Page 1

IN FOCUS 1

IMPORTANT WORKS OF ART JEWELLERY & WATCHES ANTIQUES & MODERN DESIGN 3 – 5 AUGUST 2010

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FRONT COVER: LOT 11 MICHAEL PAREKOWHAI Poorman, Beggarman, Thief (Poorman) detail $100,000 - $120,000 2


IMPORTANT WORKS OF ART FINE JEWELLERY & WATCHES ANTIQUES & MODERN DESIGN

LEFT: LOT 17 MICHAEL PAREKOWHAI Kapa Haka series (Puhina)

$45,000 - $65,000

OPPOSITE PAGE: LOT 24 SHANE COTTON Lying in the Blackland 2000mm x 3000mm

$250,000 - $300,000 IN FOCUS 3


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IMPORTANT WORKS OF ART

Tue 3 Aug 2010 – 6:30pm VIEWING FROM TUE 27 JULY

FINE JEWELLERY & WATCHES

Wed 4 Aug 2010 – 6:00pm VIEWING FROM THU 29 JULY

ANTIQUES & MODERN DESIGN

Thu 5 Aug 2010 – 6:00pm VIEWING FROM THU 29 JULY

EVENING VIEWING Thu 29 July 5:30pm – 7:30pm Please join us to view the suite of sales. FULL VIEWING TIMES Important Works of Art – refer to page 14. Fine Jewellery & Watches – refer to page 100. Antiques & Modern Design – refer to page 110.

PLEASE NOTE A buyer’s premium of 12.5% will be charged on all items in the Important Works of Art and Fine Jewellery & Watches sales. A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items in the Antiques & Modern Design sale. GST (12.5%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

OPPOSITE PAGE: LOT 31 BILL HAMMOND All Along the Heaphy Highway $230,000 - $270,000

PRICES REALISED AND SALE TOTALS LISTED IN THE ‘IN FOCUS’ SECTION OF THIS CATALOGUE INCLUDE BUYER’S PREMIUM AND GST, AND ARE ROUNDED TO THE NEAREST $100.

IN FOCUS 3


IN FOCUS IMPORTANT WORKS OF ART At the halfway point of the 2010 auction season, Webb’s has achieved six of the ten highest prices achieved at auction in New Zealand this year. With over $1.7 million in turnover at the March Important Works of Art sale, the response from buyers demonstrates strong demand for quality works. Seemingly defying uncertain economic times, Webb’s has experienced a steady increase in sales by value over the past two years. Whilst volumes are slightly down, the average price per lot has increased alongside increased sale rates by volume at the top end of the market. Within a context of low interest rates, poor confidence in sharemarket performance and low or negative growth in real estate values, art is being taken seriously as an alternative investment. In the previous March sale, Webb’s was entrusted with marketing many important works by leading New Zealand modern and contemporary artists. The results for the highvalue end of the market could be compared, for the first time in a decade, with the strong confidence levels of the early 2000s. Of the ten works offered with estimates over $50,000, six attracted saleroom competition which resulted in sales under the hammer, three sold immediately afterwards and only one work remains unsold. Equally, various works stimulated considerable competition which took their prices well beyond our estimate range. With our 90% success rate at the top end, two sales over $200,000 and three over $100,000, vendors of major works took note and have come forward with another selection of extraordinary works for this catalogue. Of the modern period, our masterpiece in this

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catalogue is unquestionably the lyrical, large and early bird painting by Don Binney, Man’s Head from Te Henga III. This painting is significantly larger than is the one which holds the record price for Don Binney’s work at auction, Kotare over Hikurangi, which achieved $220,000 at Webb’s in mid-2009. The inclusion of this painting in the catalogue represents a rare opportunity to acquire one of the artist’s great early works. In the contemporary domain, this catalogue includes several works of justified critical acclaim by leading contemporary artists. After setting a new record price at auction for the work of Shane Cotton with the sale of Blackout Movement in March, Webb’s presents to the market Lying in the Black Land, arguably the most important work by the artist ever to be offered at auction. Produced in 1997 whilst Cotton was a Frances Hodgkins Fellow, this work signifies an important shift in the artist’s practice. The foundation for the significant series of paintings broadly grouped as Kenehi (Genesis) paintings, which date from 1998 to 2002, this work defines the artist’s practice from this period with its dense and layered symbolism combining Maori and Christian belief systems. Webb’s welcomes back All Along the Heaphy Highway, a work which is regarded as one of the most overtly political paintings by Bill Hammond. Heaphy, after whom the track is named, is ironically juxtaposed with Heaphy the artist and Heaphy the surveyor. Beautifully conceived and executed, the elegant gang of bird people dominates the right-hand side of the work, overlaid with text and musical notes, whilst on the left are dense gothic bird, horse and ghoul figures.

Allan Smith sums up this work in his text as being in “opposition between two of Hammond’s key themes – the chaos and an irrational, dark complexity of feelings on the one hand and, on the other, the sublimely dignified serenity of painterly ornamentation”. Exquisite in its emeraldgreen palette, this is the first of Hammond’s works in this hue presented to the market since Webb’s set the current auction market record for Hammond’s work in 2008 with Fortified Gang Headquarters. By superb coincidence, the sale includes examples of both figures that comprised Michael Parekowhai’s contribution to the Third Asia Pacific Triennial in 2004 entitled ‘Paradise Now? Contemporary Art from the Pacific’. The show was intended to question whether the Pacific was indeed a Paradise and, if it was, then whose Paradise was it? As a result, Parekowhai’s work, which is largely concerned with the racial stereotyping of minorities in New Zealand and with issues of identity, was well suited to the show. Poorman of the Poorman, Beggarman, Thief trio is one of the artist’s most important early sculptural works. Reflecting Webb’s high-level relationships with corporate business, some works in this catalogue have been consigned on behalf of Air New Zealand and will be sold to support their chosen charity, Kids Restore New Zealand. This organisation concentrates on the restoration of New Zealand’s natural environment through the leadership of young people. SOPHIE COUPLAND DIRECTOR


LOT 18 DON BINNEY Man's Head from Te Henga III $250,000 - $350,000

IN FOCUS 5


IN REVIEW Oceanic & African Arts

With consignment from institutional and major private collections and auction records set across many genre and price points; the Oceanic and African Art sale held on June 15th was a resounding success. Sales exceeded $830,000 reflecting the quality of the materials offered and Webb’s handling and promotion. The huia feather featured on the front cover of the catalogue achieved $8,500, setting a world record for the sale of a single feather. The Maori and Pacific sections of the sale were the focus for local collectors, who competed fiercely for the fine examples of weapons, adornment, adzes and carved taonga. A full list of prices realised is published on page 130 of this catalogue.

A

PICTURED A RARE AND SUPERB FIJIAN WAR CLUB. Realised: $32,700 B RARE TONGAN WHALEBONE CHEST ORNAMENT. Realised: $23,400 C IMPORTANT FIJIAN HEADREST. Realised:$8,200 D RARE BAINING PAPUA NEW GUINEA CEREMONIAL MASK. Realised: $7,200 E MATAU - MAORI BRONZE SHARK HOOK. Realised: $3,700 F PA KAHAWAI - MAORI FISHING LURE. Realised: $2,500 G MAORI TEKOTEKO - CARVED ANCESTRAL FIGURE. Realised $11,100 H HUIA FEATHER. Realised $8,500 I CLASSICAL LUBA KIFWEBE AFRICAN MASK. Realised: $12,900 J MAORI KAKA PORIA POUNAMU. Realised: $2,300 K RARE MAORI MOA BONE HARPOON HEAD. Realised: $9,600 L PATU PARAOA - MAORI WHALEBONE MASTER CARVER’S MALLET. Realised: $8,200 M PRE CONTACT MAORI FINELY CARVED WAKA HUIA. Realised: $46,000 N LARGE AND SUPERB MAORI TOKI. Realised: $25,000 O KETE MUKA KIWI - MAORI FLAX AND KIWI FEATHER BAG. Realised: $7,000 P SUPERB AND IMPORTANT MAORI KUMETE. Realised: $29,200

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IN FOCUS 7


TOM MACKIE COLLECTION OF COMICS SUNDAY 24 OCTOBER - 5:00PM A special sale featuring an exciting array of quality comics and related materials from Australasia, the USA, the UK and Europe. Comprising over 10,000 objects spanning more than a century of graphic narration, the Mackie Collection will offer a fascinating insight into this important artform.

MODEL SOLDIERS & SHIPS FROM THE COLLECTION OF JOHN GIBSON QC WEDNESDAY 29 SEPTEMBER – 6:00PM Consisting of a connoisseur’s collection of over 1,000 items, this sale includes pieces by Hocker, Britains, Imperial Productions and other well known makers of model soldiers and ships. The sale also includes the reference library and prints relating to the collection.

CONTACT Francis McWhannell bethunes@webbs.co.nz +64 21 232 603

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Brian Wood bwood@webbs.co.nz +64 21 486 948


CONTEMPORARY ART PHOTOGRAPHY & CERAMICS 21 SEPTEMBER 2010 ENTRIES NOW INVITED Providing an overview of current practice across the genres of contemporary art, photography and ceramics, with a particular focus on works produced since 1990.

BILL CULBERT Off White reconstructed fluorescent tube title inscribed signed and dated April ‘03 610mm x 180mm x 100mm $12,000 - $18,000 MARTIN POPPLEWELL Skull glazed ceramic $500 - $700

CONTACT Emma Fox efox@webbs.co.nz +64 21 646 828

Brian Wood bwood@webbs.co.nz +64 21 486 948 IN FOCUS 9


RARE BOOKS SUNDAY 5 SEPTEMBER ENTRIES INVITED The September sale of rare books, maps, photography and ephemera will include an impressive offering of Maori imprints, together with a strong collection of New Zealand history titles. Quality additional entries are invited until early August.

G F ANGAS The New Zealanders Illustrated Realised $21,000, June 2010

The Bethunes at Webb’s June sale of rare books featured the finest collection of Maori books and printed materials seen at auction for over a decade, as well as impressive offerings of New Zealand literature and history titles. Angas’s The New Zealanders Illustrated was the top seller, realising $21,000. A handsome copy of the 1898 facsimile edition of Tasman’s journal fetched an impressive $3,400. For information regarding consigning or purchasing, contact Webb’s rare book specialist Francis McWhannell.

FINE & RARE WINE MONDAY 30 AUGUST ENTRIES INVITED The August wine auction will continue the recent theme of offering a wide variety of quality aged wines. Well cellared fine and rare wines from New Zealand, Australia and the great regions of Europe are currently invited for inclusion.

2000 CHATEAU PETRUS Realised $4,440, June 2010

CONTACT Francis McWhannell bethunes@webbs.co.nz +64 21 232 603 10

Simon Ward wine@webbs.co.nz +64 21 642 277

The Fine Wine auction held in May saw over $313,200 in sales, a record for this specialist department. Plentiful supply and strong demand for international wines, especially for French Grand Cru Bordeaux wines has strongly boosted sales. A bottle of 2000 Chateau Petrus, cru exceptional, Pomerol, realised an impressive $4,400. For information regarding consigning or purchasing, contact Webb’s fine wine specialist Simon Ward.


ASIAN ARTS

20 SEPTEMBER 2010 The sale includes two substantial private collections, featuring Chinese and Japanese ceramics, bronzes, lacquerware, cloisonnĂŠ, jade, ivory, netsuke, inro, swords and snuff bottles. A 19TH CENTURY BURMESE MANDALAY SEATED CAST BRONZE BUDDHA $3,000 - $5,000

CONTACT Jeff Hobbs jhobbs@webbs.co.nz +64 21 503 251

James Hogan jhogan@webbs.co.nz +64 9 524 6804 IN FOCUS 11


IMPORTANT COMMISSION Webb’s value collections at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Webb’s was honoured to be contracted to value the prestigious Taonga Maori, Oceanic and international ethnographic collections of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa during the month of July. These collections are of world heritage significance. Managing Director Neil Campbell, Head of Tribal Art Jeff Hobbs and Head of Valuations Brian Wood would like to thank the curators and managers of the collections for their hospitality and support during this exciting project.

CONTACT Brian Wood bwood@webbs.co.nz +64 21 486 948

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OCEANIC & AFRICAN ART AN INVITATION TO CONSIGN Following the remarkable results of the June sale which saw over $830,000 of fine Oceanic and African Arts sold, entries are now invited for another sale in this important category.

A FINE WAKAHUIA ATTRIBUTED TO TENE WAITERE L 615mm $8,000 – $12,000

`Ahu `ula (Feathered cloak) 1700s Plant fiber, feather 1520 x 2450mm Registration Number FE000327 Gift of Lord St Oswald, 1912

CONTACT CONTACT Neil Campbell ncampbell@webbs.co.nz +64 21 875 966

Jeff Hobbs Brian Wood 021 486 948 jhobbs@webbs.co.nz bwood@webbs.co.nz +64 21 503 251 IN FOCUS 13


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IMPORTANT WORKS OF ART Day 1, Tue 3 Aug 2010 – 6:30pm Tue 27 July Wed 28 July Thu 29 July Fri 30 July Sat 31 July Sun 1 Aug Mon 2 Aug Tue 3 Aug

VIEWING 9:00am – 5:30pm 9:00am – 5:30pm 9:00am – 7:30pm 9:00am – 5:30pm 11:00am – 3:00pm 11:00am – 3:00pm 9:00am – 5:30pm 9:00am – 12:00pm

BUYER’S PREMIUM A buyer’s premium of 12.5% will be charged on all items in this Important Works of Art sale. GST (12.5%) is payable on the buyer’s premium only. OPPOSITE PAGE: LOT 19 RALPH HOTERE The Wind II $90,000 - $120,000

IMPORTANT WORKS IN OF FOCUS ART 15


1

RICHARD KILLEEN

Lettercase acrylic on 20 aluminium pieces title inscribed, signed and dated 2002, together with labelled matchbox case Cat# 3627 30mm x 30mm each piece

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$2,500 - $3,500


2

GARTH TAPPER

Toheroa Pickers oil on canvas signed and dated ‘95 1020mm x 755mm Provenance: Collection of Air New Zealand

3

PAUL DIBBLE

Man Getting the Measure of the Earth bronze, 2/3 signed and dated NZ 2000 450mm x 540mm x 100mm

$10,000 - $15,000

$12,000 - $18,000

IN FOCUS 17


COLIN MCCAHON Colin McCahon was introduced to John Caselberg, author of the poems in the Van Gogh lithographs, by James K Baxter in Christchurch in 1948. According to Caselberg, McCahon’s first words to him were: “Who are you? A poet, or prophet, or what?” This was perceptive because Caselberg was both a poet and something of a prophet; his heroes, at least, were prophetic poets like William Blake and painters like Colin McCahon. From 1952, he and McCahon became close friends and collaborated together on Issue, a little magazine, the first of which included seven love poems by Caselberg with a striking cover drawing (a nude) by McCahon. Other collaborations were interrupted by McCahon’s move to Auckland in 1953. In Auckland, McCahon hit upon a cheap way of making prints: crayons were used on specially prepared lithographic paper and prints run off on a simple hand-operated machine. His first effort was Kauri (1954). Sending a copy to Caselberg, McCahon remarked, “what about a few more poems – another seven – to illustrate and produce per medium of lithography”¹. Meanwhile, Caselberg had published his first book of poems, The Sound of the Morning (Pegasus Press, 1954), which included Van Gogh, a poetic sequence dramatising the visions and sufferings of the great Dutch post-impressionist. Eventually, in 1957, McCahon decided to make a set of lithographic prints of the sequence. Either through an oversight or some misadventure during printing, he used only five of the six poems in the sequence. The set consists of five pages – a simple lettered title page, a striking full-page image of multiple suns as a kind of frontispiece, and three pages which combine images with poems. McCahon’s drawings partly reflect images in the poems, and partly Van Gogh’s paintings (the last drawing, for instance, recalls Van Gogh’s ‘suicide’ painting, Crows over the Cornfield). One poem reading, “God, it is all dark./The heart beat but there is no answering hark/Of a hearer and no one to speak”, must have particularly struck a chord with McCahon because he used it on two later works, John in Canterbury (1959), dedicated to Caselberg, and again in one of his lettered scrolls in 1969. Presumably the poem’s anguished cry at lack of recognition, struck home to both poet and printmaker. Unfortunately, Pegasus Press would not release copyright, so the lithographs could not be sold and were not exhibited until the 1970s; many were given by McCahon to friends.

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COLIN MCCAHON

Van Gogh - Poems by John Caselberg four lithographs and title page title inscribed, signed on the plate and dated Auckland September 1957 357mm x 251mm each Note: This suite of lithographs is held in the collections of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington; Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetu, Christchurch; Forrester Gallery, Oamaru; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra Exhibited: Answering Hark: McCahon/ Caselberg, Painter/Poet (Hocken Library, 1999)

Other McCahon lithographs were printed in editions of 50 or 100, which is a possible indication of how many sets of Van Gogh were printed; the sets are neither numbered nor signed, except on the first two plates. On the other hand, he may have printed fewer when the copyright embargo became known. This powerful sequence was McCahon’s most extensive work in a print medium and is a fine early example of his combining image and text. PETER SIMPSON ¹ Peter Simpson, Answering Hark: McCahon/Caselberg: Painter/Poet, 2001, p. 47

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Reference: Peter Simpson; Answering Hark: McCahon/Caselberg Craig Potton Publishing 2001 Illustrated: Ibid p. 52 $18,000 - $25,000


IN FOCUS 19


GREER TWISS

Commissioned in 1997 for the Koru Club Lounge at Auckland International Airport, The Birds is part of Greer Twiss’ ongoing exploration of aspects of conservation and museum practice. In its original setting, this work occupied an indoor site, but these weatherresistant copperplated birds could equally well be placed in a patio or courtyard setting, arranged either in a group or dispersed as stand-alone pieces. The work offers such flexibility in its composition because the individual bird poles are not joined together but are independent of each other; each bird pole is free-standing. The Birds holds a significant place in the history of Greer Twiss’ sculpture. The work develops out of one of the sculptor’s largest pieces, Edible History, an installation designed for the Elam Sculpture Show in 1993. Edible History critiqued the museum presentation of native birds: the Victorian practice of displaying stuffed, taxidermied birds on top of spun metal poles, tagged and labelled with the Maori, Latin and common names of the birds. Twiss’ birds, made out of metal, infiltrated the display space as decoys, rather in the manner of his Decoys and Illusions installation. In both installations, Edible History and Decoys and Illusions, other decoys were interspersed among the birds. In Edible History, a bowler hat was placed on top of a pole: a bowler hat with a speaker inside it. Representative of the European intruder, this acoustic work was the voice of appreciation, presenting a recitation from Cook’s journals, praising the beauty of New Zealand native birds, the sound of their song and, most particularly, their fine flavour in a fricassee. In this, Captain Cook prefigures Walter Buller killing New Zealand native birds in order to preserve them in a museum display. Twiss critiques them both. In the continuum of Twiss’ work, The Birds leads to the sculptor’s Graftings in The Fernery at the Auckland Domain. In this work, birds are set on poles as if they were grafted onto trees and planted. It is a conservation allusion (and illusion) which has a specific parallel in Greer Twiss’ most recent outing in the public arena, his large-scale Flight Trainer for Albatross, erected on the Auckland waterfront in 2004. To this framework for injured albatross, Twiss has tied three young birds, elevated and with wings extended, in an attempt to teach them how to fly again. The birds face out to sea, where they belong. The fourth bird, on the ladder on the ground, is learning to walk again. Along with The Birds, this work is part of the formal and thematic development that has characterised Greer Twiss’ work throughout his long and distinguished career. DR. ROBIN WOODWARD 20

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GREER TWISS

The Birds copper plated lead 1. Gannett Takapu Sula Bassana Serrator. 940mmx 300mm x 240mm. 2. Pass Bird Takahe Notornis Mantelli. 860mm x 330mm x 240mm 3.Bellbird Koromiko Anthormis Mecanura. 80mm x 360mm x 240mm. 4. Morepork Ruru Noaeseeladiae novaeseeladie. 360mm x 240mm x 240mm. 5. Parrot Kakapo Strigops Habroptilus. 1350mm x 240mm x 240mm. 6. Bittern Matuku Hurfpo Botaurus Stellaris Poiciloptillus. 680mm x 460mm x 240mm. 7. Weka Gallirallus Australis. 1300mm x 310mm x 240mm. 8. a. Brown Kiwi Kiwi Apteryx Australis. b. Robin Toutouwai Petroica Traversi. 1540mm x 300mm x 240mm. 9. a. Kingfisher Kotare Halcyon Sancta Vagaws. b.Gull Karoro Larus Dominicanus. 1470mm x 400mm x 240mm. 10. a. Saddleback Tieke Philesturnus Carunculatus. b.Shag Karuhiuhi Phalaorooc orax. 680mm x 280mm x 240mm. 11.Duck Pavera Anus Superciliosa Superciliosa. 1540mm x 360mm x 240mm 12.a. Kea Nestor Notabilis. b.Parson Bird Tui Prosthemadera Novaeseelandiae. 1300mm x 240mm x 240mm, Provenance: Collection of Air New Zealand

$30,000 - $50,000


IN FOCUS 21


6

ALLEN MADDOX

A Hedonist’s Philosophy on Abstraction oil on three hessian canvases title inscribed, signed with artist’s initials AM and dated ‘77 1860mm x 900mm, 1860mm x 1570mm, 1860mm x 810mm, Provenance: Painted with Tony Fomison whilst he painted the Pieta triptych

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$20,000 - $30,000


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ANN ROBINSON

Side Carved Flax Pod 45% lead crystal, 1/1 signed and dated 2001 295mm x 370mm x 250mm

$30,000 - $40,000

IN FOCUS 23


MICHAEL SMITHER

The sixties was a time of prodigious output for Michael Smither. Having moved into The Gables in New Plymouth, Smither was to embark on an intense and intimate period of the portrayal of everyday family life. His nearest and dearest were his subject matter: his wife Elizabeth and his first two children, Thomas and Sarah, both born in that decade. Thomas at the Bathroom Window has all of the hallmarks of one such successful early domestic painting. Smither recalls the bathroom at The Gables as being “pokey, narrow and green” ¹, and certainly that is conveyed in the colour and unusual angles of the composition. The work is also notable for its animation of line, feelings of sentiment and nostalgia, and close observation. Who amongst us with children in their lives, has not found their child under the curtain staring out at the world? It is a place that they can enter only when supervised and that is filled with possible excitement, adventure and danger. Gazing with boundless wonder and fascination, Thomas sees the garden hose lying like a coiled snake, green against the green grass. Inside, spare details give a clear vision of period and place: the chunky ceramic sink looming towards us in the cramped space, slightly tired with its gaping overflow hole, prim taps and broken plug chain. The cap has been left off the toothpaste: a source of much tension in many households! And the worn toothbrushes of varying sizes are hanging on their hooks, assuring us that Thomas is but one member of a larger family. Smither is often quoted as saying he uses oil paint like modelling clay and Thomas’ trousers, the garden hose and the toothpaste tube are enlivened with three-dimensional writhing folds and twists of green, pink and blue. The citrus-fresh tones, oblique angles and checkerboard floor keep the eye circling between the interior and exterior spaces. EMMA FOX.

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MICHAEL SMITHER

Thomas at the Bathroom Window oil on board signed and dated ‘69; title inscribed and signed verso 840mm x 845mm Illustrated: Trish Gribben, Michael Smither Painter, Ron Sang Publications, 2004 p. 66

¹Trish Gribben, Michael Smither Painter, Ron Sang Publications, 2004, p. 66.

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$70,000 - $90,000


IN FOCUS 25


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JULIAN DASHPER

Untitled (Drumskin) vinyl on drumskin 395mm diameter

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GORDON WALTERS

Untitled (Koru) ink on paper signed and dated 1975 verso 655mm x 455mm

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$15,000 - $20,000

$65,000 - $85,000


IN FOCUS 27


MICHAEL PAREKOWHAI

Consisting of three life-sized fibreglass mannequins, Michael Parekowhai’s installation Poorman, Beggarman, Thief was originally set up within an art gallery space. Posing as well-to-do members of a discerning and sophisticated art-buying clique, the mannequins were attired in immaculate tuxedos complete with bow ties, glossy wigs and brightly polished shoes. The physical appearance of the figures visually jars with the disparaging titles of the works and successfully draws attention to commonplace cultural stereotypes. Poorman, Beggarman, Thief initially comprised Parekowhai’s contribution to Paradise Now? Contemporary Art from the Pacific, exhibited in New York in 2004. The show was intended to question whether the Pacific was indeed a Paradise and, if it was, then whose Paradise was it? Therefore, Parekowhai’s work, which is largely concerned with the racial stereotyping of minorities in New Zealand and with issues of identity, was well suited to the show. Produced in 1996 and modelled on his father, Parekowhai’s mannequin Poorman stands casually at ease with legs slightly apart, his weight resting on his back foot and arms crossed over his body. The title of the work, Poorman, Beggarman, Thief boldly states that Maori are too often thought of, and labelled as, a generalised body of people rather than as individuals. The piece coolly offers three broad and somewhat pejorative labels to refer to Maori en masse as being either poverty stricken or criminals. Parekowhai reinforced this by fixing his mannequins with name tags which introduced them with the ironic line “Hello, my name is HORI”. The term ‘Hori’ is a generic and derogatory term used historically by Pakeha to refer to Maori people. It is simultaneously the name of Michael Parekowhai’s father and the Maori translation of the English name ‘George’. Thus, Parekowhai’s work operates on a number of levels by being witty and personally relevant while concurrently inviting the viewer to reconsider culturally damning typecasts. Parekowhai calls negative New Zealand assumptions about the ‘collective’ Maori into question with a rare finesse which is equally apparent in his later work from 2003, Kapa Haka, (Puhina) one of the figures from which can be seen on pages 36-37 of the current catalogue. Standing in the time-honoured contrapposto pose, Poorman returns the viewer’s gaze and, in doing so, challenges the spectator to engage with the work and to consider its physical presence as well as the issues and concerns that Parekowhai has skilfully addressed in its creation. By completing the work on a life-sized scale, Parekowhai has ensured that the mannequins are abruptly confronting and yet curiously alluring. JEMMA FIELD 28

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MICHAEL PAREKOWHAI

Poorman, Beggarman, Thief (Poorman) fibreglass mannequin, dinner suit, inscribed name badge on stand, from a suite of three. 1850mm x 765mm x 585mm Exhibited: Paradise Now? Contemporary Art from the Pacific, Asia Society Museum, New York Feb 18 - May 9, 2004. Illustrated: Paradise Now? Contemporary Art from the Pacific, Asia Society Museum, New York p.17 and p.73. Michael Lett and Ryan Moore, Michael Parekowhai, Michael Lett Publishing 2007 p.384 p.422 p. 516.

$100,000 - $120,000


IN FOCUS 29


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GORDON WALTERS

Untitled gouache and collage (double-sided) title inscribed, signed and dated 1958, on one side 290mm x 390mm

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RICHARD KILLEEN

Left Right acrylic on 13 paper cutouts mounted on paper title inscribed, signed and dated 1981 760mm x 560mm Note: This work is a study for the work Left Right alkyd on 13 aluminium panels, in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki.

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$10,000 - $15,000

$12,000 - $18,000


IN FOCUS 31


John Holmwood was a keen observer and painter of everyday life in New Zealand. Originally trained as a commercial artist at Wellington Technical College, Holmwood went on to employment at the New Zealand Railways advertising department. This saw him travel the country inspecting various railway billboard sites in the 1940s and these journeys exposed him to a broad cross-section of New Zealand rural life, including the clearing of native bush. This became a subject that he often painted, after Christopher Perkins and Eric Lee-Johnson. Horses and Children depicts a snapshot of rural life at a time when the land was changing. The children run barefoot at play, flying kites and riding horses bareback, amidst the windswept trees. The scrub in the distance atop the rugged terrain has been partially cleared and fenced off; the stumps at the foreground

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JOHN HOLMWOOD

Horses and Children oil on board signed 735mm x 805mm

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$20,000 - $30,000

offer a timely reminder of the realities that were required in order for farm life to occur. Painted in a variety of techniques, including scratching and scumbling, the work is built up from numerous applications and manipulations of paint, hinting that, perhaps, Holmwood painted from memory of the feel of the place. Perhaps this scene was glimpsed from a passing train, the heaviness of the stumps bearing the weight of Holmwood’s observation. JESSICA PEARLESS


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ROBERT ELLIS

Conjunction III oil on board signed and dated ‘74; title inscribed, signed and dated 1974 and inscribed BL no.8 verso 1220mm x 1220mm

$15,000 - $25,000

IN FOCUS 33


MICHAEL SMITHER

Many of Michael Smither’s paintings are faithful records of a time and place, carefully observed. The Manifesto Café and Wine Bar was a bit of an institution in Queen Street, Auckland, in the mid-to-late-’90s. Hosting weekly jazz sessions downstairs, it attracted visionaries such as Mark de Clive Lowe, performing with Jan Hellriegel; Ken Haines and his talented son Nathan, and many others. Living in Ponsonby at the time, Michael Smither was a regular attendee, sketching the performers and the audience from his corner vantage point. The scene depicted is a couple seated in the window of the café area. Smither tells it as an engagement “witnessed in a sidelong glance”¹ with the other elements combining to flesh out the story. The parking meter marks time passing, the water is illustrating the purity of the ‘sacramental act’ of betrothal and the woman opposite signifies loneliness. The work is simplified by the blocks of colour which aid us in our further reading of the work. The back of the blue sign points like an arrow to the joined hands, the focal point of the physical and emotional drama. The street cleaner is decked out entirely in bright yellow: hat, clothing and equipment; the figure in green is for jealousy, the betrothed in blue. There is a tongue of red in the expired meter; the vehicle is red and white. The Volkswagen Kombi van has its own art history, coming from a series of sketches made in Pat Condon’s Merivale driveway, and is transplanted into the scene. Pat Condon was the former director of the Canterbury Gallery and a lifelong friend of Smither; the plate number is true to the original. EMMA FOX ¹ Trish Gribben, Michael Smither Painter, Ron Sang Publications, 2004 p. 236 34

16

MICHAEL SMITHER

Manifesto Café oil on board signed and dated 2001 790mm x 1200mm Illustrated: Trish Gribben, Michael Smither Painter, Ron Sang Publications, 2004 p. 237

$65,000 - $85,000


IN FOCUS 35


MICHAEL PAREKOWHAI Executed in 2003, Michael Parekowhai’s installation piece Kapa Haka was expressly commissioned for the exhibition Paradise Now? Contemporary Art from the Pacific (2004) that was held at the Asia Society Museum in New York. The 15 identical, life-sized, glossy fibreglass figures, posed as security guards, were originally positioned outside the museum as though guarding the precious treasures within. Measuring around six feet tall and solid in stature, each of the guards stands with legs apart and arms staunchly crossed, collectively packing a powerful punch. In a similar manner to his earlier work Poorman, Beggarman, Thief from 1999, which was modelled on Parekowhai’s father and can be seen on pages 28-29 of the current catalogue, the security guard that stars repeatedly in Kapa Haka is modelled on the artist’s brother, Paratene, who is indeed a security guard. The use of repetition in Kapa Haka draws attention to issues of identity since Parekowhai’s mannequins are afforded scant individuality. Apart from their identifying colour tags, in this instance puhina or grey, they are lumped together in an undifferentiated mass: Parekowhai thus makes a poignant comment on New Zealand race relations and the tendency for Maori to be viewed as a non-specific entity. The only differentiating feature among the figures of Kapa Haka is the use of those ID tags that identify each guard as a different colour in te reo Maori. By crafting a crowd out of identical sameness but naming each figure a different colour, Parekowhai invites the spectator to imagine the full spectrum of difference and individuality that quietly thrives under the pretence of an apparently indistinguishable exterior and, in the process, to register the difference between what people assume about Maori en masse and what Parekowhai knows about his brother as an individual person. The title of the work Kapa Haka refers to a specific and time-honoured tradition of Maori performance which involves both song and dance and works as a medium through which their unique cultural identity is expressed. In the context of Parekowhai’s work, this custom is ironically and playfully appropriated in a frozen performance piece. In New Zealand, the fibreglass Kapa Haka figures were initially exhibited at Michael Lett on Karangahape Road, Auckland, where five of them stood motionlessly inside the front window and unabashedly guarded the empty gallery space. As art objects, the figures are instantly alluring with their lustrous, glossy finish and their curious sameness, which, in the same manner as identical twins, cannot fail to pique the viewer’s curiosity and insist on seriously close consideration. Parekowhai’s infinitely layered pieces that comprise Kapa Haka are successful in their multiplicity of meaning. Their heavy physical presence demands that the spectator reconsider inherited assumptions concerning racial stereotyping while their brusque pose, blank expression and flawless polish allow them to be appreciated as aesthetic objects. JEMMA FIELD 36

17

MICHAEL PAREKOWHAI

Kapa Haka series (Puhina) automotive paint on fibreglass, from an edition of 15, 2003 1880mm x 680mm x 420mm Exhibited: Kapa Haka, Michael Lett, Auckland 2003. Kapa Haka, Roslyn Oxley9, Sydney, 2003. Paradise Now? Contemporary Art From the Pacific, The Asia Society Museum, New York, Feb 18 - May 9 2004. Phoenix, an exhibition of work by Elam staff at the Gus Fisher Gallery, Auckland, 20 May 2006. Illustrated; Michael Lett and Ryan Moore, Michael Parekowhai, Michael Lett Publishing 2007 p.312-313

$45,000 - $65,000


IN FOCUS 37


DON BINNEY

18

DON BINNEY

Man’s Head from Te Henga III oil and acrylic on canvas title inscribed, signed and dated Oct-Dec 1974 1900mm x 1200mm Illustrated: Maurice Shadbolt, Binney’s Birds, Jetaway Inflight Magazine, No. 26, p. 7

Don Binney’s canvas featuring the distant outline of Old Man’s Head, the rocky formations of Bethells Beach or Te Henga and a large, centrally placed pukeko, is an arresting, magnificent piece that is wholly characteristic of his iconic ‘New Zealand’ paintings from the mid-seventies. The painting’s majestic calm is a fundamental element of all of Binney’s most successful paintings, which function almost as snapshots – fleeting instants that have been frozen in time thanks to the skilful handling of Binney’s brush. The visual language of the paintings is achieved through the poise of the birds, the motionless landscape forms and the still ribbons or flat expanses of ocean and sky. Turning away from the raw energy of the distinctly American abstract expressionists, who dominated the New Zealand art scene right through the 1960s, Binney turned to the natural environment of his native country and, specifically, its bountiful ornithological history and its idiosyncratic geological formations. These elements have graced his canvases ever since and most commonly they feature together in a rich symbiosis. Although human figures rarely appear in Binney’s work, their absence functions as a place-holder for the viewer, inserting a human element into the painting by inviting and enticing the spectator to exercise a form of ownership over the view that is shown on the canvas. Ultimately, however, Binney succeeds in maintaining a distance between image and viewer primarily through the aforementioned regal serenity of his paintings. They exist at a remove precisely because they exude such an innate quietude: a composed tranquillity that is born from Binney’s love and close, personal examination of New Zealand bush and bird life. In Man’s Head from Te Henga III, Binney’s broad black outlining 38

$250,000 - $350,000

and blocks of pigment call to mind stained-glass windows and Paul Gauguin’s early cloisonné works, in which the post-impressionist carefully juxtaposed wedges of arbitrary colour which were contained within thick inky lines. Binney, too, largely structures his chromatic relationships through a linear language that is executed primarily in ebony. His paintings reward close inspection since these outlines are often meticulously textured, adding to the visual depth of his work while simultaneously ensuring a level of legibility. The distinctive crisp clarity of Binney’s work is a further result of his tendency to employ sharp outlines in conjunction with the typically un-modulated expanses of sky as well as the use of bright, clear colours. This lucidity is often attributed to the harshness of the New Zealand light which has captivated many national talents including Alfred Sharpe, Christopher Perkins, Rita Angus and Pat Hanly. In Binney’s paintings, this inimitable light is distilled into a hardedged realism that maintains the integrity of the chosen view while transforming it into a product of unique artistic vision. In true Binney style, the oversized pukeko hovers soundlessly above the still landscape of Auckland’s west coast, which stretches away from the viewer towards a small band of sapphire sea. Feet dangling and wings half-spread, the pukeko assumes a position of eternal poise as it hangs suspended against Binney’s flat, unruffled sky and wispy band of clouds. Comparatively, the pukeko’s breast offers a feast of thick daubs of oil paint that gather into an almost sculptural mass, which is then echoed in the rich impasto of the foreground foliage. The pristine beauty of the rolling hills, grass fields, dense tree-tops and sand dunes provides a comprehensive New Zealand environment, above which the pukeko floats endlessly in an azure sky. JEMMA FIELD


IN FOCUS 39


RALPH HOTERE

19

RALPH HOTERE

The Wind II burnished steel and acrylic on board, in Roger Hicken driftwood frame title inscribed, signed and dated ‘83 and inscribed Bill Manhire, Port Chalmers; signed with initials RH to frame and stamped verso 890mm x 810mm Provenance: Bosshard Gallery, Dunedin 1983 Illustrated: Kriselle Baker and Vincent O’Sullivan, Hotere, Ron Sang Publications, 2008 p. 222

The collaborations between the country’s pre-eminent artist Ralph Hotere and one of its leading poets, Bill Manhire, are some of the most enriching in New Zealand’s cultural landscape. Hotere’s work has long been regarded as occupying a unique place in our recent art history, with its profoundly moving combination of complete affinity to the land, sombre beauty, emotional intensity, personal integrity and political address. His use of hitherto unexpected materials, steel, iron or salvaged window frames, has granted his work both clarity of expression because of their modesty and lyrical freedom by virtue of the expressive leaps he achieves with them. Similarly, Manhire’s poetry reflects and enables new and affecting ways of encountering the world, often quietly painful and often from the most prosaic of circumstances. The Wind II sits within what is perhaps the most extraordinary and most intellectually and emotionally expansive period of Hotere’s oeuvre: from the mid1970s to the mid-1980s. First shown (as Baby Iron No.3) in the Baby Iron exhibition at Janne Land Gallery in Wellington in October 1983 then at RKS Art Auckland in December of the same year, it is one of the more lyrical and to some extent mysterious of the 11 pieces that appeared in that showing. As fresh and beautiful as it was 25-plus years ago, it retains its original Roger Hickin driftwood frame with his initials inscribed into the top edge, and his stamp verso. In The Wind II, Hotere explores the properties of the polished steel in a way that delights both in the physical properties available to him and in the moving, enlivened surfaces that result. His use of an oxyactetylene torch to mark out a strong, cruciform composition establishes a stable structure to the work that strengthens the activating fire-mark in the upper left quadrant (like a finger or comet of heat) as well as the almost playful peeling back of the steel to reveal a scarlet second ground in the lower right. It also adds a 40

$90,000 - $120,000

strong, though subtle, degree of colour variation to the shiny surface of the metal that softens the reflective surface: humanises it somehow. That invigorated surface then becomes the lively ground for the burnishing tool: Hotere transcribing one of Manhire’s texts that turns up on different occasions in his work – whether in a Song Cycle banner of 1976 or a stainless-steel screen from 1987. There’s a finely poised confluence between the text of this poem and the manner of its realisation. The shift of the dullness and reflection of the surface and the appearing and disappearing of words as you move before the work seem to call up the wind of its opening line: to activate growing shadows in ways that seem, all at once, to encourage and then refuse a lover’s touch, collapse and then extend the distance between the two people in the poem – as if the promised yet denied proximity hinted at here is akin to some vertiginous moment of a lovers’ encounter. Is this a reconciliation or a separation: a coming together or an estrangement conveyed by the strange, haunting question of the speaker and the change observed in the air? The publisher, painter and writer Janet Paul remarked that Hotere’s achievement in the Baby Iron works was “an animating way to free the gesture with a poetic chemistry, allowing the flame to augment his marks and engage our spirit”. Such a description of the gestural and textual affect is entirely appropriate for this exquisite and moving example of Hotere’s work from such a significant and compelling suite. DR PETER SHAND Janet Paul: Ralph Hotere’s Baby Iron, Art New Zealand 29, Summer 1983/84, pp. 22–23. Refer also: Kriselle Baker and Vincent O’Sullivan, Hotere, Ron Sang Publications, 2008; Gregory O’Brien Some Paintings I Am Frequently Asked About: Talking with Bill Manhire about Ralph Hotere, Landfall 191, March 1996, pp. 21–33; Gregory O’Brien, Hotere: Out the Black Window, Godwit, 1997.


IN FOCUS 41


JEFFREY HARRIS

20

JEFFREY HARRIS

War oil on board title inscribed, signed and dated 1972 and inscribed August 1983 on loan National Art Gallery, Wellington on original label affixed verso 1210mm x 1210mm Exhibited: Jeffrey Harris, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin, 2 Oct 2004 - 13 February 2005 Illustrated: Justin Paton, Jeffrey Harris, Victoria University Press, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2005 p. 109

$40,000 - $60,000

In 1972, at the age of 23, Jeffrey Harris had already won the attention of a small group of influential artists and collectors in Dunedin, and had been included in New Zealand Young Contemporaries at Auckland Art Gallery. His energy and confidence were matched in paintings and drawings shown at the CSA Gallery in Christchurch and in the Otago Museum foyer, Dunedin, and he was taken up by the leading North Island dealers Barry Lett in Auckland and Peter McLeavey in Wellington.

anomalously lit up beyond the place where twin gallows stand. In

At first sight, the paintings that caused this excitement appeared naive and anachronistic. Hectic, crowded and with highly charged

any apparent purpose. In the foreground, a naked man and woman

a landscape of lurid greens, a lone tree appears bleached as if by a blast of heat or light; three crucifixes or grave markers cast harsh shadows as if they, too, are in the path of a violent light. On a small stage, an abject tableau is being enacted. Behind this, a man pursues a naked figure; another points in the direction of these events but without a hand at the end of his sleeve. Another man holds up a frame which seems to extend the stage in some way but without embrace, but with expressions of anguish or even agony; the man

symbols and paradoxical tableaux, their content defied narrative interpretation. Recognisable art-historical subjects such as crucifixions, genres of landscape and portrait painting, and composition strategies including perspectives and grids, were violently mashed up. This outburst of imaginative energy did not fit within the then-emerging rumours of a Neo-Expressionism centred on German Neue Wilden painters who dominated the international art market from the late 1970s through the mid-1980s either. Harris arrived at a style and purpose for his art independently of any movement or training. He flaunted his self-taught approaches and omnivorous, chaotic uptake of art history. A highly sophisticated, intuitive intelligence was combined with intense emotional force.

stares in the direction of a crudely painted, armless figure. Another,

These qualities are dramatically at work in the painting, War (1972). At first sight, this might be interpreted as an anti-war painting. Fires rage across a landscape above which military aircraft fly. But the coherence of this narrative soon breaks down. A dark road has

responding to War, one of the most complex and highly charged

42

perhaps a Veronica figure, seems to be wiping the armless man with a pleated napkin. Meanings collapse, the abjection of the work seems neither exclusively subjective nor a protest of some sort. A grotesque chaos engulfs narrative sense. Justin Paton, who curated the Harris retrospective at Dunedin Public Art Gallery in 2004, used a quote by the American curator, Robert Storr, who located the grotesque where “logical and emotional certainties waver, taste loses its bearings, and familiar realities warp into disorienting paradoxes”. Harris has said that he uses highly charged symbols such as crucifixions simply to increase the emotional intensity of paintings. Both comments are key to works in the artist’s unflaggingly intense oeuvre. The effect of War is in its total impact, not in the narratives that fragment within it. IAN WEDDE


IN FOCUS 43


21

RICHARD KILLEEN

Behind City Windows unique pigment inkjet on canvas title inscribed, signed and dated 2004 914mm x 610mm Exhibited: City Living, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2004 Reference: T.J. McNamara, Killeen Gets You Thinking, New Zealand Herald, August 4th, 2004

44

$20,000 - $30,000


22

GEOFF THORNLEY

Construction Tondo oil on canvas on board signed and stencilled and dated 4.81 verso 1300mm diameter

$15,000 - $20,000

Geoff Thornley’s Tondo series relies on the compositional devices of balance, geometry and structure. Movement is captured in the visualization of a rotation or circular motion, enhanced by the triangular variations in the surface of the work at various points in its structure.

built up on to a surface of gessoed canvas laid on to board. The

The redness of the circular void of Tondo envelopes you as a viewer, pulling you into a consideration of the space the work inhabits. The expansive openness creates a vastness, yet also controls and encompasses space, while the white components offer contemplative pauses.

Untitled (Construction #13) (Lot 29) is painted in juxtaposing

The refined surfaces of the Tondo series, as is the case with many of the constructed works, are made of highly finished layers of oil finely

constructed, sophisticated works by Thornley which are represented

outer edge of the red circle is perforated by the segments of white, which are physically separate components from the main red surface. The Tondo paintings were completed in conjunction with the Constructions and Albus works in the late 1970s and early 1980s. shades of a deep sky blue and sharp green, the two tones forming contrasting voids. The tension of the work lies in the slice of blue within the green, forming an off-kilter rectangular plane. Untitled (Dyad) (Lot 49) completes the significant offering of highly in this catalogue. JESSICA PEARLESS

IN FOCUS 45


MICHAEL ILLINGWORTH

Nude in a Starry Field is a paean to the power of nature, sex and painting, all touchstones of Michael Illingworth’s art. It belongs to a body of whimsical anthropomorphic landscapes started in the late 1960s which banish Illingworth’s familiar cast of bewildered and neutered suburbanites beyond the frame. Illingworth turns his gaze away from the evils of modern culture, fully devoting his art to the wonders and majesty of the natural world. Recognisable landscape forms are refigured through imagined or magical elements, with heavy sexual overtones. The centralised hill becomes the breast of a living landscape, whose sweeps and curves are echoed in the pulsating organic shapes that writhe in orgiastic ecstasy beneath it. These are the potent and majestic deities of nature who, Illingworth insisted, were appreciated by Maori but were being driven from the land through Western materialism and the inhibited and restrictive behaviour it encourages. Nude in a Starry Field can easily be read through the social criticism for which Illingworth is best known. Bourgeois Western culture is condemned through its absence and distance from this scene of natural harmony. But, for Illingworth, these landscapes were primarily about seeing, experiencing and conveying the full power of nature. He argued that art itself had its origins in these elemental forces, and must “come straight from the heart, the primeval being”¹. Here a back-to-earth nature philosophy merges with a romantic faith in the artist as a visionary or seer who can experience the world more sensitively than can most, and whose role is to convey these experiences through art. This painting demonstrates Illingworth’s solution to this difficult task. He liberates his landscape from the demands of realistic representation, with its appeal to surface appearances. The organic sexualised forms serve as flat strips or bands of colour that extend across the picture plane, and are layered to eliminate spatial depth and emphasise pattern and colouring. Heightened colour and stylised forms further remove the scene from ‘the real’, while making connections to the art and vision of children which Illingworth valued for their potential to reconfigure the familiar in new and unexpected ways. Illingworth borrowed Paul Klee’s term ‘poetic imagery’ to explain the impact a painting like Nude in a Starry Field should have on the viewer. This is an art that seeks to bypass the intellect and reason. It is designed to arouse the sensory and the imaginative: qualities Illingworth believed were crushed in modern society, but could be fully restored through the ‘return’ to older and more meaningful ways of experiencing the world. Nude in a Starry Field acts as evidence of Illingworth’s own communion with these forces and as an invitation for us all to experience this way of being. AARON LISTER ¹ ‘Interview with Michael Illingworth’, Barry Lett Galleries Newsletter, 19 August 1965. 46

23

MICHAEL ILLINGWORTH

Nude in a Starry Field oil on jute canvas signed with artist’s cipher and dated ‘71 verso 710mm x 610mm

$50,000 - $70,000


IN FOCUS 47


SHANE COTTON Lying in the Black Land is one of the first paintings completed after Shane Cotton was awarded the Frances Hodgkins Fellowship in 1998. It is amongst the most important works in New Zealand’s art history due to its exploration of the historical conflict between Christianity and Maoritanga. The conflation of Christian and Maori imagery in Lying in the Black Land is central to Cotton’s work from the late 1990s. The paintings that Cotton produced between 1998 and 2002 have been loosely grouped together as the Kenehi or Genesis paintings and are characterised by a marked interest in his own personal and family history. Of these exceptionally significant works, Lying in the Black Land is one of the first and most significant as it references and repeats the fraught relationship that played out between 19thcentury colonial missionaries and Cotton’s Ngapuhi ancestors, whose traditional art practices were suppressed as they were thought to be pagan. It is therefore poignantly appropriate that Cotton should explore this historic relationship in pictorial format. Its scale too, is significant, in that it marks a radical change in the artist’s oeuvre as his work shifted into what Lara Strongman has termed Cotton’s ‘museum scale’ pieces.¹ Indeed, the monumental scale of Lying in the Black Land transforms the painting into a veritable environment that engulfs the spectator. Cotton neatly splits the vast canvas through palette choice with the left half bearing a burnt brown ground while the right half is coloured in an inky black which came to dominate his work of the late 1990s. A solid white cross further subdivides the left half of the work, the centre of which is dominated by a large floating head composed in a style that references Maori carvings. In Maori meeting houses, a carved body-less head is often seen at the apex of the gable and is known as the parata or koruru; it is representative of the ancestor after whom the house is named. The body of this carved head is often seen on the ridge pole inside the porch while the house itself is also symbolic of the koruru body. In Cotton’s painting, traditional Maori and Christian symbols are seamlessly juxtaposed with the large tiki head bearing a saintly halo while its tongue offers a carved pattern of puriri leaves. This amalgamation of Maori and Western motifs is central to Cotton’s art practice of the period and it recurs throughout the large expanse of Lying in the Black Land. Two smaller koruru appear at the base of the cross as the fruits born by a small plant while passages in te reo Maori abound alongside koru patterns and Western emblems of eternity.² Several more koruru are dotted across the black portion on the right-hand side of the canvas. This half of the painting is inundated with complex yet covert symbols. Small and predominantly white crosses march horizontally across the pitch-black darkness. A couple of them are ominously twisted, hinting at the potent symbol of 48

white supremacy in the swastika of the Nazi party. The centre of the painting is taken up by a white bird settled on a fluttering ribbon which is embellished with te reo Maori that speaks of the puriri trees of Taiamai. The motif recurs in Cotton’s later work where the bird and the puriri tree are invoked as symbols of the area of Taiamai.³ It can alternatively be seen as a reworking of the potent ancient symbol of rebirth, as a white phoenix rising from the ashes. Alongside time-honoured Western motifs, Cotton also includes more localised imagery with shrunken silhouettes of mountain ranges anchoring the work in New Zealand while the appearance of a steamship and a charabanc car have been identified by Strongman as allusions to ‘waka transformations’ found on meeting houses along the East Coast from the early 20th century.4 Two waka are found in the work, forming one of a number of Cotton’s poignant motifs that hold Maori and Pakehaārelevance simultaneously. A brown waka sits upright at the bottom of the painting while further up the canvas a white waka lies upturned. The waka are inscribed with text and refer concurrently to the biblical story of Christ’s incredible ability to walk on water and to the Ngapuhi proverb that queries “Who will right the upturned waka?” Both narratives hold personal relevance for Cotton deriving from his familial marae at Ngawha. The jet-black half of the canvas hosts a multitude of complex symbolic imagery. Thick white ribbons of paint swim out in a serpentine manner from a square tiki head at the top of the work, which Cotton employs as a backdrop for poignantly symbolic Maori words which are written in bold, demanding capital letters. The large sprawling letters that spell whakanuia suggest acknowledgement and recognition, celebration, promotion, commemoration and merriment. As with most of Cotton’s paintings, possibility and ambiguity reign supreme. Much of the strength and success of Cotton’s work lies in his use of imagery and words that abound with latent symbolism. Whakanuia could allude to the racial inequality that many still see as dividing Maori and Pakehaāor perhaps to the need for Maori concerns to be better acknowledged. There is even the possibility that the painting is itself celebrating New Zealand’s unique biculturalism. It is significant that the word has been taken up in recent years to designate the celebrations held on Waitangi Day in Rotorua that are intended to educate people about traditional Maori culture. As well as powerfully suggestive words, Lying in the Black Land contains Maori proverbs or whakatauaki, which succinctly allude to the values, feelings and beliefs of Cotton’s ancestors. JEMMA FIELD ¹Lara Strongman, ‘Ruarangi: The Meeting Place between Sea and Sky. A Consideration of Shane Cotton’s Work 1993–2003’, pp. 14–31 in Shane Cotton: Survey 1993–2003, Exhib. Cat., Wellington, 2004, p. 23. ibid, ² p. 24. ³ibid, p. 24–5. 4 ibid, p. 24.


24

SHANE COTTON

Lying in the Blackland oil on canvas title inscribed, signed and dated Š1998 2000mm x 3000mm Exhibited: Shane Cotton: Survey 1993 - 2003, City Gallery, Wellington 17 July - 19 October 2003 Illustrated: in the accompanying exhibition catalogue, Shane Cotton, City Gallery, Wellington 2003, p. 67

$250,000 - $300,000


50


STEPHEN BAMBURY Stephen Bambury began his group of paintings titled “Necessary Correction” in 1994. The title makes reference to Colin McCahon’s Necessary Protection paintings, but implies the need for a re-consideration, a “correction” of the assumptions made within a New Zealand context of their genealogy. The paintings appear, at least superficially to share something of the compositional form of Bambury’s vertical tau cross diptychs. The form of the tau cross had long been implied in Bambury’s more symmetrical cross forms where he often inferred a separation of one arm of the cross, scribing or delineating it along one axis. This was and is consistent with his approach to geometry - one that wilfully destabilises so called pure form, and in doing so refutes the fundamentalist position such formalism aspires to. That McCahon’s own work had been offered up to its New Zealand audience as a function of a blend of geographical and spiritual determinism raised questions for Bambury particularly as he re-established himself in New Zealand after four years’ living and working in France as the inaugural Moet & Chandon fellow. In Europe, Bambury had encountered the paintings of renowned Swiss painter Helmut Federle, an artist who shared something of McCahon’s own reflective spirit. Federle can be seen as drawing on a history of Northern European painting - a symbolic tradition rooted in the landscape but unlike McCahon’s harsh southern light, Federle’s vision is diffused through a “last light of day” romanticism. Federle too had taken the form that was present in McCahon but his resource was the initial of his first name ‘H’ turned on its side: a prosaic decision, perhaps, but one that has given rise to a long series of paintings called Basics on Composition. Curiously the self -referential nature of the gesture of using his own initial speaks to McCahon’s arguably self referential I AM. Bambury therefore finds himself in a situation between gently distorted mirrors, recognising both forms but determined to work this significant space between them. This notion became the subject of a significant project at the inaugural exhibition in the McCahon room of the Auckland art Gallery Toi o Tamaki in 1997. An exhibiton curated by both the artist and William McAloon titled: The McCahon Room: Necessary Correction: Colin McCahon, Stephen Bambury, Helmut Federle, explored Bambury’s Necessary Correction paintings through the “local” lens of McCahon and the distant end of the looking glass in Helmut Federle. One aspect that sets Bambury aside is the particularity of his material language. Oil and acrylic paint, and for that matter canvas, are replaced by resin and graphite on aluminium. Despite the common aspects of language that these three artists seemed to share, their dialects differ remarkably and the closer one looks the greater the nuances become. What does become apparent is the degree to which the mythology of McCahon as a virgin birth in the isolated antipodes looks less tenable despite the will of local historians. And for Bambury, it once again demonstrates the breadth of his awareness and the complexity of implications in negotiating a practice within New Zealand’s borders. This is something which, perhaps more than any other painter working in New Zealand, he has met head-on.

25

STEPHEN BAMBURY

The Necessary Correction paintings embrace the conceptual questioning and the wondrous material adventure that has defined his practice. Increasingly Bambury’s work is finding its audience beyond New Zealand’s shores. This in itself is a ‘necessary correction’. EMMA FOX

Necessary Correction XIX acrylic and graphite on two aluminium panels title inscribed, signed and dated ‘05 1180mm x 860mm

$35,000 - $45,000

IN FOCUS 51


52


26

DON BINNEY

Tui acrylic on paper signed and dated 2003 410mm x 290mm

$30,000 - $40,000

27

ANN ROBINSON

Puka Vase 45% cast lead crystal signed and dated 2001 and inscribed 1/1 635mm x 170mm diameter

$28,000 - $38,000

IN FOCUS 53


VIRGINIA KING

28

VIRGINIA KING

Limpet - Coracle macrocarpa, bronze, acrylic and oil stain signed and dated 1997 2800mm x 1800mm x 500mm Provenance: Collection of Air New Zealand Illustrated: Liz Caughey, Virginia King Sculptor, David Bateman Publishing, 2005 p. 4

Limpet-Coracle (1997), one of the most significant of Virginia King’s works from the mid-1990s, was inspired by a marine biologist’s discovery that the simple limpet moves daily around the rock pool on the rising tide to feed, returning to exactly the same position from which it came. For King, this was reminiscent of New Zealanders’ penchant for almost ritualistic travelling abroad, only to return to the fires of home. King has made three large macrocarpa limpets, each with a cast bronze, hand-beaten and patinaed inlay on the back. This was the first, created as a commission for the First Class Departure Lounge at Auckland International Airport and now being offered for sale with all proceeds going to charity. The second work, Limpet-Shrine, won the Jane Campion Memory Award for Site Specific Sculpture at Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi, in 1998 and was subsequently purchased by the Singapore Tourism Bureau, from the curated exhibition Singapore ’99. The third limpet is in the permanent collection of Pacific Art at the Hawaii State Art Museum. Chronologically, Limpet-Coracle sits between King’s early work that teased out her ongoing fascination with language – some multipieced and often displayed floating on water, others freestanding and reminiscent of book leaves – and her later stainless-steel works, which were monumental in scale and often commissioned for public places. As with many of her early works, Limpet-Coracle is best displayed suspended to allow the play of light on its surface, and of shadow behind. This impressive and beautiful work demonstrates many of the 54

$20,000 - $30,000

signature characteristics of King’s oeuvre: its inspiration lies in nature (the limpet); it is constructed of panels of finely crafted, perforated components reminiscent of nature’s repetition of pattern, and neatly ‘stitched’ together to form a whole, using oval ‘biscuits’ on the back to clamp the joined segments and emphasise her method of construction; the work enlarges a tiny life form to a grand scale to emphasise its complexity, vulnerability and ecological importance; and, like many of King’s works from the mid-1990s, it accentuates ‘the spaces between’, drawing attention to the space-shapes within and around line or material, which allow us to read words or images, rather than to the defining edges. From other sculptures in a similar vein, King has reused the ‘discarded’ (subtracted) pieces to create new works, joining them using wire, copper, rope or string, to create a different statement ‘by addition’, and to ensure minimal wastage of her valued natural material. Most of King’s works during this period were made from salvaged materials such as swamp kauri, macrocarpa, stone and even printers’ blocks. Others were transient sculptures created to be eroded by the forces of nature, such as her Piha sand sculpture which diminished with each tide. King is also well known for Sliver in Broadway, Newmarket, her collaborative public bridge commissions, Rewarewa Creek and Aramarama Millennium Bridge, and her permanent earth sculpture at Brick Bay near Warkworth. The latter, most easily viewed on Google Earth, was created within rather than from nature, a triumph of sensitive collaboration. For more information on Virginia’s work, visit: www.virginiakingsculptor.com. LIZ CAUGHEY


IN FOCUS 55


56


29

GEOFF THORNLEY

Construction #13 oil on board signed and dated 1980 verso 1330mm x 1040mm

$12,000 - $18,000

30

RICHARD KILLEEN

Pitch (Blue) alkyd on twenty aluminium pieces title inscribed, signed and dated March 1981 2500mm x 2500mm approximately Provenance: Private Collection, Sydney. Purchased: Webb’s September 1986. Formerly in the collection of Denis Cohn, gallerist

$45,000 - $55,000

IN FOCUS 57


BILL HAMMOND

31

BILL HAMMOND

All Along the Heaphy Highway acrylic on canvas title inscribed, signed and dated 1998 1070mm x 1455mm Illustrated: Jennifer Hay, Bill Hammond, Jingle Jangle Morning, Christchuch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetu, 2007, p.138

$230,000 - $270,000

All Along the Heaphy Highway immediately summons up scenarios we think we know well – classic set pieces from films, Renaissance paintings and theatre – but, the more we study this grandly compelling painting, the more odd and unsettling it becomes. The painting’s highly charged atmosphere suggests the classic tension of an ambush about to happen at the same time as it relays the bustling and preening of a royal court, settling itself in, ready to conduct the weighty business of state as the world looks on. Think of von Tempsky and William Strutt’s ambush paintings of the New Zealand Wars, and then think of Mantegna’s frescoes of the Gonzaga family and retinue.

Hammond has shown the 1940s’ critic A R D Fairburn to be in his

The lofty vantage point of the gathered bird people on the righthand side of the painting indicates supreme tactical advantage, as any travelers on the road below are seen and anticipated with predatory delight a long time before they actually reach the shadowed grove, through which they must pass. The way the poses of the watchers move between high seriousness and comic exaggeration, puts me in mind of the TV advertisement in which a manic group of giggling, sneering possums kidnaps a car from hapless youths hypnotised by a boxed pizza glowing on the roadway like a piece of alien technology. The TV ad plays on all the sci-fi and horror films we have seen about nocturnal abductions in forests and encountering the uncanny and insane inhabitants of lost highways. Hammond has done a great deal to seek out and populate the dark forest of myth in the New Zealand psyche. One easily thinks of: the shaggy medieval forests of Altdorfer; the archaic English and damp Northern European forests that Tolkien recreated in Mirkwood and Fangorn as homes of goblins, orcs, elves and ents; Shakespeare’s woods in which magical transformations of appearance and identity frequently occur; or the cruel magic of Robert Holdstock’s Mythago Wood in which the fears and desires of the collective unconscious are projected as real phantoms.

confused but telling attempt to depict the invisible mythic world

It is not hard to understand why Peter Jackson has said that Bill Hammond is his favourite New Zealand artist. And how wrong 58

declaration that, “there is no golden mist in the air, no Merlin in our woods”. For starters, what did Fairburn think had happened to the spirit inhabitants of the woods about which Maori mythology told stories? Hammond’s populous spirit world is, on one level, an indirect acknowledgement of the uncanny return of this repressed mythology. In the early part of the 20th century, the Arts and Crafts architect Chapman-Taylor made a number of cutely romantic photographs of gauzily clad nymphets prancing amongst the ferns and kauris, in a deliberate attempt to graft an English, Arthurian and Elven fantasy onto the local bush. Another close at hand can be seen in Trevor Lloyd’s surreal 1925 painting Death of a Moa. Lloyd’s gathering of gossipy birds is spied on by supposedly Maori wood sprites, the patupaiarehe. Less overtly mythical is a strange 1886 painting by Kennett Watkins, The Home of the Cormorants, Waitakere Ranges, in which pied cormorants perch silently on a network of spindly branches. Chapman-Taylor and Lloyd’s sylvan fantasies, and Watkins’ eerie image are all quirky ancestors of Hammond’s uncanny avian communities. The cleverly handled sense of big-scale drama in All Along the Heaphy Highway provides an understructure for a medley of exquisite colouristic and calligraphic effects which ripple across the work. Hammond is very able to match the intricate and delicate to the coarse and sketchy. The birds in the light are tattooed with musical notations, city high-rises, cars and copperplate script inventories of land surveys and sales. In the dark mesh of detail on the left-hand side of the image, bird, horse and ghoul figures appear and fade away amidst a sticky tracery of branches, foliage and dripping paint. Small flecks of dark pigment and ambiguous brush marks float on a saturated emerald ground, sometimes morphing into bodies or sprays of leaves, or just remaining as suggestive stains. ALLAN SMITH


IN FOCUS 59


32

DORIS LUSK

Night Drive Port Hills oil on canvasboard signed and dated 1959 580mm x 1020mm Exhibited: Contemporary New Zealand Painting and Sculpture, Auckland Art Gallery, April 1960

$35,000 - $45,000

33

OPPOSITE PAGE: EVELYN PAGE

Wellington Harbour from Mount Cook oil on canvasboard signed 465mm x 385mm

60

$18,000 - $28,000

Evelyn Page is most likely to have been painted this scene from Wright Street, looking down towards Hargreaves Street in the Wellington suburb of Mount Cook. Chronologically, it would have been painted around the 1950s when the artist’s family was settling in Waikanae. Architectural features both small and significant are instantly recognisable and can still be seen today. The three-car garage at the road junction still exists, as does the carillon of the National War Memorial. The large building with the green roof was, of course, the former National Gallery and Museum in Buckle Street and behind it sits the Old Technical College. At the harbour’s edge sits the Odlin Building and, beyond the bay, the Hutt Valley shimmers in the distance. Remarkably unchanged, the city shows its vintage with the introduction of the Austin 7 parked in the road and the above-ground telegraph poles. The three ships in the harbour are tankers or possibly passenger ferries, signalling a vibrant, working city. EMMA FOX


IN FOCUS 61


34

BILL HAMMOND

Modern Day acrylic on linen title inscribed, signed and dated 1991 700mm x 1000mm

$50,000 - $70,000

Set within a commercial business area of skyscrapers and dark alleys, Bill Hammond’s Modern Day features a selection of buildings with human features working on computers or tills, drinking martinis, talking on cellphones, dancing or pushing supermarket trolleys. The painting is characteristic of Hammond’s works of the 1990s, which sought to comment on the rise of consumerism, materialism and crime together with the depersonalising effect of technological advances. The work is completed in a quirky style, reminiscent of 1980s comic strips and cartoons, and all forms are sketched in a cursory manner. Hammond tempers his paucity of line with areas of thickly brushed colour and a wealth of intricate details. A mob of building-people are seen marching in a patch of black through the business district, 62

their features bland and uniform while calligraphic marks reminiscent of city graffiti decorate the drainpipes. Continuing in the style of comics, circles of magnification are provided, giving insight to the internal goings-on in some of the buildings, where speeches are made and transactions completed. The frenetic energy of the piece is heightened by the jumbled collection of fractured viewpoints, which in turn capture and emanate the claustrophobic feel of a concrete jungle. Indeed, Robert Leonard sums up this period of Hammond’s work: “Wired, paranoid, hypedup, his paintings (of the late 1980s) were junky, punky and dystopian – juiced up with sadistic speed-freak cartoon-violence. They offered no pastoral idyll or redemptive promised land, but a deregulated incubator-world super-heated with information.” JEMMA FIELD


35

GRAHAME SYDNEY

Homestead with Mt Ida oil on linen signed and dated 2004; title inscribed, signed and dated c2004 Cambrian Valley, Otago, NZ verso 650mm x 1010mm Provenance: Private Collection, Christchurch

$70,000 - $85,000

Grahame Sydney is renowned as a landscape artist of uncommon proficiency and his vision of his environment is matched only by his uncompromising skill and technique. In his hand, landscape

of occupancy. A building, a telephone pole, a letterbox, standing

elements evoke emotion in the viewer with their turbulent skies, lonely plains and eloquent hills: exacting representations of our natural world.

against a backdrop of ancient alps is unchanged and untouched by

From his home and studio in Central Otago, Sydney returns again and again to the breathtaking vistas that surround him: the Southern Alps, Maniototo, and Mt Ida, empty but for a hint

extremes of weather and terrain. In this work, Sydney has chosen to

in for the absent human dweller, are depictions of the sublime, of man’s insignificance in the face of nature. A tumbledown dwelling the temporary presence of man. Winter in Central Otago, seemingly devoid of colour, presents extraordinary displays of light and shade, depict an old homestead, abandoned amongst the blinding snow and under a crisp, clear-blue sky. EMMA FOX

IN FOCUS 63


36

MICHAEL SMITHER

Doralto Road in the Moonlight oil on board title inscribed, signed and dated ‘69 verso 720mm x 700mm

$50,000 - $70,000

Doralto Road in Frankleigh Park, New Plymouth, is the site of Michael Smither’s childhood home. Mary, Smither’s mother, is backlit at the front door of her home, waving out to Kirby Wright, a long-time friend of the artist. This nocturnal scene depicts a busy evening of people living their lives and, like much of Smither’s most celebrated work from the 1970s, is loosely a ‘domestic’ painting, a poignant 64

depiction of a particular time and place. Typical of Smither’s interest in ‘the extraordinariness of the ordinary’ and his keen eye for the minute details of daily life, this work offers an exaggerated Realism. The varied sources of light, both natural and man-made, include street lights, vehicle headlights and the moon, and bring a highkeyed emotional tenor to the subject matter. Kirby has pulled into the driveway in his Volkswagen beetle: he was a young man, who was about to sell up all of his worldly possesions, give away his dog and move to join his fiancé Margaret abroad. He was poised on the brink of breaking free of the small town life while Smither, by contrast, stayed on and produced some of the most recognisable images of domestic life in New Zealand’s art history. EMMA FOX


37

MARTI FRIEDLANDER

Ralph Hotere - 1978 gelatin silver print Illustrated: Kriselle Baker and Vincent O’Sullivan, Hotere, Ron Sang Publications 2008, p.1 (detail) 500mm x 400mm

$5,000 - $7,000

Marti Friedlander’s photography career spans over 50 years, during which time she has photographed people and places both known and unknown. At times it is the event that is important, at others the place. But it is her portraits of artists, writers, politicians, and kuia that tell us most about the people of our country. An often intimate look at a person unknown to us, except perhaps by reputation. In

an age of tawdry celebrity, her dignified observations of subjects are by way of contrast, up close and personal. The closeness of the subject to the photographer, and hence to us the viewer, forces us into a confrontation with them. They demand our attention, by the simple fact of having been recorded, and of the sensitivity with which the shot has been composed. In this photograph, we have one artist recording another, one of a series of images of a relationship and its mutual respect developing over many years. As a subject, Hotere remains a mystery to most, preferring his art, rather than himself, to do the talking. But to those who know him, it is said he is a deeply charismatic man, with enormous presence and charm. Even here, he evades our glance, looking to a point somewhere behind the photographer. We are free to study him, his confident stance and elusive gaze, but he reveals little. EMMA FOX IN FOCUS 65


38

BILL HAMMOND

Playing the Drums acrylic on copper title inscribed, signed and dated 1988 705mm x 300mm

39

RALPH HOTERE

Drawing for a Tin Roof Painting pastel, acrylic and pencil on paper title inscribed, signed and dated ‘85-’86 and inscribed Music Faculty, University Auckland, Port Chalmers 980mm x 640mm

66

$25,000 - $35,000

$20,000 - $30,000


IN FOCUS 67


PAT HANLY

40

PAT HANLY

Escape From Destruction oil on board signed, title inscribed; signed and dated 1960 and inscribed A.274 verso, original Gallery One label and original James Bourlett and Sons Ltd Liverpool, exhibition label affixed verso, inscribed John Moore’s Exhibition 1959 and; inscribed The painting. Destruction of a city. Dark heat and fire orange (text obscured) everywhere, the sensual twisting of a lost symbol (text obscured) through the debri (sic), in a lone building stands for a moment (text obscured) plunging down above which the tired white dove (text obscured) ...lessly a shadow portrait of man is framed in a molten (text obscured) and to the left a rich fertile green tree symbol is surrounded by a singular white and insulating line. April 10 - 1960 in artist’s hand on label affixed verso 1200mm x 1200mm Provenance: By descent from Robin Howard. Robin Howard was an early patron of Gallery One, London Exhibited: Gallery One; Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, 16 North Audley Street, Grosvenor Square, London WI, Hyde Park, 1960.

$40,000 - $50,000

Despite Patrick Hanly’s sly dictum – “do no early works” – we are fortunate to have these four Fire Series artworks that are now to be auctioned. Hanly, notoriously, destroyed paintings that he regarded as unsuccessful so these works could well have had the artist’s approval. All four works were acquired by the late Robin Howard, possibly from Gallery One in London, and remained in his care for five decades. It is art-historically important that these Hanly creations are now safely here in Aotearoa.

whole. The jutting, brown-and-ochre landform in the lower left of

The late ’50s and early ’60s in London were times of intense artistic ferment which somehow grew and survived within an atmosphere of extreme anxiety about the Cold War. Hanly’s Fire Series was agonisingly concerned with the threat of annihilation by nuclear attack, yet an equally important theme in the paintings was the possibility of escape to an island paradise.

Destruction (lot 43), the most compositionally accomplished of

Escape from Destruction (lot 40), is indisputably from the Fire Series. Hanly began creating this thematically related series of more than 20 paintings in London towards the end of 1959. He completed the series some time in 1960. Particular images reoccur in this series of paintings. Fire and dark destruction are vividly contrasted with the positive, nurturing and creative symbols such as the feminine roundness of the paradise-escape islands, the austere and contemplative female profile, and the child-like houses within the green serenity of the tree of life. And, as so often occurs in these works, here in the upper left of the painting is the many-sailed escape vessel. The white border around the yacht echoes, significantly, not just a cloud shape but the outline of the iconic woman’s hair.

And yet, in spite of these tensions, there is hope expressed in

Hope of Paradise (lot 42), a significant early work by Hanly, provides a valuable addition to our understanding of the Fire Series as a

This building may well be the source for this emblem.

68

this picture contrasts powerfully with the sharply defined buildingshapes in red and blue whose roofs segue into the sails of the escape vessel. To this viewer, the escape ‘barge’ has a more positive feel than does the offer of sanctuary within the yellow-brown promontory. The whole upper area of the painting suggests a stormy blue-green seascape and half-perceived images appear to be trying to rise from beneath this turbulent surface.

these repatriated works, provides interesting paradoxes. The word ‘bomb’ is enclosed in an egg-shaped form yet Hanly’s oval shapes are most often positive images. The atomic weapon is a destructive, descending force. Everything to the right of the painting is aspiring upwards while leaning away from the coming blast of the weapon. the swift upward momentum, driven by light, in the two circular ‘escaping’ forms. A pure and simple Fire Series painting, Fire above the City (lot 41) offers little hope of an escape to any paradise island. The three triangular-roofed houses at the bottom of the painting are bathed in red light and there is no hint that the roofs could stand in as sails. The two upper shapes, floating on an ochre background, are suggestive of ‘islands’ but they are pigmented in red and the larger form, upper right, carries a symbol, I believe, for a half-destroyed building. When Hanly shared accommodation with Bill Culbert in Kensington Gore, the neighbouring house stood derelict: it had lost its back wall in the blitz. RUSSELL HALEY


IN FOCUS 69


70


41

PAT HANLY

42

PAT HANLY

Fire Above the City oil on board signed and dated ‘60; title inscribed, signed twice and dated ‘60 and inscribed A.236 verso, original Gallery One label affixed verso 700mm x 610mm Provenance: By descent from Robin Howard. Robin Howard was an early patron of Gallery One, London Exhibited: Gallery One; Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, 16 North Audley Street, Grosvenor Square, London WI, Hyde Park, 1960.

Hope of Paradise oil on board signed and dated ‘60; title inscribed, signed and dated 1960, and inscribed A.249 verso, original Gallery One label affixed verso 610mm x 800mm Provenance: By descent from Robin Howard. Robin Howard was an early patron of Gallery One, London Exhibited: Gallery One; Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, 16 North Audley Street, Grosvenor Square, London WI, Hyde Park, 1960.

$30,000 - $40,000

$30,000 - $40,000

IN FOCUS 71


43

PAT HANLY

Destruction oil on board signed and dated ‘60; title inscribed, signed and dated 1960, and inscribed A.246 verso, original Gallery One label affixed verso 570mm x 460mm Provenance: By descent from Robin Howard. Robin Howard was an early patron of Gallery One, London Exhibited: Gallery One; Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, 16 North Audley Street, Grosvenor Square, London WI, Hyde Park, 1960.

72

$20,000 - $30,000


44

GRAHAME SYDNEY

Catherine Sleeping oil on linen signed and dated 1987, signed and dated 1987 and inscribed Dunedin NZ 1987 585mm x 715mm llustrated: Grahame Sydney, The Art of Grahame Sydney, Longacre Press, 2000 p.137

$55,000 - $65,000

IN FOCUS 73


STAR GOSSAGE

Portraits of mothers and children are part of a Western art historical canon that goes back centuries, beginning with depictions of the Virgin Mary and baby Jesus. The images became so familiar, so iconic, that, despite the individuality of the subject, they became symbolic of all or every woman. Rangi-Marie Peace, Mother and Child is in fact an intensely personal and intimate depiction of the artist and her daughter Grace, born in 2004. This is a painting of enormous serenity and calm, and Damian Skinner has said of her work that: “All of Gossage’s figures have a quality of passive expectancy. They are waiting: languid in some cases, stoic in others, weary in some. The paintings offer a kind of pregnant moment, an expanded pause. This quality is an invitation to get involved, to take part in the construction of narrative. Who are these people? Where are they? What are they waiting for?”¹ Mythical and ethereal, the mother cradles her swaddled baby in a protective embrace, eyes half closed in part exhaustion, part ecstasy. As an artist, Gossage maintains a strong spiritual connection to her environment, which she also expresses through film and writing. “She resides on a headland above Pakiri Beach; it is a place resonating with personal myth and a landscape that is rich in history. This gorgeous stretch of the Northern East Coast is suffused with white sands, blue sea and native bush. Pakiri is emblematic of Gossage’s psychic landscape – the site and subject of her work.”² A graduate with a Diploma of Fine Art, she majored in Computer Art and Film from the Otago Polytechnic School of Fine Arts, Dunedin. Her work was included in Taiawhio, a groundbreaking exhibition of contemporary Maori Art, and the companion publication, Taiawhio – Conversations with Contemporary Maori Artists (2002). In 2006, Moana and Rangi-Marie Peace were exhibited together; and Moana is now in the permanent collection of Te Papa Tongarewa. EMMA FOX. ¹ Damien Skinner, Ao: New Paintings by Star Gossage, Paul Nache Gallery, 2009.

45

STAR GOSSAGE

Rangi-Marie Peace Mother and Child acrylic on board title inscribed, signed and dated June 2004 verso 1200mm x 1200mm Illustrated; Lisa Reihana, Maps of Memories, The Art of Star Gossage, Art New Zealand, Autumn 2006, Issue 118 p.42

² Lisa Reihana, ‘A Close Engagement, the Art of Star Gossage’, Art New Zealand, Autumn 2006, Issue 118, p. 42.

74

$12,000 - $18,000


IN FOCUS 75


46

PAUL HARTIGAN

Warp ink on acrylic title inscribed and signed verso 2020mm x 2000mm Exhibited: Paul Hartigan, Flat Out, Artis Gallery 27 Oct - 21 Nov, 1998

76

$8,000 - $12,000


47

DICK FRIZZELL

Greener Pastures oil on linen title inscribed, signed and dated 1/6/98 605mm x 605mm

$20,000 - $30,000

IN FOCUS 77


48

TOM KREISLER

Untitled (Exorcise Series) acrylic on canvas 1070mm x 1435mm

78

$6,000 - $8,000


49

GEOFF THORNLEY

Untitled (Dyad) acrylic on board signed verso 970mm x 715mm

50

NEIL DAWSON

Beam (Silver Fern) brushed steel, halogen light fitting, 3/6 title inscribed, signed and dated 2007 on crate lid 1495mm x 295mm diameter

$10,000 - $15,000

$10,000 - $15,000

IN FOCUS 79


51

RALPH HOTERE

Port Chalmers brolite lacquer on board title inscribed, signed and dated ‘73 verso 600mm x 590mm

80

$40,000 - $60,000


Don Binney is most often associated with landscape paintings in which bird forms play a dominant role, often rendered in a scale much larger than life. But Binney has experimented with other forms and ideas, some involving still life elements in a landscape setting, others, as in this example, bringing together an effigy of a British monarch and a famous New Zealand landscape feature, Lion Rock at Piha Beach. This painting in fact belongs to a series, which depicts Queen Victoria and King Edward VII among others set against the landscape in silhouette. Here the effigy with its connotations of empire and colonisation sets uneasily upon the land, unlike the bird forms that relate and have a sense of kinship. Whereas the birds appear to fly and inhabit the land, the effigies are symbols of power that shadow the country with their influence but clearly belong elsewhere. In each case the effigies relate to a period of the discovery and occupation of New Zealand by the British. George III reigned at the earliest phase in the late 18th century, the time of Captain Cook.

52

DON BINNEY

Lion Rock with King George III oil on board signed and dated 1984 580mm x 640mm

$18,000 - $25,000

PROF MICHAEL DUNN IN FOCUS 81


53

JOHN WALSH

Hemi Happens Upon a Gathering of Manaia acrylic on board title inscribed, signed and dated 2002 verso 710mm x 1185mm

82

$12,000 - $18,000

54

PAT HANLY

Hard Birth Mother and Bouquet mixed media on paper title inscribed, signed and dated ‘94 760mm x 1000mm

$12,000 - $18,000


55

IAN SCOTT

Lattice PVA on canvas signed and dated May ‘77 verso 1524mm x 1524mm

$6,000 - $8,000

56

ROBERT ELLIS

Motorway oil on board signed and dated 1963 900mm x 1200mm

$20,000 - $30,000

IN FOCUS 83


57

BILL HAMMOND

I Thought Maybe You’d Understand “Ramones” acrylic on board title inscribed, signed and dated 1985; signed and dated 1989 verso 155mm x 1075mm

84

$30,000 - $40,000

58

COLIN MCCAHON

Kurow Hill charcoal on paper title inscribed, signed and dated 1972 215mm x 280mm

$15,000 - $20,000


59

JULIA MORISON

My Desire From Gobsmack and Flabbergast mixed media on two aluminium panels title inscribed, signed and dated ‘05 verso 600mm x 600mm, 600mm x 200mm

Illustrated: Justin Paton, Julia Morison, a loop around a loop, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu and Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2007 p.171 $6,000 - $8,000

IN FOCUS 85


86

61

PAUL DIBBLE

Lone Man Walking bronze signed and dated 2006 720mm x 570mm x 180mm

$10,000 - $15,000

60

PAT HANLY

New Bouquet acrylic on wooden assemblage title inscribed, signed and dated ‘92 verso 900mm x 700mm

$8,000 - $12,000


62

NEIL DAWSON

Jive aluminium with custom box, 21/35 title inscribed, signed and dated 2002; title inscribed; signed and dated 2003 on box 380mm diameter

$5,000 - $7,000

63

GREER TWISS

Shadow bronze and steel stamped and dated ‘72 940mm x 440mm x 145mm

$4,000 - $6,000

64

ANDREW DRUMMOND

Untitled copper and bronze 1500mm x 430mm x 120mm Note: Andrew Drummond’s work is currently the subject of a major retrospective Observation/ Action/ Reflection, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, 14 May - 15 September 2010

$7,000 - $9,000

IN FOCUS 87


65

TERRY STRINGER

Jug and Bowl painted bronze, 1/3 stamped with artist’s monogram and signed and dated ‘86 470mm x 280mm x 95mm

$5,000 - $7,000

66

PETER PERYER

Edward Bullmore’s Launch gelatin silver print 410mm x 275mm Illustrated: Gregory Burke and Peter Weiermair, Second Nature: Peter Peryer Photographer, City Gallery, Wellington 1995, p.123

$4,000 - $6,000

67

RALPH HOTERE

Winter Solstice Carey’s Bay gold leaf and acrylic on glass title inscribed, signed and dated ‘93; inscribed Judy, Happy Birthday, Love Ralph, 20/11/93 215mm x 175mm

88

$10,000 - $15,000


68

MICHAEL HARRISON

Bear acrylic on paper signed 295mm x 210mm

69

RUDI GOPAS

Portrait of a Woman in Head Scarf oil on canvas board signed and dated ‘56

70

FRANCES HODGKINS

Portrait of May Kenyon watercolour signed and dated ‘96; inscribed May verso 197mm x 145mm Note: May Kenyon was a close friend, fellow painter and model of Frances Hodgkins.

$2,000 - $3,000

$6,000 - $8,000

$15,000 - $25,000

IN FOCUS 89


90


71

KARL MAUGHAN

Colyton (May) oil on canvas title inscribed, signed and dated May 2008 verso 900mm x 1200mm

$15,000 - $20,000

72

JOHN WALSH

Untitled oil on board signed and dated 2004 verso 890mm x 1190mm

73

RICHARD KILLEEN

Shoso-In oil on board signed and dated 1973 verso 1220mmx x 610mm

74

PAUL HARTIGAN

Favourite Fish enamel on board title inscribed, signed and dated 1990 360mm x 1185mm Exhibited; New Works, Lesley Kreisler Gallery, New Plymouth, 1990

$10,000 - $15,000

$10,000 - $15,000

$10,000 - $15,000

IN FOCUS 91


75

GARTH TAPPER

2:30pm oil on board signed and dated ‘77; title inscribed and signed verso 575mm x 580mm

$7,000 - $9,000

76

GEOFF THORNLEY

Untitled mixed media on paper title inscribed, signed and dated 1973 on typewritten label affixed verso 890mm x 685mm

92

$4,000 - $6,000

77

WILLIAM SUTTON

Otago watercolour signed and dated ‘85 365mm x 500mm

78

TRISTAN L. JULES LACROIX

French Hunting Scene oil on canvas signed and dated 1897 640mm x 1000mm

$5,000 - $7,000

$10,000 - $15,000


IN FOCUS 93


94


79

DOROTHY NAPANGARDI

Salt on Mina Mina acrylic on canvas 1470mm x 970mm Provenance: Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from Ochre Art Online Contemporary Indigenous Art

$9,000 - $15,000

80

LILY KELLY NAPANGARDI

Sand Hills acrylic on linen 1800mm x 1200mm Provenance: Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from Tomo’s Aboriginal Art Pty Ltd, Alice Springs

$5,000 - $7,000

81

EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE

Of My Country synthetic polymer paint on canvas signed verso 1210mm x 910mm Provenance: Commissioned by Delmore Gallery in February 1993.

$15,000 - $20,000

IN FOCUS 95


82

82

KATHLEEN PETYARRE

Thorny Devil Lizard acrylic on canvas 910mm x 910mm Provenance: Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from the U.I Aboriginal Art Gallery

$3,500 - $5,500

83

ABIE LOY KEMARRE

Bush Hen Dreaming acrylic on canvas 1220mm x 1380mm Provenance: Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from Central Aboriginal Artists, Alice Springs

$3,000 - $5,000

84

LILY KELLY NAPANGARDI

Dreaming Tali acrylic on canvas 1220mm x 700mm Provenance: Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from Central Aboriginal Artists, Alice Springs

$1,000 - $2,000

85

JOSIE PETRICK KEMARRE

Bush Seed acrylic on canvas 1510mm x 900mm Provenance: Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from Central Aboriginal Artists, Alice Springs

$1,500 - $2,500

86

ABIE LOY KEMARRE

Woman’s Dreaming acrylic on canvas 1200mm x 490mm Provenance: Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from B.L.Cowley Pty Ltd

83 96

$1,500 - $2,500


84

86

85

IN FOCUS 97


PLATE A

A1

A2

A3

A4

A5

A8

A7

A6

A9 98


FINE & AFFORDABLE JEWELLERY & WATCHES INCLUDING OVER 80 ITEMS BEING SOLD WITHOUT RESERVE ON BEHALF OF THE OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE

Day 2, Wed 4 Aug 2010 Two sessions – 2:00pm & 6:00pm Lots 100 – 300 Fine Jewellery & Watches Lots 1000 – 1200 Affordable & Estate Jewellery

Thu 29 July Fri 30 July Sat 31 July Sun 1 Aug Mon 2 Aug Tue 3 Aug Wed 4 Aug

VIEWING 9:00am – 7:30pm 9:00am – 5:15pm 11:00am – 3:00pm 11:00am – 3:00pm 9:00am – 5:15pm 9:00am – 5:15pm 9:00am – 12:30pm (sharp)

BUYER’S PREMIUM A buyer’s premium of 12.5% will be charged on all items in this Jewellery & Watches sale. GST (12.5%) is payable on the buyer’s premium only. NO DELIVERY OF ITEMS PURCHASED CAN BE GIVEN DURING THE SALE SESSIONS. FINE JEWELLERY & WATCHES IN FOCUS 99


Jewellery & Watches 2pm Lots 1000 – 1200 Affordable and estate jewellery, gold chains and pocket watches 6pm Lots 100 – 300 A splendid offering of magnificent and fine jewellery, accoutrements, valuable pocket and wrist watches A catalogue for both sections will be available free of charge at viewings and will be available online from 29 July. The catalogue will provide an inventory style list for the ‘Affordable’ 2pm session and full descriptions for the 6pm session. Both sections include seized items to be sold without reserve on behalf of the official assignee. 100


PLATE B

B4 B5 B1

B6

B2

B7

B3

B8

B12 B9

B11

B13

B10 IN FOCUS 101


Key to illustrations PLATE A A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8 A9

Magnificent ring set with a 5.11ct cushion-cut diamond $50,000-$70,000 Pair of very good ruby and diamond earrings $10,000-$20,000 Particularly good ruby & diamond cluster ring $15,000-$20,000 Art Deco period diamond & sapphire bow brooch $4,750-$5,750 Splendid fancy pink and white diamond marquise cluster ring $55,000-$60,000 Exceptional necklace of sapphires and over 26ct of diamonds $47,500-$57,500 Fancy yellow and white diamond drop earrings $5,000-$6,000 Fancy yellow and white diamond triple cluster ring $10,000-$14,000 Magnificent emerald of 7.48 ct set in a ring with diamonds $35,000-$45,000

PLATE B B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9 B10 B11 B12 B13

Marquise outline diamond cluster ring $3,000-$4,000 Cushion-oval diamond cluster dress ring , total 3.37ct $4,000-$5,000 Pendant set with an 11.93ct emerald and diamonds $9,500-$10,500 Aquamarine & diamond pendant $1,600-$2,000 Three row diamond cluster line bracelet, over 6ct total $9,500-$10,500 Bracelet set with 12.98ct of baguette & round brilliant diamonds $17,500-$20,000 Leopard mask ring, black enamel, green enamel & diamonds $2,850-$3,850 Splendid necklace set with over 25ct of diamonds $28,000-$38,000 Cocktail ring set with diamonds $5,000-$7,000 I.W.C. Titanium “Mercedes AMG” automatic wristwatch $5,500-$6,500 Diamond Rivière necklace total 12.61ct $16,000-$20,000 Diamond pendant $4,000-$6,000 Bangle of diamond circlet clusters $3,750-$4,250

PLATE C C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10 C11 C12 C13 C14

102

Pair of hoop earrings set with 4.89ct of diamonds $5,250-$6,250 Diamond cluster ring matching C13 $1,500-$1,800 Solitaire 1.2ct old cut diamond ring $3,750-$4,750 Solitaire 1.87ct fine white early European cut diamond ring $8,500-$9,500 Omega Speedmaster auto wristwatch with diamond bezel $4,250-$5,250 Pair of tiered diamond cluster earrings $2,750-$3,250 Diamond cluster ring matching C6 $2,000-$2,750 Diamond pendant $2,500-$3,000 Necklace & detachable pendant set with diamonds $9,500-$12,500 Tennis style diamond line bracelet, 4.74ct $6,500-$7,500 Line bracelet of pear shaped diamond clusters total 5.40 ct $5,750-$6,750 Fine diamond Rivière necklace total 10.00ct, D-F ,VVS-IF $20,000-$25,000 Bracelet of circular diamond clusters, 12.9 ct, matching C2 $14,000-$18,000 Omega Speedmaster triple date auto wristwatch $3,800-$4,800


PLATE C

C6

C1 C5 C7 C2

C3

C4

C8

C9

C12

C11 C13 C10

C14

IN FOCUS 103


PLATE D D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10 D11 D12 D13

Bangle set with diamond clusters $4,000-$5,000 Bangle channel set with Princess cut diamonds $4,500-$5,500 Champagne & white diamond drop earrings, total over 8ct $9,000-$12,000 Russian wedding ring set with diamonds $2,500-$3,000 Bracelet of fancy coloured sapphires and diamonds $5,500-$7,500 Diamond necklace total 11.54ct $12,500-$15,000 Diamond bracelet, total 4.96ct, matching D6 $5,500-$6,500 Pair of Chinoiserie geometric diamond earrings $3,000-$4,000 Ring matching D8 $1,650-$1,850 Patek Philippe, Gentleman’s 18ct gold manual wristwatch $6,000-$8,000 Fancy coloured sapphire & diamond necklace $4,700-$5,700 Parker gold plated fountain pen $200-$400 Omega S/S and gold Constellation auto wristwatch $3,500-$4,000

PLATE E E1 Pair of Creole diamond earrings, 2.51ct total $3,500-$4,500 E2 Diamond ring matching E1 , 1.67ct $2,250-$2,750 E3 I.W.C. , Gentleman’s 18ct gold wristwatch $4,500-$5,500 E4 Mesh bracelet set with fancy coloured sapphires $4,750-$5,750 E5 Exquisite pendant of fancy pink, fancy yellow & white diamonds $15,000-$16,000 E6 Necklace of fancy yellow & white diamonds , total over 17 ct $25,000-$35,000 E7 Marquise shape diamond cluster ring $3,000-$3,500 E8 Ring set with baguette & brilliant cut diamonds $3,750-$4,750 E9 Rolex, Gent’s 18ct Oyster perpetual Day Date, lapis & diamond face $12,000-$18,000 E10 Bracelet set with emeralds and diamonds $2,850-$3,250 E11 Pair of diamond earstuds, heart outline $2,000-$2,500 E12 Necklace of golden South Seas cultured pearls $5,500-$6,500

104


D1

PLATE D

D2 D4

D5

D3

D6

D7 D8

D9 D13

D11

D10

D12 FINE JEWELLERY WATCHES IN&FOCUS 105


PLATE E

E6

E3

E4

E1

E2 E5

E6

E7

E12 E8

E10

E9

106

E11


VALUATIONS Independent reports and valuations for many of the items will be available at viewings or can be faxed or emailed on request from 29 July. COLLECTION OF ITEMS There will be no delivery of items purchased while the sales are in progress. Items purchased will be available for collection only once cleared funds have been received. PAYMENT Please refer to the conditions of business. Payment must be made within seven days of the sale. We accept payment by cash, EFTPOS (please be aware of limits on transactions to protect your account), direct credit and cashier’s cheque (bank cheque). Personal cheques will be accepted, but without exception subject to clearance before delivery of goods can be made. Credit cards are accepted only with all charges to the buyer. ABSENTEE BIDS Telephone bids will not be accepted for the ‘Affordable’ section of the sale. For the Fine Jewellery & Watches section telephone bids will be accepted for items with an estimate over $500. Written instructions to bid, on the absentee bid form, are welcomed for all sections of the sale. IN FOCUS 107


108


ANTIQUES & MODERN DESIGN Day 3, Thu 5 Aug 2010 – 6:00pm Lots 300 – 336 Lots 337 – 395 Lots 396 – 480 Lots 481 – 518 Lots 519 – 574

Thu 29 July Fri 30 July Sat 31 July Sun 1 Aug Mon 2 Aug Tue 3 Aug Wed 4 Aug Thu 5 Aug

VIEWING 9:00am – 7:30pm 9:00am – 5:00pm 11:00am – 3:00pm 11:00am – 3:00pm 9:00am – 5:30pm 9:00am – 5:30pm 9:00am – 5:30pm 9:00am – 12:00pm

Equestrian Miscellaneous Ceramics & Glass Sterling Silver & Silver Plate Furniture & Rugs PLEASE NOTE Absentee and phone bids must be registered before 12:00pm on Thursday 5 August 2010. A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items in this Antiques & Modern Design sale. GST (12.5%) is payable on the buyer’s premium only. This sale will be preceded by an uncatalogued Collectables sale at 4:00pm. Both sales are fully illustrated online at webbs.co.nz.

OPPOSITE PAGE: LOT 370 A PAIR OF DOUBLE-BARRELLED SPORTING GUNS BY WILLIAM EVANS $28,000 - $35,000

ANTIQUES & MODERNINDESIGN FOCUS 109


300 A HORSE HEAD REPUTEDLY OF SOULT MOUNTED ON EBONISED WOODEN SHIELD $500 - $700 See illustration page 113 301 A SILVER MOUNTED HOOF OF THE HORSE SOULT $200 - $300 See illustration page 113 302 A GOOD BROWN LEATHER SADDLE FORMERLY OWNED BY RODEO PERSONALITY GARY MCPHEE

made by Charlie Leach, Rotorua. Stamped McPhee. L630.

$600 - $800

312

303 A BLACK LEATHER SADDLE

with embossed floral designs and white decorative stitching. L640.

$600 - $800

304 A SET OF JOCKEY SCALES IN CAST IRON

by Herring & Son, Chertsey, England. Named Auckland Racing Club and dated 1884. Meshed metal chair to one side and weight platform to the other. Note: some painted restoration.

$2,000 - $3,000

See illustration page 112

305 A SET OF JOCKEY SCALES IN CAST IRON

by W & T Avery Ltd. Class 2 scale, with jockey seat in strap metal. Note: weight platform absent.

$400 - $600

306 AN EDWARDIAN OAK SMOKERS STAND WITH TWO HORSESHOESHAPED SHELVES

H960.

322

$350 - $500

307 A QUIRKY EQUESTRIAN CARVING

in the form of a hoof supporting four horse heads of different sizes. Note: some damage. H390.

$150 - $200

308 A FRAMED MID 20TH CENTURY POSTER FOR THE MELBOURNE CUP BY SHATTOCK

H860 W660.

$200 - $300

309 THREE PICTURES OF RACE MEETINGS

being overpainted 19th century engravings. Note: faults. H660 W1180.

$200 - $300

310 A GILT FRAMED COLOURED LITHOGRAPH DEPICTING A RACE MEETING

with plaque inscribed Grand Prix. H760 W1180.

$200 - $300

311 A 19TH CENTURY COLOURED STEEL ENGRAVING DEPICTING ORMONDE AND JOCKEY

Note: some faults. H740 W890.

$100 - $200

304 110


312 A LARGE OIL ON CANVAS DEPICTING HORSE AND JOCKEY IN A LANDSCAPE

the original oak frame with copper plaque named El Gallo. Note: minor faults. H970 W1280.

$500 - $700

See illustration page 112

313 AN OAK FRAMED PHOTOGRAPH DEPICTING MASTER SOULT WITH HANDLER

H550 W640.

$150 - $250

314 AN UNFRAMED OIL ON CANVAS DEPICTING WAIRIKI

by Cameron Johnson, dated 1907. Note: some faults. H510 W920.

$300 - $500

315 A LARGE COLOURED LITHOGRAPH DEPICTING VARIOUS JOCKEYS

dated September 1921. H360 W660.

$100 - $180

See illustration page 113

319 A HAND-COLOURED PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINT DEPICTING CARDIGAN BAY

H500 W600.

$100 - $150

320 A FRAMED 19TH CENTURY COLOURED ENGRAVING DEPICTING GALOPIN WITH JOCKEY

Note: some faults. H720 W880.

$200 - $300

321 A PAIR OF ORNATELY FRAMED HORSE PORTRAITS DEPICTING KINDERGARTEN AND WOTAN

See illustration page 113

$300 - $400

by R Wilkinson. H500 W580.

$200 - $300

317 A FRAMED MONOCHROME PRINT COMMEMORATING THE HORSE CARBINE

by Trodell & Co, Melbourne. In original frame. H910 W690.

316 AN OAK FRAMED OIL ON CANVAS DEPICTING MUSKET

318 AN OAK FRAMED PICTURE OF SIX GENTLEMEN AT RANDWICK RACECOURSE

being one hand-coloured photograph and one lithograph. H620 W740.

$200 - $300

322 AN ORNATELY FRAMED HAND-COLOURED STEEL ENGRAVING DEPICTING KISBER AND JOCKEY

dated July 1876. H630 W790.

$300 - $400

See illustration page 112

by Crown Studios, Auckland. H540 W640.

$80 - $150

301

367

300

318 315

IN FOCUS 111


323 A HAND-TINTED PHOTOGRAPH DEPICTING PHAR-LAP

331 AN OAK FRAMED EARLY 20TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPH DEPICTING SCION WITH JOCKEY

in oval plaster frame. Note: some faults. W600.

$150 - $250

324 A FRAMED COLONIAL PHOTOGRAPH DEPICTING HORSE AND FOAL

H540 W600.

$50 - $100

325 AN OAK FRAMED PHOTOGRAPH DEPICTING YELLOW AND BLACK WITH JOCKEY

H470 W580.

$80 - $120

326 A FRAMED 19TH CENTURY HAND-COLOURED STEEL ENGRAVING DEPICTING STOCKWELL

dated 1852. Note: some faults. H520 W620.

$100 - $150

327 AN OAK FRAMED PHOTOGRAPH DEPICTING DESERT GOLD AND JOCKEY

by A Jones, Auckland 1916. H620 W740.

$100 - $150

328 A HORSE RACING OVAL PLAQUE ON TIN DEPICTING FRENCH JOE IN ACTION

dated 1956. H360.

$50 - $100

329 AN UNSIGNED OIL ON CANVAS DEPICTING CASTER THOROUGHBRED SIRE

H590 W730.

$100 - $150

332 A FRAMED COLOUR LITHOGRAPH DEPICTING CARBINE

by A D Willis, Wanganui. H580 W700.

$80 - $150

333 AN OAK FRAMED ADVERTISING PRINT DEPICTING HORSES INCLUDING CARBINE

H390 W480.

$50 - $100

334 AN OAK FRAMED PHOTOGRAPH DEPICTING PADDINGTON GREEN WITH JOCKEY

by A Jones, Auckland. H530 W640.

$100 - $150

335 AN OAK FRAMED PHOTOGRAPH DEPICTING PARISIAN DIAMOND WITH JOCKEY

by A Jones, Auckland. H540 W640.

$100 - $150

336 A SET OF TEN MOUNTED EARLY 20TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS DEPICTING FLEMINGTON RACECOURSE

Note: some faults. Images H230 W570.

$1,000 - $1,500

dated September 1893. H550 W650.

$300 - $400

330 A FRAMED COLOUR LITHOGRAPH DEPICTING JOCKEY GEORGE FORDHAM

dated 24 May 1884. H640 W460.

$80 - $150

439

503 112

468

433

498

438

501

439

496

496


MISCELLANEOUS

344 A FRAMED WATERCOLOUR COASTAL SCENE BY N WELSH

337 A FRAMED EARLY 20TH CENTURY PENCIL SKETCH DEPICTING A YOUNG WOMAN BY FRANCIS MCCRACKEN

signed F McCracken and dated 1913. H600 W420.

$400 - $500

338 A FRAMED 19TH CENTURY OIL ON BOARD PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DICKENS

signed with monogram and dated 1874 (four years after Dickens’s death). H290 W240.

$300 - $500

See illustration page 117

339 A NAÏVE OIL ON CANVAS PORTRAIT OF RICHARD SEDDON

unframed. Note: faults. H770 W570.

H860 W590.

$200 - $300

Image H180 W250.

$250 - $400

345 AN INTERESTING ANTIQUE HAND-COLOURED MAP OF THE CITIES OF LONDON AND WESTMINSTER

by John Norden, dated 1610. H430 W550.

$200 - $300

346 TWO 19TH CENTURY FRENCH PRINTS DEPICTING CHINESE DOMESTIC LIFE

together with two similar English prints. Framed in Hong Kong. H330 W400.

$80 - $120

347 A SET OF SIX FRAMED JAPANESE TAISHO PERIOD WOODBLOCK PRINTS DEPICTING BIRDS AMONGST FOLIAGE

$100 - $150

340 A GILT FRAMED 19TH CENTURY LITHOGRAPH OF W E GLADSTONE MP

H350 W230.

$600 - $800

348 A PAIR OF JAPANESE MEIJI PERIOD BRONZE VASES OF TAPERED FORM

each finely inlaid with long tailed cockerel in a plum tree. Signed on body and with seal mark. H180.

341 A FRAMED OIL ON BOARD DEPICTING A SHEPHERD WITH FLOCK IN SNOW BY BAXTER MORGAN

349 A PAIR OF JAPANESE EARLY MEIJI PERIOD STANDARD CLOISONN» VASES OF TAPERED OVAL BALUSTER FORM

H280 W440.

$200 - $400

342 A 19TH CENTURY UNSIGNED OIL ON BOARD DEPICTING A LANDSCAPE WITH COWS AND CASTLE RUINS

H250 W380.

$1,250 - $1,500

with floral and bird decoration on a blue ground. H150.

$250 - $350

350 A JAPANESE LATE MEIJI PERIOD CLOISONNÉ VASE

$200 - $300

of tapered four-lobed shape with floral roundels on a black spiral ground. H150.

343 A LARGE GILT FRAMED WATERCOLOUR DEPICTING AN ENGLISH VILLAGE SCENE BY A SINCLAIR

351 AN EARLY 20TH CENTURY CHINESE CLOISONNÉ CIRCULAR BOWL

circa 1900. H720 W990.

$400 - $600

506

$200 - $300

profusely decorated with swirling dragons chasing flaming pearls on a turquoise ground. Dia145.

$100 - $200

370 IN FOCUS 113


551

544

540

559

545

114


352 A GOOD PAIR OF 19TH CENTURY CHINESE CINNABAR LACQUER LIDDED BALUSTER VASES

each deeply carved, with a central panel of figures in a mountain landscape with trees. Leaf, scroll and lappet borders, with diaper pattern ground. Note: minor restoration. H300.

$3,500 - $5,000

353 A 20TH CENTURY CHINESE BRASS BALUSTER VASE WITH RELIEF ENCIRCLING DRAGONS

H180.

$200 - $300

354 A FRAMED OLD CHINESE EMBROIDERED SILK PANEL

with gilt, silver and coloured thread design of a dragon with phoenix and fo dog. H660.

$200 - $400

355 A FRAMED KIMONO OF SELF PATTERNED WHITE BROCADE DECORATED WITH CRANES

with obi sash embroidered with cranes, chrysanthemums and paulownia. H2230 W1480.

366 A TAXIDERMY JUVENILE ALLIGATOR

$700 - $900

H1020 W960.

$800 - $1,000 See illustration page 113

368 A WATER BUFFALO SKULL WITH LARGE HORNS

H810 W700.

$800 - $1,000

369 A BROWN BEAR SKIN RUG WITH FULL HEAD

in excellent condition. Recently restored. Felt base. L2200.

$2,000 - $3,000

370 A FINE AND RARE PAIR OF ANTIQUE MATCHED ENGLISH DOUBLEBARRELLED SPORTING GUNS

$800 - $1000

deeply carved with symbols and bats and dragons amid clouds. L490.

$120 - $220

367 A WATER BUFFALO SKULL WITH LARGE HORNS

356 A GOOD 18TH/19TH CENTURY CHINESE WOODEN RUYI SCEPTRE

L300.

by William Evans, gunmakers to HRH Duke of Connaught KG, 63 Pall Mall, St James, London. Both guns with figured walnut stocks, and finely engraved lock covers, trigger guards and breech lock levers. With cleaning rods and tackle, all contained in a leather-bound oak case with straps and brass corners. Lid named in gilt The Hon Sir Ford North. Case L840 W340.

$28,000 - $35,000

See illustration page 110 & 115

357 AN ORIENTAL PICNIC BASKET

371 FOUR OLD POCKET KNIVES

with three woven cane sections, and carved and pierced handles. H640.

$100 - $200

with ivory and antler handles.

$80 - $100

358 A VICTORIAN LACQUERED PAPIER-MÂCHÉ GLOVE BOX

372 A VICTORIAN SILVER AND IVORY DESK SEAL

the lid decorated with Japanese figures in kimono dress. L300.

$100 - $200

359 A SMALL CARVING OF A GOAT

in speckled cream and black stone with brown highlights skillfully incorporated. On wood stand. L90.

$200 - $300

360 A CARVED IVORY FIGURE OF KWAN YIN STANDING WITH LEAF FAN

with carved flowering bud handle and scroll chased decoration. Initials to base. H85.

$100 - $200

373 A GOOD LATE 19TH CENTURY FRENCH GILT BRASS DESK SEAL

with a monkey in full relief sitting on a trunk. Signed Leon Hingre and stamped Louchel. Vacant. H110.

$100 - $200

H155.

$200 - $300

361 AN AFRICAN CARVED IVORY HEAD

H200.

$400 - $600

362 A CARVED INDIAN ELEPHANT TUSK

on carved tusk stand. L610.

$600 - $800

363 A RECTANGULAR IVORY CIGARETTE CASE

L80 W60.

$100 - $200

364 A TAXIDERMY JUVENILE ALLIGATOR

L330.

$120 - $220

365 A TAXIDERMY JUVENILE ALLIGATOR

L320.

$120 - $220 338

566 IN FOCUS 115


374 A GOOD SMALL BRONZE BUST DESK SEAL

signed with monogram. Initials to base. H50.

$50 - $100

375 THREE OLD VICTORIAN GOLD PLATED SEALS

two with intaglio stone bases.

$150 - $300

376 A SEVEN PIECE EDWARDIAN DRESSING TABLE SET IN IVORY

comprising three hair brushes, two clothes brushes, a nail buffer and a powder bowl. Applied silver initials. Circa 1910. Note: some faults.

$100 - $200

377 A 19TH CENTURY PORTRAIT MINIATURE ON IVORY OF A YOUNG WOMAN

532

with a note verso identifying the subject as Lady Isabella Bridges, wife of Stephen Ponsonby Peacocke. L85.

533

$500 - $700

378 NINE BOOKS FROM THE PEACOCKE FAMILY COLLECTION

including Colletta, ‘Storia del Reame di Napoli [etc]’, in two volumes, 1846, Italian language, with signature of Captain Peacocke, Naples 1848. With Radcliffe, ‘The Romance of the Forest’, in two volumes, being Vols XLIII and XLIV of Barbauld’s ‘The British Novelists’, (Rivington et al), 1820, with bookplate of Rt Hon Lady Isabella Anne Brydges. Also Bigland, ‘Letters on the Study and Use of Ancient and Modern History’, (Longman et al), 1805, with signature of Raleigh Peacocke. Also Hemans, ‘Songs of the Affections [etc]’, (Blackwood), 1840, with signature of Ponsonby Peacocke, and with signature of Gerald Peacocke, Hawthorden NZ. Also Peacocke, ‘Rays from the Southern Cross’, (King), 1876. Also ‘New Zealand Army List’, 1864. And a title in German, with signature of S Ponsonby Peacocke, 25th Regt.

$150 - $250

379 AN OLD EMU EGG WITH CAMEO CARVED OVAL PANEL DEPICTING AN ADULT EMU IN A BUSH LANDSCAPE

L125.

$100 - $200

380 A BRASS RUBBING FROM A 15TH CENTURY ENGLISH TOMB IN CONTEMPORARY FRAME

422

H1700 W700.

$250 - $350

See illustration page 118

381 A BRASS RUBBING FROM A 15TH CENTURY ENGLISH TOMB IN CONTEMPORARY FRAME

H1470 W620.

$250 - $350

382 A PAIR OF BRASS RUBBINGS FROM AN ENGLISH CHURCH IN CONTEMPORARY FRAMES

H2250 W400.

$250 - $350

383 A HAND-PAINTED CREST

the oak frame with plaque inscribed The Impaled Achievement of Sir Robert Whitney of Whitney, Knight, and John Whitney of Calver Hill, Herefordshire. H1290 W980.

$250 - $350

384 AN OAK FRAMED CERTIFICATE FOR THE UNITED FIRE BRIGADES ASSOCIATION

116

being a coloured print. Dated 1911. H730 W580.

$140 - $180

546

380


385 A FRAMED THEATRE POSTER

for His Majesty’s Theatre, The King of Cadonia. By Syd Day, printer, Melbourne. H1050 W390.

$200 - $300

386 A FRAMED THEATRE POSTER

for His Majesty’s Theatre, The Silver King. By Evening Post Theatrical and General Show Printing House, Willis Street, Wellington. H1050 W390.

$200 - $300

387 A GILT FRAMED COLOURED LITHOGRAPHIC PRINT OF CAPTAIN SCOTT RN

dated 1914. Note: some faults. H750 W580.

$200 - $300

388 A MAPLE FRAMED 20TH CENTURY ADVERTISING MIRROR FOR JAMAICA RUM FEATURING LORD NELSON

H1160 W900.

$200 - $350

389 THREE VENETIAN SIRU BLOWN GLASS LANTERNS 521

429

two as wall lights and one as a ceiling shade. Note: minor faults. H280.

$400 - $600

390 A PAIR OF RETRO GERMAN LAMINATED WOOD BOOKENDS

one with globe of the world mounted, the other with celestial globe. Note: minor wear. H160.

$200 - $300

391 A UNIQUE SMALL AND HEAVY PAUL MASON BRONZE BOWL

528

the outside with deep green patina. The inside with mottled deep green patina. H850 Dia105.

$400 - $600

392 A LARGE JOHN CRICHTON MOSAIC TILE AND COPPER CHARGER

Dia570.

$500 - $800

393 AN OLD COIN-OPERATED SINGING BIRD AUTOMATON

with cock, hen and chicks in a gilded cage. Note: needs restoration. H580.

$1,000 - $2,000

394 A LATE 19TH CENTURY MUSIC BOX

526

531

the hinged lid with distressed polychrome inlaid decoration. The works stamped Ducommun-Girod. Complete with key. Needs restoration. H180 W480 D210.

$1,000 - $1,500

395 A SALT GLAZED CHIMNEY

with Clark Ltd Auckland impressed. Note: minor faults. H660 Dia350.

$500 - $700

523 IN FOCUS 117


CERAMICS & GLASS 396 A LARGE BARRY BRICKELL STONEWARE SIDE-HANDLED TEAPOT WITH BROWN GLAZE

L230.

$100 - $150

397 A DOREEN BLUMHARDT STONEWARE TEAPOT

with green/grey glaze and body with faceted panels in blue and red. Cane handle. Note: cracked lid restored. L170.

$100 - $150

410 A SMALL LEN CASTLE STONEWARE LIPPED BOWL

with pink-grey glaze and lightly pitted well. Marked. L125.

$100 - $150

411 A SMALL LEN CASTLE STONEWARE LIPPED BOWL

with pink-grey glaze. Marked. L125.

$100 - $150

412 AN IMPRESSIVE LEN CASTLE DEEP BOWL OF OVAL FORM

with grey-white glaze. H155 W310.

$500 - $700

413 A LEN CASTLE STONEWARE BOWL

398 TWO MATCHING STONEWARE LIDDED STORAGE JARS BY PAUL MELSER

414 A FINE LEN CASTLE STONEWARE BOWL

with olive brown glaze. Stamped seal marks and monogram. Circa 1960s. H115 & 145.

$50 - $80

399 A JULIET PETER STONEWARE VASE

of rectangular trough shape, with cut out top and pale green/grey glaze. Incised mark. Circa 1980s. L200.

$150 - $200

400 TWO ROY COWAN STONEWARE COVERED BOWLS

with blue and brown glaze decoration and speckled interior. Incised initial marks. Dia120 & 135.

$50 - $80

401 A LARGE BARRY BRICKELL LIDDED STORAGE JAR

with green/brown half body glaze. H200.

$100 - $150

402 A LEN CASTLE STONEWARE BOTTLE VASE

with orange and white glaze. Marked to shoulder. H130.

$180 - $250

403 A LEN CASTLE STONEWARE BOTTLE VASE

with orange and white glaze. Marked to shoulder. H145.

$180 - $250

404 A LEN CASTLE STONEWARE BOWL

with cracked geothermal mud glaze. Marked. Dia200.

$300 - $400

with shaped rim and crazed pink-grey glaze. Dia210.

$250 - $300

with crazed pale grey internal glaze. Dia220.

$250 - $300

415 A GOOD MIREK SMISEK STONEWARE WINE BOTTLE

with thick blue salt glaze. Marked with sunflower monogram. Circa 1960s. H260.

$600 - $800

416 A STONEWARE BOTTLE VASE BY ROYCE MCGLASHEN

the body with raised key and arch design. Signed and dated 1966. H190.

$100 - $150

417 TWO JACK LAIRD STONEWARE VASES

in brown and olive/mustard green glaze. H90 & 105.

$50 - $100

418 A WARREN TIPPET BROWN GLAZE STONEWARE PLATE

with stylised blue glaze decoration. Together with a brown glaze stoneware bowl by Helen Mason. Dia185 & 150.

$100 - $150

419 A SMALL WARREN TIPPET CREAM JUG

with fluted decoration and grey glaze. H100.

$100 - $150

420 A TALL KATHERINE SMYTH SQUASH VASE

of oval baluster form, with ribbed and green painted decoration. Signed to base. H265.

$40 - $80

405 A LEN CASTLE STONEWARE BOWL

421 A GOOD CREAM GLAZE CROWN LYNN VASE WITH RIBBED DECORATION

with cracked geothermal mud glaze and brown rim. Marked. Dia185.

$200 - $300

406 A LARGE LEN CASTLE STONEWARE BOWL

with shaped rim and orange and white glaze. Marked. W300.

$500 - $700

407 A GOOD LARGE LEN CASTLE EARTHENWARE BOWL OF ROUNDED SQUARE FORM

with intense light blue glaze. Marked. W360.

$1,000 - $1,500

408 A SMALL LEN CASTLE EARTHENWARE POURER

with blue glazed interior and crackled light grey exterior. Marked. L95.

$120 - $180

409 A LEN CASTLE EARTHENWARE SHALLOW BOWL 118

with crackled rim and green glazed well. Dia130.

$150 - $200

by Ernest Shufflebotham. Blue marks on base. H240.

$150 - $250

422 A JIM BEAM PAINTED POTTERY WHISKEY BOTTLE

in the form of Te Rauparaha in naval dress and with face moko. H380.

$250 - $350

See illustration page 118

423 A ROYAL DOULTON PORCELAIN MAORI ART RED AND BLACK PATTERN CUP WITH TWO SAUCERS AND PLATES

circa 1925. Note: small chip on cup.

$350 - $500

424 AN UNUSUAL SET OF THREE BRIGHTLY PAINTED CARLETONWARE MY GOODNESS MY GUINNESS FLYING TOUCANS

L160 - 250.

$200 - $400


425 A CARLTONWARE BLEU ROYALE PORCELAIN VASE

438 A LARGE POOLE POTTERY FAT BODIED VASE

with painted and gilt oriental style decoration. H120.

$100 - $200

426 A CARLTONWARE PORCELAIN CREAM JUG

with painted and gilt decoration of two cranes beneath a tree on a pale lime ground. H110.

$100 - $200

427 A CARLTONWARE PORCELAIN DISH

with painted kingfisher, leaves and flowers on a burgundy lustre ground. Gilt edging. L215.

$100 - $200

428 A STYLISH ART DECO DESIGN CROWN DEVON SERVING DISH

with bright coloured flowers and motifs on a deep blue ground. Gilt edging. L320.

$150 - $300

429 A GOOD AND LARGE CROWN DEVON PORCELAIN VASE

439 A STYLISH PAIR OF POOLE POTTERY STUDIO ART DECO BOOKENDS

with leaping deer and green monochrome glaze. H210.

$200 - $300

See illustration page 114

440 A LARGE SYLVAC POTTERY PINEAPPLE-SHAPED VASE

with raised design, painted in pastel pink and green. H250.

$100 - $200

441 A STYLISH CROWN DUCAL WARE VASE WITH APPLE GREEN MONOCHROME GLAZE

with A G Richardson mark to base. Circa 1930s. H180.

$100 - $200

with coloured African lilies on a pale green ground. Underglaze green mark with initials. Circa 1950s. H165.

$200 - $300

with coloured anemones on a variegated green ground. Impressed marks with painted initials. Circa 1950s. Note: glaze bubble faults. H300.

$300 - $400

with Newport Pottery mark on base. Circa 1938. W225.

$100 - $200

433 A LARGE BESWICK POTTERY STANDING FRUIT BOWL

See illustration page 114

See illustration page 119

$600 - $800

432 A HAND-PAINTED CLARICE CLIFF CROCUS PATTERN FRUIT BOWL

$300 - $400

442 A SUZIE COOPER FAT BODIED POTTERY JUG

431 A LARGE WALTER MOORCROFT POTTERY BALUSTER-SHAPED VASE

with stylish painted and gilt design of butterflies, leaves and trees on a deep blue speckled ground. Printed mark. Circa 1930. H340.

430 A WALTER MOORCROFT POTTERY VASE

with styish Art Deco design handles, and speckled celadon green glaze. Impressed mark. Circa 1930. Note: small faults. H260.

with incised leaf and landscape pattern under a monochrome mustard yellow glaze. Signed on base. H175.

$250 - $350

443 A SUZIE COOPER ORANGE GLAZE POTTERY MILK JUG WITH INCISED LEAF PATTERN

signed on base. H160.

$150 - $300

444 A SUZIE COOPER MUSTARD GLAZE POTTERY BOWL WITH INCISED PATTERN

signed on base. Circa 1930. W130.

$80 - $150

445 A SUZIE COOPER FAWN GLAZE POTTERY VASE WITH INCISED STYLISED SHELL AND WAVE PATTERN

signed on base. Circa 1930. H130.

$150 - $300

with pineapple base and leaf decoration. Green and yellow glaze. Impressed mark. Circa 1930. H220.

446 A ROYAL DOULTON STONEWARE ASHTRAY WITH APPLIED RAISED LION DECORATION

See illustration page 114

$200 - $400

W95.

$100 - $200

434 A BESWICK POTTERY DESERT ISLAND JUG

447 A ROYAL DOULTON FAT BODIED STONEWARE VASE

with relief palm tree and pastel blue glaze. Marked on base. Circa 1930. H185.

$100 - $200

435 A BESWICK POTTERY CREAM GLAZE CORNUCOPIA JUG VASE WITH PALM TREE MOTIF

circa 1940. H190.

$100 - $200

436 A BESWICK POTTERY YELLOW LUSTREWARE BOWL

circa 1930. L150.

$100 - $200

437 A DECORATIVE POOLE POTTERY VASE

with stylised flower and leaf painted design. Impressed Carter, Stabler & Adams mark to base. H130.

$100 - $200

with six plain opaque green glaze panels and slip trailed pearl wave pattern shoulders. Impressed mark with initials for Florence Barlow. Circa 1905. Note: lozenge kiln fault to one panel. H150.

$200 - $300

448 A ROYAL DOULTON STONEWARE VASE OF TAPERED FLARED FORM

with mottled green/mustard glaze and raised blue rosette decoration. Impressed mark, and initials E W. H190.

$200 - $300

449 A SMALL ROYAL DOULTON BALUSTER-SHAPED STONEWARE VASE

with mottled green glaze and raised rosette decoration. Impressed mark with initials M W.

$100 - $200

450 FIVE ST IVES STONEWARE BOWLS AND DISHES

with impressed monogram marks.

$80 - $120

IN FOCUS 119


451 A SMALL DAVID LEACH STONEWARE JUG

with ribbed decoration and grey glaze. Impressed monogram mark. H80.

$300 - $400

452 AN ENGLISH CYLINDRICAL STUDIO POTTERY VASE

by Janet Leach (wife of Bernard). H270.

$500 - $600

453 A WELLER POTTERY VASE OF CYLINDRICAL FORM

with relief tree decoration. Unmarked. Circa 1900. H210.

$250 - $300

454 A MID 20TH CENTURY GERMAN SCHEURICH STUDIO POTTERY VASE

with speckled mauve blue decoration. Marked on base. H260.

$50 - $100

455 A 20TH CENTURY GERMAN SCHEURICH STUDIO POTTERY VASE

with orange, green and brown glaze. Paper label. H200.

$50 - $100

456 A 20TH CENTURY GERMAN SCHEURICH STUDIO POTTERY FAT BODIED VASE

in wibrant orange glaze, with raised turquoise borders. H195.

$50 - $100

457 A 20TH CENTURY GERMAN SCHEURICH STUDIO BISCUIT POTTERY TALL VASE

of tapered form, with hand-painted berry and leaf pattern. Internal glaze. Papel label. H285.

$50 - $100

458 A SMALL ROYAL WORCESTER PORCELAIN CUP AND SAUCER

painted with pheasant pattern. Gilt detail. Unsigned. Marked with star and four dots. 1920.

$300 - $400

459 A 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN PORCELAIN CUP AND SAUCER

with rich gilding and painted floral decoration. Circa 1870. Note: hairline crack. H90.

$50 - $100

460 A SMALL 19TH CENTURY CREAM WARE JUG WITH RELIEF FIGURE DECORATION DEPICTING SLAVE SCENES

H110.

$150 - $300

461 A RARE 18TH CENTURY LIVERPOOL PEARLWARE PLATE

with Chinese style underglaze blue decoration. Dia245.

$1,000 - $1,400

462 TWO CHINESE MING PERIOD COUNTRY STYLE POTTERY BOWLS WITH UNDERGLAZE BLUE SCROLL AND CHARACTER DECORATION

W240.

$100 - $150

465 AN UNUSUAL LATE 19TH CENTURY CHINESE PAINTED POTTERY PLAQUE

with relief decoration. Central dragon with border of swirling dragons chasing pearls amid clouds. Two seal marks to base. W260.

$350 - $500

466 AN UNUSUAL CHINESE SUNG STYLE CELADON GLAZE CIRCULAR STAND DISH WITH THREE SHORT LEGS

W185.

$700 - $800

467 SIX PIECES OF 19TH CENTURY CHINESE PORCELAIN

all with polychrome enamel decorations. Largest Dia130.

$100 - $200

468 A TALL JAPANESE MEIJI PERIOD SUMIDA GAWA POTTERY VASE

with relief figure decoration. Blue grey dribble glaze. Signed lozenge mark. Note: some paint glaze loss. H330.

$200 - $300

469 AN EARLY 20TH CENTURY JAPANESE PORCELAIN BALUSTER-SHAPED VASE

with painted figures in a Mount Fujiyama landscape with trees. H300.

$150 - $200

470 AN EARLY 20TH CENTURY JAPANESE TAISHO PERIOD BALUSTERSHAPED SATSUMA POTTERY VASE

with two panels of painted figures in traditional costume between gilt peony on cobalt blue ground borders. Circa 1915. H370.

$200 - $300

471 A JAPANESE PORCELAIN STANDING FIGURE OF THE GODDESS KWANON

with underglaze blue floral pattern robe. H330.

$150 - $250

472 A LALIQUE FRANCE SMALL CLEAR PIN DISH

with frosted deer standing in centre. Signed on base. Dia100.

$200 - $300

473 A GOOD PAIR OF LARGE VICTORIAN TWO-HANDLED GLASS OVERLAY URN VASES

each in simulated tortoiseshell marble and painted with enamel flowers and insects. Note: faulted. H350.

$250 - $300

474 A LARGE ITALIAN GILT DECORATED RED GLASS COMMEMORATIVE BOWL

with inscription ‘Venezia Rugby All Blacks New Zealand’. H190 W210.

$400 - $600

475 A TALL HEXAGONAL MURANO SOMMERSO CUT AND POLISHED GLASS VASE

with two-tone blue internal decoration. Circa 1960s. Paper label intact. H230.

463 A 19TH CENTURY CHINESE BROWN GLAZE POTTERY BOWL WITH UNDERGLAZE BLUE PAINTED INTERIOR

476 A TALL RECTANGULAR MURANO SOMMERSO CUT AND POLISHED GLASS VASE

W270.

$150 - $300

464 TWO SMALL CHINESE QIANLONG PERIOD PORCELAIN TEA BOWLS WITH BLUE AND ENAMEL DECORATION $100 - $200

120

$180 - $250

with gold and veridian green internal decoration. Circa 1960s.

$250 - $300


477 A TALL MURANO SOMMERSO CUT AND POLISHED GLASS VASE

of tapered diamond-shaped form. With yellow and tan internal decoration. Circa 1960s. H300.

$250 - $300

489 A CASED SET OF SIX ART DECO STYLE STERLING SILVER COFFEE SPOONS $50 - $100

478 A MURANO SOMMERSO CUT AND POLISHED GLASS VASE

490 TWO CASED SETS OF SIX SCANDINAVIAN GILT SILVER COFFEE SPOONS

of squat geometric shape. The sides facet cut with triangles, diamonds and pentagons. Internal decoration of cobalt blue with gold border. H100 W200.

$250 - $300

479 A PINK MURANO SOMMERSO GLASS THICK RIM BOWL

with aquamarine edge. Circa 1960s. W145.

$100 - $150

480 A MURANO SOMMERSO GLASS BOWL

with a heavy facet-cut body around an apple green centre. Circa 1960s. W170.

$100 - $150

by David Andersen, Oslo. Both sets with pale green enamel decoration. Marked S 925. Circa 1920.

$300 - $400

491 A CASED SET OF TWELVE SCANDINAVIAN GILT SILVER HORS D’OEUVRES FORKS

by David Andersen, Oslo. Pale green transparent enamel decoration. Marked S 925.

$200 - $300

492 SIX OLD GEORGIAN AND VICTORIAN STERLING SILVER TEASPOONS

of various styles and dates. 1800-1850.

$50 - $100

493 THREE GEORGIAN STERLING SILVER FIDDLE PATTERN TABLE SPOONS

481 AN OCTAGONAL-SIDED STERLING SILVER ROSE BOWL

with pierced gallery border and circular foot, on black lacquered stand. Birmingham 1910. H120.

with pierced floral sides and shaped edge rim. Sheffield 1938. L300.

$250 - $300

483 AN ORNATE VICTORIAN STERLING SILVER MUG

with scroll handle and raised strapwork decoration. Maker Richard Hennell, London 1863. H100.

$350 - $450

484 A MINIATURE CHRISTENING TANKARD/MUG

Note: rim dent. H40.

$50 - $150

485 A PAIR OF GEORGIAN STYLE STERLING SILVER DECANTER COASTERS

with pierced gallery borders and mahogany bases. Birmingham 1993.

$200 - $300

486 A GOOD AND RARE GEORGE III STERLING SILVER TWO-HANDLED VESSEL

in the form of a half barrel. Maker Joseph Wilson, London 1818. L130.

$400 - $600

See illustration page 114

487 A GOOD STERLING SILVER FISH SLICE

with pierced and punched decoration. Maker Peter & William Bateman, London 1806. Weight 140g. L300.

$300 - $400

488 A CASED STERLING SILVER OLD ENGLISH PATTERN FORK AND SPOON SET

with bright cutting. Sheffield 1904.

$100 - $200

$200 - $300

494 A GEORGE IV STERLING SILVER FOLIATE HANDLED MILK AND SUGAR

$150 - $220

482 A CASED STERLING SILVER HEXAGONAL-SHAPED CAKE/BREAD BOWL

with matching engraved crests. London 1806, 1819 & 1820.

the lobed squat forms with fluting below decorated broad rims. Each vessel standing on a petal-shaped foot. Gilding to the interior walls. Maker E B, London 1821.

$500 - $800

495 A GEORGIAN STERLING SILVER MILK JUG

on four ball feet, with shaped facet sides, engraved borders and gadrooned edge. Maker V S, London 1807. Weight 149g. H110.

$300 - $400

496 A GEORGE III STERLING SILVER OVAL BOAT-SHAPED SUGAR BOWL

with swing handle and gilt interior. On oval foot. Later raised decoration to bowl. Maker Chas Aldridge, London 1795. L140.

$400 - $500

See illustration page 114

497 A GEORGIAN STERLING SILVER TWO-HANDLED SUGAR LUMP BOWL

on four ball feet, with gadrooned, reeded and bright cut border decoration. London 1809. Weight 300g. W190.

$300 - $500

498 A GEORGE III STERLING SILVER TEAPOT OF SQUAT CIRCULAR FORM

with raised floral scroll decoration and ebony handle. Maker probably Alice & George Burrows. Hallmarked London 1813. L260.

$500 - $600

See illustration page 114

499 A GEORGE III STERLING SILVER OVAL TEAPOT

with vertical ribbed decoration and fruitwood finial and handle. Maker Thomas Langford, London 1786. L240.

$500 - $600

See illustration page 114

500 A GEORGIAN STERLING SILVER TEAPOT TOGETHER WITH A MATCHING TRAY STAND

both with engraved borders and punched decoration. Maker John Moore. Weight 610g. H170.

$800 - $1,000

IN FOCUS 121


501 A GEORGE III STERLING SILVER COFFEE POT OF OVAL CYLINDRICAL FORM

512 A PLAIN SQUARE-SHAPED STERLING SILVER CIGARETTE CASE WITH WOODEN INTERIOR

with silver infuser ring, ebony scroll handle, engraved crest and acorn finial. Maker John Edwards, London 1799. H220.

See illustration page 114

513 A EUROPEAN 800 SILVER RECTANGULAR TABLE SNUFF BOX

$600 - $800

502 A CASED VICTORIAN FOUR PIECE TEA AND COFFEE SERVICE OF FLUTED TWIST DESIGN

with three pieces in sterling silver and the coffee pot in silver plate. Maker Joseph Rodgers, Sheffield 1896.

$1,200 - $1,600

503 A GOOD SMALL GEORGE III STERLING SILVER CARD TRAY/WAITER

the border with raised thistle, rose and scallop shell decoration. Crest. Maker Joseph Wilson, London 1818. Dia165.

$500 - $600

See illustration page 114

504 A PAIR OF STERLING SILVER COLUMN CANDLESTICKS

of classical form with gadrooned borders and stepped base. Weighted. Hallmarks for Sheffield 1912. H220.

$400 - $500

505 A PAIR OF STERLING SILVER OCTAGONAL FACET CANDLESTICKS

with raised leaf decoration and weighted bases. Maker George Unite. Circa 1880. Note: hallmarks rubbed. H180.

$200 - $300

506 A LARGE AND VERY IMPRESSIVE GEORGE II STERLING SILVER LIDDED HOT WATER/TEA URN

the oval body with twisted scroll handles, flame finial on lid, and gadrooned borders. The base of shaped square form, with rope edge and pierced gallery border, and supported on four ball and claw feet. Ivory tap. Winged griffin crest. Maker Fras Butty and Nicks Dumee, London 1768. Note: small faults. H530.

$6,000 - $10,000

See illustration page 115

507 A HEAVY STERLING SILVER NAPKIN RING

Sheffield 1908. Weight 98g.

$100 - $200

508 A CASED STERLING SILVER CONDIMENT SET

comprising two open salts, two mustard pots and two pepper shakers. Original spoons and blue glass liners. Hallmarked Birmingham 1914.

$150 - $200

London 1917. L90 W80.

$150 - $200

the lid with raised sculptoress and bust decoration, leaf borders and gilt interior. L80 W55.

$250 - $350

514 A GOOD VICTORIAN STERLING SILVER SNUFF BOX

with engine turned and reeeded decoration. Scroll thumb piece. Gilt interior. Maker T Ely, London 1838. L63 W40.

$400 - $500

515 SMALL STERLING SILVER PATCH BOX with scroll engraved lid. Birmingham 1913. L48 W36.$200 - $300 516 A SMALL STERLING SILVER PATCH BOX

with engraved figures in garden on lid. Birmingham 1905. L52 W32.

$100 - $150

517 A CASED PAIR OF VICTORIAN HINGED BELT CLIPS $100 - $200 518 A CUT CRYSTAL SMELLING SALTS BOTTLE WITH STERLING SILVER AND ENAMEL SCREW TOP London 1928. H80. $100 - $150

FURNITURE & RUGS 519 A FRENCH ART DECO CHEVAL MIRROR ON OVAL PLINTH

circa 1920s. H1800 W1120 D380.

$3,500 - $5,500

520 A LARGE SETH THOMAS STARBURST CLOCK

W550.

$400 - $600

521 A PAIR OF PIERO FORNASETTI OBELISK TABLE LAMPS

H900 W130 D90.

$2,000 - $3,000

See illustration page 119

522 AN ERCOL WINDSOR RANGE COFFEE TABLE IN ELM

509 A PAIR OF STERLING SILVER OVAL-SHAPED OPEN SALTS WITH ORIGINAL BLUE GLASS LINERS

523 A STYLISH WHITE LOW TABLE IN LACQUERED PLYWOOD

Chester 1927. L80.

$100 - $200

510 A GOOD ART NOUVEAU UNMARKED STUDIO SILVER OPEN SALT OR MUSTARD POT

with green glass liner and spoon. The two-handled pot sits on a tray with shaped edge and very stylish raised decoration of buds and tendrils. W150.

$80 - $120

511 A FINE VICTORIAN STERLING SILVER OVAL-SHAPED WHISKEY FLASK

with all over engraved decoration of floral scrolls with leaf border. Lioness crest. Screw top. Maker H & T, Birmingham 1870. L120.

$100 - $150

$500 - $700

based on a design by Gerrit Rietveld. H470 Dia900.

$2,000 - $4,000

See illustration page 119

524 A TONY LANE LARGE RUG FROM LOOM DESIGN

in virgin wool. 30 KPSI. L3000 W2500.

$2,000 - $4,000

525 A POUL KJÆRHOLM PK 24 CHAISE LOUNGE IN STAINLESS STEEL AND WICKER

122

by Lucien Ercolani. H360 W1040 D450.

with leather headrest. Fritz Hansen (A/S) label with text Design: Poul Kjærholm, Made in Denmark 1995. H900 W610 D1550.

$5,000 - $8,000


526 AN R BELLO DIAS FOR NUBE BLACK MEMO CHAISE LOUNGE IN LEATHER AND STEEL

H600 W800 D1580.

See illustration page 119

540 AN IMPRESSIVE 19TH CENTURY BOULLE CREDENZA

$1,000 - $1,500

527 A NUBE ORANGE ZIGGY CHAISE IN ITALIAN WOOL AND STAINLESS STEEL

539 A MID 19TH CENTURY MIRROR BACK CREDENZA IN WALNUT

H800 W700 D1800.

$1,000 - $1,500

with satinwood inlays and marble top.H1780 W1500 D430.

$2,000 - $3,000

with shaped top. The front with panelled door flanked by two glazed and panelled doors. Plinth base. Cut brass and scarlet tortoiseshell inlaid foliate decoration. Gilt metal mounts. Note: some faults. H1080 W1730 D440.

$1,500 - $2,500

See illustration page 116

528 A SINTESI LEO SOFA UPHOLSTERED IN GREY FELT

541 A VICTORIAN MIRROR BACK CREDENZA IN WALNUT

H750 W1300 D700.

See illustration page 119

$800 - $1,000

with white marble top. The shaped front with three mirrored doors. H1770 W1470 D470.

$800 - $1,200

529 AN ART DECO PERIOD SOFA IN OCHRE LEATHER

542 A LATE VICTORIAN DISPLAY CABINET IN SHERATON REVIVAL STYLE

with ebonised feet, and squared arms and back. H900 W1980 D750.

$2,500 - $3,500

530 FOUR PETER TRAAG FOR EDRA WHITE MUMMY CHAIRS

in bent beech, polyurethane and elastic ribbon. H880 W440 D410.

$200 - $300

531 A PAIR OF CHAIRS IN THE STYLE OF CHARLES AND RAY EAMES in bent, welded and chromed steel wire. The seat shells on Eiffel Tower bases. Note: small fault. H800 W480 D480.

$1,000 - $1,500

H835 W545 D500.

$150 - $250

$400 - $800

See illustration page 118

534 A BLACK ANACONDA BOOKSHELF IN POWDER-COATED STEEL

H2400 W900 D280.

$600 - $800

535 A MINOTTI ITALIA MOCO COLLECTION HENRI IV CORNER SHELF IN STAINLESS STEEL

H1100 W500 D380.

$200 - $300

536 A FRENCH RUSTIC WINE BOTTLE STAND

H1530 W730.

$300 - $500

537 A GOOD VICTORIAN TILT-TOP TABLE IN WALNUT

the shaped top with quartered veneers and inlays. The birdcage base with turned and carved decoration. H720 W1350 D1020.

$1,200 - $1,800

538 A VICTORIAN WALNUT-FRAMED PARLOUR SUITE

comprising chaise lounge, gentleman’s chair and lady’s chair. Carving to the backs and cabriole legs. Buttoned blue upholstery. Porcelain casters.

$300 - $500

with four panelled sliding doors below four glazed sliding doors. Stepped pediment and dentil cornice. H2260 W2550 D500.

$3,000 - $5,000

See illustration page 116

545 A 19TH CENTURY BUREAU BOOKCASE IN MAHOGANY

See illustration page 118 H800 W380 D550.

H1000 W690.

544 AN IMPRESSIVE LATE 19TH CENTURY NEW ZEALAND BOOKCASE

533 A RON ARAD FOR KARTELL FPE CHAIR IN POLYPROPYLENE AND STEEL

$1,000 - $1,500

543 AN ANTIQUE PINE CORNER CUPBOARD WITH GLAZED DOOR

See illustration page 119

532 A PHILIPPE STARCK FOR KARTELL PURPLE POLYCARBONATE MR IMPOSSIBLE CHAIR

on cabriole legs. The glazed bowfront with two doors above an open shelf. The whole decorated with inlays and stringing in mahogany. H1860 W1235 D370.

on ogee bracket feet. The base with six drawers. The upper section with swan-necked pediment and astral glazed doors. The fitted interior with pigeon holes, small drawers, and central cupboards and secret drawers. H2390 W1160 D560.

$4,000 - $6,000

See illustration page 115

546 A GOOD MID VICTORIAN CHIFFONIER IN MAHOGANY

the doors with carved details. Shaped apron drawer. Upstand back with single shelf and carved cresting. H1400 W1220 D460.

$800 - $1,200

See illustration page 118

547 A 19TH CENTURY CONTINENTAL DRESSING TABLE

with octagonal mirror, white marble top, and turned and reeded stretcher base. Flame veneer to the mirror support and single drawer. Note: small faults to marble. H1280 W800 D430.

$1,000 - $1,500

548 A VICTORIAN SCOTCH CHEST IN OAK

with turned feet and shaped apron. The six drawers flanked by turned and reeded half pilasters. H1290 W1270 D560.

$1,200 - $1,800

549 AN OAK COFFER

the hinged lid above three carved panels and two carved drawers. H830 W1330 D500.

$1,000 - $1,500

$1,800 - $2,500

IN FOCUS 123


550 A 19TH CENTURY FRENCH ARMOIRE IN OAK

with two doors with nickel fittings, and two drawers with nickel handles to the base. H2110 W1650 D640.

$2,500 - $3,500

562 A GOOD SET OF SIX VICTORIAN PERIOD BALLOONBACK CHAIRS IN WALNUT

with carved decoration and cabriole legs. Overstuffed seats.

$600 - $1,000

551 AN IMPRESSIVE ORIENTAL SHRINE

563 A SET OF SIX VICTORIAN BALLOONBACK CHAIRS IN WALNUT

the upper section with painted and embroidered panels below a roof structure. The base incorporating cupboards and pull-out slide, and with character decoration. Circa 1930. H2530 W1400 D840.

$1,500 - $2,000

See illustration page 116

552 A JAPANESE MEIJI PERIOD SHIBAYAMA DISPLAY CABINET

the central shelf with pierced central section. Five cupboards with sliding and hinged doors. Two drawers to base. Foliate and bird decoration. Note: some losses. H1420 W840 D240.

$400 - $800

553 A KOREAN ALTAR TABLE OF SIMPLE DESIGN

with original finish. H250 W510 D340.

$150 - $250

the central section with a cupboard above four drawers. The two flanking stepped sections each with a cupboard and two drawers. Iron fittings. H850 W910 D450.

$1,000 - $1,500

$600 - $1,000

564 A VICTORIAN REVOLVING PIANO STOOL IN WALNUT WITH TURNED AND CARVED TRIPOD BASE

H470.

$120 - $200

565 A 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN MARQUETRY FRAME WITH BEVELLED MIRROR

Note: restoration. H710 W640.

$500 - $800

566 A GOOD GEORGE III MAHOGANY-CASED BRACKET CLOCK

554 A 20TH CENTURY ORIENTAL STEP CHEST

with carved crested backrail and cabriole legs.

with brass handle and edges, and on four brass feet. Silvered dial and finely engraved back plate. The eight day double fusee movement strikes the hours with pull repeat. Original winding key. Signed J R Barbiers (Barber) Newark. H500.

$3,000 - $5,000

See illustration page 117

555 AN EARLY 19TH CENTURY MAHOGANY FOLD OVER CARD TABLE

567 AN AFGHAN HAND-KNOTTED THICK PILE CARPET IN BEIGE AND INDIGO

on replaced tapering legs with spade feet. H750 W900 D440.

$700 - $1,000

L2970 W2370.

$1,200 - $1,500

556 AN EARLY 19TH CENTURY CAMPAIGN TABLE IN MAHOGANY

568 A TURKISH HAND-KNOTTED RUG IN RED AND BLUE

with carved supports, and carved and turned stretcher rail. The base circa 1830. The hinged top restored. H800 W1250 D610.

$1,000 - $1,500

557 A LATE VICTORIAN PINE SETTLE WITH HIGH PANELLED BACK AND TWO LIFT-UP SEATS

H1720 W1540 D470.

$500 - $700

558 A 19TH CENTURY DINING TABLE IN MAHOGANY

raised on turned and reeded legs with brass casters. Later modified with an optional central leg and four leaves extending to 2520mm. H740 W1170 D1140.

$1,000 - $1,500

559 A VICTORIAN EXTENSION DINING TABLE IN WALNUT with turned and reeded legs. Original porcelain casters. H730 W2360 D1230.

$1,500 - $2,500 See illustration page 116

560 A VICTORIAN LOO TABLE IN WALNUT

124

$800 - $1,000

See illustration page 116

$100 - $200

L2850 W2110.

$1,000 - $1,200

572 A HAND-KNOTTED CARPET WITH BRIGHT MULTICOLOURED GEOMETRIC DESIGNS

backs with upholstered and buttoned panels.

L2020 W1080.

571 A HAND-KNOTTED CARPET IN ROSE AND CREAM WITH BLUE HIGHLIGHTS

561 A SET OF EIGHT VICTORIAN DINING CHAIRS on turned and reeded legs and with overstuffed seats. The show-wood

$800 - $1,200

L2070 W110.

$200 - $300

570 A TURKISH HAND-KNOTTED RUG WITH CENTRAL MEDALLION ON BLUE AND FAWN GROUND

$120 - $180

569 A TURKISH HAND-KNOTTED RUG WITH THREE CENTRAL MEDALLIONS ON A RED GROUND

oval-topped with quartered veneers. Turned and carved pedestal base. Note: slight veneer damage. H730 W1430 D1120.

L2000 W990.

L3200 W2580.

$1,000 - $1,200 See illustration page 116

573 A HAND-KNOTTED RUNNER WITH CENTRAL FLORAL MOTIF ON A BLUE GROUND WITH RED BORDERS L3470 W700.

$250 - $350

574 A HAND-KNOTTED RUNNER WITH SEVEN MEDALLIONS ON A CREAM GROUND

L3900 W700.

$250 - $350


CONDITIONS OF SALE FOR BUYERS 1. BIDDING. The highest bidder shall be the purchaser subject to the auctioneer having the right to refuse the bid of any person. Should any dispute arise as to the bidding, the lot in dispute will be immediately put up for sale again at the preceding bid, or the auctioneer may declare the purchaser, which declaration shall be conclusive. No person shall advance less at a bid than the sum nominated by the auctioneer, and no bid may be retracted. 2. RESERVES. All lots are sold subject to the right of the seller or her/ his agent to impose a reserve. 3. REGISTRATION. Purchasers shall complete a bidding card before the sale giving their own correct name, address and telephone number. It is accepted by bidders that the supply of false information on a bidding card shall be interpreted as deliberate fraud. 4. BUYER’S PREMIUM. The purchaser accepts that in addition to the hammer or selling price Webb’s will apply a buyer’s premium of 12.5% for the Important Works of Art and Fine Jewellery & Watches sales, and a buyer’s premium of 15% for the Antiques & Modern Design sale (unless otherwise stated), together with GST on such premiums. 5. PAYMENT. Payment for all items purchased is due on the day of sale immediately following completion of the sale. If full payment cannot be made on the day of sale a deposit of 10% of the total sum due must be made on the day of sale and the balance must be paid within 5 working days. Payment is by cash, bank cheque or Eftpos. Personal and private cheques will be accepted but must be cleared before goods will be released. Credit cards are not accepted. 6. LOTS SOLD AS VIEWED. All lots are sold as viewed and with all erros in description, faults and imperfections whether visible or not. Neither Webb’s nor its vendor are responsible for errors in description or for the genuineness or authenticity of any lot or for any fault or defect in it. No warranty whatsoever is made. Buyers proceed upon their own judgement. Buyers shall be deemed to have inspected the lots, or to have made enquiries to their complete satisfaction, prior to sale and by the act of bidding shall be deemed to be satisfied with the lots in all respects. 7. WEBB’S ACT AS AGENTS. They have full discretion to conduct all aspects of the sale and to withdraw any lot from the sale without giving any reason. 8. COLLECTION. Purchases are to be taken away at the buyer’s expense immediately after the sale except where a cheque remains uncleared. If this is not done Webb’s will not be responsible if the lot is lost, stolen, damaged or destroyed. Any items not collected within seven days of the auction may be subject to a storage and insurance fee. A receipted invoice must be produced prior to removal of any lot. 9. LICENCES. Buyers who purchase an item which falls within the provisions of the Protected Objects Act 1975 or the Arms Act 1958 cannot take possession of that item until they have shown to Webb’s a license under the appropriate Act. 10. FAILURE TO MAKE PAYMENT. If a purchaser fails either to pay for or take away any lot, Webb’s shall without further notice to the purchaser, at its absolute discretion and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies it may have, be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies: A. To issue proceeding against the purchaser for damages for breach of contract. B. To rescind the sale of that or any other lot sold to the purchaser at the same or any other auction.

C. To resell the lot by public or private sale. Any deficiency resulting from such resale, after giving credit to the purchaser for any part payment, together with all costs incurred in connection with the lot shall be paid to Webb’s by the purchaser. Any surplus over the proceeds of sale shall belong to the seller and in this condition the expression ‘proceeds of sale’ shall have the same meaning in relation to a sale by private treaty as it has in relation to a sale by auction. D. To store the lot whether at Webb’s own premises or elsewhere at the sole expense of the purchaser and to release the lot only after the purchase price has been paid in full plus the accrued cost of removal storage and all other costs connected to the lot. E. To charge interest on the purchase price at a rate 2% above Webb’s bankers’ then current rate for commercial overdraft facilities, to the extent that the price or any part of it remains unpaid for more than seven days from the date of the sale. F. To retain possession of that or any other lot purchased by the purchaser at that or any other auction and to release the same only after payment of money due. G. To apply the proceeds of sale of any lot then or subsequently due to the purchaser towards settlement of money due to Webb’s or its vendor. Webb’s shall be entitled to a possessory lien on any property of the purchaser for any purpose while any monies remain unpaid under this contract. H. To apply any payment made by the purchaser to Webb’s towards any money owing to Webb’s in respect of any thing whatsoever irrespective of any directive given in respect of, or restriction placed upon, such payment by the purchaser whether expressed or implied. I. Title and right of disposal of the goods shall not pass to the purchaser until payment has been made in full by cleared funds. Where any lot purchased is held by Webb’s pending i. clearance of funds by the purchaser or ii. completion of payment after receipt of a deposit, the lot will be held by Webb’s as bailee for the vendor, risk and title passing to the purchaser immediately upon notification of clearance of funds or upon completion of purchase. In the event that a lot is lost, stolen, damaged or destroyed before title is transferred to the purchaser, the purchaser shall be entitled to a refund of all monies paid to Webb’s in respect of that lot, but shall not be entitled to any compensation for any consequent losses howsoever arising. 11. BIDDERS DEEMED PRINCIPALS. All bidders shall be held personally and solely liable for all obligations arising from any bid, including both ‘telephone’ and ‘absentee’ bids. Any person wishing to bid as agent for a third party must obtain written authority to do so from Webb’s prior to bidding. 12. ‘SUBJECT BIDS’. Where the highest bid is below the reserve and the auctioneer declares a sale to be ‘subject to vendor’s consent’ or words to that effect, the highest bid remains binding upon the bidder until the vendor accepts or rejects it. If the bid is accepted there is a contractual obligation upon the bidder to pay for the lot. 13. SALES POST AUCTION OR BY PRIVATE TREATY. The above conditions shall apply to all buyers of goods from Webb’s irrespective of the circumstances under which the sale is negotiated. 14. CONDITION OF ITEMS. Condition of items is not detailed in this catalogue. Buyers must satisfy themselves as to the condition of lots they bid on and should refer to clause six. Webb’s are pleased to provide intending buyers with condition reports on any lots.

IN FOCUS 125


PRICES REALISED SALE 312 (25 - 27 MAY 2010) A2 ART, FINE JEWELLERY AND WATCHES, ANTIQUES AND MODERN DESIGN LOT 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 22 23 26 27 28 29 32 33 35 38 39 41 42 44 45 46 49 50 51 55 56 57 58 59 60 63 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82

126

$ 600 2000 1400 2000 650 600 2250 2100 850 1100 2800 1500 1600 2600 900 900 850 1100 6400 4000 1100 6800 2000 1250 2200 3600 1200 500 2100 1200 2500 4100 4600 1000 3000 3000 7500 2500 2400 4000 3000 12000 3000 300 350 300 1300 1500 1250 850 1100 1200 450 500 800

LOT 91 92 93 97 98 99 100 101 106 107 108 109 110 112 113 115 118 119 120 123 124 126 127 128 129 133 134 135 136 137 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 201 202 204 205 207 208 209 211 212 216 217 218

$

LOT

$

1000 600 1300 600 1800 700 500 2000 900 640 1600 850 3000 900 1600 900 700 750 2200 800 700 450 400 3000 600 2000 3200 6000 400 400 3400 600 3500 3000 500 500 800 3000 2000 2500 400 500 300 325 6000 1300 400 2500 350 1000 9500 550 430 1600 1500

219 221 224 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 236 237 239 241 242 246 247 248 249 251 252 253 254 255 257 264 282 283 286 289 291 292A 292B 294 296 298 300 302 306 308 310 322 326 327 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408

850 1800 4000 1800 250 750 2750 1700 7000 1000 1200 300 950 4500 600 500 500 650 600 650 1450 2500 5600 6500 1200 3500 3250 2000 6000 2800 1700 24000 47500 1800 1800 21000 16000 2300 1150 1200 4700 1600 4600 1500 1000 5000 1500 1200 300 200 580 600 475 180 400

LOT 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 419 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 449 450 451 452 453 454 457 459 460 461 462 463 464 466 467 468 469 471 472 473 474

$ 200 700 7000 240 150 60 80 200 160 590 320 320 70 1100 70 120 180 50 310 120 120 50 110 420 80 110 100 90 70 190 230 90 130 120 375 70 80 210 325 250 400 1300 2000 150 200 70 400 180 200 70 20 180 180 500 700

LOT 475 477 478 479 480 481 483 484 485 487 488 489 490 492 493 494 495 497 501 502 506 507 508 509 510 511 513 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 536 538 540 542 543 544 545 547 548 549 550 555

$ 200 380 150 160 260 90 150 210 200 250 375 500 190 130 110 200 230 100 280 600 100 120 3600 50 70 750 50 70 100 80 120 130 120 320 140 130 170 140 100 80 160 160 150 1000 1500 400 100 700 130 500 340 230 200 250 80

LOT 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 574 575 576 580 586 587 588 590 592 593 594 597 598 599 610 611 612 613 614 616 617 619 620 621 622 623 624 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638

$ 375 100 100 100 90 130 175 110 460 90 30 200 250 120 100 300 2600 15 325 130 80 85 95 80 300 100 1300 90 260 150 110 200 80 250 475 280 300 300 2100 50 50 100 600 600 2800 5200 1300 1800 1800 600 600 600 600 500 600


PRICES REALISED 312 (25 - 27 MAY 2010) A2 ART, FINE JEWELLERY AND WATCHES, ANTIQUES AND MODERN DESIGN LOT

$

LOT

$

LOT

639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 652 653 654 655 657 658 659 660 661 662 664 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 674

800 900 900 400 700 450 450 540 300 300 600 320 200 80 20 30 125 500 280 90 120 200 350 1750 60 200 625 225 200 100 400

675 676 677 679 680 681 682 686 688 689 690 691 693 695 699 700 701 702 704 705 706 711 713 714 715 717 719 721 724 729 730

700 6250 80 160 400 400 500 2750 700 800 2000 2500 1600 500 2300 300 2300 1200 5200 140 400 550 70 80 300 410 150 1300 1750 6100 550

734 737 738 1000 1002 1003 1004 1005 1006 1007 1008 1009 1010 1011 1013 1014 1015 1016 1017 1019 1020 1021 1022 1023 1025 1026 1027 1029 1031 1032 1033

$

575 300 80 1240 70 80 70 1800 200 625 425 100 20 100 500 500 750 90 90 260 4000 400 200 625 300 100 50 300 300 375 280

LOT

$

LOT

1036 1038 1044 1048 1052 1054 1060 1061 1064 1067 1070 1072 1073 1075 1078 1079 1080 1081 1083 1084 1085 1086 1088 1089 1090 1091 1092 1094 1096 1098 1099

680 900 650 400 150 250 150 225 550 200 200 150 225 375 700 600 650 150 600 150 225 100 260 380 1000 400 200 140 400 150 140

1101 1102 1103 1104 1105 1106 1107 1108 1109 1110 1111 1113 1114 1115 1116 1117 1119 1120 1122 1123 1124 1125 1127 1129 1130 1132 1134 1143 1145 1147 1148

$

150 10 750 120 40 150 130 10 175 10 275 130 100 600 100 140 70 80 120 30 50 30 150 180 400 150 300 250 100 275 180

LOT

$

1149 1150 1151 1152 1155 1156 1157 1158 1159 1160 1161 1162 1163 1164 1165 1166 1167 1168 1169 1170 1171 1172 1174 1175 1176 1177 1178 1179 1180 1181 1182

600 340 160 37 30 50 100 100 20 425 400 300 30 300 382 140 60 50 40 150 300 22.5 20 40 40 30 70 640 50 30 20

BANK ACCOUNT DETAILS PAYMENT BY DEPOSIT Important: Fax this form to Webb’s: +64 9 524 7048 so payment can be confirmed and purchases released. BUYER NAME

BUYER NUMBER

SALE NUMBER

Balance owing for purchase/s: NZ

*Please include a sale number and buyer number as reference for on direct credits to enable us to dispatch your items efficiently.

BANK ACCOUNT DETAILS

Bank: WESTPAC 79 Queen Street, Auckland Name: PETER WEBB GALLERIES LTD Account Number: 03-0104-0448184-03 For international deposits Swift Code: WPACNZ2W Amount transferred (including freight if applicable): NZ

DATE TRANSFERRED

SIGNED

CONFIDENTIALITY The information contained in this facsimile is legally privileged and/or confidential. If you are not the addressee listed below you are notified that except as authorised agent to the addressee any use disclosure copying or distribution of any of the contents of this facsimile by you is prohibited. Recipients other than the addressee listed below are asked to notify us immediately and return the original facsimile to us.

IN FOCUS 127


PRICES REALISED SALE 313 (17 JUN 2010) OCEANIC AND AFRICAN ARTS LOT 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 31 33 35 36 37 38 39 42 44 46 47 48 49 52 53 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 65 67 68 69 73 74 75 76

128

$ 3,500 1,800 2,600 800 1,000 1,300 750 950 600 800 650 250 900 225 400 400 300 350 350 500 250 250 400 700 300 350 375 200 200 600 200 700 225 100 700 400 600 200 700 400 1,300 700 700 650 700 900 700 700 700 700 500 700 700 700 500

LOT 77 79 80 82 83 84 85 86 89 90 91 94 96 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 112 113 114 115 117 118 119 120 121 123 124 125 126 128 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 141 142 145 146 147 148 154 155 156 157

$ 400 400 280 950 850 850 450 450 800 400 800 10,500 2,700 14,000 20,000 28,000 14,500 1,000 300 9,000 2,500 650 2,300 300 250 650 525 425 2,650 500 600 350 500 100 250 525 400 400 100 100 500 500 5,500 7,000 2,700 900 600 3,800 600 1,000 3,400 50 700 180 200

LOT 158 160 163 164 169 170 172 177 178 183 184 185 186 188 196 197 198 202 203 204 206 207 209 212 215 216 219 220 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250

$ 150 100 1,700 100 150 50 1,500 500 500 2,300 1,900 1,100 1,500 425 1,200 2,000 400 6,200 1,250 100 450 300 275 500 5,000 3,300 3,900 200 2,500 1,050 500 650 700 7,500 5,200 21,500 1,800 2,000 600 2,100 4,200 3,500 600 900 600 500 550 300 600 250 700 200 500 200 250

LOT 252 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 284 288 289 296 297 299 300 305 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323

$

LOT

$

300 225 325 250 400 250 200 275 350 550 200 350 80 250 2,100 400 850 700 2,000 550 375 350 300 350 300 300 2,400 1,200 350 500 600 10,000 2,250 1,900 8,200 4,000 6,500 2,500 1,000 1,100 300 450 1,700 2,200 1,900 4,100 2,200 4,200 6,000 2,250 5,500 800 800 150 200

324 325 326 327 328 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 344A 345 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 355 358 359 360 361 363 366 368 369 370 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 383 385 387 388 389 390 391 393

250 100 250 200 250 1,050 1,000 1,400 2,100 2,100 3,200 200 200 250 7,000 9,500 40,000 7,300 25,000 10,000 30,000 5,000 2,000 10,000 3,600 10,500 7,000 11,100 2,350 10,000 5,500 7,000 8,000 4,000 4,500 1,000 2,500 600 2,800 250 5,000 1,900 2,000 3,350 1,700 1,800 2,600 250 900 2,500 4,250 1,600 400 1,200 1,200

LOT

$

394 300 396 1,100 397 2,300 398 1,900 400 800 402 6,500 404 1,400 405 6,000 408 100 410 200 411 400 412 550 413 100 414 800 417 200 418 250 422 10,000 424 4,200 425 11,000 426 1,000 427 2,000 428 3,000 429 7,500 430 2,500 432 4,000 434 1,500 435 250 436 300 437 200 439 1,000 443 300 444 350 446 500 447 2,500 452 400 454 300 457 200


BIDDING SLIP FOR ABSENTEE BIDDERS ON LOTS IN SALE 315 Please bid on my behalf at the above sale for the following lots up to the prices recorded. These bids are to be executed as cheaply as is permitted by other bids or reserves if any.* I agree to comply with the Conditions of Sale as printed in the catalogue. I understand that in the case of a successful bid on items in the Important Works of Art and Fine Jewellery & Watches sales, a buyer’s premium of twelve and a half percent (12.5%) will be added to the hammer price and that GST is charged on the premium. I understand that in the case of a successful bid on items in the Antiques & Modern Design sale a buyer’s premium of fifteen percent (15%) will be added to the hammer price and that GST is charged on the premium. On major lots customers may prefer to bid by telephone. Please enquire regarding this service which Webb’s carry out at no charge.

LOT NO.

CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION BID*

MR MRS MISS MS (PLEASE CIRCLE) FIRST NAME

SURNAME/COMPANY

HOME PHONE

BUSINESS PHONE

MOBILE

FACSIMILIE

POSTAL ADDRESS CONTACT NAME EMAIL ADDRESS ARRANGEMENTS FOR PAYMENT: I agree to pay immediately on receipt of notice from Webb’s of my successful bid. Payment will be by cash cheque or bank transfer. I will arrange for collection of my purchases or I agree to pay for packing and freight costs incurred by Webb’s in having any purchases forwarded to me. In order to avoid delay in clearing purchases buyers who are unknown to us are advised to make arrangements for payment before the sale or for references to be supplied. If such arrangements are not made cheques will be cleared before purchases are delivered. * Webb’s will do its utmost to carry out bidding instructions for absentee bidders. It will not be responsible however if circumstances prevent it from doing so.

SIGNED

DATE

18 Manukau Rd Newmarket | PO Box 99251 Auckland 1149 New Zealand Ph:  09 524 6804 / Fax: 09 524 7048 | auctions@webbs.co.nz / www.webbs.co.nz IN FOCUS 129


INDEX OF ARTISTS Bambury, Stephen Binney, Don   Cotton, Shane   Dashper, Julian Dawson, Neil Dibble, Paul Drummond, Andrew   Ellis, Robert   Friedlander, Marti Frizzell, Dick   Gopas, Rudi Gossage, Star   Hammond, Bill Hanly, Pat Harris, Jeffrey Harrison, Michael Hartigan, Paul Hodgkins, Frances Holmwood, John Hotere, Ralph   Illingworth, Michael   Kame Kngwarreye, Emily Kemarre, Josie Petrick Kemarre, Abie Loy Killeen, Richard

130

25 18, 26, 52 24 9 50, 62 3, 61 64 15, 56 37 47 69 45 31, 34, 38, 57 40, 41, 42, 43, 54, 60 20 68 46, 74 70 14 19, 39, 51, 67 23 81 86 83, 85 1, 13, 21, 30, 73

King, Virginia Kreisler, Tom

28 48

Lacroix, Tristan L. Jules Lusk, Doris   Maddox, Allen Maughan, Karl McCahon, Colin Morison, Julia   Napangardi, Dorothy Napangardi, Lily Kelly   Page, Evelyn Parekowhai, Michael Peryer, Peter Petyarre, Kathleen   Robinson, Ann   Scott, Ian Smither, Michael Stringer, Terry Sutton, William Sydney, Grahame   Tapper, Garth Thornley, Geoff Twiss, Greer   Walsh, John Walters, Gordon

78 32 6 71 4, 58 59 79 80, 84 33 11, 17 66 82 7, 27 55 8, 16, 36 65 77 35, 44 2, 75 22, 29, 49, 76 5, 63 53, 72 10, 12


Webb's August catalogue  

Catalogue for the August suite of sales at Webb's, including Important Works of Art, Fine Jewellery and Watches, Antiques and Modern Design