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18 Manukau Rd Newmarket PO Box 99251 Auckland, New Zealand Ph: 09 524 6804 | Fax: 09 524 7048 auctions@webbs.co.nz www.webbs.co.nz


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES IMPORTANT NOTE: BUYER’S PREMIUM A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all lots in this catalogue. GST of 12.5% is payable on the buyer’s premium only.

TUESDAY 22 JULY 2008 7.00PM

CONDITION OF ITEMS The condition of items are not generally detailed in this catalogue. Buyers must satisfy themselves to the PREVIEW: condition of lots they bid on and should refer to clause 6 in the Conditions of Sales for Buyers printed at the back of the catalogue. WEDNESDAY Webb’s is pleased to provide intending buyers with condition reports on any lots.

16 JULY

6PM

– 8PM

16 JULY

9AM

– 5.30PM

17 JULY

9AM

– 5.30PM

FRIDAY

18 JULY

9AM

– 5.30PM

SATURDAY

19 JULY

11AM – 3PM

SUNDAY

20 JULY

11AM – 3PM

MONDAY

21 JULY

9AM

– 5.30PM

TUESDAY

22 JULY

9AM

– 7PM

VIEWING:

Illustrated Front Cover: LOT 12,1939 OHV Ariel Square Four WEDNESDAY Illustrated Inside Front & Back Covers: LOT 11, 1915 Ariel Vee Twin THURSDAY Illustrated Back Cover: LOT 5, 1936 Royal Enfield

IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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FOREWORD “Keep your machine in good order, a good motorcycle is certainly worth a little attention and remember the regular beat of an engine is the rider’s best guide that all is well.” Rider’s Advice – 1925 For little more than a 100 years, the motorcycle has taken on various guises, winding its way from the great and heady pioneer days of Edwardian technology to the hyper-designed, corporate advances that have delivered nano precision and digital tuning to combustion technology. An ingenious concept that is weighted in favour of speed and agility, the motorcycle is one of our more articulated expressions of mankind’s ongoing desire for velocity and freedom. Each motorcycle in this catalogue has its own unique story that reaches forward and reminds us of the creative vision, passion and intellectual endeavour of its creators and of those few who recognised, long ago, that these motorcycles were worth preserving. The metal urging, physical construction and ongoing maintenance of each bike are underscored by the pilots and families that have

ensured that each motorcycle has remained in a state its creators envisaged all those years ago.

Special thanks to Hugh Anderson and Ray Pratt for their valuable time and encouragement.

Each motorcycle on offer reflects the aesthetic vision and technical passion of those very few designers, engineers and pilots bent on building their own perfect blend of maths and myth. Innovative engineering was part of it, but always with a strong sense of lineage and pragmatism (don’t fix it if it ain’t broken). Aesthetic power also played a critical role in the success of these motorcycles but this always balanced with a careful sense of function over form. There is nothing quite like a thing well made.

I would also like to give a special thanks to the Duncan family who provided access to Ross Duncan’s wonderful collection of motorcycles. Ross was well known for his passion for, and love of, fine machinery and a number of beautiful motorcycles in this publication celebrate this.

I would like to thank and acknowledge all of those who have supported Webb’s in our desire to celebrate the passion and power of motorcycle design. The previous owners of the motorcycles in this catalogue were and remain deeply passionate men who gained enormous pleasure from working with, and acting as custodians over, these very special pieces of motorcycling heritage. I have a longstanding interest in motorcycling, so it has been an absolute privilege to have had the opportunity to work alongside such wonderful pieces of design that tread so successfully (in my opinion) between art and technology.

The majority of motorcycles are in good running order but some have not been ridden for a number of years. Therefore, it is essential that buyers satisfy themselves about the accuracy and condition of the motorcycles in which they are interested. It is also recommended that customary safety reviews are undertaken prior to riding. Thank you and good luck.

Neil Campbell Managing Director, Webb’s


PRIVATE TREATY//SALE Contact NEIL CAMPBELL +649 529 5607 email: ncampbell@webbs.co.nz

Webb’s has Important Motorcycles for sale by Private Treaty including this exquisite example of the quintessential late 1973 Ducati GT 750. P.O.A.


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IMPORTANT MOTORCYCLES & RELATED MEMORBILIA NEXT SALE SCHEDULED FOR EARLY 2009 ENTRIES NOW INVITED Following the positive response received to this catalogue, another sale of important vintage and collectors’ motorcycles will be held early in 2009. Entries are currently invited for this specialist sale which will have a focus on early and rare examples of motorcycling history and related memorabilia. Please contact Webb’s for further details on how to participate in New Zealand’s premier auction of important motorcycles or to discuss in confidence any aspect of buying or selling motorcycles. Contact NEIL CAMPBELL +649 529 5607 email: ncampbell@webbs.co.nz

THE HEAVY LINES of the 1962 FLH Harley Davidson are accentuated in black. This is a good, low-slung, weighted ride, built for long meandering rides up and down the line.


LOT

01 1969 BSA BANTAM 175 BUSHMAN Engine No: D14C8619 $2,500 – $3,500

THE IRREPRESSIBLE D175B BUSHMAN By 1951, BSA was the largest producer of motorcycles in the world and it was the Bantam that was to prove the most enduring and arguably the most popular British bike of all time. Small but perfectly formed, more than 500,000 Bantams were produced and sold by BSA from 1948 until 1971 in a wide variety of configurations (road, trials and competition use). In its familiar and somewhat radical white and orange colour scheme, the Bushman variety offered a higher top gear ratio than the others and was particularly popular in rural New Zealand with its incredibly simple mechanics and light geometry. The Bantam holds a special place in New Zealand’s motorcycle history. From its war effort origins to its being the basis of many backyard

performance modifications for the grass tracks of the ’50s and ’60s, it was the Bantam that gave meaning to the word ‘utilitarian’ – inexpensive, simple and long-lasting. Even better, in amongst the big singles there was a growing number of riders who preferred the light simplicity of the Bantam – Stan ‘Tommy’ Tucker, New Zealand grass track racer, was one of them. Easily modified, the Bantam made a surprisingly competitive ride in the right hands and would quite often give the big singles a run for their money on tight courses. With its genuine patina and a particularly charming hand-painted ‘Bushman’ decal, this bike was acquired by Stan Tucker from one of his early apprentices in exchange for one of Stan’s aging British singles and is accompanied by the original manual and ownership papers.


LOT

02 1952 AJS 350 Engine No: 52/16M 15840 Chassis No: 44365 $4,000 - $6,000

THE ‘EVERY MAN’S BIKE’ Weighing as much as the 500cc model, from which most of them were derived, but considerably less powerful, the typical British 350 of the 1950s was not likely to be anyone’s first choice as a fast sports bike. Rather, these honest, workday mounts were chosen for other reasons, chiefly their inherent strength, dependability and economy. AMC’s offerings in this important market sector were the Matchless G3L and AJS Model 16: two bikes, identical in all essential respects, tank badge and magneto position excepted. Testing one of these stalwarts in 1961, Motorcycling Magazine UK recorded a modest top speed of 76mph but found that when toured at a relaxed

pace across country, an excellent 86 miles per gallon was achievable. Although limited, Motorcycling Magazine’s experience confirmed that such a machine was light on the pocket, both for running costs and for the equally important, maintenance and repair factors. Finished in the model’s traditional black livery, this AJS also belongs to one of New Zealand’s better-known riders from the ’50s, Stan ‘Tommy’ Tucker, known for his physical agility on our early grass tracks. Stan has personally prepared this motorcycle for sale and you will note his handmade tank badges. Original papers and work manual accompany the motorcycle.

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LOT

03 2006 CCM T35s No 6 of 120 Engine No: K416 - 104984 Chassis No: SMZHC4OD56804259 Max Power: 42hp $8,000 – $12,000

BRITISH STREET FIGHTER CCM stands for ‘Clews Competition Machines’. This company has been producing high-performance motorcycles, mostly off-roaders, in Bolton, UK, since 1971. Because it is a very small manufacturer (it turns out about seven bikes a week), its products have always had a unique feel and attract the attention of the world’s most informed and passionate riders. Alan Clew (the original owner and founder) and his sons regained control of the famous CCM factory in 2006 and, with this, designed a new class of motorcycle. The limited-edition T53s model (only 120 hand-built units were made available) received applause across the globe and was the winner of the highly competitive 2006 British Short Track series.

The T35s is essentially a power band cloaked in a limited-edition piece of only-just-road-legal, combustion technology. It’s stable, very fast, light and controlled. The bike’s design takes inspiration from the flat-track machines that race the half-mile and mile-long dirt ovals in the USA. Anyone who’s seen the film ‘On Any Sunday’ will know what flat-tracking’s about. If you haven’t, look at flat-track as speedway but with more danger and pain. Oh, and did I mention the wheelies? A highly refined piece of madness, the CCM T35s reminds you of why the British did so well in Spitfires.


LOT

04 1968 YAMAHA DS6250 Engine No: DS6 112240 Chassis No: 112240 Max Power: 28hp Top Speed: 140kph $1,500 – $2,500

THE BEGINNING OF THE END With a top speed of 140kph the impact of this bike on the open road motorcycling fraternity is difficult to understate. The DS range laid the foundation for what was to become Yamaha’s infamous RD (racedeveloped) series which ultimately spelt the end of British dominance and the rise of Japanese success. The engine has a high degree of sensitivity. A quarter-inch turn at the throttle magnifies to an intense leap at the rear wheel. Whatever you put into the bike, it tends to translate that input, amplify it and feed it back to you. The DS6 served notice in 1968 and was no place for a jerky, indecisive pilot who had been brought up on the somewhat lofty British singles of the day.

It’s the way the Yamaha’s two-stroke engine delivers its power that separated it from the then-preferred four-stroke twins. Four-stroke twins accelerate by pulling themselves consistently through the rev-range with determination – not so with the DS6 which throws itself through its revrange delivering instantaneous chunks of power. The revs build so rapidly that the tachometer always seems to be one shift behind. Overall, the DS6 is a rare thrill, merely for the fact that many of its type got the better of the rider. This particular example is in very original condition right down to the signature original grey cabling.

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LOT

05 1936 ROYAL ENFIELD FJ 500CC 4 VALVE Engine No: JF2074 Max Power: 22bhp Max speed: 125kph $12,000 – $16,000

THE RARE AND INFAMOUS ‘BULLET’ “Made like a gun, goes like a bullet” was Royal Enfield’s slogan and, in 1931, E O Pardoe designed and prototyped a four-valve, single-cylinder which was introduced and christened the ‘Bullet’ and which, over time, developed a particularly punchy brand of power. Royal Enfield manufactured a range of fastchanging Bullets during the 1930s and, by 1934, the 500cc gained a four-value head which transformed into a more highly tuned ‘modern-looking’ vertical cylinder design in 1936. The first of these new machines were superbly styled and came with coil ignition, dry sump lubrication with the oil reservoir contained within the crankcase, and fourspeed, foot-change gearboxes. Its compact layout was balanced by its twin ports and the distinctive upswept, sporty exhaust pipes which established the pattern for all future Royal Enfield singles. Authentically restored in 1977, this rare pre-war Bullet is in good running order. The vendor is not aware of any other Bullets of this model in New Zealand. Handwritten instructions outlining the starting procedure and a maintenance pattern accompany the bike together with some parts.


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LOT

06 1914 TRIUMPH TOURIST Chassis No: 253447 Engine No: 43067 Max Power: 3.5hp $20,000 – $25,000 THE FIRST ALL-BRITISH MOTORCYCLE Originally a bicycle manufacturer founded by German immigrants Siegfried Bettman and Maurice Schulte, Triumph was established in 1902 and used Belgian Minerva engines. However, the two men understood the power of being recognised as “home grown” and were determined to build their own power units; the first of these, a 298cc single-cylinder side valve, arrived in 1904. By 1905, Triumph succeeded in manufacturing the first 100% British-made motorcycle. Production at this stage was approximately five per week. The famous 3.5hp model offered here first appeared in 1907. Originally 453cc, its side valve engine was enlarged to 476cc in 1908 and finally to 499cc in 1910 before being superseded by the 4hp model in late 1914.

A slim tank housed within the frame holds fuel and oil. Transmission is by direct belt drive so to start the Triumph it is necessary to pedal up to speed until you release the values closed to create displacement pressure which in turn fires up the machine. Once running, you might reach a heady top speed of 25 mph. With this model, Triumph’s early success in competitive racing was highlighted in 1908 when Jack Marshall won the Isle of Man TT, an event that continues to capture the imagination of today’s public. By the outbreak of WWI, the marque’s reputation for quality and dependability was well established and led to Triumph playing a key role in the Great War supplying front-line dispatch vehicles for our Allied forces. Offered from the Ross Duncan Collection, this is an outstanding example of the early Triumph and represents the best of British from a bygone era.


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LOT

07 1929 BSA S29 OHV 2 PORT SLOPER Chassis No: 131104 Engine No: 11783 $13,500 – $16,500 THE ORIGINAL SLOPER The history of BSA predates the motorised age considerably. Its roots go back to the time of King William III who, in 1692, attempted to improve the fire power of the army by drawing up a contract between the Board of Ordnance and five Birmingham gunsmiths. This ‘contract’ continued for many years and, on 7 June 1861, the Birmingham Small Arms Company was formed; by 1863 a factory had been built at the Small Heath site on the outskirts of Birmingham. In 1880, the company started to make cycles whilst retaining the ‘Piled Arms’ symbol that had become known throughout the world. Whilst rival factories pursued racing success to ensure popularity, BSA concentrated on producing well-priced, good-quality machines in volume in order to enjoy the economies of scale.

Announced in August 1926, the Sloper was introduced in 1927. With its overhead value cylinder angled forward, the Sloper’s low rakish looks were in tune with the times. With a wet sump, saddle tank and a 90-degree value angle, the S29 was absolutely up to the minute. Producing 18hp, capable of delivering a respectable 120kph and priced at 47 pounds, the Sloper was an immediate success and what it lacked in speed it made up for in style. Selling over 80,000 units, the BSA Sloper proved to be a company favourite and suggested that the public’s aesthetic eye was maturing. Another wonderful bike from the Ross Duncan collection, the S29 laid the foundations for what was to evolve into the fabulously aggressive and well-balanced BSA ‘Gold Star’.


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

08 1963 HARLEY-DAVIDSON SPORTSTER Engine No: 63 XLH1440 $16,000 – $20,000

AMERICAN MUSCLE In 1963, Willie G Davidson (son of founder Arthur Davidson) joined the HarleyDavidson family firm as Director of Design. By then, 120,000 miles of super-highway had been constructed across the United States and was rapidly changing the face of motorcycling culture. The rider’s demand for high-performance, long-range machines drew race technology from the track onto the street at an unprecedented pace. The T120 Bonneville was gaining significant market share and Harley-Davidson, now America’s longest-standing motorcycle company, responded to British muscle headon with what is now considered to be a signature design: the light and powerful XLH Sportster. It was this Sportster that redefined the battle lines and allowed Harley-Davidson to reclaim its dominance of the drag racing scene that was in many ways the heart and soul of the United States bike scene.

In 1963, the Sportster stood alone as the muscle bike of the day. With the styling, engineering and heritage that only the Harley-Davidson Motor Company could bring to the sport, the ‘63 Sportster ran like a muscle bike should, with power and presence. Willie G Davidson fought pressure from the bean counters to simplify the design and accommodate emerging corporate production practice. However, the ’63 model retained the classic variability of the XLH/C Sportster that allowed the rider to easily modify the machine to his style – note that this example has the ’63 XLCH (Competition Hot) frontend fitted. Willie understood simple customization and the brute power of the 45 degree V-Twin gave voice to the individual rider and, more importantly, to his father’s founding passion.


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LOT

09 1955 BSA 10A GOLDEN FLASH Engine No: BA10 – 11600 Chassis No: BA7S 15640 Max Power: 35hp $7,000 – $12,000 TO TALK THE TORQUE The first assignment for Bert Hopwood (originally of Norton and Edward Turner’s protégé) at BSA was to create a motorcycle with more torque. He quickly designed, built and prototyped the BSA A10 650cc ‘Golden Flash’ twin which was announced in October 1949 and joined BSA’s 500cc A7 model. More than just enlarge an A7, Hopwood spayed the exhaust ports of the Golden Flash to improve cooling, specified a large crank and stronger crankshaft and provided an oil trough to give consistent lubrication to the camshaft. Mildly tuned, the Golden Flash delivered a solid 35hp at 5,500rmp, was economical relaxed and well within its limits on the other side of 100mph.

The new 650 was strikingly finished in pale gold metallic livery. In 1955, the Golden Flash was updated with the swinging-arm frame and separate gearbox and continued in essentially this form until production ceased in 1962. Many different types of A models were produced with great names like ‘Super Flash’ and ‘Road Rocket’. The A models were very simple in their look and were not noted for their extravagance but celebrated for their reliability and oil tightness. Price was a major reason for their staying popular and winning the hearts and minds of thousands of motorcyclists at the time. It’s fair to say that the A model became a trademark design of BSA. An extremely robust and confident motorcycle, it proved to be one of collector, Ross Duncan’s favourite rally machines.


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

10 1917 HD 1000CC BROADTRACK RACER Engine No: L17T 4430 Stripped F Head Stock Racer $25,000 – $35,000

FULL ON The first board track opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum Motordome near Playa del Rey, California, on 8 April 1910. Based on, and utilising the same technology as the French velodromes used for bicycle races, the imposing track and others like it were created with 2 inch x 4 inch boards, and banked up to 50 degrees, or more. Timber was cheap, labour was plentiful, and board track racing offered a level of spectacle not seen since Roman times and, by 1915, around a half-dozen tracks had opened for the engrossed public. Patches of oil, gaping holes and splinters too numerous to count meant that the riders endured brutal riding conditions in their quest for victory and there was the everpresent danger of laying the bike down at high speed. Race promoters made fortunes as did the pilots, with up to 80,000 spectators clambering around the track. Daily gate receipts of $10,000 were common. True to form, the lure of big money encouraged a troupe of privateers to strip down and build up purpose-built race bikes with the highest

attainable horsepower they could squeeze from their motors. The design philosophy was fair and pragmatic – if it didn’t make the bike lighter or faster (such as brakes!) it was removed. It was also common to do away with the complication of having an actual throttle – instead the pilots preferred to hard wire the throttle ‘full on’. Very high speeds and a complete lack of safety precautions lead to spectacular wrecks on the board tracks in the 1910s, often killing a half-dozen competitors and spectators at a time. The effect of the banking was higher cornering speed and greater Gforce on drivers. Fans sat on the top of the track looking down at the racers. When a pilot lost control, he would scream up and off the track and into the crowd. The press started calling circuits ‘murderdromes’. This controversy over safety eventually marked the demise of board track racing and by the 1930s the sport was virtually extinct. This example has been meticulously restored by Dave Oldham, one of New Zealand’s best emerging specialists in important motorcycles.


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

11 CIRCA 1915 ARIEL 670CC VEE TWIN Split crank cases marked 47 Lower engine marked A5824 $15,000 – $20,000

THE GREAT UNKNOWN Very little is known about this very early example of the Ariel Vee Twin. The vendor can recall seeing the motorcycle in his late brother’s garage in the late 1950s. With the heavily dusted patina it is also difficult to ascertain whether the bike was re-commissioned long ago. Turning over smoothly, the 670cc displacement motor is wet and all componentry is authentic and complete. The machine is powered by a Vee Twin 670cc motor, has a belt drive, a foot clutch pedal, a hand-change, three-speed gearbox and a 50-degree bosch magneto, and runs on 26 x 2½-inch beaded edge tires. When marketed, it was priced high at 70/15/- pounds. Undoubtedly one of the oldest Ariel Vee Twins in the southern hemisphere, this wonderful example would respond well to a very light and sympathetic restoration. The motorcycle comes with an original parts manual and a significant range of accompanying parts. Like many motorcycle manufacturers, Ariel has a history that is traced back to the very

first days of bicycle technology and early (1847) pneumatic-tyre technology which they produced for horse-drawn carriages. However, it wasn’t until the company patented their invention of the tension spoke wheel in 1870 that Ariel’s mark was permanently struck. It then went on to produce Britain’s first all-metal penny farthing machine and named it the Ariel – Spirit of Air – as it was lighter than most other contemporary machines. The first Ariel motorcycle was produced in 1902 under licence from White and Poppe. When the Great War broke out, the Ariel consisted of only three models: a 350cc two stroke single, a 498cc s.v. single and a 670cc s.v. Vee Twin. Ariel attracted pivotal designers such as J A Preswick, Bert Hopwood and Edward Turner (the man behind the most influential vertical twin ever made, Triumph’s Speed Twin, and also the imposing Ariel Square Four (refer lot 12).Widely recognised as having produced some of the most handsome and successful motorcycles during its illustrious and turbulent history this Ariel is a significant and truly historical find.


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LOT

12 THE 1939 OHV ARIEL SQUARE FOUR – THE 4G 955CC Chassis No: P338 Engine No: DE317 Max. Power: 38hp $22,000 – $25,000 THE ARISTOCRATIC BRUTE – SMOOTH, FAST AND POWERFUL Legend has it that Edward Turner conceived the Square Four engine in 1928 – the essence of the concept appearing so quickly that he was required to write it down on the back of a cigarette packet. The engine was essentially a pair of ‘across frame’ OHC parallel twins joined by their geared central flywheels, with one four-cylinder block (or Monobloc) and one head. The idea for the engine was rejected by BSA, but embraced by Ariel. Thus it became the ‘Ariel Square Four’. The idea of mounting an inline four into a performance motorcycle had historically given rise to fundamental problems: mount it longitudinally and the wheelbase was too long, transversely and the bike was too fat – both outcomes would result in poor geometry and handling. So anyone attempting to deliver the qualities that only four-cylinder motors might deliver to a sports bike was required to think outside of the square.

Turner’s vision was to provide “a four cylinder engine small enough for use in a solo motorcycle yet producing ample power for high performance without undue compression, racing cams or big choke carburetors”. Essentially, Edward Turner’s design philosophy foreshadowed decades of modern motorcycle design; he stated that he merely sought to “deliver ultimate reliability and performance with minimum attentions (maintenance requirements)”. Stunning the public with its beautifully low slung lines the Square Four was first shown at Olympia in 1930. Originally an overheadcamshaft 500, the model grew to 601cc before a total redesign saw it emerge as the highly refined 4G, with its aggressive 995cc overhead-valve, all-iron engine, in 1937. Ariel’s patented Anstey link plunger rear suspension (as depicted here) became an option in 1939 but would not be offered again until 1946 when a telescopic front fork replaced the previous girder type. With its limitless reserves of pulling power and innate smoothness, the model was a superb touring mount for the solo pilot. This exquisite example of the rare crossover model (last of the girder, first of the Anstey link plunger) comes from the Ross Duncan collection and is undoubtedly a superior example of the superbike of the girder fork era.


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LOT

13 1958 MANX NORTON 10M 77295 Engine No: 10M77295 Chassis No: 10M77295 Max Power: 38hp (on an average day) $50,000 – $70,000 RAW POWER With a history stretching back almost to the beginning of motorcycling history itself, the Norton single is without doubt one of the greatest over-the-counter production racers ever produced and The Manx is the epitome of the British racing single. These extremely ‘cammy’ Nortons dominated road racing at a Grand Prix level until they were finally eclipsed by the Italian and Japanese multi-cylinders. Even then, both factory and privately entered Manx models put up some tremendous performances often against heroic odds to win countless races well into the ‘60s. Mechanically, the Manx was immensely strong and, because of this, it earned a unique place as the privateer’s machine of choice on which you could represent your Nation and heroically campaign the Grand Prix. Originally purchased from the Manx factory in 1958 by John Hamplemen (National Representative 1955 and 1957; New Zealand Team Captain in 1957) and then by Hugh Anderson (four times World Champion), this Manx Norton is the most successfully campaigned machine known to exist within New Zealand.

John Hemplemen was noted for his superbly fluid riding style and for many years New Zealanders were thrilled by his exhibitions. He commenced his racing career in 1948 at air strip, beach and grass track events. By the time he was 18 years old, John Hemplemen had won three New Zealand titles. Entering road racing in 1952, Mr Hempleton was to develop into a highly competitive rider at an international level. Having acquired the Manx direct from the factory in 1957, John Hemplemen went on to campaign the Manx successfully throughout the ‘Continental circus’ racking a large number of wins and impressive placings which made him a household name at the time. 1958 Results below:

Returning from England on the ‘Rangitiki’ late in 1958, he wasted no time in putting the Manx to task, racking up good results late in the season: 30.10.58 Ardmore Airfield, Airfield Championship 1st 26.12.58 Wanganui Round the Houses 350cc Road Race 2nd 1959 marked the silver jubilee of the NZTT series which started on Waiheke Island in 1931 and 80,000 spectators saw Mr Hemplemen win the event. Mr Hemplemen’s other successes within the New Zealand setting that year are as listed: 1.1.59 Rotorua Grand Prix, 350cc Road Race 1st 3.1.59 Mt Maunganui Road Race, Open Scratch Race Open Championship

1st 1st

Salzburg (Austria)

2nd

10.1.59 Ardmore Airfield, 350cc Grand Prix

1st

St Wendel (Saar)

1st

Moulins (France)

7th

24.1.59 Bay of Plenty Grand Prix, 350cc Grand Prix

1st

Dutch TT (Assen)

10

26.1.59 Te Puna Road Race, 350cc Class

1st

th

1st

th

Francorchamps (Belgian GP)

9

21.2.59 NZTT Mangere, 350cc NZTT

Cadours (France)

7

th

7.11.59 Ardmore Airfield, 350cc Championship1st

Swedish GP (Hedemora)

7

th

Zeltweg (Austria)

1

28.11.59 Levin Circuit Race, 350cc Race 500cc Race (on 350cc)

1st 1st

Czech GP (Brno)

7th

5.12.59 Taranaki Grand Prix, 350cc Race

1st

Zandvoort (Holland)

1st

Silverstone (England)

5

Kirkby Mallory (England)

2nd

Returning to Europe, Mr Hemplemen competed against the highly resourced factory supported riders and again secured success. Mr Hemplemen’s consistency was a reflection of both his ability to prepare the Manx for various circuits and his concentrated skill as a Manx pilot.

Isle of Man (Broken Mag Chain)

st

th

DNF


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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The 1960 results were as follows: Silverstone (England)

6

Salzburg (Austria)

2

St Wendel (Saar)

4

Karlskoga (Sweden)

2

Hockenheim (German Grand Prix)

5th

Schleiz (East German Grand Prix)

6th

Dutch TT (Assen)

6

Belgium Grand Prix (Francorchamps)

3

Nurburgring (Germany)

2

Truxton (England)

1st

Ulster Grand Prix (Ireland)

6th

Czech Grand Prix (Brno)

2nd

East German Grand Prix (Sachsenring)

1st

Italian Grand Prix (Monza)

4th

th

nd th

nd

th

rd

nd

Returning once again to New Zealand in late 1960, Mr Hemplemen became a MZ works rider and went about selling the Manx to the future World Champion, Hugh Anderson, who duly returned to the United Kingdom with the Manx to ride at the 1960 Thruxton Commonwealth Meeting. He achieved 2nd place but also broke the lap record. Having won 25 Grand Prix victories Hugh Anderson is one of the most outstanding racers ever produced by New Zealand. No other Kiwi and only one other competitor (Mick Doohan) has bettered Anderson’s 25 GP victories.

Having aggressively campaigned the Manx, Anderson travelled back to New Zealand for the 1960 – 61 summer races where he won every start in the North Island.

Zeltweg (Austria)

1st

Czech Grand Prix (Brno)

7th

Zandvoort (Holland)

1st

From here, Mr Anderson returned to Europe for the 1961 Saar Grand Prix where he won the 350cc Grand Prix. Then at Monza in 1961, he was the 1st privateer across the line, finishing a very respectable 7th overall, whilst competing against the highly financed factories and on a bike which was now four years old.

Silverstone (England)

5th

Restored in 1990 to as-new condition, the Manx holds an impeccable campaign history, and is accompanied by the No 57 racing fairing and change-of-ownership papers between Mr Hemplemen and Mr Anderson who has personally vetted the machine and confirms that the Manx is near original save the front rim. The last Manx was built in 1962. Other successes attributed to this Manx Norton include: 1958 - 350cc Competition Races Salzburg (Austria)

2

Record Lap St Wendel (Saar)

1

Moulins (France)

7th

Dutch TT (Assen)

10th

Francorchamps (Belgian Grand Prix)

nd st

1959 - 350cc Competition Races Silverstone (England)

6th

Salzburg (Austria)

2nd

St Wendal (Saar)

4th

Karlskoga (Sweden)

2nd

Hockenheim (German Grand Prix)

5th

Schleiz (Germany)

3rd

Record Lap Dutch TT (Assen)

6th

Belgian Grand Prix (Francorchamps)

3rd

Nurburgring (Germany)

2nd

Thruxton (England)

1st

Ulster Grand Prix (Ireland)

6th

Czech Grand Prix (Brno)

2nd

E.German Grand Prix (Sachsenring)

1st

Italian Grand Prix (Monza)

4th

9th

Cadours (France)

7th

Swedish Grand Prix (Hedemora)

7th

IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

14 1914 CLYNO 5/6HP WITH SIDECAR COMPONENTS Frame No: 899 Engine No: 4332 $30,000 – $35,000 GENTLEMAN’S COMFORT Manufactured from 1911 to 1923 the Clyno quickly developed a fine reputation for reliability, relative speed and comfort. The first of the Clyno motorcycles utilising proprietary Vee Twin engines was made by the Thrapston, Wolverhampton-based firm, Stevens (later becoming AJS), utilising fittings from Charter lea of London. In 1912, a larger machine was built powered by a 750cc 5/6hp Stevens Vee Twin. Sleek, low and lightweight for its time (under 190lbs), the powerful, high-geared Clyno Vee Twin proved equally capable both as a solo ride or when linked to a sidecar. By 1913, the Clyno motorcycle was also known for its innovation and convenience with such features as quickly detachable wheels (a patented interchangeable front and rear sidecar system), cast alloy footboards and a two-speed, chain-driven model. Clyno was the first to enclose drive chains in all aluminum cases. Robustly engineered, Clyno machines also enjoyed success in trials, including the MCC’s prestigious London–Edinburgh and London– Exeter events, and were much favoured

for their sidecars, and in 1914 they were in substantial demand for armoured battle field combinations. Clyno later changed emphasis from motorcycles to light cars which ultimately spelt doom for the company as they were unable to ride out the post-war depression. Located by a workmate, this motorcycle was brought to the attention of the current owner because it was going to be buried. As was often the case, someone had dismantled it many years previously and then forgotten about it. The frame was found nearby in an overgrown hedge. Not knowing exactly what he had, the owner did the only thing he could and undertook a trial assembly only to discover that he, in fact, had a complete motorcycle – a Clyno – a marque he had not heard of until that moment. Some time later, after many long nights, the Clyno attended its first rally in 1990 and after two attempts successfully completed the Hawke’s Bay rally from Taupo to Napier; this is testament to both the machine and its rider. The bike is accompanied by visual records of the restoration and sidecar components.


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

15 1914 DOUGLAS 348CC 2¾HP Model U Engine No: 84564 $12,000 – $18,000

THE ORIGINAL HORIZONTAL TWIN The Douglas Engineering Company was formed in Bristol by brothers William and Edward in 1882, first as a blacksmith’s shop, but soon expanding to become an iron founders. After the turn of the century and the advent of the motor vehicle, the company soon became involved in the development of engines and was especially known for its horizontally opposed twin cylinder engine bikes and as manufacturers of furious speedway machines. There were no less than five incarnations of Douglas throughout its somewhat bumpy history but, despite this, Douglas enjoyed competitive success and helped establish the flat twin as a practical engine layout for motorcycles as it lowered the centre of gravity and provided a smooth delivery of power. The attractive external fly wheel was also a signature mark which, when lightly struck, produces a wonderfully clear and consistent note. The native timber hand grips and brake pads were a common solution as the demands of the Great War placed pressure on the supply of quality rubber. For the same reason, the main belt drive is constructed from layered canvas. Douglas remained faithful to the horizontally opposed twin cylinder until the final model, the Dragonfly, which was announced in 1954 with production finally ending in 1957. Well campaigned by the vendor, this excellent 1914 Douglas is in good running order.


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

16 1926 HARLEY-DAVIDSON 7/9 COMPLETE WITH ROYAL TOURIST SIDECAR OUTFIT Engine Number: 26J4557 Max Power: 25hp $26,000 – $30,000 THE INFAMOUS F HEAD In February 1907, a prototype HarleyDavidson with a 45-degree V-Twin engine was displayed at the Chicago Automobile Show. Although shown and advertised, very few V - Twin models were built between 1907 and 1910. However, the design focus on performance and low compression power production ensured the success of HarleyDavidson and by the 1920s, Harley-Davidson was the largest motorcycle manufacturer in the world with its motorcycles selling in over 67 countries. Harley-Davidson’s blueprint for their signature V-twin was established with adoption of the mechanically operated (push rod) inlet valves in 1911 (replacing the ‘atmospheric’ type inherited from the single), it was this development that made the Harley-Davidson V Twin a truly practical machine. Known by the sobriquet ‘pocket valve’, the ‘F-head’ (inlet-over-exhaust) built

both in 61ci and 74ci capacities (1,000cc and 1,200cc respectively) would remain in production for the next 20 years. Technical innovation of the F head continued with the introduction of conventional, threespeed, sliding-gear transmission with the ‘step starter’ being introduced on the top-ofthe-range version of the twin which, with full electrical equipment, was listed as the Model J, which is what is presented here. As one of the oldest sidecar manufacturers in the world Harley-Davidson was selling seven sidecars for every ten bikes before Ford’s Model T became cheap enough to offer a more comfortable alternative. With motorcycle-sidecar combinations becoming ever more popular a whole range of various side car outfits with a wealth of extra options were offered to the customer. Sold new for $98.00 (side car included) the power and reliability of the F head was put to private and commercial use in vast numbers. Particularly popular amongst the bootleg runners the F head and side car outfit had the power and capacity to out run most police vehicles of the day, of course the side could also be dressed quite successfully to hide the illicit cargo of the times. Heralding from Ross Duncan’s collection, this is a wonderfully maintained example of what is arguably Harley-Davidson’s most influential period.


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

17 1979 YAMAHA XT 500 Engine No: 8H7 003210 Chassis No: 8H7 003210 Max Power: 27hp $4,500 – $5,000 THE ‘PINE TREE’ In 1975, the single-cylinder four-stroke motorcycle was more or less extinct and buried due to the dominance of the smooth powerful multi-cylinder two-stroke. In fact, at the time, Britain’s BSA was one of the few makers still offering big single machines, but even this renowned brand had not released a new big single in a good number of years. It seemed that 40 years of singlecylinder combustion development was to be relegated to a vintage status. And then there was Yamaha’s XT 500. Making its debut in 1976, the XT heralded a renaissance for the big ‘thumper’based displacement. Marking the start of the off-road phenomenon that continues today, the XT celebrated the merits of the thumper philosophy which had carried past generations through some of the best years of motorcycle development.

To mark this the XT 500 won the first two places in the inaugural Paris to Dakar rally (1979) and immediately gained legend status capturing a new generation of rider with a passion for adventurous motorcycling. Described by Yamaha as merely a result of good basic design principles, the XT was an unexpected and wildly successful hit. Its down-to-earth, no-nonsense pragmatism appealed to the New Zealand rider. Just as comfortable on the farm with a ewe hung across the tank as it was winding its way through sealed hilltops or pulling a wheelie outside the local dairy, the XT 500 has quietly earned its place in this country with its generous low-strung charisma. The XT underscores a remarkable reliability which you know will never leave you in the lurch.


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

18 2001 MV AUGUSTA F4+1 Engine No: AY03150 Chassis No: ZCGF401AAYV002580 Max Power: 135hp Top Speed: 260kph $16,000 – $22,000 SINGULAR VELOCITY The motorcycle presented here is the result of what is now considered one of the finest engineering collaborations of modern time: MV Augusta and Ferrari – Enzo and Count Domenico Augusta – were two men who were not concerned about the relatively mundane business of making road-going machines; it was racing and winning that obsessed them to the end, and the MVF4 is a testament to this. Dominating the great tracks of the ‘50s and ‘60s, MV gained 270 Grand Prix wins and no less than 75 rider and manufacturers’ World Championships. In short, MV captured the 500cc crown every year from 1958 to 1974 through riders such as John Surtees, Gary Hocking, Mike Hailwood, Giacomo Agostini and Phil Reed.

The heritage of the MVF4 can be traced back to the great designer Pietro Remor (of Gillera fame) who joined MV in 1950. Designing a ferocious double overhead cam four-cylinder race machine that could take its pilot into the white side of 200kpm, MV announced to the world the future of modern motorcycle racing. The inline four reeked of quality and integrity with speed and handling to match. The same can be said of the modern MVF4. With numerous innovations, the F4 is a benchmark in contemporary motorcycling. Technology, design and the desire to create a machine that establishes a new technical standard, combined with Massimo Tamburini genius and styling created a new reference point. Every detail is conceived to enhance dynamic value, to exude heightened technical expertise and to deliver a superb concentrated velocity.


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

19 1931 ARIEL SLOPER Engine No: D628 Chassis No: 5603 $14,000 – $20,000

THE 29S By 1926, Ariel’s chief designer Val Page had come up with an overheadvalve 500cc single that reputedly produced a good 20 hp – hence their marketing phrase: “20 horses in the cradle”. At the same time, Ariel became known for its publicity stunts; trials rider Harry Parrey rode to the top of Mount Snowden and also crossed the English Channel on a standard Ariel equipped with floats. Compact, good looking and fast (it could top 120kph) he Ariel Sloper was not enough to stop Ariel’s parent company from falling briefly into

bankruptcy in 193. Jack Sangster swooped in to save the day and soon after put Edward Turner (Head of Design) and Bert Hopwood (Chief Draughtsman) to task. Always striking at the top end of the market, the Ariel Sloper exhibited all of the elaborate hallmarks of Ariel. However the depression was starting to effect demand and a season later the company was forced to rationalise its production plant and return to the slightly less dramatic vertical displacement model. With this the stylistic but short lived design was retired.


LOT

20 2000 DUCATI MH900E Engine No: ZDMV 300AA1BOO1760 Chassis No: ZDMV904A2KO13384 $20,000 – $25,000

THE MIKE HAILWOOD 900 EVOLUZIONE One of the world’s leading manufacturers of high-performance sport motorcycles, Ducati was founded in 1926 and is now widely recognised amongst the motorcycle fraternity for producing racing-inspired motorcycles characterised by unique engine features, innovative design, advanced engineering and overall technical excellence. It’s fair to say that Ducati has always managed to craft its motorcycles with passion. Pierre Terblanche’s successful effort in combining memory with modern technology was the basis on which to conceive, design, and produce the MH900e, the Mike Hailwood evolution. This limited-edition collector’s bike was pre-sold exclusively on the internet by Ducati in 2000

in honour of the unforgettable Mike Hailwood and his historic conquest of the world TT title on the legendary Isle of Man circuit in 1978. The MH900e applies the exquisite running gear of a 900 Supersport, a single-sided swingarm made specifically for the bike, and the signature bodywork of Pierre Terblanche which reaches back in time to capture the style of Mike Hailwood’s ferocious TT-winning Pantah. Technically, the MH900e range does not exist, the only bike that does exist is the MH900e: one version, refined and exciting, with no alternatives, either in performance, equipment or colour scheme. The exclusive character of the MH900e places it as a modern classic in a class of its own. IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

21 1954 AJS 500 16MS Engine No: 5416MS20744 Chassis No: A5438 $4,500 - $6,500

THE QUIET ACHIEVER One of the most prestigious of all British marques, the ďŹ rm of Albert John Stevens (AJS) was incorporated in 1909 and went on to become one of the pillars of the British motorcycle industry. In the 1920s, AJS was consistently successful in motor sport and development work culminated in awesomely fast machines. By the early ‘30s, AJS had accumulated 117 world records. AJS racing machines included the wonderful 350cc 7R (the original Boy Racer) and the Porcupine parallel twin, initially designed to house early supercharged technology.

The 500 16MS, housed in a rigid frame, with a robust overhead-valve engine, four-speed gearbox and a teledraulic front end provided a wellresolved bike for the day. This example underwent restoration some years ago and, since completion, has seen little use.


LOT

22 1953 AJS 500 MC MODEL 20 Engine No: 5320/15557 Chassis No: A6186 $4,500 – $6,500

THE SPRING TWIN One of the first models to provide plush seating for the pillion passenger the Spring Twin was a very successful model and considered a flagship cruiser of the day. Mr Ross Duncan had a fastidious eye for detail when it came to ensuring that his collection was in good order on all levels. This AJS MC is accompanied by a letter from Mr Roy Bacon of Classic Motorcycle magazine confirming the year and model of the motorcycle.

With this, Mr Duncan politely corrected the Motor Registration Centre of New Zealand who kindly responded and made correct their initial oversight; this correspondence is also with the motorcycle. A particularly fine example, this Spring Twin comes complete with the original framed mounted hand pump for those rare but troublesome road side puncture episodes.

IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

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LOT

23 1973 CB350F Engine No: CB530F 1066590 Chassis No: CB530F 1036531 Max Power: 34hp Top Speed: 160kph $2,500 – $3,500

THE RIGHT PATH The four-cylinder CB series represents one of the great technical leaps since motorcycling began – a potent overhead cam engine, disc brakes, a tight five-speed gearbox, electric start and guts to boot. Winning the French 24-hour Bo d’Or race in 1969 and the 1970 United States Daytona, the CB750 was then compacted into the CB350F.

The power below 6500rpm was highly manageable and came on in a pleasant rush above 6500rpm that carried the rider all the way to the bike’s respectable 8500rpm red-line. The handling was known to be good and predictable for the time. Overall the bike is comfortable and well laid out, the engine indestructible, easy to work on, and very reliable.

Although aimed at the sporting segment of the market, the four-stroke CB350F did not have the acceleration of the competition’s two-strokes. But what the CB350F engine lacked in power it made up for in refinement: the small-displacement four-stroke was smoother, quieter and much more economical than the two-strokes.

The CB350F is a personal experience, a modern tinkerer’s machine, a good first bike, a great way to get to work and back, or to enjoy some nostalgia for those of us who remember them when they were new.


KTM RC8 - 1190

TRIUMPH ROCKET III TOURER

FXSTSSE2 SOFTAIL SPRINGER

BUELL 2008 1125r


A GUIDE FOR BUYERS Webb’s have set out the following information for the benefit of first time buyers and those who are unfamiliar with auction procedures. Important note: Please refer to full conditions of sale for buyers printed in the reverse of this catalogue and displayed in the saleroom. Registration: All intending buyers must complete a bidding form available from the reception desk BUYING AT AUCTION 1. Floor Bidders Ensure that you have registered and obtained a buyer number before bidding on the lot or lots you have chosen Be aware that a buyer’s premium of 12.5%+GST on the premium or 15%+GST is payable by all buyers in addition to the hammer price. Please make sure that you are aware of the amount of the buyer’s premium. Make your bids clear preferably by holding up your buyer number card. If you make a mistake e.g. the auctioneer takes a bid from you at a higher level than you had intended or you realise that you had bid on the wrong lot call out to the auctioneer immediately so that the bidding can be adjusted. Waiting until after the hammer falls is too late. If your bid is the highest and the lot is knocked down to you then you have entered a binding obligation to pay for that lot.

of any opening bid or may open the bidding on your behalf at the Auctioneers estimate at the Auctioneer’s sole discretion. Telephone Bids The same conditions as above apply to telephone bidders. Webb’s will telephone the number you have given several minutes before the lot you have request comes up for sale. If your phone is engaged or we are unable to make contact the auction will proceed without your bidding. Our staff will ask you to hold when we have made contact. They will then tell you that your lot is about to come up. The bids will be relayed to you and you can enter the bidding at any time by making your call. Please note that the bidding at many auctions can be fast and furious. The auctioneer will not favour a phone bidder over and above buyers who are attending the auction by giving them more time to bid. You will need to establish your limit and make sure that you bid clearly and promptly. Telephone bids are only accepted for catalogued sales and on items with estimates over 500. Pre-Sale Estimates Estimates printed in the catalogue or given verbally are intended as a guide only and can be subject to revision nearer to the time of a sale. Webb’s staff are available during pre-sale viewing times and by appointment to assist prospective bidders with estimates and any aspect of the auction procedure.

2. Sales Subject to Vendor’s Consent

Condition Reports

Where your bid is the highest but still below the reserve the Auctioneer may declare you to be the “buyer subject to Vendor’s consent”. This means that your bid is held as binding and will be communicated to the Vendor at the earliest opportunity. If the vendor accepts then there is a contractual obligation for you to pay for the lot. If the vendor does not accept you are released from any obligation however you will have first right to negotiate with the vendor through Webb’s until an agreement is reached and Webb’s will not present other offers to the vendor until your negotiations are ended.

Webb’s staff will provide condition reports for out of Auckland buyers. However please note that no 6 in the Conditions of Sale for Buyers will still apply despite the obtaining of a condition report.

3. Absentee Bids Webb’s will endeavour to ensure that your bidding instructions are executed but accept no responsibility or liability for failure to do so. Lots will be bought as favourably as is allowed by bidding in the sale room and any reserve imposed by the vendor. Please note that Webb’s cannot guarantee that another bidder will not be successful at your limit if in the course of competitive bidding someone else bids your limit first. Absentee bids are accepted by written instruction which can be sent by fax (e-mailed absentee bids are not accepted) up to l hour before the commencement of the sale. Absentee bids will be executed on the following basis: If your bid limit is equal to or above a reserve the Auctioneer may open the bidding at reserve on your behalf and will bid thereafter only in response to competition for the lot.If your bid limit is below a reserve the Auctioneer may open the bidding at your limit and if there are no further bids in the room may sell to you “subject to vendor’s consent”. In the absence of a reserve the Auctioneer may exercise your bid in advance

Payment Payment for all items purchased is due on the day of sale immediately following completion of the sale. If full payment cannot be made on the day of sale a deposit of 10% of the total sum due must be made on the day of sale and the balance must be paid within 5 working days. Payment is by cash bank cheque or Eftpos. Cheques will be accepted but must be cleared before delivery of goods will be given. Credit cards are not accepted. Packing and Freight Webb’s do not pack goods in house. However we will arrange for your items to be packed insured and shipped by a professional agent. All costs associated with packing and freight are payable by the purchaser. Valuation Service Webb’s provide free market appraisals on Monday mornings from 9am-1pm or at other times by appointment. Webb’s appraisers will come to your home to view and appraise larger items. Webb’s will provide valuations for insurance matrimonial division family division etc. Please enquire at reception for charges. Valuation charges are refundable on occasion when goods are subsequently offered for sale within a reasonable period.


CONDITIONS OF SALE FOR BUYERS 1. BIDDING: The highest bidder shall be the purchaser subject to the auctioneer having the right to refuse the bid of any person. Should any dispute arise as to the bidding the lot in dispute will be immediately put up for sale again at the preceding bid or the auctioneer may declare the purchaser which declaration shall be conclusive. No person shall advance less at a bid than the sum nominated by the auctioneer and no bid may be retracted. 2. RESERVES. All lots are sold subject to the right of the seller or his agent to impose a reserve. 3. REGISTRATION. Purchasers shall complete a bidding card before the sale giving their own correct name address and telephone number. It is accepted by bidders that the supply of false information on a bidding card shall be interpreted as deliberate fraud. 4. BUYERS’ PREMIUM. The purchaser accepts that in addition to the hammer or selling price Webb’s will apply a buyer’s premium of 15% of the hammer price (unless otherwise stated) together with GST on such premium, which combined sum shall be the total purchase price. 5. PAYMENT. Payment for all items purchased is due on the day of sale immediately following completion of the sale. If full payment cannot be made on the day of sale a deposit of 10% of the total sum due must be made on the day of sale and the balance must be paid within 5 working days. Payment is by cash, bank (cashiers) cheque or Eftpos. Personal and private bank cheques will be accepted but must be cleared before delivery of goods will be given. Credit cards are not accepted. 6. LOTS SOLD AS VIEWED. All lots are sold as viewed and with all errors to description faults and imperfections whether visible or not. Neither Webb’s nor its vendor are responsible for errors of description or for the genuineness or authenticity of any lot or for any fault or defect in it and make no warranty whatever. Buyers proceed upon their own judgement. Buyers shall be deemed to have inspected the lots or to have made enquiries to their complete satisfaction prior to sale and by the act of bidding shall be deemed to be satisfied with the lots in all respects. 7. WEBB’S ACT AS AGENTS. They have full discretion to conduct all aspects of the sale and to withdraw any lot from the sale without giving any reason. 8. COLLECTION. Purchases are to be taken away at the buyer’s expense immediately after the sale except where a cheque remains uncleared. If this is not done Webb’s will not be responsible if the lot is lost stolen damaged or destroyed. Any items not collected within seven days of the auction may be subject to a storage and insurance fee. A receipted invoice must be produced prior to delivery of any lot. 9. LICENCES. Buyers who purchase an item which falls within the provisions of the Antiquities Act 1975 or the Arms Act 1958 cannot take possession of that item until they have shown to Webb’s a license under the appropriate Act. 10. FAILURE TO MAKE PAYMENT. If a purchaser fails either to pay for or take away any lot Webb’s shall without further notice to the purchaser at its absolute discretion and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies it may have be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies: a. To issue proceeding against the purchaser for damages for breach of contract.

b. To rescind the sale of that or any other lot sold to the purchaser at the same or any other auction. c. To resell the lot by public or private sale. Any deficiency resulting from such resale after giving credit to the purchaser for any part payment together with all costs incurred in connection with the lot shall be paid to Webb’s by the purchaser. Any surplus over the proceeds of sale shall belong to the seller and in this condition the expression “proceeds of sale” shall have the same meaning in relation to a sale by private treaty as it has in relation to a sale by auction. d. To store the lot whether at Webb’s own premises or elsewhere at the sole expense of the purchaser and to release the lot only after the purchase price has been paid in full plus the accrued cost of removal storage and all other costs connected to the lot. e. To charge interest on the purchase price at a rate 2% above Webb’s bankers’ then current rate for commercial overdraft facilities to the extent that the price or any part of it remains unpaid for more than seven days from the date of the sale. f. To retain possession of that or any other lot purchased by the purchaser at that or any other auction and to release the same only after payment of money due. g. To apply the proceeds of sale of any lot then or subsequently due to the purchaser towards settlement of money due to Webb’s or it’s vendor. Webb’s shall be entitled to a possessory lien on any property of the purchaser for any purpose while any money remains unpaid under this contract. h. To apply any payment made by the purchaser to Webb’s towards any money owing to Webb’s in respect of any thing whatsoever irrespective of any directive given in respect of or restriction placed upon such payment by the purchaser whether expressed or implied. i. Title and right of disposal of the goods shall not pass to the purchaser until payment has been made in full by cleared funds. Where any lot purchased in held by Webb’s pending i. clearance of funds by the purchaser or ii. completion of payment after receipt of a deposit the lot will be held by Webb’s as bailee for the vendor risk and title passing to the purchaser immediately upon notification of clearance of funds or upon completion of purchase. In the event that a lot is lost stolen damaged or destroyed before title is transferred to the purchaser the purchaser shall be entitled to a refund of all monies paid to Webb’s in respect of that lot but shall not be entitled to any compensation for any consequent losses howsoever arising. 11. BIDDERS DEEMED PRINCIPALS. All bidders shall be held personally and solely liable for all obligations arising from any bid including both telephone”and absentee bids”. Any person wishing to bid as agent for a third party must obtain written authority to do so from Webb’s prior to bidding. 12.”SUBJECT BIDS” Where the highest bid is below the reserve and the auctioneer declares a sale to be “subject to vendor’s consent” or words to that effect the highest bid remains binding upon the bidder until the vendor accepts or rejects it. If the bid is accepted there is a contractual obligation upon the bidder to pay for the lot. 13. SALES POST AUCTION OR BY PRIVATE TREATY The above conditions shall apply to all buyers of goods from Webb’s irrespective of the circumstances under wheich the sale is negotiated.

47


BIDDING SLIP FOR ABSENTEE BIDDERS ON LOTS IN THE VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLE SALE - JULY 22 2008 Please bid on my behalf at the above sale for the following lots up to prices recorded below. These bids are to be executed as cheaply as is permitted by other bids or reserves if any. * I agree to comply with the Conditions of Sale as printed in the catalogue. I understand that in the case of a successful bid on items in the Important Vintage & Collectors’ Motorcycles sale a buyers premium of fifteen percent (15%) will be added to the hammer price and that G.S.T is charged on the premium. On major lots customers may prefer to bid by telephone. Please enquire regarding this service which Webb’s carry out at no charge.

LOT NO.

CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION

BID*

MR/MRS/MS

INITIAL

SURNAME/COMPANY

HOME PH

BUSINESS PH

MOBILE

FACSIMILE

EMAIL ADDRESS

POSTAL ADDRESS

CONTACT NAME

ARRANGEMENTS FOR PAYMENT: I agree to pay immediately on receipt of notice from Webb’s of my successful bid. Payment will be by cash cheque or bank transfer. I will arrange for collection of my purchases or I agree to pay for packing and freight costs incurred by Webb’s in having any purchases forwarded to me. In order to avoid delay in clearing purchases Buyers who are unknown to us are advised to make arrangements for payment before the sale or for references to be supplied. If such arrangements are not made cheques will be cleared before purchases are delivered. * Webb’s will do its upmost to carry out bidding instructions for absentee bidders. It will not be responsible however if circumstances prevent it doing so.

SIGNED & DATED


IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’MOTORCYCLES  

IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES

IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’MOTORCYCLES  

IMPORTANT VINTAGE & COLLECTORS’ MOTORCYCLES