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Vol. 102, No. 49

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REVIEW DECEMBER 4, 2019

Triton to offer free job training PAGE 4

Historical Society makes T-shirts available PAGE 8

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Looking back at the death of a charismatic activist Fred Hampton was killed a half-century ago By MICHAEL ROMAIN Staff Reporter

Fifty years ago today — Dec. 4, 1969 — Black Panther leader and Maywood native Fred Hampton was assassinated during an early-morning police raid on his apartment, located on the West Side of Chicago at 2337 W. Monroe. He was 21 years old. Around 4:30 a.m., a 14-man unit pumped nearly 100 shots into the apartment. The Panthers did not return fire. The evidence gathered in the days, weeks, months and years since Hampton’s death would establish that the raid was organized as part of the FBI’s secret and illegal counterintelligence program, COINTELPRO, an initiative designed to systematically destroy just about any form of effective black political empowerment not controlled by the government. Martin Luther King Jr., for instance, was one of the program’s targets. Hampton’s death had a seismic effect on Chicago’s political scene. Edward V. Hanrahan, the Cook County State’s Attorney who authorized the raid and who, afterward,

ALEX ROGALS/Staff Photographer

GIVING BACK: Emily Lyons helps fill boxes during the Community Center’s annual Thanksgiving meal delivery on

Nov. 27. Read the article on page 8.

Peace Corners provide relaxation for students

Trauma affects a large number of children By MARIA MAXHAM Staff Reporter

See HAMPTON on page 9

A good neighbor has your back.

“These are all our children. We will profit by, or pay for, whatever they become.” That’s a quote from James Baldwin, and it’s the introduction that Field Stevenson Principal Tiffany Brunson used in her presentation about children and trauma. A large number of students at Field Ste-

venson School – 65 out of approximately 150 – are affected by trauma, according to Brunson. In a presentation entitled “Fostering Resilient Learners,” Brunson spoke about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), the impact they have on children,

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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019 FPSD91 Making Spirits Bright ad (FPR)

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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

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Going through the galaxy with grandkids

great thing about being a grandparent is getting a do-over raising kids. We know what didn’t work when we were raising our kids, so we don’t repeat the same mistakes with the grandkids. Unless you’re a stubborn guy like me. I had tried to hook my kids on classical music, the way my parents had hooked me. I took them to Chicago Symphony Orchestra concerts. They liked going downtown and dining at fine restaurants. They just didn’t like the concert part. This didn’t stop me from taking my 8-year-old grandson, Troy, to a CSO concert. They were playing the perfect piece of music for Troy, The Planets. Troy owned a telescope and liked looking at pictures of outer space. He also liked the music from “Star Wars,” which sounds a lot like The Planets. However, by the time the concert date came, Troy had moved on from astronomy to focusing on his future career as an NFL wide receiver. He had also switched from “Star Wars” music to Kanye West I picked him up on the big night and took him out for dinner. Fine dining wasn’t on the menu because Troy’s favorite entrees are chicken nuggets and macaroni and cheese. Troy showed excellent manners by

not bringing his iPad into the restaurant. After we ate, we rushed to the concert. When I read the program, I saw they weren’t playing The Planets till the second half of the two-hour concert. I broke the news to Troy that there was going to be opera before The Planets. He looked up at me wide-eyed and asked, “What’s opera?” After the soprano in the sparkly dress finished singing, Troy, the music critic said, “That lady sings louder than my music teacher!” I became concerned about Troy having the stamina to visit all eight planets. He had awakened at “6:32” and finished an entire day of second Grade, which included three recesses. Troy is a trouper, though, and was ready for the hour-long piece. On our journey through the solar system, our first stop was “Mars.” The war-like music sounded a lot like Darth Vader’s theme music. “Venus, the Bringer of Peace” was just the opposite. Countdowns are important to astronauts. So, for Troy’s benefit, I started counting down the planets on my fingers. We visited “Mercury” another peaceful planet, before landing on Jupiter, a very jolly planet. As we explored deeper into space, the music became more mysterious. By the time we reached “Neptune” the music was

JOHN RICE

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F O R E S T PA R K

REVIEW

downright mystical, with an invisible choir singing a wordless song. When the piece ended, the audience rose and gave the CSO a long standing ovation. Like many space travelers before him, Troy was just thankful to be back on Earth. “I survived!” he declared with relief. I give Troy a lot of credit. He was the youngest member of the audience by about four years. I decided to wait a few years before inviting him to another concert. It’s OK that our kids rejected going to classical music concerts because they embraced other traditions we introduced. They make fresh-baked cinnamon rolls for birthdays, they take first-day-of-school photos next to a front-yard tree, and they say a little prayer before meals. They’ve also introduced their own traditions, like the family soup party on Halloween. It does my heart good to see our grandkids continue family traditions, like going to the Holiday Walk. Our grandsons love coming to Madison Street for this family-friendly event: the live store windows, the reindeer and Santa riding a fire truck. If Troy is interested, there’s even some classical music. ■ John Rice is a columnist/private detective, who has seen his business and family thrive in Forest Park. He thoroughly enjoys life in the village and still gets a thrill smelling Red Hots, watching softball and strolling through cemeteries. Jrice1038@aol.com

Editorial Design Manager Claire Innes Editorial Designers Mark Moroney Ad Design Manager Andrew Mead Ad Designers Debbie Becker Staff Photographer Alex Rogals Advertising Manager Dawn Ferencak Ad Sales Marc Stopeck Inside Sales Mary Ellen Nelligan Client Engagement Natalie Johnson Circulation Manager Jill Wagner Distribution Coordinator Wakeelah Cocroft-Aldridge Front Desk Carolyn Henning, Maria Murzyn Chairman Emeritus Robert K. Downs Publisher Dan Haley Associate Publisher Dawn Ferencak Business Manager Joyce Minich

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19,000 Torpedoes XXXX

Remember Bishop’s Chili, a successful Chicago restaurant opened by Mary “Ma” Bishop in the 1920’s on 18th and Damon? Her son, George branched off and continued the family business by opening a second location to the west in Forest Park at the intersection of Roosevelt and Elgin in the 1950’s. Joe Janouch, Vice President of Bishop’s was interviewed in 1992 and said, “I think some of our success comes from the fact that we’ve kept this a family business and we’ve stuck to one recipe all these years.” Janouch was careful not to reveal the secret mixture that gave Bishop’s chili its spicy kick. He only shared that the secret recipe included meat, beans, onions and spices. The chili does not include tomato paste, flour or brown sugar. This favorite restaurant on the south end of town expanded west again in 1970’s to Westmont. In the early 1990s, Bishop’s Chili, after 36 years in Forest Park, was demolished to make way for Walgreens, now at the corner of Roosevelt and Harlem, which fills the corner all the way to Elgin.

Contributing Reporters Tom Holmes, John Rice, Bob Skolnik, Jackie Glosniak, Robert J. Lifka Columnists Alan Brouilette, Jill Wagner, Tom Holmes, John Rice, Senior Editor Bob Uphues Editor Maria Maxham IT Manager/Web Developer Mike Risher

The attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 led to the United States’ entry into World War II and Forest Park’s industrial military aid. A year earlier the Secretary of the Navy selected the 80-acre, former Harlem Racetrack and Harlem Golf Course on Roosevelt Road and Desplaines Avenue for production of ordnance materials for the National Defense. The American Can Company was selected for the construction and management of a new Naval Ordnance Plant, which opened only eight months later, with a large reception on October 29, 1942. In peak production, the plant manufactured 400 torpedoes a month. The total number of people working in the plant swelled to over 6,000 personnel by late 1943 until late 1944. In 1945, the plant was converted from a contractor-operated to a Navy-operated activity but continued to produce torpedoes and related items. In 1970, the Defense Department decided to close the Forest Park plant. During the nearly 30 years of service to the Department of the Navy and Department of Defense, the Naval Ordnance Station in Forest Park produced approximately 19,000 torpedoes and overhauled, converted and or modernized several thousands of torpedoes and other items of ordnance material.

Jill Wagner

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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

D209 responds to Appellate Court’s Restore decision D209 calls court decision ‘wrong’ and anticipates Supreme Court review

Based on the agreement, Restore performed “emergency mitigation and repairs” valued at $6.9 million, with total work valued at $7.3 million. By February 2015, Legat, the district’s architectural firm, had certified that Restore had completed $5.8 million worth of work, which was paid through the district’s By MICHAEL ROMAIN Staff Reporter insurance policy. Forest Park Review previously reported Proviso Township High Schools District 209 that by 2015, the board had stopped paying on officials recently issued a response to an ar- the total due and owed $1.4 million. The D209 ticle published last week about a court ruling school board has argued that they don’t have related to a former vendor with the district. to pay the remainder, because the contract The Forest Park Review previously report- was never valid in the first place. ed that an Illinois Appellate Court ruled earIn her statement Moreno explained that lier this year that the district has to pay the while Restore claims that it’s owed an addiroughly $1.4 million it owes Restore Constructional $1.4 million, “District 209’s insurance tion Company for emergency carrier has already concluded that repairs that took place after a Restore was paid full value for the fire broke out at Proviso East work and is not entitled to any monHigh School in 2014. ey. … It must be understood and The appellate court’s decision clear that the Board never stopped reversed a 2017 decision by the paying anything for the fire loss. Circuit Court of Cook County, It never made any payments for which dismissed a lawsuit Rethe fire loss since the matter was store had filed in order to secure the balance. covered by the District’s insurance According to a statement ispolicy.” sued by Cynthia Moreno, D209’s As this paper previously recommunications director, the ported, Restore filed a lawsuit in appellate court ruling did not Circuit Court on October 2015, but order D209 to pay anything that lawsuit was dismissed a year “nor could it, based upon the later. The company then appealed way that the case was presented the decision. CYNTHIA MORENO to it.” According to a summary of the Moreno stated the “factual D209 communications director case by attorneys with the labor disputes involved in the litilaw firm Franczek P.C., which gation, including if money is doesn’t represent either side, Reowed, were never addressed store “sought payment for what it by the parties because the Cirwas owed based on equitable princuit Court determined that ciples, not the existence of a valid Restore’s case was legally deficient. If the matter is eventually remanded to contract. The Appellate Court held that even the Circuit Court, then the Circuit Court will though there was no valid contract in place, it determine if Restore is entitled to any more would be unjust to allow the school district to money and, if so, how much. This process has retain the company’s services without paying not occurred.” the reasonable value for them. Thus, a conThe two-alarm fire on May 10, 2014 broke tract implied in law could be enforced against out in the second-floor social room at the high the school district.” school, with smoke spreading to the thirdFranzcek P.C. attorneys stated on Nov. 5 floor chemistry labs. Roughly two weeks later, that the Illinois Supreme Court “has agreed on May 22, former D209 Supt. Nettie Collins- to review the case, so it remains to be seen if Hart signed two contracts on behalf of the the decision will stand,” adding that the state district — one with “Restore Restoration to Supreme Court’s decision could affect other mitigate and remediate fire damage and the districts across Illinois that have “avoided other with Restore Construction to repair the liability for work performed by construction fire-damaged school. The agreement did not companies under invalid contracts.” go through the typical competitive bidding Moreno said that “while the District reprocess,” according to the appellate court spects the decision of the Illinois Appellate opinion. Court, it believes that it was wrong which is On Aug. 12, 2014, former D209 school board why it decided to ask the Supreme Court to president Dan Adams signed an amended agreement with Restore Construction for review the case,” adding that the high court’s emergency repairs, but that amended agree- discretionary review is allowed “in less than ment was never presented to the full school 2% of civil cases filed in Illinois Supreme board for approval and a vote. Court.”

“It must be understood and clear that the Board never stopped paying anything for the fire loss.”

Triton to offer free job training Program designed to increase minority plumbers, carpenters, other skilled workers By MICHAEL ROMAIN Staff Reporter

A new career training program at Triton College will give Fprest Park community members the opportunity to earn a professional certificate from the college at no cost to them, thanks to a $1 million grant the college received a few months ago that’s designed to boost the number of minorities who are represented in high-demand fields. The free certificate program will last for nine months and offer between 12 and 18 credit hours in a variety of areas, including carpentry, plumbing, welding, medical billing and automotive engine repair. Most of the programs will take place during the evening to accommodate adult learners. The program is open to anyone with at least a high school diploma, or the equivalent, living in Bellwood, Broadview, Forest Park, Hillside, Maywood, Oak Park, Rosemont and Stone Park. Audrey Jonas, Triton’s director of public affairs and community relations, said during a Nov. 25 regular meeting of the Maywood Board of Trustees that the Workforce Equity Initiative Grant was made possible through the Illinois Community College Board and sponsored by the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus. The caucus was responsible for appropriating a total of $18.7 million in fiscal year 2020 for the equity grants. All 48 community colleges in Illinois were encouraged to apply. The grant is designed to increase the numbers of minorities, particularly African Americans, in “in-demand, well-paying

jobs in a variety of fields,” Jonas said. According to the Illinois Community College Underrepresented Report, which evaluates the degree of access to educational opportunities and diversity among community colleges in the state, African Americans accounted for only 12 percent of Career and Technical Education (CTE) program graduates in the state in fiscal year 2017. Minorities, in general, accounted for 34 percent of CTE program graduates that fiscal year. “This is not an associate degree, but job training,” Jonas said. “Our goal is to close the skills gap in communities of need in the local workforce.” The Black Caucus does have one major requirement for community colleges that take the equity grant money — at least 60 percent of the program participants have to be African American. “They want to make sure that this job training goes toward African Americans in our community district,” Jonas said. The program starts Jan. 21, 2020, she said, adding that the “idea is to have students graduated by the end of the year in 2020.” There are roughly 160 seats that will be available in the program, Jonas said. Jamila Thomas, a Maywood native who is the founder of Community Support Alliance, a Hillside-based nonprofit that’s focused on nonprofit development, said that she agreed to host an informational meeting at her offices for the grant program because she wants to ensure that as many people in her hometown take advantage of the opportunity. “Anything I can do to help and give back to the community I came from, that’s what I will do,” Thomas said. The informational session will take place at 6:30 p.m., Monday, Dec. 9, at 4415 Harrison St. (suite 303) in Hillside.


Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

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C R I M E

Dog nabbed on CTA Blue Line while owner naps A dog named Sweetie was stolen from a man in a wheelchair while he slept on the CTA Blue Line train on Nov. 26 at 4:45 a.m. Sweetie, a fawn-colored, 12-year-old pug, was leashed to the wheelchair, but the leash was cut and the dog taken. Sweetie was wearing a red sweater with white reindeer on it

Gillette Razor Blades and Crest Whitening Strips Two men stole $1,284 in Gillette Razor Blades and Crest Whitening Strips from Walgreens on Nov. 26 at 12:20 p.m. After the theft, the criminals went into nearby Wing Stop and asked for empty bags, which they took outside and began to fill with inventory from their pockets. It was observed by a witness that one of the men had a hammer in his pocket. When the police arrived, they found a hammer and screwdriver in the jacket pocket of one of the two men. The Wing Stop bags were filled with the packaged razor blades and dental care items with Walgreens stickers on them. When the officers reviewed Walgreen’s security footage, they witnessed one of the perpetrators prying open displays at the store and putting items into his jacket and shirt. Felony

charges were approved against both men.

82 MPH on Roosevelt Road An older model blue Pontiac minivan, reported as stolen from Chicago, led Forest Park police on a wild chase on Nov. 27 around 12:22 a.m. Initially, the reporting officer activated his emergency lights and curbed the vehicle at 1200 Desplaines Ave. But when he exited his patrol car, the suspect sped away quickly, performed a U-turn and traveled eastbound on Roosevelt Road, running a red light in the process. The officer realized the vehicle met the description of one used in a burglary at Walmart the previous day, and that there were two

male subjects in it, the same as reported in the previous day’s burglary. The minivan reached 82 MPH and drove in the westbound lane on Roosevelt Road while traveling east. It continued northbound onto Harlem, then turned onto I-290 heading toward the lake. Officers terminated the pursuit at Austin Avenue.

Motor vehicle thefts At least five incidences of motor vehicle thefts were reported this week: ■ A 2016 white 4-door Chevrolet sedan, from the parking lot of an apartment building on the 7300 block of Circle Avenue on Nov. 26 around 4:04 p.m.

■ A Big Tex flatbed trailer with a wooden bed used to transport cars, from a parking lot on Roosevelt Road between Nov. 26 at midnight and Nov. 29 at 9 p.m. ■ A 2002 turquoise Dodge Caravan, from the parking lot of the victim’s residence on the 7200 block of Dixon Street between Nov. 28 at 5 p.m. and Nov. 29 at 4 a.m. ■ A 2017 dark blue 4-door Toyota Corolla, from a residence on the 7400 block of Washington Street, on Nov. 27 around 2:20 p.m. The vehicle was left running and unattended with the keys in the ignition. ■ A 2008 red Chrysler Sebring convertible, from in front of a residence on the 7400 block of Washington Street, on Nov. 27 around 9:55 p.m. The owner of the vehicle was delivering a pizza to that address. He left his vehicle running and unattended with the keys inside to bring food to the first floor of an apartment building. These items were obtained from police reports filed by the Forest Park Police Department, Nov. 24-30, and represent a portion of the incidents to which police responded. Unless otherwise indicated, anybody named in these reports has only been charged with a crime. These cases have not been adjudicated.

Compiled by Maria Maxham


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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

NOTICE of Proposed Property Tax Increase for the Village of Forest Park. I. A public hearing to approve a proposed property tax levy increase for the Village of Forest Park for 2019 will be held on Monday, December 16, 2019, at 6:45 p.m., in the Council Chambers of Village Hall located in the lower level of 517 Desplaines Avenue, Forest Park, IL 60130. Any person desiring to appear at the public hearing and present testimony to the taxing district may contact Village Clerk Vanessa Moritz, 517 Desplaines Avenue, Forest Park, Illinois or at 708-615-6202. II. The corporate and special purpose property taxes extended or abated for 2018 were $7,489,578. The proposed corporate and special property taxes to be levied for 2019 are $7,836,489. This represents a 4.6% increase over the previous year. III. The property taxes extended for debt service and public building commission leases for 2018 were $-0-. The estimated property taxes to be levied for debt service and public building commission leases for 2019 are $-0-. This represents a 0% increase over the previous year. IV. The total property taxes extended or abated for 2018 were $7,489,578. The estimated total property taxes to be levied for 2019 are $7,836,489. This represents a 4.6% increase over the previous year. /s/ Vanessa Moritz Village Clerk Village of Forest Park 517 Desplaines Avenue Forest Park, IL 60130

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Volunteers needed for census The Forest Park Complete Count Committee (CCC) is looking for volunteers to help educate residents and spread the word about the importance of the 2020 Census. “It’s vital that we get as many people as possible to participate in the census,” said committee Chairman Alex Serrano. One of the biggest advantages of maximum resident participation in the census is that the government calculates funding for infrastructure, schools and other areas of local need based on how many people are counted. Mayor Rory Hoskins spoke to the Review in August about the critical importance of the census. “There are estimates that for every person not counted, the village can lose $1,800,” said Hoskins. “This affects schools; it affects park districts; it affects every unit of government because we need the revenue.” Dionne Roberts-Emegha, a census partnership specialist, said, “The federal government allocates $675 billion to states based on census data and, of course, cities and counties and local governments use census data to plan where to put bridges, roads, schools, etc. It’s really the reason why the census is important.” In 2010, only 74 percent of Forest Park residents participated in the census. With a rough population of 14,000, that means approximately 3,640 people were not counted. At $1,800 a year, that’s an annual loss of revenue of over $6.5 million. Over 10 years, since the last census, that’s over $65 million. Lots and lots of money. “That’s why we need volunteers,” said Serrano. “We need to make sure the word gets out there.” When asked what the committee’s goal is this year, he laughed and said he’d like to see 98 to 100 percent participation in the

2020 Census. “But let’s be realistic,” he said, adding that any increase would make a big difference. “There are so many misconceptions about the census,” Serrano said. “For example, people don’t trust the government. But the government is obligated to keep their information confidential.” He encourages people to look up Title 13 of the U.S. Code, which is in place to ensure that sensitive or confidential information isn’t shared. According to the census.gov website, “By law, your information is confidential. Your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court. Anyone who violates this law faces severe penalties.” Committee member Michelle Fitz-Henry spoke at an October Forest Park village council meeting to raise awareness about the committee. She stressed that volunteers do not go door to door. Instead, they work with the Census Bureau to raise awareness through media, village events and faithbased organizations. “Our village needs a robust response to the upcoming census to receive monetary benefits that we deserve and are entitled to. Residents must participate in the upcoming census,” said Fitz-Henry. She added that the philosophy of the committee is “Do what you can do when you can do it.” In other words, any amount of help is appreciated and welcome. Serrano said that people who are interested in helping can send an email to the committee at forestpark.ccc@gmail.com. This includes people who run events or faithbased organizations and would be willing to allow census committee members to distribute information.

Maria Maxham

CTA will pay for police services In November, the Village of Forest Park entered into an intergovernmental agreement with the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), through which Forest Park police officers will provide services on CTA property, including platforms, trains and other CTA locations within the village. The project is known as the CTA Special Detail and, according to the agreement, provides provisions for “the use of sworn, off-duty, fulltime PD officers as security personnel.” The CTA will provide $95,000 per year to the Forest Park police department to pay officers for their time, and officers must voluntarily choose to work these extra hours. They can participate in the CTA Special Detail when they are on furlough, a regular day off, a day off due to holiday or on personal time. The collaborative agreement comes out of a desire for more security at Forest Park CTA stops. As the agreement states, “the

security of CTA passengers, employees and property is a matter of public concern, and the provision of such security is in the public interest.” The duties of the Forest Park police department include assigning voluntary officers on a daily basis to CTA property within the village; facilitating the employment of the officers by accepting requests of those who wish to participate and maintaining a roster of these individuals; maintaining weekly employment schedules, as well as keep records of CTA incidents, including crimes and arrests, that involve Forest Park police officers; and to conduct meetings with CTA representatives on a regular basis. The agreement was approved unanimously by Mayor Rory Hoskins and all four Forest Park commissioners – Jessica Voogd, Ryan Nero, Joe Byrnes and Dan Novak – at a village council meeting on Nov. 12.

Maria Maxham


Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

Chilly Chili night with District 91

Mayor Hoskin’s Toy Drive Mayor Hoskin’s Toy Drive to benefit local families will be held on Dec. 12 from 6 to 10 p.m. at the American Legion, 500 Circle Ave. Please bring an unwrapped, new gift for kids ages 3 to 16. Free food and soft drinks will be provided. If you are unable to attend, you can still help! Simply drop off an unwrapped gift (for kids 3 to 16) or a gift card (for youth 11 to 16) at the Howard Mohr Community Center at 7640 Jackson Blvd.

Christmas Bazaar

Doing the Holiday Walk this year? Warm up with a bowl of delicious chili and have your holiday family photo taken compliments of the District 91 Board of Education. Chili “flight” features gourmet chili from local area restaurants. Meet up with friends and share the warmth of free chili before you enjoy the beautiful Holiday Walk and Festival of Lights in Forest Park. Located in the District Office parking lot on Ferdinand just off Madison (next to McDonald’s). Dec. 6, from 5 to 7 p.m.

Shop for ornaments, gifts, soaps, lotions, cookies and candy from the nuns at the famous St. John Chrysostomos Greek Orthodox Monastery in Wisconsin. The event is held at Always in Style at 7516 ½ Madison St. on Dec. 5 and 7 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Dec. 6 from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.Contact Irene at 708-366-9583 for more information.

December 4 - 11

Sundaes with Santa

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BIG WEEK

Dec. 8 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Brown Cow, 7347 Madison St. What is Santa’s favorite ice cream? Come find out at the Sundaes with Santa Event. Your family will together enjoy a whimsical experience enjoying homemade hot cocoa, making sundaes with Santa, and a photo op with Santa where your children can let him know their Christmas wishes. Includes a holiday craft, ice cream, drinks, photo op visit with Santa, goody bag and balloon. Reservations on the hour. Tickets are $10 per person. Call 708-366-7970 to reserve a spot.

Holiday Walk and Festival of Windows Stroll along Madison St. between Harlem Avenue and Desplaines Avenue on Friday, Dec. 6 from 6 to 9 p.m. Live window displays, horse-drawn carriage rides, face painting and ice sculptures by Nadeau’s Ice are just part of the magic of the annual Holiday Walk on Madison Street. Santa and Mrs. Claus arrive by fire engine at 6 p.m to help light the tree and then walk to Forest Park Bank for visits and photos. Bring your holiday shopping list and don’t forget to make a reservation at your favorite restaurant!

Breakfast with Santa Saturday, Dec. 7 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Park District of Forest Park, 7501 Harrison St. Come be whisked away to a winter wonderland where Santa and Mrs. Claus will fill your morning with enjoyment. Children will enjoy breakfast with their families and get to meet Santa and Mrs. Claus. Santa’s Elves will also be on hand to help the little ones make arts and crafts! Santa and Mrs. Claus will be visiting from 10 to 11 a.m. Please bring your own camera. Register at pdofp.org or by visiting the Park District of Forest Park administration building or the Roos Recreation Center. This event is $9 per person; children 2 and under are free.


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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

Forest Park provides Thanksgiving meals to residents Community Center delivers more than food By MARIA MAXHAM Staff Reporter

Forest Park, like any village, has its share of infighting. Take a look at the villagerelated Facebook groups, and you’ll get a sense of the divisiveness and disagreements that pop up on a regular basis. But despite all that, when it comes down to it, the town has a big heart and a history of coming together and helping its residents. That was apparent on Nov. 27, the day before Thanksgiving, during the Community Center Food Pantry’s annual Thanksgiving meal delivery. Volunteers showed up at 9 a.m., but days had already been spent setting up empty boxes and filling them with food to donate. According to Community Center Director Karen Dylewski, this year over 140 turkeys and meals were delivered. The turkeys, buns and pies are purchased from Ed’s Way with donated money, and the rest of the boxes are assembled from food contributions to the food pantry. Each resident or family on the list received a turkey and a box of food for meal prep. These boxes are heavy. Carry one up three flights of stairs and you’ll be winded. Add in a turkey that you hold in one hand while hoisting the box on one hip, and it’s almost impossible by yourself. Good thing I had my 16-year-old daughter with me. The operation at the Community Center was efficiently run, thanks to the regular volunteers who have been doing this for years: Dylewski, Commissioner Joe Byrnes and his wife Sandy, Mike Thompson from the American Legion. There were other regular volunteers too, who have been doing this for as long as she can remember, said Dylewski. “Are you here to deliver turkeys?” asked

Sandy when I showed up. “I’m here to do whatever needs to be done,” I answered. I was just there to write a story, but since I was out and about, I might as well participate, I thought. “I’ll start you out with two addresses.” Sandy handed me two index cars with names and addresses on them. My daughter and I carried two very heavy boxes filled with canned vegetables, rice packets, buns and other food to help create a Thanksgiving meal – as well as two turkeys – to the car and filled the trunk. We delivered the two boxes and turkeys, then headed back to the Community Center. It was easier the second time around because Forest Park firefighters and paramedics were there to load up our cars. They show up every year. “They can’t deliver the food because they might have to go out on a call,” said Dylewski. This year the volunteers from the fire department were Michael Kinder, Humberto Soto, Aaron Hannan, Andrew Weber, Phil Damato and paramedics Richard Lovett and Matthew Bakke. We headed out again, this time to a multiunit building with some other volunteers including Kristen Lyons. There were multiple people receiving meals there, and we filled shopping carts provided by the building and used elevators to bring the food up. On the third floor, I spent a long time talking to one of the residents, a witty and intelligent woman. She told me about her “sputnik,” a Ninja food cooker that air fries, pressure cooks and does a lot of other kitchen-related stuff. She affectionately named it after the Soviet satellite. “That turkey won’t fit in my sputnik, though,” she said. “I’ll have to do it in the oven again. You know what I did last year? They brought me a turkey, and it was too much for just me. So I cooked it with sweet potatoes and green beans and other side dishes. And I plated it up and borrowed the

shopping carts from downstairs and delivered dinner to all the people here in the building who didn’t have anywhere to go on Thanksgiving.” She also told me she’s a cancer survivor. “It’s a word I’ve had to add to my vocabulary,” she said. “Survivor. But I’ve been told that’s what I am. Every day is a bonus day. I feel lucky every morning when I open my eyes.” When I leave, I feel an unexpected sadness. I was too warm, standing in the overheated hallway, and as a rule I don’t enjoy small talk. But she invited me in to see her multi-cooker. She was funny and wise, and a great conversationalist. The kind of person I will miss after meeting only once. Sometimes I think of words that I wish existed. On Wednesday, I wished there was a word that meant “to recognize somebody even though you’re meeting them for the first time ever.” Back at the Community Center, the deliveries were done. A huge spread of food had been laid out on several long tables, including salad and Italian beef sandwiches and buffalo chicken dip and so much more. “It’s a tradition. All the volunteers sit

down and eat.” Karen nodded toward the table. “And there’s a fridge over there with soda. Help yourself.” I told her I had to go to work. She insisted but acquiesced when she realized I really did have to go. But not before filling up my arms – and my daughter’s arms – with snacks. Joe Byrnes saw me leaving. “You need to sit down and eat,” he said. Like Dylewski, he told me it’s a tradition. “Every day is a gift,” said the woman I talked to outside her apartment. And that day certainly was. Join the Howard Mohr Community Center on Dec. 23 at 9 a.m. to help deliver Christmas baskets to residents. In addition to food, Dylewski and her team will be bringing gifts to kids. Mayor Rory Hoskins is holding a toy drive on Dec. 12 from 6 to 10 p.m. at the American Legion, 500 Circle Ave. to collect presents for this purpose. Bring an unwrapped and new gift for kids ages 3 to 16 or a gift card for youth aged 11 to 16. Food and soft drinks will be provided. Gifts and cards can also be dropped off at the Community Center at 7640 Jackson Blvd.

Limited edition Forest Park T-shirts available

New annual tradition for Historical Society By MARIA MAXHAM Staff Reporter

The Historical Society of Forest Park (HSFP) is starting a new tradition – an annual T-shirt, which will debut this year at the Holiday Walk on Dec. 6. According to HSFP member Kristen Lyons, each year the HSFP will select an aspect of Forest Park history and put it on a t-shirt for sale to the general public. These shirts will be a limited edition; only a select number will be made, probably around 100 this year.

“The 2020 T-shirt will tell the history of the WWII torpedo plant in Forest Park, on Roosevelt Road where Living Fresh and the mall now stand. This piece of WWII history was preserved by the Village of Forest Park in the city sticker issue in 1952, so the shirts have two pieces of history, the US Navy torpedo factory and the 1950’s retro style,” said Lyons. She added that the HSFP got permission from Mayor Rory Hoskins before design and production. Shirts will be sold during the Holiday Walk for $20 each at Century & Sleuths Bookstore, 7419 Madison St. “They’ll be rolled with a ribbon and gift tag, so they’re ready for gifting,” said Lyons. The shirts are cotton and available in adult sizes medium through XXL.

Image provided

TORPEDO T: The Forest Park Historical Society is beginning an annual tradition of producing a yearly T-shirt. The 2019 shirt will go on sale Dec. 6 during the Holiday Walk, and the design is based on the Navy torpedo factory that existed in Forest Park.


Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

HAMPTON

Charismatic activist from page 1 falsely characterized the execution as a “gun battle” and praised the officers for their “restraint,” lost his bid for reelection and never held political office again. Hampton’s death, according to many political observers, also set the stage for the election of Harold Washington, the city’s first AfricanAmerican mayor. But old articles published in the Proviso Herald and Forest Park Review show that Hampton’s death also had a powerful impact on Proviso East High School and the wider Proviso Township. Hampton had been a controversial student-leader at Proviso East, where, depending on the perspective, he was either a racial agitator and self-righteous thug or a courageous civil rights activist who was willing to take a radical stand on issues few others were willing to stick their necks out for. However people saw him, most would argue that the circumstances (and the proven racist conspiracy) of Hampton’s death substantially proved the point he’d been making all along — that trenchant, systemic racism in the North was real and, in some cases, just as potent as its Southern cousin. In October 1969, Proviso Herald reporter Paul Sassone covered what he said would be Hampton’s last public speech in Proviso Township — a speech that was prophetic in more ways than one. The meeting took place at First Baptist Church in Melrose Park, where Hampton would be memorialized just two months later. “Look, I’m 21,” Sassone recalled Hampton saying at the meeting, which was held to discuss racism in the suburbs. “If you think it has all happened in 21 years and that I did it, then you should take me out and shoot me. But you and I know that these situations have been around for a long time.” Captivated by Hampton’s charisma and his intelligence, Sassone was convinced that “the ‘power structure’ was afraid of him for the wrong reasons. Hampton was no hoodlum or gangster. He was an intelligent and highly articulate revolutionary. That is, he didn’t like the way America was being run and wanted a change, using any means necessary.” Hampton was right. “These situations” had been around a long time, and they would hang around long after the militant activist’s death. In the days after the assassination, “the scene of racial turmoil” was such that Proviso East officials suspended classes until after Christmas, Sassone reported in the Dec. 18, 1969 Proviso Herald. During a Dec. 10 memorial service for Hampton, fist fights between black and white students broke out and “the first of several walkouts occurred when a large group of white students left in protest, and then the blacks walked out,” Thomas Mi-

likin, an assistant superintendent, told Sassone. In Hampton’s hometown of Maywood, Mayor Leonard Chabala, three trustees and members of the Maywood Commission on Human Relations “issued a statement for murder charges to be filed against the 14 State’s Attorney’s police involved in the fatal ‘shootout’ at 2337 W. Monroe, Chicago,” according to a Dec. 11, 1969 Herald article that Sassone wrote. The village officials had been among the approximately 25,000 people who took a guided tour through the murder scene (police had not bothered to secure it). The statement called Hampton’s death “‘a blatant act of legitimized murder,’ and likened the police tactics to Hitler’s Nazis,” the Herald reported. After the village officials’ statement, Maywood’s acting police chief at the time, Wilbert Samuels — likely channeling the anger of many whites in the village at the time that their representatives were siding with black militants against the police — resigned. “The chief said he considered the statement we made offensive,” Rev. Thomas Strieter, the Maywood trustee, told the Herald. “Apparently he thought we were critical of all police, which is not true.” In Forest Park, the published reactions were much more subdued. Although the Hampton raid was page one news in the Herald, the Chicago Sun-Times, the Chicago Tribune and was covered by AP and other news agencies around the country, the Dec. 10, 1969 Forest Park Review made no mention of the raid. In a Dec. 17, 1969 Forest Park Review, the paper announces “Proviso East Closed Until January 5th,” but barely alludes to the underlying cause, alluding to “conditions prevailing at present in both school and community of Proviso Twp.,” the paper notes. In his “Personal Observations” on page 6 of the Dec. 17 issue, the paper’s editor and publisher at the time, Claude A. Walker, mentions Hampton’s shooting as a cautionary tale and an obstacle to “Peace on Earth and Good Will Toward Man.” “The aftermath of the shooting of Hampton last week has stirred up a tempest that may lead to a series of riots on the streets of Chicago that may take many lives. What happened to the ‘Good Will?’” Edgar L. Hiestand Jr., a minister at Neighborhood Methodist Church in Maywood, offered what could be considered a response to Walker in a letter to the Proviso Herald, published Dec. 11. Hiestand called Hampton’s death “a threefold tragedy,” with the greatest tragedy being “that all of us have allowed wrongs to accumulate. “We’ve condoned a snails-pace progress in jobs, housing, education and justice in all facets of America’s life,” Hiestand wrote. “We’ve acquiesced in the rationalization of violence and the muffling of dissent, whether in Pinkville or W. Monroe St. The real victim is America’s soul.”

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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

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INDEPENDENTS DAY: Fifteen local writers participated in Small Business Saturday at Century & Sleuths’ author open house on Nov. 30, which celebrated independent bookstores.

Small Business Saturday fosters community Local shops gear up for annual Holiday Walk By MARIA MAXHAM Staff Reporter

Small Business Saturday took on special meaning on Nov. 30 at Century & Sleuths Bookstore, 7419 Madison St, when owner Augie Aleksy held Independents Day, featuring 15 local authors. “It was a celebration of independent bookstores and writers,” said Aleksy. “We served coffee and cookies. I call it a soirée,” he added, “but my wife said it was an ‘open house.’” An open house that brought in the shop’s third highest sales for a single day in the past 10 years. Each author had a seat, a table with a stack of books, and two chairs for guests to sit down and talk. “They were each scheduled for two hours,” said Aleksy, “but some of them stayed longer. It was wonderful. There were authors talking to each other. They were buying each other’s books.” But he explained that, equally important, were customers talking not just to the authors but to each other. “It was a real social and community event,” Aleksy added. Participating authors included: Kathryn Atwood, D. M. Pirrone, Michael A. Black, Georgann Prochaska, Ava Black, Libby Hellmann, John Helmke, Robert Goldsborough, Pat Camalliere, John Rice, Tracy Clark, Bill Rapp, Mark Edward Langely, San P. Park and Raymond Benson. “All of them have a local connection,” Aleksy said. “They live locally or write

about local topics.” Rapp, for example, is originally from Naperville, and some of his books are set in a town based on his hometown. Goldsborough’s books are set in Chicago, and he pulls from his experience as a reallife reporter in his crime novels. And, of course, there was at least one writer from Forest Park: the Review’s own John Rice. Farther east on Madison Street, Todd & Holland Tea Merchants celebrated Small Business Saturday too. Owner Janet Todd expressed her love for the “holiday.” “Small Business Saturday is like visiting with old friends because our local customers came in with extended family members and their children,” said Todd. “It’s just a great day.” She added that small businesses like hers truly appreciate the movements that encourage people to shop local. She’s gearing up for the Holiday Walk, during which she’ll be serving cookies and tea so people can warm up. Ice sculptures will be made on the front lawn. Up and down Madison Street, other businesses are also getting ready for the Holiday Walk and Festival of Windows, sponsored by the Forest Park Chamber of Commerce, which runs from 6 to 9 p.m. on Dec. 6. The event features live window displays in many of the stores along the street, horse-drawn carriage rides, face painting and ice sculptures by Nadeau’s Ice. Santa and Mrs. Claus arrive by fire engine at 6 p.m to help light the tree and then walk to Forest Park Bank for visits and photos with residents. Don’t forget your camera. And don’t miss the Forest Park Review and Wednesday Journal staff in the windows of Grand Appliance, 7440 Madison St.

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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

13

OPINION O U R

Let walnuts be walnuts

V I E W

D91 innovates on grading

W

e’ve all had letter grades drilled into us for so long it seems like a sacrosanct and unquestionable model. There are A students and C students. Or maybe you’re an A in the realms of history and English but can hardly crack a C in math and

science. When you think about it, letter grades are a fairly imprecise and subjective system of assessment for a very wide range of students. The same way that standardized tests are a wholly imperfect snapshot of a group of kids at one moment in time, what actually does it tell if a student is a High C or a Low B in math? In District 91, Forest Park’s public schools, there has been active innovation over several years now in how students are assessed throughout the school year. These tests return highly individualized results, which tell teachers, parents and students precisely what headway a student is making in learning specific subjects and skills. That has resulted in much more responsive and individualized learning opportunities. D91, beginning with the 2020-21school year, will begin a steady remaking of how that learning translates into assessments. It is an approach rapidly gaining steam in education and is called Standards Based Grading. Initially, letter grades will disappear for math and ELA (English and Language Arts) and be replaced by something far more descriptive of a student’s current levels. This will be useful and actionable information for every student and family. We hear the boo birds. “A’s and B’s were plenty good for me and my kids.” Or “Isn’t this more of the dumbing down of public schools?” We don’t think so. Standards Based Grading is another innovative way that modern education focuses on the individual needs and learning styles of each child. It is a bold and not surprising step by our public schools in Forest Park.

New houses meet disability need You’ve got to savor the win-wins. Forest Park is celebrating the construction, and soon the occupancy, of three handsome new single-family homes constructed specifically for people with some sort of disability. IFF, a mission-driven developer, has just constructed these homes in Forest Park, Bellwood, Maywood and Berwyn. There are three in Forest Park — one on Circle Avenue, two on Ferdinand. In the planning process, IFF worked positively with Forest Park village government. An IFF leader singled out Village Administrator Tim Gillian and Director of Public Health and Safety Steve Glinke as strong partners. Glinke told the Review that there were mutual benefits as three vacant and or foreclosed properties were purchased by IFF, demolished and rebuilt to serve precise housing needs. IFF also worked with the Progress Center for Independent Living, a stellar Forest Park-based nonprofit. Now the Progress Center is working to place local people into this new housing. This is what happens when good people, smart people, pull together to make our community stronger and more welcoming.

A

s they sipped their decaf coffee and munched on chocolate chip cookies after the interfaith Thanksgiving event last Wednesday evening, Pastor Walter Mitty asked the five other men sitting at his table, “So what did you think?” “It’s about time,” said Dan Bailey, editor of the Poplar Park Times, after giving everyone a minute to consider the question. “Ever since our president tried to institute a Muslim ban in 2017, I’ve been pushing the religious community here to make something like this happen in our community.” “And you know that the small number of us in town appreciate you supporting us,” said Ehud Ahmadi with a look on his face that mixed gratitude with sadness. “It did feel good to see my imam on the stage sitting with the other religious leaders.” Rabbi Levine asked, “But what?” Ehud noticed the irony of a rabbi asking a Muslim how he felt, smiled at his Jewish friend, took a deep breath and answered, “It’s complicated. I mean, tomorrow is Thanksgiving, right? So this evening I should be talking about all of the good things I’ve received since I came here. Everyone at this table has treated me and my family like their neighbors — no better, no worse.” “That’s one of many things we have in common, my friend,” said the rabbi.” I grew up hearing my parents and grandparents telling stories of the Holocaust. They were determined to make me appreciate what I have in this country.” The people around the table fell silent, recalling the stories they had heard growing up, stories meant to frame the present with meaning and perspective. Ehud broke the silence. “But the reason I said it was complicated is because the interfaith event we just experienced can be taken in more than one way.” “Say more,” said Pastor Mitty with piqued interest. He had participated in the event that night with mixed feelings and wanted to hear about Ehud’s ambivalence. Ehud was choosing his words carefully. “On the one hand, I want to teach my children to respect people who think and believe differently than we do. But I also want to pass on to them the faith I love and cherish. The problem, as I see it, is that the picture of all the different traditions having an equal place on the stage can send the message that America is a huge marketplace of ideologies and faith systems and that they are free to choose whichever one they like the best.” “Let me put it another way,” said Rabbi

TOM

Levine. “Ehud and I are both members of small religious minorities, and we worry that our children’s religious identity will be eroded by being immersed in this culture. The term is assimilation.” “You know,” said Dominique, jumping into the conversation, “Something clicked in my head just now. Part of the American myth is that we are a melting pot and the story goes that people like the grandparents of Father Sullivan here came to this country as immigrants who were different from real Americans but they gradually blended in with everyone else.” “And part of the problem with that story,” said Fr. Sullivan, “is that my Irish grandparents were white and could ‘melt’ in, so to speak, easier that Dominique’s forbears.” “And that’s why we don’t share Black History Month with other ethnicities,” Dominique explained. “As a racial cohort, we are coming to the place where we don’t want to be just like everybody else. What most of us black folks are trying to do is find our authentic place in this society without sacrificing who we are.” Ehud nodded, “And I want to remain a distinct chocolate chip in the cookie and my friend the rabbi wants to remain a recognizable walnut.” Rabbi Levine said, “That’s the challenge the chocolate chip and the walnut face every day. Can we find a recipe that allows us to blend with the other ingredients and still maintain our peculiar identities?” “And let me put it still another way,” said Fr. Sullivan. “If you stay in the realm of rational, abstract concepts, I suppose Ehud could imagine being married to many, many women other than Amna. But if he wants to dive into love in a profound way, he has to get concrete. He chose one out of the many and made a commitment to her, for better for worse.” After he stopped laughing, Ehud said, “How did a celibate guy like you gain such profound insights about married life?! But the guy in the brown habit gets it. Fr. Bob must pray in Jesus’ name and I cannot, not if I’m faithful to the tradition I love. Like someone said — authentic religion is like the mafia; you’re either all the way in or all the way out.” “The trick in getting along,” Pastor Walt thought as he walked home, “is not to throw every religion and philosophy into a spiritual blender and conclude that, in the end, we’re all the same. The trick is finding the recipe that allows chocolate chips to remain chocolate chips and walnuts to be walnuts.”

HOLMES


14

Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

TRAUMA

Kids can refocus from page 1 and how to create trauma-sensitive classrooms and schools. ACEs include abuse (physical, emotional or sexual), neglect (physical and emotional) and household dysfunction (e.g., mental illness of a family member, an incarcerated relative, abuse of the mother, divorce). When children experience any form of ACE, the emotional impact on them can affect their behavior and/or their physical and mental health. In a slide presented by Brunson at a school board meeting on Nov. 14, the risk outcomes included alcoholism, drug use, missed work, suicide attempts, depression and diseases related to lack of physical activity or smoking. Additionally, a higher number of ACEs is correlated with a greater risk for grade repetition, according to a Johns Hopkins University study Brunson referenced in her presentation. Brunson has been leading a movement at Field Stevenson to help teachers understand trauma and how it affects students, and to help students relax and focus, even if they’re stressed about events at home or in other areas of their lives. A key component is the realization that a child’s learning will suffer from, for example, not having enough to eat or having an incarcerated parent. “Students who have trauma in their lives need

a safe space where they can learn despite what’s going on at home,” said Brunson. “And educators need to understand what’s causing destructive student behaviors and help break negative cycles.” At Field Stevenson, special quiet areas called “peace corners” have been set up throughout the school. These are places where students can choose to go to get away and de-stress. “They can take a break,” said Brunson. In the peace corners, activities are available for the kids if they want to do them, including writing and coloring. Children are reminded to practice breathing. Brunson mentioned that the kids at Field Stevenson are taught mindfulness, which includes breathing techniques. “We give and equip kids with the power of control,” she said. Yoga is also taught in the schools, and the kids are encouraged to take “brain breaks,” which help them refocus. The resource Brunson is using at Field Stevenson is a book called “Fostering Resilient Learners: Strategies for Creating a Trauma-Sensitive Classroom” by Kristin Sauers and Pete Hall. In the introduction to the book, the authors describe the new classroom environment faced by educators today: “[Students] step into our schools toting heavy burdens: the stress of overwhelming trauma and the scars of neglect and abuse. The experience of trauma has dramatically altered the landscape of the schools we work in.” Brunson said it is her goal to help all students with their burdens so they can learn at high levels in an environment of protection and encouragement.

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BRAIN BREAK: Students at Field Stevenson are invited to use peace corners to de-stress or refocus.

L E T T E R S

It’s not racist to be against illegal aliens Can we stop the race baiting, please? The only people who talk about “illegal humans” are liberal progressives as they attempt to impugn the character and motives of people who think laws should be followed. The correct, official term is “illegal alien.” As an “older, whiter” descendant of “European” grandparents who legally immigrated to this country, I’m getting really tired of being called a racist because I believe our “brown brethren” should also come here legally. But I guess it’s OK to practice racism against whites today. On Feb. 7, 2017 the Review quoted Sally Cody referring to the art project on the

bridge, “We want to stay away from anything that’s too political,” Cody said. “We want to make sure we are not offending anyone.” I’m not standing up for the vandalism, but if they had stuck to the idea of keeping politics out of it, there wouldn’t have been any vandalism. Saying, “No human is illegal,” is offensive to me because I know I’m being called a racist. If we don’t support illegal immigration we’re racists, and that’s exactly how the Nov. 27 editorial ended. It’s disgusting.

Richard Wright Forest Park

O B I T U A R I E S

Barbara Kolasa, 92 Resident of Forest Park Barbara Kolasa (nee Krysch), 92, of Forest Park, died on Nov. 16, 2019. She was the mother of Henry, Edward (Susana) and the late Walter; and the grandmoth-

er of Brian and Kristina. Services were held privately. Additional information is available at Zimmerman-Harnett Funeral Home, 708-366-2200.


Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

Check First.

RELIGION GUIDE

First Congregational Church of Maywood

400 N. Fifth Avenue (1 block north of Lake St.) Come join us for Sunday Morning Worship at 11 am Pastor Elliot Wimbush will be preaching the message. Refreshments and fellowship follow the service. 708-344-6150 firstchurchofmaywood.org When you're looking for a place to worship the Lord, Check First.

You’re Invited to A Church for All Nations A Church Without Walls SERVICE LOCATION Forest Park Plaza 7600 W. Roosevelt Road Forest Park, IL 60130

William S. Winston Pastor

Roman Catholic

Good Shepherd

Sunday Service 7AM, 9AM & 11:15AM Believer’s Walk of Faith Broadcast Schedule (Times in Central Standard Time) Television DAYSTAR (M-F)

3:30-4:00pm

Nationwide

WJYS-TV (M-F)

6:30-7:00am

Chicago, IL.

WCIU-TV (Sun.)

10:30-11:00am

Chicago, IL.

Word Network

10:30-11:00am

Nationwide

(M-F)

www.livingwd.org www.billwinston.org

West Suburban Temple Har Zion

1040 N. Harlem Avenue River Forest Meet our Rabbi, Adir Glick Pray, learn, and celebrate with our caring, progressive, egalitarian community. Interfaith families are welcome. Accredited Early Childhood Program Religious School for K thru 12 Daily Morning Minyan Weekly Shabbat Services Friday 6:30pm & Saturday 10:00am Affiliated with United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism 708.366.9000 www.wsthz.org

188 South Oak Park Ave. Saturday Mass: 5:30 p.m. Sunday Masses: 9:00 & 11:00 a.m., 5:00 p.m. Weekday Mass: 8:30 a.m. M–F Holy Day Masses: As Announced Reconciliation: Saturday 4:15 p.m. Parish Office: 708-848-4417 Religious Ed Phone: 708-848-7220 stemund.org

Worshiping at 820 Ontario, Oak Park IL (First Baptist Church) 9:00a-Worship 10:30a-Education Hour

All are welcome. goodshepherdlc.org 708-848-4741

St. Giles Family Mass Community

Lutheran—ELCA

United Lutheran Church

409 Greenfield Street (at Ridgeland Avenue) Oak Park Holy Communion with nursery care and children’s chapel each Sunday at 9:30 a.m.

OAK PARK MEETING OF FRIENDS (Quakers) Meeting For Worship Sundays at 10:00 a.m. at Oak Park Art League 720 Chicago Ave., Oak Park Please call 708-445-8201 www.oakparkfriends.org

Roman Catholic

Ascension Catholic Church

www.unitedlutheranchurch.org

708/386-1576

(708) 697-5000 LIVE Webcast - 11:15AM Service

St. Edmund Catholic Church

ELCA, Lutheran

Lutheran-Independent

Grace Lutheran Church

7300 W. Division, River Forest David R. Lyle, Senior Pastor David W. Wegner, Assoc. Pastor Lauren Dow Wegner, Assoc. Pastor Sunday Worship, 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Sunday School/Adult Ed. 9:45 a.m. Childcare Available

Grace Lutheran School

Preschool - 8th Grade Bill Koehne, Principal 366-6900, graceriverforest.org Lutheran-Missouri Synod

St. John Evangelical Lutheran Church

305 Circle Ave, Forest Park Sunday Worship, 9:30am Christian Education Hour 8:30am Wednesday Worship 7:00pm Wheelchair Access to Sanctuary Leonard Payton, Pastor Roney Riley, Assistant Pastor 708-366-3226 www.stjohnforestpark.org Methodist

First United Methodist Church of Oak Park

324 N. Oak Park Avenue 708-383-4983 www.firstUMCoakpark.org Sunday School for all Ages, 9am Sunday Worship, 10am Children’s Chapel during Worship Rev. Katherine Thomas Paisley, Pastor Professionally Staffed Nursery Fellowship Time after Worship

808 S. East Ave. 708/848-2703 www.ascensionoakpark.com Worship: Saturday Mass 5:00 pm Sunday Masses 7:30, 9:00, 11 am 5:00 pm at St. Edmund Church Sacrament of Reconciliation 4 – 4:45 pm Saturday Taizé Prayer 7:30 pm First Fridays Feb.– Dec. & Jan. 1 Rev. James Hurlbert, Pastor Roman Catholic

St. Bernardine Catholic Church Harrison & Elgin, Forest Park

CELEBRATING OUR 107TH YEAR! Sat. Masses: 8:30am & 5:00pm SUNDAY MASSES: 8:00am & 10:30am 10:30 Mass-Daycare for all ages CCD Sun. 9am-10:15am Reconciliation: Sat. 9am & 4pm Weekday Masses: Monday–Thursday 6:30am Church Office: 708-366-0839 CCD: 708-366-3553 www.stbern.com Pastor: Fr. Stanislaw Kuca

We welcome all to attend Sunday Mass at 10 a.m. on the St. Giles Parish campus on the second floor of the school gym, the southernmost building in the school complex at 1034 North Linden Avenue. Established in 1970, we are a laybased community within St. Giles Roman Catholic Parish. Our Mass is family-friendly. We encourage liturgically active toddlers. Children from 3 to 13 and young adults play meaningful parts in each Sunday liturgy. Together with the parish, we offer Catechesis of the Good Shepherd, a Montessori-based religious education program for children in grades K-8. For more information, go to http://www.stgilesparish.org/ family-mass-community or call Bob Wielgos at 708-288-2196.

Third Unitarian Church 10AM Sunday Forum 11AM Service Rev. Colleen Vahey thirdunitarianchurch.org (773) 626-9385 301 N. Mayfield, Chicago Committed to justice, not to a creed Upcoming Religious Holidays

Dec 1-24 Advent

6 Saint Nicholas Day

Christian

Christian

8 Bodhi Day (Rohatsu) Buddhism Immaculate Conception of Mary Catholic Christian

12 Feast day - Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Christian

To place a listing in the Religion Guide, call Mary Ellen: 708/613-3342

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16

Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

FORESTPARKREVIEW.COM New local ads this week

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Place your ad online anytime at: www.ForestParkReview.com/Classified/

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REACHES SIX SUBURBAN COMMUNITIES: OAK PARK, RIVER FOREST, FOREST PARK, BROOKFIELD, RIVERSIDE, NORTH RIVERSIDE, AND PARTS OF CHICAGO

Please Check Your Ad: The publisher will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Wednesday Journal Classified must be notified before the second insertion. The newspaper reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement.

BY PHONE: (708) 613-3333 | BY FAX: (708) 467-9066 | BY E-MAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@FORESTPARKREVIEW.COM HELP WANTED DRIVER PART TIME - ASAP Local Company looking for part time driver/receiving clerk. Must be drug free & have valid IL DL. Must be able to lift 75Lbs. Hrs 7am to 1pm. EOE $12/hr email resume HR@sievertelectric.com PARKING ENFORCEMENT OFFICER FOREST PARK, IL The Forest Park Police Department, seeks a Part-Time Parking Enforcement Officer. Eligible candidates will be required to pass an aptitude test and an extensive background check. Qualifications include high school diploma (or equivalent), a valid driver’s license, knowledge of basic parking regulations, and good verbal and written skills. EVENING AND OVERNIGHT HOURS ARE MANDATORY. Open until filled. Applications are available at Village Hall, 517 Desplaines Ave. or at www.forestpark. net and should be returned Attn: Vanessa Moritz, Village Clerk, Village of Forest Park, 517 Des Plaines Avenue, Forest Park, IL 60130. Email: vmoritz@forestpark.net.

SUBURBAN REAL ESTATE NEW CONCEPT FOR MAYWOOD In this quiet residential neighborhood

902 S. 3RD AVENUE (2 blks W of 1st Ave & 1 blk N of Madison)

Reserve your own affordable 2 or 3 BR condo unit of 1000+ sq ft of living space being built on this historic site. You’ll benefit from a unique 12-year tax freeze and lower monthly living expenses from energy saving systems/appliances, and you can help design your own individual unit. Plans also include building 5 new townhomes onsite. For details Call 708-383-9223.

SUBURBAN RENTALS

Software Architect II sought by Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association in Chicago, IL to trnl bus neds into a data mdl, proving exprtise on data mdling tools and techniques for dsgning data mdls for applctn and rltd sys. Apply @ www.jobpostingtoday. com, Ref #77110.

3BR 1 BA APARTMENT Recently updated, hardwood floors throughout, ceiling fans in every room. Kitchen w/ granite countertops. Garage parking 1 space, 2 spaces outside parking. Storage in basement. Washer & dryer on property free to tenants. Award-winning schools. Close to public trans, parks & shopping. $1500/mo. Elec. Included. Tenant pays heating & cooking gas only. 1 month req’d for security. Jim 708-955-1684

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Lead Bus Driver Wanted Forest Park School District 91 Forest Park Elementary School District 91 seeks a highly qualified, personable, organized, responsible individual for the position of Lead Bus Driver. Responsibilities Include: • Transporting students safely on designated route • Hiring and supervisory responsibility for all district bus drivers and assistants • Logistical planning and coordination of all transportation commitments within the district • Regular communication with parents and internal and out of district personnel • Recordkeeping and maintenance duties • Other duties as assigned Requirements: • Current CDL, school bus endorsement and passenger endorsement

CITY RENTALS APARTMENT FOR RENT 2 bedroom apt w 1/bath 2nd floor of 2 flat building in Austin area. $1200. Call 773-576-5122 fredb60615@gmail.com

LOOK q

A MUST-SEE!!! 929-933 N. LEAMINGTON ST. BEAUTIFUL newly renovated Studios ($725 - $750) & 2-bdrm Apts. ($875 - $900) in quiet bldg. Appls incld; tenant pays utilities. Credit/bkgrnd check req’d. Sect. 8 Welcome! For private viewing, call 708-307-8178.

ROOMS FOR RENT AUSTIN CLEAN ROOM With fridge, micro. Nr Oak Park, Super Walmart, Food 4 Less, bus, & Metra. $116/wk and up. 773-637-5957

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT THERAPY OFFICES FOR RENT Therapy offices for rent in north Oak Park. Rehabbed building. Nicely furnished. Flexible leasing. Free parking. Free wifi; Secure building; Friendly colleagues providing referrals. Shared waiting room; optional Conference. Call or email with questions. Shown on Sundays. Lee 708.383.0729 drlmadden@ameritech.net

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT OFFICES

ITEMS FOR SALE ROOMBA VACUUM $49.00 708-848-8755

OAK PARK

SHEARLING COAT Brown shearling coat w/ attached hood. $149.00 708-848-8755

RIVER FOREST

WANTED TO BUY

Strand & Browne 708-488-0011

WANTED MILITARY ITEMS: Helmets, medals, patches, uniforms, weapons, flags, photos, paperwork, Also toy soldiers–lead, plastic–other misc. toys. Call Uncle Gary 708-522-3400

*6955 North Ave. *6144 Roosevelt Rd. 1 to 5 room suites *7777 Lake St. 1116 sq. ft. suite

COMMERCIAL RETAIL SPACE RETAIL SPACE–FOR LEASE A 1600 Sq Ft. Retail Space for Lease in Strip Mall: 321 S. Harlem Ave., Forest Park, IL. 60130. Vacated. Available Now. Upgraded. Formerly a Cleaners. End space. Heavy foot/road traffic area. 45-Space Parking Lot! For more details: Serious Inquiries ONLY: EMAIL: poppygator@yahoo.com CALL/TEXT: PB at: (708)250-7997

ITEMS FOR SALE 1999 ELIZABETH TAYLOR CLEOPATRA DOLL $70.00 Call 708-513-0087 1998-1999 HARLEY-DAVIDSON KEN & BARBIE DOLLS $80.00 for both Call 708-513-0087 www.ForestParkReview.com

SUBURBAN RENTALS

M&M

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PETS While you’re away, your pets are okay . . . at home

cat calls

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We install plugs for battery-operated vehicles We fix any electrical problem and do small jobs We install Surge Protectors • Home Re-wiring • New Plugs & Switches Added • New circuit breaker boxes • Code violations corrected Service upgrades,100-200 amp • Garage & A/C lines installed Fast Emergency Service | Residential • Commercial • Industrial Free Home Evaluations | Lic. • Bonded • Ins. • Low Rates • Free Est.

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Selling your home by owner? Advertise in Wednesday Classified! Call: 708-613-3342


Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

FORESTPARKREVIEW.COM

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PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT, COUNTY DIVISION IN THE MATTER OF THE VILLAGE OF BROOKFIELD, COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS, SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FOR ALLEY IMPROVEMENTS OF THE 4100 BLOCK BETWEEN DEYO AVENUE AND DUBOIS BOULEVARD

) ) ) ) ) )

2018 COSA 000001 VILLAGE OF BROOKFIELD SPECIAL ASSESSMENT NO. 359

NOTICE - CERTIFICATE OF FINAL COST AND COMPLETION Notice is hereby given to all persons interested that the Village of Brookfield, Illinois, having ordered the construction of improvements to a portion of the public alley located between the 4100 block between Deyo Avenue and DuBois Boulevard, has filed with the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, a Certificate of Final Cost and Completion and a Motion to Confirm the Certificate of Final Cost and Completion to have the court consider and determine whether or not the facts stated in the certificate are true. The hearing thereon will be held on the 23rd day of December 2019, at 10:30 a.m. or as soon thereafter as the business of the court will permit before the Honorable James Carroll in room 1710 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 W. Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois. All persons desiring to file objections to the Certificate of Final Cost and Completion may do so with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County before that time and may appear at the hearing and have their objections heard. DATED this 27th day of November 2019. VILLAGE OF BROOKFIELD By: Kit P. Ketchmark, President Board of Local Improvements

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT, COUNTY DIVISION IN THE MATTER OF THE VILLAGE OF BROOKFIELD, COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS, SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FOR ALLEY IMPROVEMENTS IN A PORTION OF THE 3500 BLOCK BETWEEN FOREST AVENUE AND PRAIRIE AVENUE

Don’t be caught short… reach the people making the decisions. Advertise your home improvement business in Wednesday Classified. Call 708/613-3342

) ) ) ) ) )

2018 COSA 000002 VILLAGE OF BROOKFIELD SPECIAL ASSESSMENT NO. 361

NOTICE - CERTIFICATE OF FINAL COST AND COMPLETION Notice is hereby given to all persons interested that the Village of Brookfield, Illinois, having ordered the construction of improvements to a portion of the public alley located between the 3500 block between Forest Avenue and Prairie Avenue, has filed with the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, a Certificate of Final Cost and Completion and a Motion to Confirm the Certificate of Final Cost and Completion to have the court consider and determine whether or not the facts stated in the certificate are true. The hearing thereon will be held on the 23rd day of December 2019, at 10:30 a.m. or as soon thereafter as the business of the court will permit before the Honorable James Carroll in room 1710 of the Richard J. Daley Center, 50 W. Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois. All persons desiring to file objections to the Certificate of Final Cost and Completion may do so with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County before that time, and may appear at the hearing and have their objections heard.

Illinois Classified Advertising Network TRAINING/EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS FOR NEW YEAR–BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED - JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 1-800-481-8312

VILLAGE OF BROOKFIELD By: Kit P. Ketchmark, President Board of Local Improvements Published in Landmark 11/27, 12/4/2019

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to “An Act in relation to the use of an Assumed Business Name in the conduct or transaction of Business in the State,” as amended, that a certification was registered by the undersigned with the County Clerk of Cook County. Registration Number: Y19002602 on November 14, 2019 Under the Assumed Business Name of GLOSS ADDICT with the business located at: 2110 S. 4TH AVE., MAYWOOD, IL 60153. The true and real full name(s) and residence address of the owner(s)/ partner(s) is: FELICIA SIMMONS 2110 S. 4TH AVE. MAYWOOD, IL 60153. Published in Forest Park Review 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/2019

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Public Meeting Concerning Riverside School District 96 Proposed eLearning Plan

LEGAL NOTICE SCOTT J. LEVY (32596) Attorney for Petitioner 1525 East 53rd Street, Suite 504 Chicago, Illinois 60615

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Riverside School District 96 Board of Education will hold a public hearing at the beginning of its regularly scheduled Board meeting at 7:00 PM on Wednesday, December 18, 2019 to be held in the Learning Resource Center (LRC) at Hauser Jr. High School located at 65 Woodside Rd., Riverside, IL 60546.

STATE OF ILLINOIS) COUNTY OF COOK )ss

The purpose of said hearing will be to receive public comment on the proposed eLearning plan, which, if approved, will permit students’ instruction to be received while students are not physically present in lieu of the district’s scheduled emergency days. This program is allowed under Public Act 101-0012. Notification of this hearing is provided to families and is posted in the newspaper more than 10 days prior to the scheduled Public Hearing. Published in RB Landmark 12/4/2019

Published in Landmark 11/27, 12/4/2019

DATED this 27th day of November 2019.

Attention! Homeimprovement pros!

17

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to “An Act in relation to the use of an Assumed Business Name in the conduct or transaction of Business in the State,” as amended, that a certification was registered by the undersigned with the County Clerk of Cook County. Registration Number: Y19002681 on November 26, 2019 Under the Assumed Business Name of JOY XOXO with the business located at: P.O. BOX 22, BERWYN, IL 60402. The true and real full name(s) and residence address of the owner(s)/partner(s) is: JEANITA MOORE 3512 OAK PARK AVE BERWYN, IL 60402. Published in Wednesday Journal 12/4, 12/11, 12/18/2019

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Board of Education of Oak Park Elementary School District #97 will receive sealed Financial & Human Resources System responses at the Administrative Office located at 260 West Madison Street – Oak Park, IL, 60302, until 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 18, 2019. At this time sealed responses will be publicly opened and read. Copies of specifications may be secured at the Oak Park Elementary School District #97 District Office, 260 Madison Street, Oak Park, IL 60302. Cut-off date for picking up scope of services is 4:00 pm, December 13, 2019. Responses mailed or delivered shall be marked to the attention of: Oak Park School District 97 Attn. Mr. Michael Arensdorff 260 Madison Street Oak Park, Illinois 60302 The front of the envelope should be clearly marked “FINANCIAL & HUMAN RESOURCES SYSTEM”. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Mr. Michael Arensdorff at (708) 524-3015 or marensdorff@ op97.org Responses Due Date: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 at 4:00 P.M. Only those responses complying with the provision and specification of the response will be considered. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive any informalities, qualification or irregularities and/or reject any or all responses, when in its opinion, such action will serve the best interest of the Board of Education of Oak Park Elementary School District 97. Sheryl Marinier Board Secretary Published in Wednesday Journal 12/4/2019

Starting a New Business in 2020? Call the experts before you place your legal ad! Publish your assumed name legal notice here

708-613-3342

Circuit Court of Cook County, County Department, Domestic Relations Division. In re the marriage of MARCELO GONZALEZ-NUNEZ, Petitioner and MARIA MARTHA RUIZ, Respondent, Case No. 2019D-000393. The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you, the above named Respondent, that a Petition has been filed in the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, by the Petitioner, for Dissolution of Marriage and for other relief; and that said suit is now pending. Now, therefore, unless you, the said Respondent, file your response to said Petition or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois, Room 802, Richard J. Daley Center, 50 West Washington Street, in the City of Chicago, Illinois, on or before December 27, 2019, default may be entered against you at any time after that day, and a judgment for Dissolution of Marriage entered in accordance with the prayer of said Petition. DOROTHY A. BROWN, Clerk. Published in Wednesday Journal 11/27, 12/4, 12/11/2019

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS PROJECT NAME: Riverside School District 96 is requesting Bids for the following project: RIVERSIDE SCHOOL DISTRICT 96 – CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM -All Trade Packages (see bid dates below) -Tentative Start Date: 1/27/2020 -Substantial Completion Date: 8/14/2020 -Owner’s Representative: Vistara Construction Services -Architect: DLA Architects -Construction Manager: Berglund Construction SUBMISSION DUE DATE: Bids for ALL Trade Packages must be delivered by 1:00 pm on Friday, December 20th, 2019 to the attention of Jim Fitton, Riverside School District 96. Bids must be addressed and delivered to Riverside School District 96, 3340 S. Harlem Ave, Riverside, IL 60546. Public Bid Opening will be held in the District Office Board Room on the 2nd floor immediately following receipt of bids. CONTACT: Mr. Brian Sayles, Project Manager; bsayles@berglundco.com or 312-871-4442 DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE: Bid documents will become available at 8:00 am on Wednesday, December 4th, 2019. Please contact Brian Sayles with Berglund Construction to receive a bid invite through SmartBid, which will have the link to all project Documents. Published in Landmark 11/27, 12/4/2019

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT CHANCERY DIVISION LOANCARE, LLC Plaintiff, -v.JORGE BAUTISTA, ROSALIA SANCHEZ Defendants 2018 CH 06558 149 RICE AVENUE BELLWOOD, IL 60104 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 2, 2019, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 6, 2020, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at a public sale to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 149 RICE AVENUE, BELLWOOD, IL 60104 Property Index No. 15-09-107-0930000 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial Sale fee for the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE


18

Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

FORESTPARKREVIEW.COM

CLASSIFIED

(708) 613-3333 • FAX: (708) 467-9066 • E-MAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@FORESTPARKREVIEW.COM

Let the sun shine in...

Public Notice: Your right to know

In print • Online • Available to you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year ForestParkReview.com | PublicNoticeIllinois.com REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file, CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL, 60527 (630) 794-9876 THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE IL, 60527 630-794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-18-05678 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 2018 CH 06558 TJSC#: 39-6480 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Case # 2018 CH 06558 I3138437

The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial Sale fee for the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file, CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL, 60527 (630) 794-9876 THE JUDICIAL SALES

CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE IL, 60527 630-794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-17-17365 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 2018 CH 05883 TJSC#: 39-6512 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Case # 2018 CH 05883 I3138403

real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file, CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL, 60527 (630) 794-9876 THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE IL, 60527 630-794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-12-14848 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Attorney Code. 21762 Case Number: 12 CH 019546 TJSC#: 39-7341 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Case # 12 CH 019546 I3138921

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT CHANCERY DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF ABFC 2007-WMC1 TRUST ASSET BACKED FUNDING CORPORATION ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007WMC1 Plaintiff, -v.CLEVELAND ARMSTEAD, YVETTE PENNYMON ARMSTEAD A/K/A YVETTE PENNYMON, ILLINOIS HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY Defendants 2018 CH 05883 309 SOUTH 22ND AVE BELLWOOD, IL 60104 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 3, 2019, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 6, 2020, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at a public sale to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 309 SOUTH 22ND AVE, BELLWOOD, IL 60104 Property Index No. 15-10-124-0110000

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT CHANCERY DIVISION CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, -v.JESSIE BRUMFIELD Defendants 12 CH 019546 1526 N. AUSTIN BLVD. OAK PARK, IL 60302 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on September 11, 2012, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 10:30 AM on January 7, 2020, at The Judicial Sales Corporation, One South Wacker Drive, CHICAGO, IL, 60606, sell at a public sale to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 1526 N. AUSTIN BLVD., OAK PARK, IL 60302 Property Index No. 16-05-106-020; 16-05-106-021 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial Sale fee for the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said

local employees, happy employees! REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

P

Hire Local. Place an ad on FPR’s

Local Online Job Board. Go to ForestParkReview.com/classified today!

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on age, race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. The Illinois Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental or advertising of real estate based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal-opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll free at: 1-800-669-9777. Wednesday Journal • Landmark • Forest Park Review

Contact Mary Ellen Nelligan for more information. (708) 613-3342 Classifieds@ForestParkReview.


Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

INC., REALTOR

19

(708) 366-8989 7342 MADISON ST, FOREST PARK, ILLINOIS 60130

9346 LANDINGS LN

317 ELGIN

1338 MARENGO

Bright two bed two bath on 4th. fl. with balcony in gated community w 24 hr. security guard. Ceramic tile fl. in kit and dinette. Complex offers outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts and clubhouse. Elevator building w/inside heated garage. coin laundry on 1st.fl. In Des Plaines, close to shopping, schools and highway.....................$149,900

2,450 S.F. OF LUXURY! Center unit! 4 floors of living! Enormous master with a soaking tub and enclosed shower, walk in closet, and a private balcony. 2nd fl. offers 2 additional large bedrooms, walk in closet, storage, and full bath. 1st fl is all oak flooring, living room with a fireplace and eating area, and an eat in kitchen. Bedroom #4 is located in the fully finished basement with a family room area, and full bathroom. 1 space garage. This is the LARGEST TOWNHOME on the market IN FOREST PARK!! ....................................................................................................$389,000

First floor apartment completely remodeled with 2 bedrooms and duplex 3rd. bedroom and half bath and family room in the basement. Second floor is two bedrooms and one bath. Outside parking for 4 cars. Projected rent for 1st floor between ...............................$1375 & $1450

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Forest Park Review, December 4, 2019

HOLIDAY HIGH STREET MARKET Thursday, December 12th 2:00 — 6:00pm

Warm up with spiked hot chocolate, do some holiday gift shopping, enjoy seasonal activities hosted by local businesses and sing some carols around the fireplace. Our Holiday High Street Market is an opportunity for neighbors and local professionals to gather together to toast the season.

Caledonia Senior Living is nestled in the Forest Preserve in North Riverside and is truly magical during the holiday.

2800 Des Plaines Ave., North Riverside 60546

CaledoniaSeniorLiving.org

To RSVP or to find out how your local business can participate please call

708.447.5092

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Forest Park Review 120419  

Forest Park Review 120419