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INSTITUTIONAL MASTER PLAN NOTIFICATION FORM

Chapter 1 – Executive Summary ........................................................................... 1 Chapter 2 – Emmanuel College’s Mission and Objectives .................................. 5 Introduction • 2000-2011: Emmanuel College’s Transformation • 2011-2021—The Second Decade: Building on Success to Secure Emmanuel College’s Future

Chapter 3 – Campus Profile .................................................................................. 9 • • • •

Campus History Campus Description Property and Uses o Academic/Student Uses o Endowment Uses/Endowment Parcels Programs of Study o Undergraduate o Graduate and Professional Programs o Athletics

Chapter 4 – Emmanuel College’s Neighborhood Context................................... 17 Introduction • Longwood Medical and Academic Area o Colleges of the Fenway o Harvard Medical School, Teaching Hospitals and Research Institutions o Cultural Institutions o Primary Secondary Schools Within the LMA o Medical, Academic and Scientific Community Organization (MASCO) • Surrounding Neighborhoods o The Fenway Neighborhood o Audubon Circle o Mission Hill

Chapter 5 – Campus Planning Framework........................................................... 21 Introduction • Zoning/Regulatory Context o LMA Interim Guidelines o The Fenway Urban Village Plan o Emerald Necklace Master Plan • Use and Activity • Access • Building Height and Massing • Landscape • Sustainable Design and Development


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Chapter 6 – Proposed Future IMP Projects ..........................................................41 Introduction • Academic/Student Projects o Cardinal Cushing Library o Julie Hall North • Parking

Chapter 7 – Transportation ....................................................................................53 Introduction Transportation • Proposed IMP Projects o Academic Campus Projects o Future Transportation • Existing Transportation Conditions o Public Transportation ƒ MBTA Services ƒ MASCO Shuttle Services o Roadway Network o Parking o Vehicle Access • Future Transportation Conditions o Parking Ratio Summary • Transportation Demand Management • Construction Management o Construction Vehicle Traffic o Construction Parking o Pedestrian Access o Construction Monitoring

Chapter 8 – Student Housing ................................................................................59 Student Housing Plan Student Housing Policies

Chapter 9 – Community Benefits Plan ..................................................................61 Introduction Economic Development Service Initiatives • The Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership o Youth Program o Sociedad Latina o The Cultural Competence Peer Educator Training Program o Kids to College o O’Bryant Gateway to the LMA Program • Campus Ministry Office o New Student Day of Service o Alternative Spring Break o Making a Difference in the Life of a Child


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• •

o Sunday Service Group o ESOL Program: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages—Building Bridges o Emmanuel College Community Outreach (ECCO) Roberto Clemente Field: A Public/Private Partnership The Center for Science Education at Emmanuel College o For Students ƒ S.E.T. in the City ƒ Biomedical Research Institute for Secondary School Students o For Teachers ƒ Science Courses for Elementary School Teachers: Teaching Science Through Scientific Inquiry: Physical Sciences Gr. 1-6 ƒ Strategies for Teaching Science K-5 ƒ Science Courses for Secondary School Science Teachers Education to Boston o Carolyn A. Lynch Institute ƒ The Lynch Institute for Professional Development ƒ The Catholic School Principal Leadership Institute at Emmanuel College ƒ The Mentor Program ƒ The Center for Early Mathematics Learning o Dual Enrollment Plan Community Partnerships


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CHAPTER 1

Executive Summary

Opened in 1919 by the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, Emmanuel College is a Catholic, coeducational, residential, liberal arts and sciences institution located on a 17-acre campus in the heart of Boston’s educational, scientific, cultural and medical communities. In 2000, the College filed an Institutional Master Plan (IMP) which has served as the blueprint for the College’s planning for the past decade. Since becoming coeducational in 2000, Emmanuel has experienced an 11-fold increase in applications for admission and its enrollment has more than tripled to 1,750 full-time undergraduate students. The College’s mission is to educate students in a dynamic learning community rooted in the liberal arts and sciences and shaped by strong ethical values and a Catholic intellectual tradition. Emmanuel has maintained a laser-sharp focus on its educational mission, making bold and innovative decisions that have transformed the College.

The goal of the 2000 IMP was to provide state-of-the-art academic facilities for teaching and learning and to leverage the College’s location within the Longwood Medical and Academic Area (LMA) by creating an Endowment Campus. This master planning effort has enabled Emmanuel College to dramatically enhance the academic and student life experience over the last decade with the construction of the Maureen Murphy Wilkens Science Center and the Jean Yawkey Center. The College has also cultivated a unique partnership with global health care leader, Merck & Co., Inc., which opened Merck Research Laboratories-Boston in 2004 on the Endowment Campus. Emmanuel College decided to create an Endowment Campus in order to provide financial resources to support the College’s academic mission. In the past 10 years, the College has upgraded all of its residence halls, reacquired and renovated Julie Hall, built the new Jean Yawkey Center and gymnasium, and constructed the state-of-the-art Maureen Murphy Wilkens Science Center. These decisions to invest in major capital improvements and to increase the College’s enrollment have resulted in a vibrant transformation of the Emmanuel College campus and its academic and studentlife experience. Under the terms of the 2000 IMP, the Endowment Campus consisted of Parcels A, B and C, all of which were to be developed and used for research use. Currently, Parcel B is the site of the 300,000 SF Merck Research Laboratories-Boston, Parcel A is ground leased to Merck for its future expansion, and Parcel C is the site of Alumnae Hall and a parking garage, currently being leased to Brigham and Women’s Hospital for research use and parking by LMA institutions. Through the ground-lease agreement with Merck, Emmanuel is the only college in the country to have a private research facility on its campus. Since Merck Research Laboratories-Boston opened its doors in October 2004, Emmanuel students have gained access to unique academic


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opportunities including the Merck Scholars Program and various internships, support for facultystudent research initiatives and student stipends for summer research projects, the use of research equipment donated to the College by Merck, and the monthly Emmanuel/Merck Joint Science Seminar Series. In addition to Emmanuel students, faculty and staff, the Greater Boston community has benefitted from the upgraded facilities at the College. In response to studies showing a lack of sufficient inquiry-based science education in K-12 programs across the nation, as well as a number of teachers instructing without proper certification, Emmanuel established The Center for Science Education. Through access to facilities and resources in the new Maureen Murphy Wilkens Science Center and Emmanuel’s science faculty, The Science Center for Education promotes scientific literacy and provides quality professional development for elementary and secondary science teachers. The Center also hosts events to inspire students, especially those in urban schools without access to laboratory equipment, to pursue careers in science. One example is S.E.T. (Science, Engineering, Technology) in the City, a daylong event for Boston-area high-school girls. Students visit the Emmanuel campus, engage in hands-on science activities led by professionals and interact with women working in S.E.T. fields. Within the Jean Yawkey Center, Emmanuel’s student center, is the Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership. Established in 2004 by a grant from the Yawkey Foundation, this Center is dedicated to developing service opportunities and leadership skills for Emmanuel students and providing programs for young people in Boston area schools and community organizations. Emmanuel students volunteer in local schools as mentors and tutors, while students from Beacon Academy, Fenway High School and McKinley Middle School have access to the College’s facilities, including the Emmanuel College gymnasium. Through the Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership, Emmanuel students engage in service learning courses, which further connect a student’s sense of commitment and action, encouraging them to impact positive change in the community through service-orientated curriculums. Students are also involved with on-going volunteer service at a number of agencies and institutions in the city of Boston, including Our Lady of Perpetual Help Mission Grammar School, Greater Boston Food Bank, Cradles to Crayons, Haley House, Rosie’s Place and Sociedad Latina. Over the past decade, Emmanuel’s students, faculty and staff have contributed more than 250,000 hours of community service. In 2009, Emmanuel College and the Yawkey Foundation, in partnership with the city of Boston, contributed $4 million to restore Roberto Clemente Field, located in the historic Emerald Necklace designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. This new complex features an NCAA-regulation synthetic turf field, which accommodates regulation softball, soccer and lacrosse, while also serving as a practice field for Boston Latin School’s football team. The complex also features a three-lane rubberized track, providing practice areas for track and field for both Emmanuel students and other


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area schools. The track also remains open to the public for recreational walking and jogging yearround, giving the community an important athletic and recreational resource. This renewal of Emmanuel’s Institutional Master Plan in 2011 is based upon a strategic 10year plan that will accommodate student growth to 2,200 students. The College seeks to build enhanced academic and residence space for its students and will finance this by developing Parcel C on its Endowment Campus through a PDA Development Plan. Emmanuel intends to submit a PDA Development Plan to the Authority for its approval under Article 80 of the Boston Zoning Code. This document references a modification of the dimensional limitations for Parcel C, resulting in an increase from 141,000 SF to 360,000SF of biomedical research space, in accordance with an approved Planned Development Area (PDA) Development Plan. With the permit of 360,000 SF on Parcel C, the College will obtain the necessary funds to further enhance Emmanuel’s educational mission through a new residence hall, Julie Hall North, which will include extended dining space, seminar rooms and beds for approximately 450 new students. The proposed expansion of the Cardinal Cushing Library will provide academic space for both students and faculty on the academic campus. Parcels A and B (hereafter referred to as Merck Research Laboratories-Boston) will remain as permitted in 2000. In all, the College proposes 259,000 SF of net-new space to its Academic Campus through this IMP and 317,000 SF of net-new space to its Endowment Campus through a PDA Development Plan for Parcel C. Emmanuel intends to submit the PDA Development Plan for Parcel C, which will specify the dimensions and uses, to be reviewed simultaneously with the IMP.


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CHAPTER 2

Emmanuel College’s mission and objectives

Introduction Emmanuel College is located at 400 The Fenway, between Brookline Avenue and Avenue Louis Pasteur in the Longwood Medical and Academic Area (LMA). Under the leadership of President Sister Janet Eisner, SND and the board of trustees, Emmanuel has maintained a laser-sharp focus on the College’s educational mission, which drives all decision making. Mission: To educate students in a dynamic learning community rooted in the liberal arts and sciences and shaped by strong ethical values and a Catholic intellectual tradition.

The commitment of the administration and faculty to these guiding principles has led the growth that has taken place on Emmanuel College’s campus over the last decade, and will continue to lead during the improvements that are planned for the next decade. 2000-2011: EMMANUEL COLLEGE’S TRANSFORMATION Emmanuel College completed an Institutional Master Plan (IMP) in 2000. The successful implementation opened up a new chapter for the College that has also benefited the LMA and city of Boston. Within the last 10 years, Emmanuel College has rebounded from a period of low enrollment to become the strong and thriving institution it is today. Enrollment has nearly tripled to 1,765 traditional students, bringing it more in line with its enrollments of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Emmanuel’s resurgence has been underwritten by the creation of an “Endowment Campus” to host biomedical research. In 2004, Merck & Co., Inc. opened its largest national research center on Parcel B of the Endowment Campus and also ground leased Parcel A for future expansion. Merck Research LaboratoriesBoston is an 11-story, 300,000 SF, private research facility that has funded the College’s growth since 2000. The Endowment Campus includes an additional strategic development site, Parcel C. This additional parcel provides a prime location to grow biomedical research in the LMA and a location that can attract globally significant research facilities to Boston. The Endowment Campus partnership with Merck represents a first-of-its-kind association that has become a national model for other institutions considering such development opportunities.


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In pioneering the concept, Emmanuel established three core guidelines that it continues to follow: • • •

Emmanuel’s first priority is that the Academic Campus maintains its “right size,” ensuring that the academic space is used wholly and effectively, while continuing to house 75 percent of its students. The Endowment Campus is dedicated to biomedical research uses that enhance the mission of the College, strengthen the vision of the larger LMA and help build Boston’s economy. Planning and design for development of the Endowment Campus respects the character of Emmanuel’s campus, the adjacent institutions and Avenue Louis Pasteur.

In the past decade, Emmanuel College has created a thriving campus life that fosters formal and informal learning and a culture that focuses on innovative and collaborative teaching and research. The goals on which this plan was predicated include: 1. Competitively position the College for quality student enrollment

The decision was made in 2000 to admit young men to the traditional undergraduate program, and the following year the first coeducational class arrived on campus. This decision, along with the numerous improvements implemented, allowed Emmanuel College to increase enrollment threefold in less than 10 years, bringing the numbers back to historic levels. 2. Maintain a strong educational program with highly qualified faculty

With the growth in student enrollment and investments in new facilities and technology, Emmanuel College has been able to not only increase the number of faculty positions, but also attract prominent new faculty members. Since 2000, the number of full-time faculty has doubled. 3. Maintain financial stability

Prior to the 2000 IMP, Emmanuel College’s trustees and administration concluded that addressing the College’s extensive list of deferred maintenance and capital improvement needs was beyond the capacity of its existing revenue projections. The College was able to advance important projects and continue to provide the educational experience called for in its mission through the creation of the Endowment Campus and the successful partnership with Merck & Co., Inc. 4. Provide up-to-date academic facilities and technology resources

A number of important projects have been completed that greatly improve Emmanuel College’s technology resources. The state-of-the-art Maureen Murphy Wilkens Science Center contains 14 laboratories for biology, chemistry, physics, biochemistry, neuroscience and faculty research, as well as multipurpose classrooms and meeting spaces. The Wilkens Science Center advances the educational mission of the College by increasing opportunities for interactive teaching and learning, enabling the College to better prepare students in the sciences and other high-growth fields. A completely reconfigured and restored Art Department includes upgraded and restored facilities for traditional art programs, including studios for painting, drawing, printmaking, 3D


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graphics and ceramics, as well as a Mac computer lab. The iconic Administration Building is also undergoing an extensive renovation, receiving both aesthetic and structural updates, including the installation of its first-ever HVAC system. 5. Provide a living environment conducive to personal development and global understanding

In 2004, the College constructed the Jean Yawkey Center to enhance the campus life experience of all Emmanuel students. Referred to as the “living room” of the campus, this student center contains athletic, dining and recreational facilities and includes the Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership, which provides service opportunities for both students and young people in Boston-area schools. In addition, the College also allocated $25 million to reacquire and renovate the Julie Hall residence hall, providing more on-campus housing for its students. Emmanuel also invested $10 million to upgrade St. Joseph Hall, the largest residence hall on campus, which houses 410 students and contains a newly updated fitness center, Health Services, and offices for student clubs. In 2009, Emmanuel College and the Yawkey Foundation, in partnership with the city of Boston, contributed $4 million to restore Roberto Clemente Field. This complex now features a NCAA-regulation synthetic turf field, which accommodates regulation softball, soccer and lacrosse, and also serves at the practice field for Boston Latin School’s football team. The complex also features a three-lane rubberized track, providing practice areas for track and field for both Emmanuel students and other area schools. The track also remains open to the public for recreational walking and jogging year-round. Emmanuel College continues to maintain the turf field. In recognition of campus improvements, Carol R. Johnson Associates was awarded the Boston Society of Landscape Architects 2005 Merit Award for the redesigning of the College’s main quadrangle. In 2011, Emmanuel received a Paul E. Tsongas Award by Preservation Massachusetts. The College was one of three schools recognized in the “Campus Commitment for Revitalization” category, which highlighted projects that demonstrated an institution’s “commitment to community by incorporating educational facilities within the community fabric.”


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2011-2021—THE SECOND DECADE: BUILDING ON SUCCESS TO SECURE EMMANUEL COLLEGE’S FUTURE A new Endowment Campus opportunity on an enhanced Parcel C, through a PDA Development Plan, will enable Emmanuel College to advance its educational mission, by providing the financial stability to further enhance the Academic Campus, while at the same time increase the city of Boston’s overall prosperity. The additional research facility on the Endowment Campus will further reinforce the LMA and Boston’s role as a leading center of biomedical research. The additional collaborative teaching and research facilities that are planned will enable the College to take a leadership role in a new era of learning. Proposed developments include Julie Hall North, an approximately 450-bed residential building that will maintain the College’s priority of housing 75 percent of its students on campus. The ground level of this building will increase student dining areas and kitchen space, as well as provide meeting space for student organizations. The upper floors will feature new dorm space with a variety of room layouts, including both suites and traditional corridor-style dorms. A selection of attractive housing options will encourage students to remain on campus. The existing Cardinal Cushing Library will also undergo extensive renovation, adding a 300+-seat auditorium, classrooms, faculty offices, and a series of informal meeting spaces to facilitate collaborative learning among students and faculty. Overall, the 2011 Master Plan goals are to: • • • • • •

Accommodate undergraduate growth to a 2,200 student campus Continue to house 75 percent of students on campus Leverage the Endowment Campus to support the academic mission Increase academic and student-life space to address current limitations Provide state-of-the-art learning spaces and technology Continue to enhance useable green space on campus

These goals have been shaped foremost by the increasingly sophisticated needs of students and the types of learning environments that will prepare them to succeed. These learning styles require a new generation of academic facilities characterized by multipurpose spaces for group activities; blended social/academic spaces; breakout spaces for study and project work; collaborative and interactive learning spaces; faculty technology training laboratories; and instructional tools extending beyond the classroom, including smartboards and video screens.


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Chapter 3

Campus profile

Campus history In 1919, the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, an international Catholic religious congregation, opened Emmanuel College as the first Catholic college for women in New England. Deeply committed to education, the Sisters founded the College to provide an education to women who might not otherwise have had the opportunity. For much of its history, Emmanuel served proudly as a Catholic liberal arts and sciences college for women and enjoyed a reputation for academic rigor and a commitment to social justice. The College attracted a talented and deeply committed faculty, whose legacy and service to Emmanuel’s mission is continued by a new generation of teacher-scholars who have witnessed the tremendous recent growth of the institution. Since becoming coeducational in 2000, Emmanuel has experienced an 11-fold increase in applications for admission and its enrollment has more than tripled to 1,750 traditional undergraduate students. Today, Emmanuel College is a vibrant, coeducational liberal arts and sciences institution that is still committed to educating students and challenging them to “become critical thinkers, ethical decision makers, and contributing members of the local community and the global society.”

Campus description The Emmanuel College campus is bounded by Brookline Avenue on the northwest, The Fenway on the northeast, Avenue Louis Pasteur on the east, and property belonging to other institutions (including Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard University, and the LMA) on the south. With Merck Research Laboratories-Boston on Endowment Parcel B, 12 buildings currently exist on campus.

Property and uses

ACADEMIC/STUDENT USES Academic instruction and research, administration, athletics, student residence, student life, endowment and parking all occur on the campus, distributed among campus buildings as follows:


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Building

Size (SF gross)*

Uses

Proposed changes/improvements during term of 2011 Master Plan

Administration Building Cardinal Cushing Library

119,353

No substantial change

51,782

Administration, chapel, academic, dining Library, academic

Maureen Murphy Wilkens Science Center Jean Yawkey Center and gymnasium

46,800

Academic, parking

41,231

Marian Hall

46,646

Student life, recreation, administration, athletics, parking Academic, dining

Julie Hall

54,500

Student residence

St. Joseph Hall

94,450

Student residence

St. Ann Hall

49,803

Student residence

Loretto Hall

57,190

Student residence

Modular Meeting Space

4 trailers

Academic

Total Existing – Academic Campus

561,755

New residence halls – 2000 IMP (permitted but not built, includes Fenway Residence Hall, permitted 2008)

296,700

Academic Campus

Net total permitted – Academic Campus * Figures are approximate

63,000 677,180

Student residence

Renovate portion of building; replace remainder with new building No substantial change No substantial change; connect with new adjacent building No substantial change; connect with new adjacent building New student residence hall and student life building No substantial change anticipated during term of 2011 IMP No substantial change anticipated during term of 2011 IMP No substantial change anticipated during term of 2011 IMP Remove; replace with landscaped area Longer-term development intent; would replace St. Joseph, St. Ann and Loretto Halls


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The 2000 IMP permitted a series of new student residence halls forming a new residential quadrangle between Brookline Avenue and Emmanuel’s Main Quadrangle, replacing St. Joseph, St. Ann and Loretto Halls (“Permitted Residential Quadrangle Project”). The Permitted Residential Quadrangle Project remains an important part of Emmanuel’s longer-term vision for the campus. As a step toward implementation of the Permitted Residential Quadrangle Project, Emmanuel had proposed the Fenway Residence Hall project, a new residence hall to contain approximately 211 student beds at the corner of Brookline Avenue and The Fenway. The project had received approval from the Boston Redevelopment Authority in July 2008 as being consistent with the planning for the Permitted Residential Quadrangle Project, but did not receive the endorsement from the Boston Parks & Recreation Commission. Although Emmanuel has retained the Fenway Residence Hall project as an approved project in this Master Plan, the actual implementation of the design for the Fenway Residence Hall project will ensure that it will be consistent with the design of the Permitted Residential Quadrangle Project. ENDOWMENT USES / ENDOWMENT PARCELS: The successful development of Merck Research Laboratories-Boston through the 2000 Institutional Master Plan reflects both the significant contribution that it has provided to the LMA and the city of Boston and the importance of the Endowment Campus to Emmanuel College’s future. In 2003 and 2007, MASCO revealed that pressures for additional biomedical research space in the LMA will continue to grow and Avenue Louis Pasteur serves as the ideal location for this growth. Building on Parcel A as permitted and Parcel C as enhanced through a PDA Development Plan can successfully replicate the model that Merck Laboratories-Boston established. Emmanuel’s proposed new 360,000 SF research facility on Parcel C, through a PDA Development Plan, will provide an important additional growth opportunity for LMA research enterprises and associated growth in jobs and city revenue. The development of the Endowment Campus has also benefitted the Emmanuel College community in many previously unforeseen ways. Through the College’s partnership with Merck, Emmanuel students have gained access to academic opportunities including the Merck Scholars Program and various internships, support for faculty-student research initiatives and student stipends for summer research projects, the use of cutting-edge research equipment donated to the College by Merck Research Laboratories, and the monthly Emmanuel/Merck Joint Science Seminar Series. The Endowment Campus revenue created from Parcel C would enable further the advancement of Emmanuel College’s programs. Parcel A: Permitted for 168,300 SF of private-sector research use as part of the 2000 IMP, Parcel A has not yet been redeveloped and is presently used as a surface parking lot. The development plan for Parcel A will not change. Parcel B: Permitted for private-sector research use as part of the 2000 IMP, this site was developed in 2004 with a new 11-story, 300,000 SF research building as Merck Research Laboratories-Boston. Parcel C: Parcel C is presently occupied by Alumnae Hall, a parking deck and surface parking. Alumnae Hall has been renovated since 2000 and has been used both as swing space for academic functions during building renovation projects on the Academic Campus, and as space for lease to other LMA institutions. Parking in the deck and surface lot behind Alumnae Hall is leased to other LMA institutions. A PDA Development Plan anticipates replacing both Alumnae Hall and the existing parking with a new 360,000 SF research building on Parcel C.


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Endowment campus Parcel

Permitted size (SF gross)*

Uses

A (permitted but not

168,300

Research , office

324,000

Research, office

141,400

Research, office

built) B (Merck Research Laboratories, built) C** (site of existing Alumnae Hall and parking deck)

Proposed changes/improvements during term of 2011 Master Plan Replace with new research building No substantial change Replace with new research building**

Total permitted – 633,700 Endowment Campus * Figures are approximate ** Parcel C development will be subject to a PDA Development Plan

Programs of study

UNDERGRADUATE Emmanuel College offers six degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Education, and Master of Science. Degrees are offered to traditional undergraduate students in more than 40 majors, minors and concentrations. Majors, Minors and Areas of Study Accounting American Politics & Government American Studies Art History Art Therapy Biochemistry Biology Biostatistics Catholic Studies Chemistry Communication, Media and Cultural Studies Counseling & Health Crime & Justice Developmental Psychology Economics Education – Elementary and Secondary English Forensic Science Gender & Women’s Studies Global Studies & International Affairs Graphic Design & Technology Health Care Health Sciences

History Human Services Information Technology International Relations & Comparative Politics Latin American Studies Literature Management Mathematics Music Music-Theater Neuroscience Organizational Leadership Performing Arts Philosophy Photography Political Science Psychology Social Inequality & Social Justice Sociology Spanish Sport Management Studio Art Theater Arts Theology & Religious Studies Writing and Literature


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Other Academic Opportunities: Individualized Majors Pre-Professional Preparation: Pre-Medical Pre-Veterinary Pre-Dental Pre-Law GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS For more than 30 years, Emmanuel College has offered fully accredited degree and certificate programs designed for working professionals. Graduate and Professional Programs is the home of the College’s graduate programs, Arts and Sciences Summer Term, and programs designed to assist working professionals to complete an undergraduate degree. Programs are designed for part-time students and complement the schedule of those working full time. Degrees in Graduate and Professional Programs are offered in an accelerated seven-week-per-course format, and courses are instructed on campus or online. Emmanuel College is the school of choice in the Fenway area for nurses, educators, research administrators, biopharmaceutical leaders, human resource professionals and those who seek to earn degrees at a dynamic liberal arts institution. The programs include: • • •

Nursing (undergraduate program – RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing) Nursing* (graduate programs – Master of Science in Nursing with choices for specialization in) o Education o Management Management (graduate programs – Master of Science in Management with choices for specialization in) o Biopharmaceutical Leadership* o Management and Leadership o Research Administration Human Resources (graduate program – Master of Science in Human Resource Management)


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Education (graduate programs – with choices for specialization) o Master of Arts in Teaching o Master of Education in School Administration o Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Educational Leadership

*new for fall 2011 Emmanuel College has a unique mission of service to the community and encourages the diverse populations of students that have been attracted to the Graduate and Professional Programs. Due to this, it has a number of scholarship opportunities for certain audiences, such as teachers of the Boston Public Schools and Catholic schools, nurses at Catholic hospitals, and those who serve the community, such as volunteers with the Notre Dame Mission Volunteers and City Year participants. In addition, through Employer Connect, Emmanuel College works in partnership with employers for multiple workforce development efforts. Examples of these employer partnerships include: Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Merck Research Laboratories-Boston and Harvard University. ATHLETICS The College promotes strong athletic competition and high academic standards for their student athletes in order to develop the whole person both on and off the playing fields. Affiliated with the Great Northeast Athletic Conference, the College offers 17 varsity sports including lacrosse, soccer, softball, basketball, volleyball and track and field. In the 2010-2011 academic year, 54 Emmanuel student athletes were named Division III GNAC Academic AllConference, each having earned a minimum 3.25 cumulative GPA, a varsity letter and academic standing as a sophomore. The College has made a substantial investment in its facilities to support the athletic program. The Jean Yawkey Center, constructed in 2004, is a comprehensive athletic facility housing the gymnasium (with an NCAA-regulation basketball and volleyball court and bleacher seating capacity of 1400), fitness center, locker rooms and an athletic training room. Newly renovated Clemente Field is also home to the Emmanuel Saints and features an NCAAregulation synthetic turf field, which accommodates regulation softball, soccer and lacrosse, while also serving as a practice field for Boston Latin School’s football team. The complex also features a three-lane rubberized track, providing practice areas for track and field for both Emmanuel students and other area schools. The track also remains open to the public for recreational walking and jogging year-round. St. Joseph Residence Hall is also home to a newly updated fitness center, equipped with cardiovascular machines, circuit training and free weights.


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Emmanuel College students participate in the following NCAA Division III athletic programs: NCAA Division III Teams Women’s Teams  Basketball  Cross Country  Indoor Track and Field  Lacrosse  Outdoor Track and Field  Soccer  Softball  Tennis  Volleyball 

Men’s Teams  Basketball  Cross Country  Golf  Indoor Track and Field  Lacrosse  Outdoor Track and Field  Soccer  Volleyball   

In addition to Division III varsity competition, Emmanuel College students also have the opportunity to participate in club sport activities and intramural sports with the Colleges of the Fenway.


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Chapter 4

Emmanuel College’s neighborhood context

Introduction Emmanuel College has been proud to call the Longwood Medical and Academic Area (LMA) its home since the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur founded the College in 1919. Emmanuel continues to leverage its location within the LMA, with its commitment to advancing biomedical research on both the Academic Campus and the Endowment Campus, through its relationship with Merck & Co., Inc. and its PDA Development Plan proposed development on Endowment Parcel C. The partnership with Merck has provided the LMA with a leading global pharmaceutical research facility in Merck Research LaboratoriesBoston, while also providing the College’s students with invaluable opportunities for scholarships and internships, as well as access to state-of-the art equipment donated by Merck. Emmanuel has also maintained strong relationships with the surrounding neighborhoods of The Fenway, Audubon Circle and Mission Hill, connecting the neighborhoods to the LMA through programs such as the Center for Science Education, which educate local youth in potential future career opportunities that may exist in the LMA. Other collaborative initiatives through the Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership, Carolyn A. Lynch Institute and the Campus Ministry Office also help to bring the community and the LMA together. LONGWOOD MEDICAL AND ACADEMIC AREA The 213-acre LMA, bounded by The Riverway, The Fenway, and Huntington Avenue, comprises one of the premier medical, research, academic and cultural communities in the world. This district of 23 leading institutions and organizations (including Emmanuel College) is also one of Boston’s most important engines for economic development, job creation and education. More than 40,000 people work within the LMA, 18,000 students attend school in the community, and more than one million patients visit the area’s hospitals for medical care each year. The institutions that make up this relatively small part of Boston generate more than $5 billion in annual revenues and have a combined payroll of more than $1.8 billion. Colleges of The Fenway An equally important example of the type of collaborative organization that nurtures the great benefits of interpersonal and interdisciplinary partnerships in an urban area is the Colleges of The Fenway. Emmanuel College is a founding member of this consortium of area schools which includes Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Simmons College, Wentworth Institute of Technology, and Wheelock College. One of the major advantages to students within the Colleges of the Fenway is the ability to cross-register. Cross-registration provides full-time undergraduates of the Colleges of the Fenway with the opportunity to take two courses per semester at any of the six institutions at no additional tuition charge. This provides students with advantages of a small college, but exposes them to resources similar to a large university, enabling students to broaden both their intellectual


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and social capacities, and introduces them to faculty, research, colleagues and curricula they would not otherwise have experienced. On average, 300 students have cross-registered each semester since the consortium’s inception. The consortium also provides Emmanuel College with the opportunity to share facilities at other schools and to share its resources with other institutions in the group. In this way, these colleges may avoid duplicating costly services and facilities and build on each institution’s strengths and resources. For instance, students at other colleges frequently make use of Emmanuel College’s dining and recreation facilities. In addition to saving resources, the enhanced opportunities of social interaction among the students of different institutions reinforce Emmanuel College’s commitment to creating a more diverse educational and social environment. Harvard Medical School, Teaching Hospitals, and Research Institutions The Harvard Medical School, schools of Dental Medicine and Public Health, as well as five major Harvard teaching hospitals and health facilities care for approximately half of all patients seeking hospital-based care in the city of Boston. These facilities are consistently ranked as the top hospitals in the United States. Emmanuel College’s nursing and executive education programs complement these institutions by providing a component of the workforce training necessary to build the skill sets of some employees. Cultural Institutions The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in the Fenway neighborhood is located within short walking distance of Emmanuel College. The museum houses an art collection of world importance, including significant examples of European, Asian and American art, from paintings and sculpture to tapestries and decorative arts. It is the only private art collection in which the building, collection, and installations are the creation of one individual. Also within walking distance is the recently expanded Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. It contains over 450,000 works of art, making it one of the most comprehensive collections in the Americas. Emmanuel College students can gain access to both of these important institutions by using their Emmanuel ID card. Primary/Secondary Schools Within the LMA There are several primary and secondary schools located within the LMA. Boston Latin School, founded in 1635, is not only the oldest public school in America but also continues to rank academically as one of the best. It is a six-year college-preparatory school that focuses on a classical tradition for education. The Winsor School is an independent day school for girls in grades 5-12 that also has a strong academic record. The school enrolls approximately 430 students that come from more than 50 different communities in and around the city of Boston. In the spring of 2005, Emmanuel College collaborated with Fenway High School, one of Boston’s small pilot schools, to create a Dual Enrollment Program. The program builds confidence and contributes to the academic success of urban high school students by providing the opportunity to enroll in undergraduate courses at the College for high school and college credit at no cost. Emmanuel also partners with Fenway High School to provide professional development courses and workshops that focus on standards-based education and the critical areas of literacy and mathematics. The College provides students from the nearby primary and secondary school with access to the Yawkey Center gymnasium. The investment made in the Roberto Clemente Field through Emmanuel College and the Yawkey Foundation’s partnership with the City of Boston has provided for a significantly improved field for Boston Latin School’s athletics. Medical, Academic, and Scientific Community Organization (MASCO) MASCO, of which Emmanuel College, along with 23 LMA institutions, is an active member, is a nonprofit organization established by its member institutions with the mission to plan, develop and enhance the LMA for the benefit of the general public and its members. MASCO and its affiliates, MASCO Services, Inc., the Longwood Medical Area Child Care Center, and Colleges of the Fenway, offer a wide


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range of services including area planning and development, parking and transportation services, group purchasing, shared business services, telecommunications and child care. MASCO’s mission is to pursue programs that promote a sense of community among its members and create and deliver services more effectively provided on a shared basis. For over 40 years, this type of cross-institutional sharing has been an ongoing priority for the Fenway area. SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOODS The Fenway Neighborhood The Fenway neighborhood is located to the north and east of Emmanuel College. The area is often divided into East Fenway and West Fenway, with the Back Bay Fens and Muddy River running through the middle. The predominant building type is five- to six-story apartment buildings that were primarily constructed between 1880 and 1930, and several small retail establishments exist throughout the neighborhoods. The 2007 version of the Fenway Urban Village Plan identified five components that focused on building a robust and welcoming community: a sufficient and varied housing supply; access to public transportation and strategies to curb vehicular traffic; community-building facilities; a healthy business community; and access to quality open space. In the last few years, development in The Fenway has been increasing and is reflective of the business goals set forth in the plan. Recent developments include the renovation of the Landmark Center; the 2003 addition of Hotel Commonwealth that replaced a number of mixed-use buildings in Kenmore Square; and the 576-unit, 17-floor Trilogy apartment building on Brookline Avenue and Boylston Street, part of which includes housing for both Harvard affiliates as well as income-certified Boston residents. The increased retail presence along Boylston Street and its evolution into a more walkable neighborhood main street has had a profound impact on the work/social patterns of Emmanuel College students. It has become a primary destination, and the students’ presence contributes to the growing vitality of this area. The Back Bay Fens, a component of the Emerald Necklace system of parks and boulevards that was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted in 1879, is the neighborhood’s most important open space/recreational resource and provides a beautiful wooded setting for Emmanuel College’s front door. Included within the Back Bay Fens are the oldest remaining wartime Victory Gardens planted by citizens; the Kelleher Rose Garden; and World War II, Korean and Vietnam War memorials. It also includes the recently renovated Roberto Clemente Field, an important community athletic resource. In 2001, the Emerald Necklace Master Plan was updated, and set out to clearly define an action plan for each portion of the park system. An initiative for restoring the historic Olmsted Muddy River Park and Parklands that began in the late 1970s and 1980s is now nearing the construction phase. A key component, under the authority of the Army Corps of Engineers, includes not only protection from a 20-year flood event, but also the restoration of The Fens so that it will be closer in general landscape, bridges, and plantings to the original Frederick Law Olmsted design. Currently, in the area near the Landmark Center (also known as the Sears Rotary), where The Riverway, The Fenway, Park Drive, Brookline Avenue and Boylston Street all converge, the Muddy River disappears under the roadways into two 8-foot-wide culverts. As part of the project, the river will once again see daylight while flowing through new, wider culverts as water makes its way to the Charles. Work on the project is scheduled to begin during the summer of 2011. When completed, the project will transform a major gateway to Emmanuel College. Audubon Circle The Circle is a small historic residential neighborhood located between Brookline on the west, Kenmore and Fenway Park on the east, the Massachusetts Turnpike and Boston University to the north, and the Back Bay Fens to the south. The neighborhood is known for the diversity of its residents which includes


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renters, young legal and medical professionals residing in new high-rise apartment buildings, and families whose roots in the neighborhood go back generations. Audubon Circle has a number of restaurants and retail shops in the neighborhood that are frequented by Emmanuel College students. Mission Hill Mission Hill is a one-square-mile neighborhood located to the south of Emmanuel College. It is generally bounded by Columbus Avenue and the Roxbury neighborhood to the east, Longwood Avenue to the northeast and The Riverway/Jamaicaway and the town of Brookline to the west. Approximately threequarters of this neighborhood is residential and made-up of privately owned one- to three-family buildings as well as a number of multi-family buildings built from the 1940s through the 1960s. Mission Hill’s 18,000 residents are racially and economically diverse, and over the years have developed strong relationships with Emmanuel College and its students.

Emmanuel students dedicate their time to OLPH Mission Grammar School, volunteering on the annual New Student Day of Service and the annual Spring Day of Service, and members of the Education Club interact with Mission Grammar students in their after school program. Emmanuel College and the Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership also provide gym space for practice and home games during the OLPH Mission Saints boys’ basketball season as part of Emmanuel’s youth program. The College is also involved with Sociedad Latina, an organization that cultivates leaders among Latino youth. Each year, The Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership provides a yearlong, selective, paid internship at Sociedad Latina to work with youth on education reform, advocacy and community organizing. Emmanuel College sponsors Sociedad Latina’s annual Three Kings Day Celebration, which commemorates the Biblical story of the three kings who followed the star of Bethlehem to bring gifts to the Christ child. The College also supports the Mission Possible! College Access Program, which makes higher education a reality for some of Boston’s most at-risk youth, through a blend of academic and college access support, workforce development opportunities, case management and parent engagement activities. Each year, the program serves 85 Mission Hill youth, ages 14-21. Emmanuel College also supports ABCD Parker Hill/Fenway Neighborhood Service Center in its SummerWorks program. The program provides low-income local youth, ages 14-21, with meaningful summer jobs, education, and counseling and leadership training. Each year, Emmanuel sponsors the placement of several youth at participating worksites, creating a strong partnership between young residents of the neighborhood and the surrounding institutions.


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Chapter 5

Campus planning framework

Introduction The 2000 IMP continues to shape the campus trajectory moving forward. A key portion of the plan states that “Since Emmanuel College first opened its doors in 1919, the LMA has grown behind it and the skyline of Boston has grown in front of it. Emmanuel College’s campus must strike a balance among its various roles in the community: as a key contributor to the setting for the historic Fens; as a community of learning—a contemplative space for learning, living and enjoying community; and as an architectural moderator between the intensity of the LMA and the green space of the Back Bay Fens.” This continues to be an important role that the Emmanuel College campus will play, and the strategic plan for the 17-acre campus reflects this balance. The proposed 2011 IMP builds on this strong foundation. Overall, the central planning and design principles that will shape the planning process are: • • • •

Programming that mixes formal and informal learning spaces Transparency that communicates the discovery, excitement and social interaction within every building Architecture that honors Emmanuel College’s historic Administration Building and expresses Emmanuel College’s vitality Urban design that expresses the BRA’s guidelines and integrates Emmanuel College more fully into its LMA and Fenway setting

Importantly, the resulting projects shaped by these goals will also reflect the existing surrounding context. ZONING/REGULATORY CONTEXT Emmanuel College’s 2011 IMP incorporates the letter and spirit of the institutional zoning and planning guidelines put forth by the BRA and other city agencies, as well as the community planning initiatives over the past decade. LMA Interim Guidelines (2003) In 2002, the BRA and the Office of Jobs and Community Services (OJCS), in conjunction with the Boston Transportation Department (BTD) initiated a master planning process for the LMA. In 2003, the BRA adopted a set of LMA Interim Guidelines to inform the BRA’s considerations while reviewing proposed projects pursuant to Article 80 of the Boston Zoning Code.


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The Interim Guidelines are designed to accomplish the following: • • • • • •

Require institutions and developers contemplating development in the LMA to comply with certain fundamental principles of good planning in the areas of transportation, urban design and workforce development as described herein; Accommodate near-term institutional growth while addressing residents’ concerns for quality of life and employment opportunities by overlaying specific development guidelines regarding transportation, urban design and workforce development; Control growth in the LMA to create a better physical environment and a raised quality of life through improvements in the public realm and an enhanced transportation infrastructure; Set a new standard in how development will improve Boston residents’ opportunities for jobs, housing, education and business development; Provide the immediate context within which a long-term master plan for the LMA will be developed through an approximately 18-month public process; and Protect the viability of the LMA for the future by managing growth in the near-term, while encouraging institutional growth and opportunities in other locations suitable to accommodate and benefit from these industries.

Emmanuel College has adhered to these guidelines in its planning efforts since they were adopted and will continue to do so during the 2011 IMP process. The Fenway Urban Village Plan The Urban Village Plan, completed in 1999 and updated in 2008, is a neighborhood based, smart-growth plan created by the Fenway Community Development Corporation. Its purpose is to transform the neighborhood into an urban village that they define as “a self-sustaining environment where people can live, work, shop, and entertain in a single urban area.” The plan identifies the following five components necessary to achieve the vision of the plan:

• • • • •

A sufficient and varied housing supply Excellent access to public transportation and curbs on vehicular traffic Community-building facilities such as a community center A healthy business community serving local residents and visitors alike, while providing employment opportunities Easy access to open space and a responsible level of impact upon the environment

Emmanuel College recognizes the importance of supporting the vision of the neighborhood, and in fact, many of Emmanuel College’s own planning goals correlate well with them. These include investments in public open space, increasing on-campus housing and strengthening relationships with the local business community. Emerald Necklace Master Plan The Emerald Necklace is a series of interconnected parks and boulevards that includes the Back Bay Fens, which provides a gracious and verdant setting for Emmanuel’s “front door” to the city. The Emerald Necklace extends in two directions from the Back Bay Fens to include the Boston Common, Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Jamaica Pond, Arnold Arboretum and Franklin Park. This system of open spaces is the backbone of Boston’s park resources, and it has earned national and international recognition for its landscape design and value to its urban context. Developed between 1878 and 1895 by the firm of Frederick Law Olmsted, the Emerald Necklace has been appreciated by residents, students and visitors for


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well over 100 years. However, the system has also experienced neglect and certain levels of disinvestment over this time period. Emmanuel College’s planning is consistent with all guidelines and principles set by the LMA, the Fenway Community Development Corporation and the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, including the College’s continued support of the Kelleher Rose Garden and the maintenance of Roberto Clemente Field.


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USE AND ACTIVITY The map below highlights current locations of key activities, including academic/administration, student housing, student life/dining, endowment campus, parking, landscaped areas and servicing. The map on the following page indicates activity locations associated with currently permitted buildings. Maps on subsequent locations show activities associated with Emmanuel’s intentions for the next 10 years and beyond. Parcel C will be developed as a PDA Development Plan and subject to a PDA overlay district designation.

Campus activity locations – existing Emmanuel’s campus contains a mix of uses supporting its core academic activities – academic instruction, student housing, student life – and endowment campus uses that provide financial support for the academic mission.


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Campus activity locations – Permitted per 2000 IMP


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Campus activity locations – 10-year timeframe The proposed campus master plan maintains the mix and locations of campus uses present today


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Campus activity locations – Longer term


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ACCESS The sole regular vehicular access point to Emmanuel College is via The Fenway. Emergency access is also possible from Brookline Avenue via the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s East Campus and from Blackfan Street. Pedestrian access occurs from multiple points, including from The Fenway, Blackfan Street and (via gated walks as part of the COF path) Avenue Louis Pasteur and Brookline Avenue. Two branches of the MBTA Green Line rapid transit provide service to the Emmanuel College campus area. The “E” Branch of the Green Line provides service along Huntington Avenue between Lechmere and Heath Street. It provides service to Downtown Boston and has connections to the Red, Blue and Orange lines. The “E” Branch includes the LMA stop at the intersection of Longwood Avenue and Huntington Avenue, and the Museum of Fine Arts stop at the intersection of Huntington Avenue and Ruggles Street. The stops are located approximately a third of a mile from the Emmanuel College campus. The campus is also served by the “D” Branch of the Green Line which runs outbound along The Riverway from Kenmore Station. It connects Lechmere and Riverside and provides the same rapid transit connection as the “E” Branch. The Fenway station is located about a quarter of a mile from the campus. Also nearby are Ruggles Station on the Orange Line, three Commuter Rail lines that stop at that station, and Yawkey Station on the Framingham-Worcester Commuter Rail Line. In addition, eight MBTA bus routes currently provide service to The Fenway and Emmanuel College, and MASCO operates an extensive LMA Shuttle network making important connections from the LMA to a variety of transit stations and other destinations.


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Campus access: Regular campus vehicular access occurs solely via Emmanuel’s driveway on The Fenway. Additional emergency access is possible via the adjacent Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center property. Pedestrian access occurs via primary entrances from The Fenway and Blackfan Street and via secondary Engagement Gateways on Brookline Avenue and Avenue Louis Pasteur.


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Campus access - 2000 IMP


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Campus access – Proposed plan; 10-year timeframe


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Campus access – Proposed plan; longer term


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BUILDING HEIGHT AND MASSING Emmanuel College intends to follow the LMA Interim Guidelines and future institutional projects are designed to meet these conditions. Consistent building edge and massing will be maintained along perimeter streets (Brookline Avenue, Avenue Louis Pasteur and The Fenway). Buildings along the perimeter (including Blackfan Street) are designed to have strong visual and access connections to the streets. The greater building heights will be located in two successive tiers toward the southwest edge of campus to minimize any shadow and visual impacts. The successive tiers can also create a gradual transition from lower heights along The Fenway to the greater heights toward the interior of the LMA along Blackfan Street.

Height and setback requirements: The LMA Interim Guidelines and Fenway design guidelines establish building height and setback requirements affecting the campus.


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LANDSCAPE The master plan emphasizes two distinct types of landscaped spaces that are critical to Emmanuel College’s relationship with its surroundings and to the life of its community of learning. First, a dignified, green lawn and iron fence define the campus perimeter along its major adjoining streets: Brookline Avenue, The Fenway and Avenue Louis Pasteur. The plan reinforces visual connections into and across this green perimeter both from the adjoining streets and from campus buildings and open spaces. In particular, the redevelopment of portions of Cardinal Cushing Library will create prominent glazed façade areas at the corner of The Fenway and Avenue Louis Pasteur, and the new Julie Hall North building will add large ground-floor windows displaying active meeting space along Brookline Avenue. Second, the master plan shapes a series of interconnected outdoor “rooms” framed by buildings in traditional collegiate fashion. Since 2000, Emmanuel College’s main quadrangle has been significantly enhanced as a center of campus life by placing buildings adjacent to it that link indoor and outdoor activity through transparency. The Yawkey Center connects meeting, dining, recreation and social spaces to the quadrangle through generous glazing and multiple entrances, and has thus become the favorite gathering place on campus. The Wilkens Science Center likewise uses extensive glazing to reveal science teaching and research to the quadrangle, while embellishing the laboratories with the quadrangle’s abundant greenery and daylight. The 2011 Master Plan builds upon this success in several ways: •

Expanding the perceived size of the main quadrangle by consolidating and landscaping surface parking and driveways. Parking along St. Ann Hall will be laid out more efficiently, with pathways and trees incorporated into its design. This will draw St. Ann Hall and the Administration Building further into the life of the quadrangle and provide space for a more prominent pedestrian walk linking the quadrangle with The Fenway. Restoring green rooms among existing residence halls. The 2000 IMP identified a residential quadrangle framed by new residence halls. The 2011 IMP continues to anticipate this West Quadrangle as a long-term goal, but identifies the following improvements as higher priorities within the next 10 years. Julie Hall North will create a new southern face to this green space and ultimately to the larger, longer-term West Quadrangle. The existing driveway and turnaround between St. Ann, St. Joseph and Julie Halls will be replaced with landscaped outdoor plaza areas designed for student use. Walks will be designed for occasional vehicular use to accommodate servicing, student move-in and move-out, and emergency access, but their appearance will clearly signal their primary purpose as places for people. Creating an East Quadrangle. This area of the campus has been enhanced with a new walkway and drive configuration as well as the façade of the Wilkens Science Center, which architecturally complements the Administration Building. The area will become a true, inviting outdoor room by replacing modular classrooms with landscaping and framing the space with a highly transparent


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addition to the Cardinal Cushing Library. This new outdoor space will not only add opportunity for outdoor activity, but also improve the quality of connections from within the campus to Blackfan Street, Avenue Louis Pasteur and The Fenway.

Existing campus landscape framework


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Campus landscape framework (per 2000 IMP)


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Campus landscape framework (10-year timeframe): Campus open spaces and buildings are organized around four main internal green spaces and lawns along adjacent public streets.


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Proposed campus landscape framework (longer term)


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SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Emmanuel College is committed to becoming a more environmentally sustainable institution. In September 2010, Sr. Janet Eisner signed the American Colleges and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment in an effort to work toward climate neutrality. In response, the College evaluated its operations in order to improve and expand upon its current sustainability initiatives. Such efforts have resulted in an increase in the amount of recycled materials diverted from the general waste stream and selection as a pilot site to test reusability of office supply packaging. Future goals include: • •

Enhancing faculty and student learning by encouraging research and developing academic programs, internships, and extra-curricular activities focused on sustainability Pursuing sustainable practices that may result in benefits such as a healthier learning and work environment and financial savings: o Green construction and master plan implementation o Efficient water and energy usage o Composting o Encouraging use of walking, transit and biking as alternatives to driving for staff and students ƒ Full-time Emmanuel employees are offered a 65 percent subsidy on monthly MBTA passes. ƒ Colleges of the Fenway is one of 11 sponsors of Hubway, a new bicycle-sharing program under Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s Boston Bikes Program, which aims to encourage Boston-area residents and commuters to adopt a strong commitment to healthy transportation options. Hubway will launch in the summer 2011. Evaluating and increasing the sustainable impact of existing programs (i.e. employee benefits, food, landscaping, and planning and policy)

These goals, coupled with Emmanuel’s “green” accomplishments to date, direct the College to focus on high-quality, high-density, and high-value development. The College strives to accomplish this through the creation of sustainable buildings and landscapes that meet LEED standards.


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Chapter 6

Proposed future IMP projects

Introduction Under the 2000 Institutional Master Plan, Emmanuel College pioneered the creation of an Endowment Campus concept and several new buildings that redefined the College campus. The following proposed future IMP projects continue this trajectory and will further ensure Emmanuel College’s success going forward. ACADEMIC/ STUDENT PROJECTS Overall, the College has planned 259,000 SF of new academic and student life facilities, including an expanded and renovated library, new dining and social space, and a residence hall. Two planned projects will provide the flexibility to accommodate these uses. These projects will ensure Emmanuel College’s commitment to its mission and continued efforts towards maintaining a high percentage of on-campus students, as well as enhancing overall campus life. Table 6-1: Academic campus * Building Existing building floor area (SF)

Existing building floor area to be removed (SF) 17,800

New building floor area (SF)

Total permitted campus building floor area (SF) 561,755 241,200 802,955

FAR

Total building floor area SF)

Building Heights

Cardinal Cushing 51,800 76,000 110,000 75 ft. Library Julie Hall North 0 0 183,000 183,000 75 ft., 150 ft. Total 259,000 293,000 *Figures are approximate Development of these two buildings will change the Academic campus-wide FAR calculation from 1.06 to 1.52 as detailed in the following table. Table 6-2: Academic campus FAR Land area basis for FAR calculation (SF) (approximate)

Existing Net additional Planned

528,000 0 528,000

1.06 1.52


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Existing Campus


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Permitted campus plan (per 2000 IMP and updates)


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2011 Master Plan: Emmanuel anticipates developing the Cardinal Cushing Library Academic Expansion and the Julie North residence hall over the next 10 years


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JULIE NORTH 

Longer-term site plan: Beyond a 10-year timeframe, Emmanuel anticipates rebuilding existing residence halls to create a new residential quadrangle based on the 2000 IMP


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Cardinal Cushing Library Site location and approximate building footprint

The existing main building along The Fenway, which primarily contains library stacks (approximate footprint of 11,388 SF), will be renovated. Demolition, reconstruction and expansion will take place along the southeastern portion of the existing building facing Avenue Louis Pasteur (approximate existing footprint 6,800 SF; approximate new footprint 14,000 SF). Gross floor area, impacts on existing building, and principal uses

The new portion of the building will contain a 300+ seat auditorium, which will replace a smaller existing one. In addition, there will be classrooms, faculty offices, and a series of informal meeting spaces placed prominently at the corner of The Fenway and Avenue Louis Pasteur. The existing building, approximately 51,800 SF in size, will be reduced in size through demolition of approximately 17,800 SF, and the remaining portion of approximately 34,000 SF will be renovated. The building will be expanded with an addition of approximately 76,000 SF for a total building area of approximately 110,000 SF and a net increase of approximately 58,200 SF. Building height

The building height will be up to six stories with a height of 75 feet. Design approach

The architecture of the new portion of the Cardinal Cushing Library will consciously complement the design of adjacent buildings of different eras and character: the portion of the library to remain, the Administration Building, and the Maureen Murphy Wilkens Science Center. The portion of Cardinal Cushing Library to remain, which features a grand two-story window onto The Fenway, will be preserved. Extensive glazing on the campus side of the building will frame the new East Quadrangle, promoting strong visual connections between interior teaching, faculty office and lounge spaces and exterior landscaped area. The existing blank walls facing Avenue Louis Pasteur will be replaced with windows that create a sense of interest and promote pedestrian safety by putting more “eyes on the street.” Parking areas or facilities to be provided

There will be no new parking facilities provided. Current planning controls of site

According to the LMA Interim Guidelines, there is a 75’ height limit and 40’ setback from Avenue Louis Pasteur. Both of these conditions will be met.

Site Plan: The plan retains the existing portion of Cardinal Cushing Library facing The Fenway, and replaces the portion of the building facing Avenue Louis Pasteur within an Academic Expansion Building


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Proposed and existing views of Cardinal Cushing Library and Academic Expansion at the corner of The Fenway and Avenue Louis Pasteur


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Street elevation: Fenway

Street elevation: Avenue Louis Pasteur Proposed building elevations respond to height, materials and other characteristics of adjacent existing buildings on The Fenway and Avenue Louis Pasteur


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Julie Hall North Site location and approximate building footprint

Julie Hall North will be located between Julie Hall and the Jean Yawkey Center. It will extend along the existing north façade of Julie Hall to Brookline Avenue and have a total footprint approximately 20,250 SF. Gross floor area, impacts on existing building and principal uses

The ground level of the new building would significantly expand Emmanuel’s student dining areas and related servery and kitchen space, which are located directly adjacent in the Jean Yawkey Center and Marian Hall. This will add critical new dining and kitchen capacity to the campus and deliver more diverse options for the students. The ground floor would also contain meeting space for student organizations, academic, student life and outreach activities. Portions of the second floor would contain additional spaces serving a variety of meeting and teaching needs. The balance of the second floor and the upper floors would contain approximately 450 new student beds in a variety of room formats, as well as associated social and living/learning spaces. Gross building area would total approximately 183,000 SF. The makeup of the room choices will be a mix of suite options along with traditional corridor-style dorms. Building height

The building will be 14 stories with a height of 150 feet. Design approach

The lower levels of the building facing northeast would continue the architectural precedent of the adjacent Yawkey Center: extensive glazing creating strong visual connections between the interior student life and meeting spaces and the exterior landscaped spaces. This transparency will further reinforce student life by displaying student activity and promoting opportunity for students to engage with each other and with faculty. The northeast façade of the building will form an active edge to Emmanuel’s main residential quadrangle. Julie Hall North would replace the planned building forming the southwest edge of this quadrangle in the 2000 IMP. Lower floors of Julie Hall North facing Brookline Avenue would also feature extensive glazing at ground floor level to reveal activity to the broader community, and to improve the pedestrian environment on Brookline Avenue with visual interest and “eyes on the street.” The upper floors of this volume would feature a mix of glazed and opaque surfaces, bringing a new face to the street while keeping in scale with adjacent St. Joseph Hall. The building volume rising above 75 feet will feature significant amounts of glazing that provide views into and out of a variety of student living and learning spaces. These spaces would accommodate a variety of activities such as group and individual study, computer use and arts activities. The volume will be especially visible from portions of The Fenway and Park Drive near Brookline Avenue. It will serve as a public landmark welcoming people not only to Emmanuel College but also to the LMA as a whole. The intermediate height of this volume, between the lower buildings along The Fenway and existing taller buildings along Blackfan Street and on the BIDMC campus, will help bring architectural coherence among these different scales. The building’s materials will also mark a transition between the predominant masonry of existing foreground buildings, as well as Emmanuel’s Administration Building and the extensive glazing of the LMA’s research facilities along Blackfan Street. Special attention will be given to the building’s profile against the sky and against neighboring tall buildings. Parking areas or facilities to be provided

There will be no new parking facilities provided. Current planning controls of site

According to the LMA Interim Guidelines, there is a 25-foot setback from Brookline Avenue. Behind this setback there is a 75’ height limit within 100 feet of Brookline Avenue, a 150’ height limit over most of the


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balance of the building site, and a small portion of the site with a 205’ height limit. The new building will conform to these limits.

Site Plan: Julie Hall North will be located between the existing Julie Hall and Marian/Yawkey buildings

Street elevation view: Julie Hall North will enhance the existing Brookline Avenue pedestrian gate with a prominent building volume.


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View from Brookline Ave: Julie Hall North will include ground-level windows enclosing active meeting space, and will frame views to internal campus quadrangles

Existing view from Brookline Ave


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PARKING As currently contemplated within this IMPNF, Emmanuel proposes the development of approximately 241,200 GSF of net-new development on its Academic Campus with no net-new parking spaces.

.


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CHAPTER 7

Transportation

Introduction The Emmanuel College Institutional Master Plan (IMP) projects exceed the thresholds for Large Project Review under Article 80D of the Boston Zoning Code. This chapter outlines the transportation development review component as required in those provisions.

Transportation This section presents an overview of the existing Emmanuel College transportation system and a summary of the planned Campus Improvement projects to be undertaken within the term of its IMP. As described in greater detail in previous chapters of this IMPNF, Emmanuel intends to construct projects on both its Academic and Endowment Campuses, including the reconstruction of the Cardinal Cushing Library and Julie Hall North, a residential building with an expanded dining space to support increased on-campus student housing initiatives. The first section provides a summary discussion of the proposed projects, which were described in detail previously in Chapter 6, Proposed Future IMP Projects. The second section briefly describes the existing transportation infrastructure at and around the Emmanuel College campus. This includes discussion of area roadways, parking, passenger drop-off/pick-up, loading activities, area public transportation options, and transportation demand management (TDM) actions that are proactively undertaken by Emmanuel. The third section provides a summary of parking modifications that are proposed in conjunction with the proposed IMP Projects. The final section provides a preliminary discussion of transportation-related construction management actions that will be employed at Emmanuel College. Note this document does not contain a detailed assessment of the transportation effects of the related projects. That assessment will be conducted as part of future Project Notification Form (PNF) and Draft Project Impact Report (DPIR) filings.


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PROPOSED IMP PROJECTS Emmanuel currently contemplates two projects, as illustrated previously in Chapter 6, during the term of this IMP, and summarized below in Table 7-1: TABLE 7-1 | Proposed Emmanuel College IMP Projects

Gross Square Area (SF) Total Net-New

Parking Spaces Total Net-New

Academic Campus Cardinal Cushing Library

76,000

58,200

0

0

Julie Hall North

183,000

183,000

0

0

259,000

241,200

0

0

Total

Academic Campus Projects On the Academic Campus, Emmanuel College proposes two projects, totaling approximately 259,000 SF of space, or 241,200 SF of net-new space (taking into consideration the proposed demolition of a portion of the existing Cardinal Cushing Library building). In connection with the proposed Academic Campus projects, Emmanuel plans to assess the viability to increase and improve usable landscaped areas within the main quadrangle and/or residence hall areas to support enhanced student life via improved pedestrian access and on-campus safety and increased total programmable on-campus green space. No new parking spaces are proposed to be constructed in connection with the Emmanuel Academic Campus projects. Future Transportation The following characterize future transportation at the Emmanuel College campus once the proposed Academic Campus projects are completed:

• •

The IMP includes the commitment to a relatively small increase in net-new parking on the Emmanuel Campus. At the end of the term of the IMP, Emmanuel proposes to add only 100 net-new parking spaces – or at a rate of only 0.22 parking spaces per 1,000 SF of development. As a direct result of this commitment, anticipated increases in traffic generation are expected to be low. Emmanuel’s two academic projects are intended to improve the student housing and life characteristics of the College – and Emmanuel students who reside on campus do not have parking privileges. Access to the Emmanuel Academic Campus will continue to be provided via a single point of access along The Fenway. This access point will continue to be used by Emmanuel faculty and staff, some students (those with driving/parking privileges), and loading and service activities that support ongoing College operations. Total parking supply on the Academic Campus will remain unchanged at 293 total spaces.

EXISTING TRANSPORTATION CONDITIONS This section provides a summary of existing transportation conditions at the Emmanuel College campus. Discussions include the following: • • • •

A discussion of available public transportation options to the campus; A description of the existing roadways that provide access to the campus; Summaries of on-site and off-site parking for Emmanuel students, staff and visitors; and Existing loading activities and deliveries.


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Public Transportation MBTA Services

Emmanuel College is well served by public transportation. The institution is located between the Heath Street branch (E Line) and the Riverside Branch (D Line) of the MBTA Green Line. The Heath Street branch runs from Lechmere Square in Cambridge to Heath Street in Jamaica Plain and includes nearby stops on Huntington Avenue at Longwood Avenue (LMA Station) and Ruggles Street (Museum of Fine Arts Station). The Riverside branch runs from Downtown Boston to Riverside Station in Newton and includes a stop near Longwood Avenue just west of the Muddy River (Longwood Station) and a stop to the northeast of the Sears Rotary (Fenway Station). Also nearby are Ruggles Station on the Orange Line, three Commuter Rail lines that stop at that station, and Yawkey Station on the Framingham-Worcester Commuter Rail Line. The MBTA also operates eight bus routes that provide service within one-half mile of Emmanuel College. Five of the eight routes travel along Brookline Avenue and provide stops in front of or very near Emmanuel College (Routes 8, 47, 60, 65 and CT2). The CT3 and 35 bus routes provide a stop on Avenue Louis Pasteur, also near the campus. A description of each of the MBTA bus routes is below: • • •

• •

Crosstown 2 (CT2) bus route operates on 20-minute headways between Kendall Square Station on the Red Line and Ruggles Station on the Orange Line. CT2 makes a stop on Brookline Avenue adjacent to Emmanuel College. Crosstown 3 (CT3) bus route operates on 20-minute headways between Brookline Avenue and Andrew Square Station on the Red Line in Dorchester. Route 8 operates on 20-minute intervals between Kenmore Square and Harbor Point in Dorchester, with high-frequency service between Kenmore Square and the Ruggles MBTA Orange Line/Commuter Rail Station during peak commuter periods. This route stops on Brookline Avenue adjacent to the campus. Route 39 provides service between the Forest Hill Station and Back Bay Station, both of which are on the MBTA Orange Line. It operates on four-minute headways during peak periods and seven-minute headways during off-peak periods. This route makes stops along Huntington Avenue. Route 47 provides service between Central Square and Broadway Stations on the MBTA Red Line via Ruggles Street Station on the MBTA Orange Line. It runs on 25-minute headways during peak hours and 45-minute headways during off-peak hours. This route stops on Brookline Avenue adjacent to the campus. Route 60 provides service between Chestnut Hill in Newton and Kenmore Square via Brookline Village Station on the MBTA Green Line – D Branch. The route operates on 18-minute headways during peak periods and on 30-minute headways during off-peak periods. This route stops on Brookline Avenue adjacent to the campus. Route 65 provides service between Harvard Square in Cambridge and Dudley Square and operates on 10-minute headways during peak periods and 15-minute headways during off-peak periods. This route stops on Brookline Avenue adjacent to the campus.

MASCO Shuttle Services

In addition to the MBTA bus routes, the Medical and Academic Area Scientific and Community Organization (MASCO) operates private shuttle services in the LMA. MASCO operates eight shuttle routes that provide service within one-half mile of the Emmanuel campus. •

Fenway Shuttle connects the LMA to the Kenmore lot. The route connects to the Landmark Center and Harvard Vanguard along Brookline Avenue. The shuttle operates on approximately 10-minute headway in the morning peak hours and eight-minute headway during the afternoon/early evening hours.


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• • • • • • •

Wentworth Shuttle provides access from the LMA to the Wentworth parking lot in the morning and to and from the Ruggles MBTA Station during the evening. The shuttle operates on approximately 30minute headway during both peaks. Crosstown Shuttle connects the Crosstown Parking facility to the LMA. The morning peak period shuttle runs on 35-minute headways, while the evening peak period operates on 12-minute headway. M6 Chestnut Hill connects Hammond Pond Park to the LMA while operating on 10- to 15-minute headways during both the morning and evening peak hours. M2 Cambridge Shuttle connects Harvard and MIT in Cambridge to the LMA. The shuttle operates from 6:40 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. on 10- to 15-minute headways. Ruggles Express Shuttle connects the LMA to the Ruggles MBTA Station which provides access to the Orange Line, as well as multiple bus and commuter rail lines. The shuttle runs on 10- to 15-minute headway during the morning and 30- to 45-minute headway during the evening. JFK/UMass Shuttle provides access to and from the JFK/UMass MBTA Red Line station in South Boston and the LMA. The shuttle operates on 15-minute headways during the morning and 15- to 20minute headways during the afternoon. Landmark Shuttle provides service between the Landmark Center and the Harvard School of Public Health. The service runs on 20-minute headways from 8:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Roadway Network Emmanuel College is nestled at the northwest edge of the LMA along The Fenway between Brookline Avenue and Avenue Louis Pasteur. The campus is located south of Brookline Avenue, west of The Fenway, north of Avenue Louis Pasteur, and east of Blackfan Street. In addition to Brookline Avenue and The Fenway, arterials serving the area include The Riverway, Park Drive, Boylston Street and Huntington Avenue. Brookline Avenue carries approximately 45,000 vehicles on an average weekday near the Emmanuel campus. The Fenway carries approximately 15,000 vehicles on an average weekday. Parking Emmanuel currently controls approximately 293 parking spaces available to college faculty, staff and some graduate/professional students on its Academic Campus. Commuter students are currently the only students allowed to park on campus. Other students with medical or family needs may have cars; their situations are reviewed on case-by-case basis. Resident students who are not authorized to have cars on campus typically do not have cars at all and therefore do not maintain cars off campus on local streets. TABLE 7-2 | Existing Emmanuel College Parking Supply

Parking Spaces Academic Campus Yawkey Center

102

Science Building

120

East of Science Building

10

East of St. Ann & Loretto Halls

33

Between St. Ann & Loretto Halls

13

South of Marian Hall

15 Total

293

Vehicle Access Primary access to Emmanuel College is provided via The Fenway. This main driveway provides access for both students and faculty, in addition to service vehicles. On the Academic Campus, service vehicles provide deliveries curb-side, as well as behind Marian and Loretto Halls. Where feasible, some of


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Emmanuel’s existing loading and service operations may be consolidated to allow for the creation of enhanced open space areas near the existing residence halls and the proposed Fenway Residence Hall project. It should be noted that loading and service access from public streets will not change in any way with the construction of the proposed Academic projects. Future student move-in and move-out activities will continue to be handled entirely on campus. No loading will occur from the public streets surrounding the campus. Emmanuel College staggers arrival times for students and only allows one vehicle per family on move-in and move-out days. There are no UHauls or trailers allowed on campus or adjacent streets. The Endowment Campus has separate, off-street loading and delivery areas. Loading and service for Merck Research Laboratories-Boston is accommodated via Blackfan Street. Access to Alumnae Hall and the Emmanuel parking deck are provided via a shared driveway along Avenue Louis Pasteur. FUTURE TRANSPORTATION CONDITIONS This section provides insight into the transportation conditions that will come about due to the development of the proposed IMP projects. A description of parking changes is presented in this section. TABLE 7-3 | Future Campus Parking Supply

Parking Spaces

Proposed Spaces

Net-New Spaces

Yawkey Center

102

102

0

Science Building

120

120

0

East of St. Ann & Loretto Halls

33

46

13

East of the Maureen Murphy Wilkens Science building

10

10

0

Between St. Ann & Loretto Halls

13

0

(-13)

South of Marian Hall

15

15

0

293

293

0

Academic Campus

Total

Parking Ratio Summary As currently contemplated within this IMPNF, Emmanuel proposes the development of approximately 241,200 GSF of net-new development on its Academic Campus with no net-new parking spaces.

TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT The Emmanuel College campus is well-situated in relation to the regional roadway network, rapid transit, commuter rail and bus system. These amenities enhance opportunities for the project to reduce vehicle trips and encourage alternative modes of travel through aggressive transportation demand management programs. Even without such efforts, the projects’ impacts relative to traffic, public transportation and pedestrians will be relatively low. The following traffic management and reduction strategies are proposed with the goal of further reducing the overall impacts: • •

All applicable projects will provide a secure bicycle storage area for use by students, employees and visitors. Emmanuel College will continue to participate in CommuteWorks, the local Transportation Management Organizations operated by MASCO.


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• •

All applicable projects will provide a bulletin board at a centralized location reserved for notices related to carpool and vanpool matching. Emmanuel College will continue to subsize 65 percent of the cost of monthly MBTA passes for qualified full-time employees and will provide on-campus sales of MBTA passes.

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT Emmanuel College will develop detailed evaluations of potential short-term construction-related transportation impacts during the course of these projects, including construction-vehicle traffic, parking supply and demand, and pedestrian access to the campus. A detailed Construction Management Plan for each of the proposed projects will be developed and submitted to the Boston Transportation Department (BTD) for their approval. Construction Vehicle Traffic Construction vehicles will be necessary to move construction materials to and from the project sites. Emmanuel recognizes that construction traffic is a concern to area residents and other institutions. Every effort will be made to reduce the noise, control fugitive dust, and minimize other disturbances associated with construction traffic. It is anticipated that Avenue Louis Pasteur and The Fenway will serve as the principal construction traffic routes to the sites. Trucks will be routed to avoid nearby residential areas. Truck staging and lay-down areas for the projects will be carefully planned. The need for street occupancy along roadways adjacent to the project sites is not known at this time. Construction Parking Contractors will be required to devise access plans for their personnel that deemphasize auto use (such as seeking off-site parking, providing transit subsidies, etc.). Construction workers will also be encouraged to use public transportation to access the project sites because no on-site parking will be provided for them. Emmanuel will work with the BTD and the Boston Police Department to ensure that parking regulations in the area and in designated residential parking areas are enforced. It is expected, as has been the case in past construction projects, that this will be a considerable disincentive. Pedestrian Access During the construction period, pedestrian access may need to be re-routed around the construction site. A variety of measures will be considered and implemented to protect the safety of pedestrians traversing those portions of the campus affected by construction. Where necessary, protective barriers around the construction sites, replacement of walkways, appropriate lighting and new directional and informational signage to direct pedestrians around the construction sites will be provided. Construction Monitoring As the projects progress, Emmanuel will work with representatives of the city of Boston to develop and ensure the effectiveness of the program of measures to minimize short-term construction-related transportation impacts.


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Chapter 8

Student housing

Student housing plan Residential life is central to an Emmanuel student’s educational experience and sense of community. Living on campus promotes friendships among students from diverse backgrounds, provides opportunities for living-learning experiences and offers easy access to the educational, cultural, recreational and volunteer/service opportunities in Boston. Residing on campus promotes personal growth and development as students learn to manage their time, do laundry, make healthy food choices, maintain a clean and organized living environment and strengthen their interpersonal skills. As students mature, they desire to live in smaller communities offered by campus suites and apartments. These upper-year housing options are common on campuses throughout the country. In the past decade, after the decision to admit male students caused enrollment to increase, the College set out to reclaim dorm space for its students, most of which was sold or being leased to other neighboring institutions. At a combined cost of $25 million, Emmanuel was able to re-acquire Julie Hall, which was sold to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center during a period of financial strain, and renovate the hall into traditional and suite-style rooms. St. Joseph Hall also underwent an extensive $10 million renovation, upgrading facilities and updating technology, to accommodate the growing expectations and standards of the modern college student. One of the goals of the 2011 IMP will be to right-size student enrollment at 2,200 from the current level of 1,765 and the campus is being designed to accommodate this adjustment. A focus of student housing in the future will be on expanding housing options for upper-year students, whose needs differ from those of 1st- and 2nd-year students. The Institutional Master Plan proposes the construction of Julie Hall North, an approximately 450-bed residence hall located between the Jean Yawkey Center and Julie Hall. The new residence hall will feature more attractive suite-style housing options available for 3rd- and 4thyear students. This new building will also provide more dining and kitchen space as well as increased meeting space for student organizations. The goal of providing on-campus housing for 75 percent of traditional students will continue.


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Student housing policies The Emmanuel Statement on Community Standards and Student Code of Conduct describes a student standard of behavior emphasizing academic excellence, personal responsibility, care for others, civility and respect. The Dean of Students reviews the College’s expectations with every new student and oversees a comprehensive system for addressing conduct violations. As described in the Student Code, these expectations apply to both on- and off-campus students and the College administration take seriously its responsibility to promoting responsible student behavior in the community. The Dean of Students is an engaged member of two community boards that address student conduct, the Mission Hill Problem Properties Task Force and the Boston Area Off-Campus Housing and Student Life Coalition. The Dean and the Director of Campus Safety participate in all meetings convened by the Mayor’s Office and the Boston Police Department related to off-campus and community student behavior.


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Chapter 9

Community benefits plan

Introduction Emmanuel College’s mission has always included a focus on involvement in the greater community through service and collaborative partnerships. The College challenges its students, as well as faculty and staff, to become contributing members of the surrounding communities and beyond. Eighty percent of Emmanuel College students participate in community service during their college years. Over the past decade, Emmanuel’s students, faculty and staff have contributed more than 250,000 hours of volunteer service.

Economic development Emmanuel College’s Endowment Campus has made a direct and sizable contribution to area job creation. This investment has been leveraged from a workforce development perspective through nurse training to support immediate needs within some of the LMA institutions and similar programs. Emmanuel has also provided numerous advanced science education courses that have strengthened the teaching capacity of public and Catholic teachers across the city. In terms of financial support, Emmanuel College has created a substantial opportunity for the city of Boston to realize more tax gains through its Endowment Campus initiative. For example, the Merck Corporation has paid $2.6 million in annual taxes to the city for the last five years. Once developed, the other endowment parcels offer the opportunity to create similar annual tax gains from land that has been tax exempt for almost 100 years. Emmanuel College and The Yawkey Foundation partnered with the city of Boston on the development of Roberto Clemente Field, providing $4 million in capital funds and a commitment to provide annual maintenance assistance. In addition, Emmanuel provides a significant amount of financial support in the form of City of Boston Scholarships and tuition discounts to city of Boston teachers.

Service Initiatives Community service is at the core of Emmanuel College’s mission, and the College has long been involved with organizations from the surrounding neighborhoods and the city as a whole. The following programs and collaborations highlight the support Emmanuel College has provided to the Boston community. In 2011, Emmanuel College was named to the 2010 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll with Distinction for the second consecutive year. Honorees are chosen by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) based on a


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series of selection factors including the scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service, and the extent to which the school offers academic service-learning courses. Throughout the 2009-2010 academic year, Emmanuel students completed 35,165 service hours. These hours included volunteer activities such as New Student Day of Service, America Reads, the Sunday Service Group, toy drives, community clean-ups and Alternative Spring Break. THE JEAN YAWKEY CENTER FOR COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP is dedicated to developing service opportunities and leadership skills for Emmanuel College students and providing programs for young people in Boston area schools and community organizations. The Center also awards scholarships to students involved in the greater community. Through the center, Emmanuel College students volunteer in schools throughout the city as mentors and tutors. Students from Beacon Academy, Fenway High School, Knights Chinese Athletic Association and McKinley Middle School, in turn, have access to the College’s facilities, including the Emmanuel College gymnasium. The following list of programs sponsored through the center includes: Youth Program Emmanuel College and the Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership provide gym space for practice and home games for the OLPH Mission Saints boys’ basketball inaugural season as part of our youth program. Sociedad Latina is an organization that cultivates leaders among Latino youth. Each year, The Jean Yawkey Center for Community Leadership provides a yearlong, selective, paid internship at Sociedad Latina to work with youth on education reform, advocacy, and community organizing. Emmanuel College sponsors Sociedad Latina’s annual Three Kings Day Celebration, which commemorates the Biblical story of the three kings who followed the star of Bethlehem to bring gifts to the Christ child. The College also supports the Mission Possible! College Access Program, which makes higher education a reality for some of Boston’s most at-risk youth, through a blend of academic and college access support, workforce development opportunities, case management and parent engagement activities. Each year, the program serves 85 Mission Hill youth, ages 14-21. The Cultural Competence Peer Educator Training Program is a comprehensive training program designed to create an understanding of issues regarding racism, culture, socio-economic status, gender bias and other issues of oppression that exist in today’s society. Kids to College Emmanuel College students meet with low-income middle school students to talk about higher education – the long-term benefits, the financial aid opportunities and the areas of study. The program allows middle school and high school students to participate in programming designed to help prepare them for their pursuit of higher education. O’Bryant Gateway to the LMA Program: As a member of the Medical Academic and Science Community Organization (MASCO), Emmanuel College provides students from the John D.


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O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science in Roxbury the opportunity to gain unique access to the LMA. CAMPUS MINISTRY OFFICE The mission of the Campus Ministry Office is to provide opportunities for members of the Emmanuel College community to grow in their civic commitments to service, especially service to the poor and neglected of our society. Programming includes: New Student Day of Service During Welcome Week, all incoming Emmanuel College students learn about service opportunities in Boston by serving at various Boston non-profit agencies. Sites include The Greater Boston Food Bank, Community Servings, Cradles to Crayons, Muddy River Clean Up, Franklin Park Zoo, Marian Manor, ReVision Urban Farm and OLPH Mission Grammar School. Alternative Spring Break A weeklong service project for Emmanuel College students. Recently, students and staff members traveled to Eagle Butte, SD, Phoenix, AZ, New Orleans, LA and Wheeling, WV, as part of the program. Making a Difference in the Life of a Child Emmanuel College students provide literacy training for elementary-school-age children at both public and private inner-city after-school programs. The mentor students help with homework and facilitate games and activities that increase academic skills. Sunday Service Group A weekly service opportunity for students interested in helping less fortunate members of the Boston community on a more frequent basis. The group regularly rotates between various services sites including: St. Ambrose Family Shelter, Pine Street Inn, Sunday Bread and Marian Manor. ESOL Program: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages – Building Bridges Students, faculty and staff teach English to Emmanuel College workers and staff from different countries. It is a way to reach out to those making their way in a new country, to learn about various cultures and enjoy the opportunity to form friendships. Emmanuel College Community Outreach (ECCO) Promotes harmony and fights inequality, mainly through community service. Students volunteer at organizations such as Community Servings, Rosie’s Place, Boston Living Center, Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless and the Greater Boston Food Bank.

ROBERTO CLEMENTE FIELD: A PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP During the summer of 2009, Emmanuel College and the city of Boston partnered on a comprehensive restoration of Roberto Clemente Field, a city-owned field located in the Back Bay Fens, just across the street from campus. Emmanuel College and The Yawkey Foundation provided $4 million to fund the capital improvements and continue to provide ongoing maintenance, security and management


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assistance worth approximately $15,000 per year. The field serves as home field for Emmanuel College softball, men’s and women’s soccer and women’s lacrosse teams, as well as the practice facility for men’s and women’s track and field. Upgrades

• • • • •

120,000 sq. ft., NCAAregulation synthetic turf field Three-lane rubberized allweather track Practice facilities for expanded track and field events, including high jump, long jump, triple jump, discus, javelin and shot put Musco Lighting – the leading sports-lighting system that is both cost-effective and environmentally sensitive New scoreboard

The field is also used by Boston Latin School athletics, Fenway High School gym classes, Colleges of the Fenway intramurals and adult and youth summer softball leagues. The all-weather track remains open to the public for recreational walking and jogging year-round. THE CENTER FOR SCIENCE EDUCATION AT EMMANUEL COLLEGE The Center for Science Education was established in response to studies showing a lack of inquirybased science education in K-12 programs across the nation, as well as a number of teachers instructing without proper certification, especially within urban settings. As a result, Emmanuel was able to receive $3 million in federal earmarks to support the center’s work. The Center for Science Education has become a major resource for K-12 teachers and students, making available quality professional development for elementary and secondary science teachers, promoting scientific literacy, inspiring students to pursue careers in science and providing leadership in science education in Massachusetts. Through access to facilities and resources in the new Maureen Murphy Wilkens Science Center, the Center for Science Education at Emmanuel College provides service to the Greater Boston community with a special focus on serving our urban neighbors. Several examples include: For Students: S.E.T. in the City

Emmanuel College collaborates with organizations and institutions around Boston to sponsor S.E.T. (Science, Engineering, Technology) in the City, a daylong event for Boston-area high-school girls to explore these cutting-edge fields. Students visit participating college campuses, engage in hands-on science activities led by professionals, and interact with women working in S.E.T. fields before concluding the day with an Omni show at the Museum of Science. Biomedical Research Institute for Secondary School Students

The two-day Biomedical Research Institute is designed to introduce high school rising juniors and seniors to current areas of research in biomedical fields and to engage them in current research projects ongoing at Emmanuel College. An Emmanuel College science faculty member teaches each module. Topics include immunology, nanotechnology, neurodegenerative diseases, animal behavior and more.


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This is a unique opportunity to expand student experiences in science to those with an active interest. A certificate of completion is awarded to all active participants. For Teachers Science Courses for Elementary School Teachers Teaching Science Through Scientific Inquiry: Physical Sciences Gr. 1-6

This science-inquiry based course provides a number of hands-on activities to be used with students in grades one to six. The specific activities support the standards in the Massachusetts state curriculum frameworks for those grade levels. Materials and supplies are provided. Strategies for Teaching Science K-5

This course focuses on presenting instructional activities in science that will actively engage teachers and students in topics of life and physical science. Science Courses for Secondary School Science Teachers

Emmanuel College offers science-content professional development summer institutes at minimal cost for teachers. Courses are designed to present current scientific research and findings in a variety of fields. Each course meets for four six-hour sessions (8:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.) providing 24-28 professional development points depending on assignments. Participants may also choose to take courses for graduate credit. The courses for summer 2011 include: • • • •

Genome Sequencing and Data Use The Physics and Biology of DNA Neuroscience and Immunology Biology in the Big Picture

EDUCATION TO BOSTON Emmanuel College has a long history of fostering the educational development of both the students and the teachers of Boston’s public and urban Catholic schools. Through strong partnerships with Boston schools including Mission Grammar, Fenway High School, the Murphy School and others, Emmanuel College students volunteer and tutor in classrooms. Boston K-12 students use the college’s facilities and participate in a number of Emmanuel College events. Carolyn A. Lynch Institute Established in 2002, the Carolyn A. Lynch Institute provides a range of collaborative programs and services that enhance the professional development of urban teachers and enrich the education of PK12 students in the city of Boston and other urban areas. Programs include: The Lynch Institute for Professional Development Urban teachers participate in courses and workshops

that focus on standards-based education in the critical areas of literacy and mathematics. Programming specifically addresses the need for professional development of primary-level teachers in assessing and intervening with young children at risk in mathematical development. The Catholic School Principal Leadership Institute at Emmanuel College Designed to build standards-

based expertise and leadership among principals, especially in their roles as supervisors of instruction. The Mentor Program In collaboration with the Catholic Schools Office, new Catholic school principals

are matched with veteran principals to help support the transition to the role of leader in a Catholic school.


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The Center for Early Mathematics Learning Programming addresses the need for training of primary level teachers, who are responsible for educating students during a time of significant development in mathematical understanding and knowledge.

Dual Enrollment Plan A collaborative program between Emmanuel College and Fenway High School that provides high school students the opportunity to enroll in undergraduate courses at the College for high school and college credit at no cost. Students from West Roxbury Education Complex and North Cambridge Catholic High School also participate in the program.

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS In addition to the above, Emmanuel College engages with numerous community partners and is always interested in creating more connections with its surrounding neighbors and the entire city of Boston. Every December, a group of Emmanuel students and management department faculty partner with the City Mission Society of Boston’s Annual Christmas Shop, receiving and sorting through some of the thousands of gifts donated for families and individuals in needs. Students are able to experience the work that goes into coordinating a nonprofit event.

Emmanuel College is currently associated a number of community partners, including: OLPH Mission Grammar School Notre Dame Education Center Greater Boston Food Bank Boston Living Center Community Servings Saturday/Sunday Bread Cradles to Crayons Charles River Conservancy N.I.C.E. Preschool Zoo New England, Franklin Park Haley House Julie’s Family Learning Program Rosie’s Place Pine Street Inn

Beacon Academy St. Ambrose Family Shelter St. Mary of the Angels Parish Sociedad Latina Peace First Jumpstart St. Katharine After School Boston Rescue Mission Notre Dame Montessori Preschool Marian Manor Sancta Maria House ReVision Urban Farm Elizabeth Seton Academy

/EmmanuelCollegeIMPNF  

http://www.emmanuel.edu/Documents/About%20Emmanuel/Govt%20Relations/EmmanuelCollegeIMPNF.pdf

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