exp in: (1) Preparing quarterly exp reviews & renewal underwriting analyses, (2) Leading strategy dvlpmt & costing scenarios rltd to strategy discussions, (3) Facilitating benchmarking discussions & analysis, incl strategy evolution based on benchmarking data, (4) Applying knowl of math, probability, statistics, & finance to set & review health care budget rates for self-insured plans & presenting to client teams & clients, (5) Reviewing employee contribution rate dvlpmt & performing IBNP reserve dvlpmt, (6) Estimating fin’l impacts in changes to provider reimbursement analyses, (7) Dvlpg models to evaluate costsaving scenarios & value retiree plans to ensure compliance w/ federal Medicare Part D regulations, (8) Analyzing plan changes & assessing impact on Medicare Advantage bid process, (9) Providing analysis to ensure regulatory compliance w/ Medicare Advantage/Medicaid, & (10) Utilizing MS Excel, PowerPoint & Word prgms. Must have Member of American Academy of Actuaries (MAAA) & Associate Society of Actuaries (ASA) designations. May travel to various & unanticipiated worksites throughout the U.S. 1-2 times per mth. All positions req. an applicant who has accepted an offer to undergo a background check. Must fax resume to (312)381-9423 & cite job code 00205.

The Village of Oak Park is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Administrative Secretary (Park-Time) in Human Resources. This position will provide a wide variety of advanced secretarial and clerical duties in support of Human Resources including filing, paying bills, responding to emails, calls and maintain a variety of confidential files and records. Applicants are encouraged to visit the Village of Oak Park’s website http://www.oakpark.us/. Interested and qualified applicants must complete a Village of Oak Park application no later than January 18, 2017.

HELP WANTED PART-TIME SOCIAL PROGRAMMING COORDINATOR SENIOR COMMUNITY Please send resume to: 7824 West Madison Street Forest Park, IL 60130 Attention: Administrator PROJECT MANAGER Brubaker Architects, Inc. seeks a Project Manager. Mail resume to: 1200 Central Ave, Ste 360, Wilmette, IL

MUSICAL INSTRUCTION PIANO LESSONS IN YOUR HOME

Experienced, creative teacher. Excellent with children. lessons@35piano.com 708.228.7150

SUBURBAN REAL ESTATE HISTORIC MAYWOOD MANOR

902 S. 3RD AVENUE (behind Aldi) Tired of renting? Why not consider buying an affordable 2BR condo w/ 1000 sq ft of living space on this historic site at less than market rents? Savings are built in from a unique 12 year tax freeze plus lower utility costs from energy saving systems and appliances. Onsite pkg, exterior lighting and enhanced security systems included. Be among the first to benefit from this unique project in which the buyer can have input into the individual unit(s). Call 708-383-9223.

SUBURBAN RENTALS 2BR APT OAK PARK 1322 N AUSTIN 1014 S HUMPHREY No pets. $1100/mo. Contact Walsh Management 708-548-1110

SUBURBAN RENTALS

ROOMS FOR RENT

RIVER FOREST 2BR CONDO River Forest condo for rent. 2 BR, 1 BA, Hardwood floors, built-in microwave and dishwasher. $1350 per month includes heat + 1 parking space. 1-1/2 month security deposit. $39.95 application fee. Call Vicki at 708-714-0686 or vicki@beyondpropertiesrealty.com. RIVER FOREST 2BR & 1BR Hardwood floors throughout. Spacious walk-in closets. Storage. Parking. Laundry in building. Heat included. Call 708-657-4226.

CITY RENTALS Augusta & Kildare: PERFECT FOR SENIORS Studio Apartment A gorgeous studio apt. features include kitchen, dining room, large living room, walk-in closet, hardwood floors, incl. heat, appliances, and laundry room, in a beautifully landscaped & well maintained building, quite, safe & secure, rent $585.00, for more information call 773-838-8471. Augusta & Harding: Beautiful 2-bedroom condo-like apt, in a sunny, safe, secure 8 unit bldg. Large newly tiled kitchen & bath, hardwood floors, central air, appliances included, tenant pays utilities, rent 785.00, for more information call 773-838-8471.

AUSTIN CLEAN ROOM With fridge, micro. Nr Oak Park, Super Walmart, Food 4 Less, bus, & Metra. $116/wk and up. 773-637-5957 Large Sunny Room with fridge & microwave. Near Green line, bus, Oak Park, 24 hour desk, parking lot. $101.00 week & up. New Mgmt. 773-378-8888

Selling your home by owner? Call to advertise: 708-613-3342

M&M property management, inc.

708-386-7355 • www.mmpropmgt.com 649 Madison Street, Oak Park Oak Park: Studios, 1 & 2 BR from $750-$2000 Forest Park: 1 & 2 BR from $750-$1300

GLA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. LaVerne Collins Managing broker

Office located at: 320 S. Wisconsin Ave. Oak Park

708-763-9927 www.glapropertymanagement.com

Properties may be broker owned.

Call us for a complete list of rentals available.

Apartment listings updated daily at:

www.oakrent.com

Wednesday Classified 3 great papers, 6 communities To place your ad, call: 708/613-3333

BEAUTIFUL CHURCH FOR RENT

in OAK PARK. Perfect for a congregation. Other potential uses. Corner of Scoville & Adams. 708-848-5460

Find your new apartment this Saturday from 10 am – 4pm at 35 Chicago Avenue. Or call us toll free at 1-888-328-8457 for an appointment.

ELECTRICAL

ELECTRICAL HANDYMAN

A&A ELECTRIC

Let an American Veteran do your work

We fix any electrical problem and do small jobs Fast Emergency Service | Residential • Commercial • Industrial Ceiling Free Home Evaluations | Lic. • Bonded • Ins. • Low Rates • Free Est. Fans Home Re-wiring • New Plugs & Switches Added Installed New circuit breaker boxes • Code violations corrected Serv. upgrades,100-200 amp • Garage & A/C lines installed

708-409-0988 • 708-738-3848

MAYWOOD COUNTRY CHURCH Lovely, old fashioned country church in Maywood, on corner of Fifth and Erie is looking for a roommate or tenant. We are willing to work out a flexible arrangement if you are an appropriate tenant. Various size spaces. Call 708 344-6150, leave a message.

SPACE FOR RENT OAK PARK SPACE Suitable for not-for-profit. Varied uses possible such as school, office spaces, community services center, clinic, etc. Please call 312-810-5948

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT * RIVER FOREST * 7777 Lake St.

- 3 & 4 room suites

7756 Madison St.

- Store: 926 sq. ft. - Medical Office Suite, 2800 sq. ft.

* OAK PARK *

6955-6957 North Ave.

- 1, 2 & 3 room office suites

6142-44 Roosevelt Rd. - 5 room office suite

Strand & Browne 708/488-0011

ITEMS FOR SALE BLUE ZUCA Blue Zuca with snow flakes,great condition,paid $178.00 in 2012, asking $50.00 Staking Jacket with paints. $50.00. please call 708-763-0710 or email timrule19@ yahoo.com

WANTED TO BUY

FOREST PARK CONDO Spacious 3 bedroom 2 bath condo for rent. Hardwood flooring living room/dining room. Freshly painted. 1 assigned parking space. Heat included. $1450 Contact (630)6972994 or (708)526-3815. OAK PARK FOREST PARK Studio, 1, and 2 BDRM. Heated. Dining room. Parking available. Walk to El. $625-$1250.

CHURCH FOR RENT

WANTED MILITARY ITEMS: Helmets, medals, patches, uniforms, weapons, flags, photos, paperwork, Also toy soldiers-lead plastic-other misc. toys. Call Uncle Gary 708-522-3400

FURNITURE TRADITIONAL DINING ROOM Table with 3 leaves & 6 chairs. Mahogany finish. Neutral upholstery on chairs. Very good condition. $400. Contact aytenai@aol.com

Sr. Discounts • 30 Yrs. Exp | Servicing Oak Park and all surrounding suburbs

CLEANING

HANDYMAN

Pam’s A+ Cleaning Service

CURT'S HANDYMAN SERVICE

A cleaner day is just a phone call away. For a detailed cleaning please call 708-937-9110

ELECTRICAL               Electricians serving the greater Oak Park area. Licensed, Bonded & Insured–Reasonable Pricing & Free Estimates. Kinetic’s proud to say you have never experienced service like this! 15 years experience and dedication. No job too big or small!

(708) 639-5271

KLIS FLOORING INC.

New hardwood flooring installation & pergo. Sanding, re-finishing, staining. Low prices, insured. Call: 773-671-4996 www.klisflooring.com

GARAGE/GARAGE DOOR Our 70th Year

Garage Doors &

Electric Door Openers

Sales & Service

(708) 652-9415 www.forestdoor.com

FREE ESTIMATES Excellent References No Job Too Small

708-488-9411

%,%#42)#!, (!.$9-!.3%26)#%3 !LL4YPESOF(OME2EPAIRS 2EPAIRS)NSTALLATIONS 0ROFESSIONAL1UALITY7ORK !T2EASONABLE0RICES 0ROMPT3ERVICE 3MALL*OBSA3PECIALTY

  

FLOORS

Free Estimates

Drywall Repair • Painting Fans Installed • Carpentry Trim Gutter Cleaning • Window Repair

+$1'<0$1 &2175$&725

:HGRTXDOLW\ZRUNDW DIIRUGDEOHSULFHV

:D\QH 

Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Repair Drywall H Painting H Tile Plumbing H Electric H Floors Windows H Doors H Siding Ask Us What We Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Do

708-296-2060 HAULING

BASEMENT CLEANING Appliances & Furniture Removal Pickup & Delivery. 708-848-9404

You have jobs. We have readers! Find the best employees with Wednesday Classified! Call 708-613-3342


22

The Landmark, January 11, 2017

RBLANDMARK.COM

CLASSIFIED HEATING/AIR CONDITIONING HEATING AND APPLIANCE EXPERT

Ask for Barry @

WINDOWS BROKEN SASH CORDS? CALL THE WINDOW MAN!

708-785-2619 or 773-585-5000

FAST RELIABLE SERVICE

(708) 452-8929

Licensed

Insured

Ralph Grande Elmwood Park 708-452-8929

Exterior and Interior All Work Guaranteed 35 Years Experience Call 708-567-4680

CLASSIC PAINTING

Fast & Neat Painting/Taping/Plaster Repair Low Cost

708.749.0011

Serving Oak Park, River Forest, Forest Park & Riverside Since 1974

RELIGION NEED A RESTART? Christmas and the New Year are perfect opportunities for each of us to jump start our year and recalibrate our priorities and relationships. Are you ready for a restart? A new beginning? Your time is now! Join us Sundays @ 11:30am New Life Community Church 3801 Madison in Brookfield newlifechicago.org/brookfield (meeting at Faith Lutheran Church)

PLASTERINGâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; STUCCOING Small & big work. Free estimates. Complete Plaster, Stucco & Re-Coating Services Work Guaranteed

Licensed, Bonded, Insured, & EPA Certified Expert craftsmanship for over 50 years

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Official notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at Oak Park Elementary School District 97 Administration Buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;260 Madison; Oak Park, IL 60301 until 1:30 p.m. local time on January 11, 2017, for the following:

Chertkow and Chertkow (22019) Attorneys for Petitioner 1525 East 53rd Street Chicago, Illinois 60615

OAK PARK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT 97 LIFE SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS & RENOVATIONS BIDS WILL BE PUBLICLY OPENED AT 2:00 PM ON JANUARY 11, 2017 AT THE OAK PARK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT 97 ADMINISTRATION OFFICEâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;260 MADISON STREETâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;OAK PARK, IL 60302. Scope of work for Life Safety Improvements includes, but is not limited to: site concrete, masonry repairs, roofing, carpentry, doors and hardware, drywall, acoustical ceiling grid and tile, painting, HVAC, plumbing and electrical. All available bid documents will be available December 21st and may be purchased from BEST Imaging Solutions (312-357-9050)â&#x20AC;&#x201C;55 E. Monroe St.; Chicago, IL 60601. Plans are available for viewing/ download at Bulley & Andrews FTP Site. https://ftp.bulley.com username: D97LifeSafety password: bulley1891 Bid security in the form of a bid bond, certified check or cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s check in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the Base Bid shall be submitted with the bid. Certificate of Insurance may be required from the successful Bidder. Oak Park Elementary School District 97 reserves the right to reject any and all bids or parts thereof, to waive any irregularities or informalities in bidding procedures, and to award the contract in a manner best serving the interest of the Owner.

McNulty Plastering & Stucco Co. 708/386-2951 t ANYTIME

RBLandmark.com â&#x20AC;˘ PublicNoticeIllinois.com

630.687.3000

FREE SERVICE CALL WITH REPAIR AND SENIOR/VETERAN DISCOUNT.

ALEX

Public Notice: Your right to know

LBDI, INC.

Home Maintenance Services, Residential & Commercial Remodeling

Lic/Bonded 25 yrs experience

PAINTING & DECORATING

Let the sun shine in...

REMODELING HOME MAINTENANCE SERVICES

Furnaces, Boilers and Space Heaters Refrigerators Ranges â&#x20AC;˘ Ovens Washer â&#x20AC;˘ Dryers Rodding Sewers

PAINTING & DECORATING

(708) 613-3333 â&#x20AC;˘ FAX: (708) 524-0447 â&#x20AC;˘ E-MAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@RBLANDMARK.COM

Lost & Found and To Be Given Away ads run free in Wednesday Classified. To place your ad, call 708-613-3342

PLUMBING

PLUMBING

A-All American

Plumbing & Sewer Service FREE ESTIMATES Service in 1 Hour in Most Cases

All Work Guaranteed Lowest Prices Guaranteed FREE Video Inspection with Sewer Rodding /P+PC5PP-BSHFt/P+PC5PP4NBMM Family Owned & Operated

t Lic. #0967

ATTENTION! HOME IMPROVEMENT PROS!

Advertise your home improvement business here. Call 708/613-3342

All Bidders must comply with applicable Illinois Law requiring the payment of prevailing wages to all laborers, workman and mechanics working on public funded projects. If during the time period of work, these rates change, the contractor shall be responsible for additional costs without any change to the contract amount. The proposed contract is subject to the requirements of the Equal Employment Practices Commission and the Illinois Human Rights Act (IHA) Illinois Revised Statute, Ch. 69, Par. 1-101, et. seq. Offers may not be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after closing date. Any Bid submitted unsealed, unsigned, fax transmissions or received subsequent to the aforementioned date and time, may be disqualified and returned to the bidder. The Oak Park School District 97 reserves the right to reject any and all bids or parts thereof, to waive any irregularities or informalities in bid procedures and to award the contract in a manner best serving the interest of The Oak Park School District. Dated: 12/21/16 Jason Stonchus Bulley & Andrews, LLC Published in Wednesday Journal 12/21, 12/28/2016, 1/4, 1/11/2017

STATE OF ILLINOIS) COUNTY OF COOK )ss Circuit Court of Cook County, County Department, Domestic Relations Division. In re the marriage of Maria Adela Ruiz, Petitioner and Alejandro Reyes, Respondent, Case No. 2016D-011584. The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you, the above named Respondent, that a Petition has been filed in the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, by the Petitioner, for Dissolution of Marriage and for other relief; and that said suit is now pending. Now, therefore, unless you, the said Respondent, file your response to said Petition or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, Room 802, Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, in the City of Chicago, Illinois, on or before January 30, 2017, default may be entered against you at any time after that day, and a judgment for Dissolution of Marriage entered in accordance with the prayer of said Petition. DOROTHY A. BROWN, Clerk. Published in Wednesday Journal 12/28/2016, 1/4, 1/11/2017

PUBLIC NOTICE RIVER FOREST PARK DISTRICT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS The River Forest Park District invites qualified Independent Certified Public Accountants licensed in the State of Illinois to submit proposals for auditing services for fiscal years ending April 30, 2017 through 2019, in accordance with the following requirements and specifications. The continuation of the contract after each year is solely at the discretion of the District. There is no expressed or implied obligation for the District to reimburse responding firms for any expenses incurred in preparing proposals in response to this request. The District reserves the right to reject any and all proposals and/ or waive minor technicalities/irregularities. To be considered, please submit the proposal no later than 4:00 p.m. on February 8, 2017, to: Mary Dominguez, Business Manager River Forest Park District 401 Thatcher Avenue River Forest, Illinois 60305 mdominguez@rfparks.com Published in Wednesday Journal 1/11/2017

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

Public Notice Pursuant to 65 ILCS 5/11-74.3-2(b)

LEGAL NOTICE THE VILLAGE OF OAK PARK WILL RECEIVE SEALED PROPOSALS AT THE PUBLIC WORKS SERVICE CENTER, 201 SOUTH BOULEVARD, OAK PARK, ILLINOIS 60302, UNTIL 3:00 P.M. ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2017 FOR THE FOLLOWING PROPOSAL # 17-101 2017 COMPREHENSIVE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE PROPOSAL FORMS MAY BE OBTAINED AT HTTP:// WWW.OAK-PARK.US/YOURG O V E R N M E N T / B U D G E TPURCHASING/REQUESTSPROPOSALS OR FROM THE PUBLIC WORKS CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER BY CALLING 708-358-5700 OR BY STOPPING BY THE OFFICE LOCATED AT 201 SOUTH BOULEVARD, OAK PARK, ILLINOIS BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 7:30 A.M. AND 4:00 P.M. THE VILLAGE OF OAK PARK RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ISSUE PROPOSAL DOCUMENTS AND SPECIFICATIONS ONLY TO THOSE VENDORS DEEMED QUALIFIED. NO PROPOSAL DOCUMENTS WILL BE ISSUED AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE WORKING DAY PRECEDING THE DATE OF PROPOSAL OPENING. A MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING SHALL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 17TH AT 10 A.M. AT THE PUBLIC WORKS CENTER, 201 SOUTH BOULEVARD, OAK PARK, ILLINOIS 60302. PROPOSALS RECEIVED FROM BIDDERS WHO DO NOT SEND A REPRESENTATIVE TO THE PRE-BID MEETING SHALL NOT BE CONSIDERED. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL ROB SPROULE AT 708.358.5700. THE VILLAGE OF OAK PARK Published in Wednesday Journal 1/11/2017

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Act in relation to the use of an Assumed Business Name in the conduct or transaction of Business in the State,â&#x20AC;? as amended, that a certification was registered by the undersigned with the County Clerk of Cook County. PURRPUSS with the business located at: 7307 ROOSEVELT RD, FOREST PARK, IL 60130. The true and real full name(s) and residence address of the owner(s)/partner(s) is: JENNIFER LAWLOR 7307 ROOSEVELT RD FOREST PARK, IL 60130 Published in Wednesday Journal 1/11, 1/18, 1/25/2016

Starting a new business in 2017? Call the experts before you place your legal ad. Publish Your Assumed Name Legal Notice here! Call 708/613-3342 to advertise.

The corporate authorities of the Village of Riverside (the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Villageâ&#x20AC;?) will hold a public hearing on February 2, 2017 at 7:00 p.m., at Riverside Township Hall, 27 Riverside Road, Riverside, Illinois (the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hearingâ&#x20AC;?), to consider whether to designate the following described property (the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Proposed Harlem Avenue Business Districtâ&#x20AC;?) as a business district as set forth in the Illinois Business District Development and Redevelopment Law, 65 ILCS 5/11-74.3-1, et seq. (the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lawâ&#x20AC;?), and whether to approve a business district plan for the Proposed Harlem Avenue Business District as set forth in the Law: THAT PART OF THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 39 NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS, BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF SAID EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25 AND THE EASTERLY EXTENSION OF THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF BERKLEY ROAD (a.k.a. BERKELEY ROAD); THENCE SOUTH ALONG SAID EAST LINE TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH THE EASTERLY EXTENSION OF THE SOUTH LINE OF A 16-FOOT-WIDE ALLEY LYING SOUTHEASTERLY OF LONGCOMMON ROAD; THENCE WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY EXTENSION AND SAID SOUTH LINE OF THE 16-FOOTWIDE ALLEY TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTHEASTERLY EXTENSION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF LOT 1 IN KIRCHMAN AND JEDLANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RIVERSIDE PARKWAY AND HARLEM AVENUE SUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 2 AND ALL OF LOTS 3 AND 4 IN CIRCUIT COURT PARTITION BEING A SUBDIVISION IN SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY EXTENSION, THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF LOT 1 AND THE NORTHWESTERLY EXTENSION THEREOF TO A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF SAID LONGCOMMON ROAD; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF A 16-FOOT-WIDE ALLEY LYING WEST OF HARLEM AVENUE; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY AND NORTHERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE OF THE 16-FOOTWIDE ALLEY AND ITS NORTHERLY EXTENSION THEREOF TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF AFORESAID BERKLEY ROAD (a.k.a. BERKELEY ROAD); THENCE EAST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF BERKLEY ROAD (a.k.a. BERKELEY ROAD) TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, ALL IN COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PROPERTY IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS (PINS): 15-25-407-013-0000 15-25-407-014-0000 15-25-407-015-0000 15-25-407-016-0000 15-25-407-017-0000

15-25-407-018-0000 15-25-407-019-0000 15-25-407-020-0000 15-25-413-013-0000 COMMON ADDRESSES: 2704 S HARLEM; 2710 S HARLEM; 27202728 S HARLEM & 539 LONGCOMMON STREET LOCATION: GENERALLY LOCATED ON THE WEST SIDE OF HARLEM AVENUE FROM BERKLEY ROAD ON THE NORTH TO THE ALLEY APPROXIMATELY 150 FT SOUTH OF LONGCOMMON ROAD TO THE SOUTH IN RIVERSIDE, COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS, AS MORE FULLY DEPICTED IN THE MAP ATTACHED TO THE BUSINESS DISTRICT PLAN ON FILE WITH THE VILLAGE FOR REVIEW AT VILLAGE OFFICES, 27 RIVERSIDE ROAD, RIVERSIDE, ILLINOIS. All interested persons will be given an opportunity to be heard at the Hearing. The business district plan for the Proposed Harlem Avenue Business District under consideration at the Hearing provides, generally, that the Village may provide or enter into an agreement with developers or business owners and tenants to provide certain public and private improvements in the Proposed Harlem Avenue Business District to enhance the immediate area and to serve the needs of development and the interests of the Village and its residents. The Village intends to develop the Proposed Harlem Business District to further contribute to the long-term economic health and vitality of the Village. Proposed Village projects in the Proposed Harlem Avenue Business District may include but shall not necessarily be limited to: improvement of public utilities including water mains, sewer related system improvements and storm water retention; property acquisition by contract or eminent domain; environmental remediation and site preparation; rehabilitation of building exterior and interior components; improvement of roadways, alleyways and sidewalks; beautification and installation of identification markers, landscaping/ streetscaping; and relocation and/ or extension of utilities. A copy of the business district plan under consideration for the Proposed Harlem Avenue Business District is available at Riverside Township Hall, 27 Riverside Rd, Riverside, Illinois, for review. Any party interested in submitting an alternative proposal or bid for any proposed conveyance, lease, mortgage, or other disposition by the Village of Riverside of land or rights in land owned by the Village and located within the Proposed Harlem Avenue Business District, should contact Jessica Frances, Village Manager, at (708) 447-2700. Any alternative proposals or bids must be addressed to and submitted to Jessica Frances, Village Manager, at the above-listed Village Hall address, no later than Friday before the Hearing, January 27, 2017, at 4:00 p.m. Village of Riverside Jessica Frances Village Manager

Published in Landmark 12/28/2016, 1/4/2017, 1/11/2017


The Landmark, January 11, 2017

RBLANDMARK.COM

CLASSIFIED

23

(708) 613-3333 • FAX: (708) 524-0447 • E-MAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@RBLANDMARK.COM

Let the sun shine in...

Public Notice: Your right to know In print • Online • Available to you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year RBLandmark.com • PublicNoticeIllinois.com PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

Oak Park River Forest High School District 200 is soliciting proposals to provide Benefit Consultant/Broker Services for its employee benefit plans. Benefit plans include group health insurance, group life, dental, Section 125 flexible spending accounts (FSA), HRA VEBA and other plans as they are added or developed.

Neighborhood Group Meeting for the redevelopment of 1000 Lake Street in Downtown Oak Park. Meeting will be held between 6:00PM 7:00PM on January 30th at the 19th Century Club Building located at 178 Forest Avenue, Oak Park, IL 60301. Neighboring residents and business owners are invited to attend.

Oak Park River Forest District 200 currently offers 4 medical plan options. Employee contributions are a percentage of premium. The self-insured/cost plus health plans, currently administered through Blue Cross Blue Shield, consists of 1 PPO plans, two HMO plans and a HDHP plan. District offers a self-insured dental administered by Delta Dental. The basic life, AD&D and supplemental life plan are insured through MetLife. All full-time employees are eligible for medical benefits. All insurance plans are due for renewal on January 1st of each year and the district typically starts the open enrollment process in November We look forward to your participation in this process. Please contact Ron Johnson at rjohnson@oprfhs.org for RFP documents. Published in Wednesday Journal 1/11/2017

LEGAL NOTICE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trustees of the Village of Brookfield will hold a public hearing at 6:15 P.M. on January 23, 2017 at the Edward Barcal Hall in the Municipal Building of the Village of Brookfield, 8820 Brookfield Avenue, Brookfield, Illinois 60513 on the Village’s proposed appropriation ordinance, which will serve as the basis for the Village’s 2017 Annual Appropriation Ordinance. The proposed appropriation ordinance will be on file in the Village Clerk’s Office for at least ten (10) days prior to January 23, 2017 and copies thereof will be conveniently available for public examination and copying. Brigid Weber, Village Clerk Published in Landmark 1/11/17

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to “An Act in relation to the use of an Assumed Business Name in the conduct or transaction of Business in the State,” as amended, that a certification was registered by the undersigned with the County Clerk of Cook County. Registration Number D17149206 on January 6, 2017. Under the Assumed Business Name of TIME TO TALK with the business located at: 4234 ARTHUR AVENUE, BROOKFIELD, IL 60513. The true and real full name(s) and residence address of the owner(s)/ partner(s) is: JENNIFER LILL MURFF 4234 ARTHUR AVENUE BROOKFIELD, IL 60513. Published in RB Landmark 1/11/2017

Published in Wednesday Journal 1/11/17

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT– CHANCERY DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.MILDRED L. ERAMES, PRIORY POINTE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, BENEFICIAL FINANCIAL 1 INC., MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants 15 CH 008268 7221 W. DIVISION STREET UNIT #3 RIVER FOREST, IL 60305 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on January 22, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 26, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive–24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7221 W. DIVISION STREET UNIT #3, RIVER FOREST, IL 60305 Property Index No. 15-01-403-0471003. The real estate is improved with a condo/townhouse. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/ 9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-15-08163. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@ il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-15-08163 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 15 CH 008268 TJSC#: 36-14645 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I711460

AVENUE, OAK PARK, IL 60304 Property Index No. 16-17-331-0070000. The real estate is improved with a yellow brick two story single family home with a two car detached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR

30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (dr iver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service. atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. McCalla Raymer Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number 7999. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 4765500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. 7999 Attorney Code. 60489 Case Number: 10 CH 42289 TJSC#: 3614560 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I711510

15 CH 10122 1020 Washington Blvd. Unit 1D Oak Park, IL 60302 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 19, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 14, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive–24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 1020 Washington Blvd. Unit 1D, Oak Park, IL 60302 Property Index No. 16-07-316-054-1004. The real estate is improved with a residential condominium. The judgment amount was $160,967.07. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this prop-

erty is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719 If the sale is not confirmed for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the purchase price paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Fax #: (217) 4221754 CookPleadings@hsbattys. com Attorney Code. 40387 Case Number: 15 CH 10122 TJSC#: 3614173 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I710654

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT–CHANCERY DIVISION SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, -v.GREGORY GARMON Defendants 10 CH 42289 1170 SOUTH HUMPHREY AVENUE OAK PARK, IL 60304 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 19, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on February 7, 2017, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive–24th Floor, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 1170 SOUTH HUMPHREY

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT–CHANCERY DIVISION BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICES, LLC Plaintiff, -v.BEVERLY D. BELLAMY AKA BEVERLY BELLAMY AKA BEVERLY D. HADDEN AKA BEVERLY HADDEN AKA BEVERLY D. PALMER AKA BEVERLY PALMER AKA BEVERLY D. WALLACE AKA BEVERLY WALLACE, CHARLES E. BELLAMY AKA CHARLES EDWARD BELLAMY AKA CHARLES BELLAMY, EASY STREET CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendants

MORTGAGE DIRECTORY

MORTGAGE RATE DIRECTORY LENDER COMMUNITY BANK OF OAK PARK - RIVER FOREST

(708) 660-7006 1001 Lake St., Oak Park IL 60301 www.cboprf.com

AMOUNT

RATE/YR

80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80%

4.125% / 30 yr. fixed 4.000% / 20 yr. fixed 3.375% / 15 yr. fixed 3.750% / 5 yr. ARM 3.875% / 7 yr. ARM 4.000% / 10 yr. ARM

POINTS/ APP. FEE 0%/$550 0%/$550 0%/$550 0%/$550 0%/$550 0%/$550

A.P.R.

4.195% 4.096% 3.497% 3.979% 4.010% 4.022%

· Approved IHDA Mortgage Program Lender · Financing available up to 97% LTV Construction Loans and Home Equity Lines of Credit available – call for terms.

Mortgage rates are accurate as of Monday afternoon. Due to the fluctuation of mortgage rates, the rates may vary before publication. Contact your mortgage lender for complete details. Mortgage rates vary in APR and other qualifying factors.

To Advertise your Mortgage Rates, call Mary Ellen Nelligan: 708/613-3342


24

The Landmark, January 11, 2017

Burlington realty Est. 1952

W NE

ICE PR

164 FAIRBANK RD $750,000

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325 NUTTALL $485,000

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3010 HARLEM UNIT 3 $215,000

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3224 RAYMOND $219,000 Charming Bungalow with cottage feel on large lot.

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193 E QUINCY $145,000

317 LIONEL RD $188,750

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720 JEFFERSON $489,900

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Stunning5BR,3BAVictorianintheheartofLaGrangeHistoricDistrict.

4530 HARVEY AVE $764,900

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E! IC PR YN W W NE BER

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313 BLACKHAWK RD

This 1920’s bungalow has been completely renovated and impeccably maintained. The 1st floor features an open floor plan and beautiful hardwood floors. A large light-filled living room centered around a beautiful wood burning fireplace is the perfect place to relax and spend time with family! The spacious dining room, opens to the kitchen and is ideal for entertaining. The kitchen features newer stainless steel appliances, granite counters, large pantry and plentiful cabinet space. A sunny eat-in area overlooks the backyard. Two large bedrooms and a full bath complete the first level. On the 2nd floor, you will find your gorgeous master retreat! This spacious bedroom with a master bath, has newer plush carpet, high vaulted ceiling, and a huge closet. A second large bedroom is across the hall. The basement has open space with high ceilings...ample opportunity to make a fabulous rec room. A quaint private backyard hosts a newer 2-car garage...the perfect space to enjoy the outdoors........................$469,000

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