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Acknowledgements This end of project evaluation report has been produced to reflect the key successes of the ‘Train the Take Part Trainers’ project. The project represents one strand of the Take Part National Support Programme which was funded by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and managed by the Community Development Foundation (CDF) and the WEA acknowledges the support and contributions made by colleagues at CDF and DCLG to the Train the Take Part Trainers project. The project was coordinated by WEA Yorkshire and Humber Region, and delivered in partnership with the National Association for Voluntary and Community Action (NAVCA). The range of courses and activities referred to in the report were offered across all nine English regions. I wish to thank the WEA project organisers, sessional tutors, participants, and the plethora of partner organisations who involved themselves in the project activities - either as participants, or through their input to course development and delivery. In particular a special thank you is due to all the on course participants whose contributions are identified in the body of the report. I would also like to express my thanks to the WEA Project Board for their guidance, and direction, and in particular special thanks to Gill Dean, Justine Walker and Karen Briggs for helping to keep the project on track both administratively and financially. And finally thanks to David Pittaway for his support with the production and design of the report.

For further information about the project and its courses and activities please contact:

Trish Land, Train the Take Part Trainers project manager, on: 0114 261 5423 or tland@wea.org.uk


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Contents Page

Executive Summary

1-8

1

Introduction

2

Background and Context

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

Why this initiative? Getting Started Programme Development Delivery Methodology

12 12 14 15 17

2.5

Evaluation process and approach

18

3

The Learning Programme: evidence of success and added value

19

3.1 3.2 3.3

Courses and Activities Learning Methods Evidence of Added Value

20 47 48

3.4

Participant Progression

50

4

Project Results Outputs and Outcomes

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4.1 4.2 4.3 4.3.1 4.3.2 4.3.3 4.3.4 4.4

Reasons for participation Participant Profile Output and Outcomes Project Outputs achieved: Phase 1 Project Outcomes achieved: Phase 1 Project Outputs achieved: Phase 2 Project Outcomes achieved: Phase 2 The Curriculum Resources File

52 54 57 57 58 59 60 62

4.5

The Tutor Trainer Database

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5

Case Studies

Appendix 1 - Working in partnership with refugees and asylum seekers in Leeds - a group experience Appendix 1 - Working in partnership with refugees and asylum seekers in Leeds - an individual experience Appendix 3 - NAVCA: Democracy Day Conferences Appendix 4 - Women’s Voices (Hastings) - a group experience Appendix 5 - Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship - an individual experience Appendix 6 - Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship - a group experience

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Executive Summary This end of project evaluation assesses the contribution that the Train the Take Part Trainers has made towards promoting active citizenship, tutor training programmes and practice. The programme ran from August 2009 to December 2010. 1 Train the ‘Take Part’ Trainers (TTPT) is a national project which aims to build active citizenship skills and knowledge alongside the development of teaching and learning methods and approaches within an adult education context. 2 The project represents one strand of the Take Part Pathfinder National Support Programme – an active citizenship and learning initiative focused on: building the confidence, skills and knowledge of individuals and communities to pursue civic activism, community leadership and lay governance roles (including those of local councillors); supporting people and organisations in developing an understanding of barriers against participation, and how to overcome those barriers; raising awareness of routes into lay governance roles, especially those involving (LSPs) Local Strategic Partnerships, and supporting people in their progression through those routes. 3 ‘Take Part’ embodies a distinctive approach to learning that enables people to make active contributions to their own communities by getting involved in civic, civil and democratic activity. 4 The TTPT project was commissioned and managed by the Community Development Foundation (CDF) and funding provided by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG). It was designed to fit with a growing policy interest around community empowerment initiatives. 5 The Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) was the lead and accountable body and the project was delivered in partnership with the National Association for Voluntary and Community Action (NAVCA). 6 The project delivered activities across all nine English regions mostly working in larger towns and cities from Exeter, Sutton and London in the South, through to Sheffield, Bradford and Durham in the North. Some areas had strong well developed local and regional infrastructures in place already; others, particularly more rurally-located regions such as Eastern region were in the process of developing those grassroots structures.

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7 Project Delivery The broad aims of the project were to: l Generate a national body of trainers to deliver Take Part programmes across England

l Capture evidence on best practice approaches to training Take Part Trainers

l Develop a source of expertise on the best ways of ensuring that trainers are equipped to deliver Take Part programmes 8 The WEA took the lead in developing the learning programme, sustaining project management, and delivery. Support was provided for three project organisers in their planning, delivery and evaluations, and in addition for disseminating the project’s evaluation findings to CDF/DCLG. 9 NAVCA was responsible for providing ways of increasing participants’ knowledge of democratic processes of developing an understanding of how local decision making structures work, the role of the voluntary and community sector in supporting community engagement and participation, and how people can involve themselves and begin to influence local and national policy making. 10 The project set out to engage those with an interest in active citizenship and community activism who might be seeking to develop further their skills in becoming ‘Take Part’ tutor/trainers. It sought actively to recruit participants from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. Activities were delivered in a variety of community settings and a range of approaches was used to engage and support participants through the programme, from one off taster events, study visits and follow up sessions to evaluate the activities, through to the negotiation and development of short courses based on identified needs, interests and experiences. Additional needs of some participants were also addressed by providing skills for life support. 11 The project supported the development of an innovative, active citizenship curriculum which included a range of accredited and non-accredited courses from introductory short courses and day conferences, right through to the accredited level 3 City and Guilds 7303 Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship.

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12 Key Achievements for the project: (For an in-depth analysis of the key successes of the project please refer to Sections 3 and 4) The key achievements of the project included: l 1083 participants trained in active citizenship teaching and learning approaches l Over 150 participants achieved the qualification required to teach adults in England and thereby to progress to further teaching qualifications

l 63 courses delivered across all English regions

l Nearly 300 people signed up to the Take Part Trainer Database

l 96% of course participants achieved their learning outcomes

l A significant number of participants reached were from ‘disadvantaged postcode’ areas l Achievement and success rates on accredited courses were over 85%, and over 96% on non-accredited courses. l A Curriculum Resources File produced to capture best practice in active citizenship teaching and learning approaches Sources are drawn from the WEA’s Management Information Systems 13 Project Outcomes: (For an in-depth analysis of the outcomes of the project please refer to Section 4, 4.3) The outcomes of the project included:

l Improved personal confidence

l Increased knowledge and skills

l Increased take-up of volunteering opportunities

l Increased take-up of other educational opportunities

l Greater opportunity for community activists to become adult educators, including some into paid work l Increased engagement of under-represented groups in civic activism, and participation, including community leadership roles

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l Greater awareness of how best to support other members of the community

l Better understanding of political processes

l Increased opportunities to network

l Greater awareness of how to campaign effectively

l Increased awareness of local and national decision-making processes


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l Increased awareness of the role of MPs and of how Parliament functions

l Increased confidence in personal ability to bring about change

l Increased awareness of teaching and learning strategies

l Greater understanding of the benefits of social media for campaigning

l Greater understanding of other cultures and improved social cohesion

l Better integration of new citizens into UK life

l Increased partnership working and greater opportunity to work with existing partners in new ways In all areas this amounted to a significant increase in learning for community participation and activism by local people over the project period. 14 The methodology used for this evaluation report has encompassed both quantitative and qualitative approaches. One-to-one interviews were conducted with project organisers, the administrative and management team as well as representatives from partner organisations. A number of tutors were also interviewed on a one-to-one basis as were over 60 participants on the various programmes. A variety of methods were used including face-to-face interviews, small focus group activities, and in addition a small number were conducted by telephone or Skype. Further information was gleaned from tutor and organiser reports, student evaluations, questionnaires, case study reports and other data that was captured through enrolment forms and course evaluation materials and this was recorded on WEA information systems. An independent external evaluator was appointed to help evaluate phase one outcomes and was helpful in producing an interim evaluation report as well as putting recording systems in place and suggesting ways in which the team might develop its own approaches to evaluation.

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15 Key Learning experiences from the project: For an in-depth analysis please refer to Section 3 – The Learning Programme Key Learning experiences from the project were that: l

Courses work best when they are participatory, responsive to ideas from everyone involved, when they relate theory to practice, challenge the experiences and expectations of participants and are fit for purpose and useful

l Participants valued an approach which started where they were at, listened to their needs and built upon their own existing skills and knowledge l Project organisers with a geographical remit and familiar with the locality and active networks were central to the effective delivery of the project

l Courses should be free along with help with childcare costs, travel and course materials is essential to actively engage members of disadvantaged communitiesas well as those who may not be disadvantaged but who wish to contribute to building a stronger, fairer and more democratic society

l Both accredited and non-accredited learning opportunities should be offered to appeal to community activists with different levels of previous educational experience were central to the overall success of the project. Accredited programmes, i.e. those that offered a teaching qualification, proved to be more popular in the second phase of the project

l Activities needed to be accessible in local community venues in order to engage target audiences

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l Strong partnerships with other empowerment initiatives was vital to the development of the project and recruitment of participants; and that successful work of this nature occurs when partners who share a range of similar values are able to work together

l Innovative practice should be developed within the programme, See Case Study in section 2. The Learning Programme: work with a group of young people in their late teens and early twenties which created lively debate around the ideas of active citizenship, rights and responsibilities, taking part and bringing about change

l The project worked best when partners’ own ethos and values were embedded recognisably into learning activities. (see Case Studies appendix 1)


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16 Conclusions Adult education – make no mistake – brings hope and the promise of a better society founded on social mobility, social justice and social cohesion. John Hayes, Minister of State for Further Education, Skills and Lifelong Learning The Train the Take Part Trainers programme provided the opportunity to revitalise teacher training and to place active citizenship and social action at the very heart of what it means to teach adults today. A range of new and imaginative adult and community learning opportunities were delivered that unequivocally engaged and motivated disadvantaged adults. The many and varied activities and courses supported by the programme offered participants the chance to develop their knowledge, build their skills and, crucially, to strengthen their communities. The project confirms the ways in which the Train the Take Part Trainers programme and indeed adult and community learning more generally can been seen to contribute to the aims of the Big Society programme. The main conclusions of the project are:

l ENTITLEMENT - The WEA believes active engagement in public life should be the entitlement of all citizens in a vibrant democracy and teaching and learning materials and resources need to be freely available and provided at no cost to the individual learner or community organisations engaged in activity of this nature

l SOCIAL ACTION - Participation in Train the Trainers programmes contributes to positive changes in social and political attitudes leading to increased social action l

LOCALISM - Community empowerment initiatives based on the ‘training of trainers’ can play a strong role in the emerging localism agenda and in developing local strategies including those for active citizenship and community cohesion

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17 Recommendations There is a significant body of evidence within this report to support the following recommendations:

l Adult learning can have a powerful social impact: it brings people together, widens horizons and develops the skills and confidence that underpin social action and change. The benefits of the Train the Trainers programme should be considered by policy makers and Government departments when designing future empowerment-based programmes.

l

Adult learning is a vibrant part of any thriving civilised society: it builds confidence, skills and knowledge to sustain people in their current economic and social responsibilities and also offers a route to personal and social fulfilment

l

Strong partnerships between voluntary and community sector organisations, the state, and other educational providers is the best way of helping to build a big and better society. Any future similar initiatives will need to adequately resource partnership working.

l Partnership working based on trust and shared aims and values work best; help and support of partners is essential to the success of any project, particularly when reaching into communities to recruit participants l Community-based training of trainers can play a strong role in local strategies including those for active citizenship and community cohesion l Projects need greater strategic support at local and regional levels to ensure effective mainstreaming and longer term continuation of project work l Significant time needs to be factored in to planning all programmes to build trust, credibility, support and partnerships.

l Adult learning has a direct effect on individual health and well-being

l Good communication between learners and partners ensures that lessons are learned and ideas shared

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l A combination of the wider benefits of adult learning in relation to health, well- being, social cohesion, civic engagement, and other areas of social policy, is likely to make the Big Society more achievable If there is one, single overarching recommendation drawn from the experience of this project it is that there are no quick fixes, no cheap options. Engaging and supporting adults from disadvantaged communities in active citizenship learning requires time to develop trust. and build groups and partnerships. Strengthening democracy costs money but ultimately is very cost effective. Thank you to everyone who has contributed their time, energy and enthusiasm to this evaluation.

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1 Introduction The Community Empowerment White Paper, Communities in Control: Real people, real power, called for the support of pubic organisations for the genuine empowerment into active participation, of individuals in their localities, as well as the provision of more focused services. It emphasised greater voice and choice for citizens and communities. Within that context it affirmed: “Citizenship learning is also important for adults. Some people want to know more about how local services are managed and local democracy operates. Some people need support and encouragement to have the confidence to speak up and get involved. We will support a Take Part local pathfinder programme, offering information and training on how to be an active citizen. It will build on the existing Take Part network.” (Paragraph 2.22, p.39). Some of the questions raised in ensuring discussions for the Train the Take Part Trainers project included: How do we engage with adult learners in a way that empowers them to become tutor/trainers in their own communities? How can a culture of active citizenship be fostered with under-represented groups to support participation and increase engagement at local and regional levels? How can community-based learning programmes contribute towards civic, civil and democratic activism? At the time there were already a number of community empowerment initiatives taking place which focused on cohesion, safer communities as well as Take Part Pathfinders which promoted active citizenship. The Train the Take Part Trainers project (TTPT) was an attempt to promote community-based tutor/training programmes located at the heart of some of those communities. It was presented as an opportunity to build on existing active citizenship work being provided by the eighteen ‘Take Part Pathfinder’ lead agencies1 but with greater emphasis to be placed on developing people’s confidence, skills and knowledge as ‘Take Part’ Trainers. The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) was keen to widen these opportunities both within and beyond the Take Part Pathfinder areas, and funding was made available to support a national programme for Training the Take Part Trainers.

1

The Take Part Pathfinder programme is funded by the Department for Communities and Local Government and managed by Community Development Foundation. The programme is a three-year initiative to develop and promote an approach to ‘taking part’ as a successful means of increasing community empowerment and engagement, especially in communities facing greater challenges.

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Learning programmes were offered across all nine English regions. Contrasts between the regions were apparent inevitably in terms of participant profile and involvement and in differing levels of contribution from partner organisations. The project’s drive was to coalesce with those nexuses of energy, extant or incipient, identifiable locally in any targeted community. Train the Take Part Trainers aimed to: l Generate a national body of trainers to deliver Take Part programmes across England

l Capture evidence on best practice approaches to training Take Part Trainers

l Develop a source of expertise on the best ways of ensuring that trainers are equipped to deliver Take Part programmes Key objectives were to increase people’s confidence, skills and knowledge as ‘Take Part’ trainers, to increase levels of participation within their own communities as community activists, and to share examples of best practice approaches to training and curriculum development with other groups and organisations. The Workers’ Educational Association (WEA)2 and partner, the National Association for Voluntary and Community Action (NAVCA),3 were awarded the TTPT contract in July 2009 and project delivery took place from September 2009 to October 2010. During this time, the project was successful in working with a range of individual adult participants, community groups and organisations including those from disadvantaged backgrounds and under-represented groups. In this process the project worked with members of Black and Minority Ethnic communities, women, those with a declared physical and learning disability and wide range of age groups. Reports from participants testify that project activities helped many of those individuals to improve their confidence, skills and knowledge to move in to community activism, and participation including volunteering, community leadership and tutor/ trainer roles as well as take up other educational opportunities. Project organisers developed in response to identified demand, a range of innovative practice and curricula through a combination of development initiatives; day schools and study visits, short introductory courses, through to longer courses which offered a recognised teaching qualification. In doing so the project was 2

The Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) is the UK’s largest voluntary provider of adult education. Ever since it was founded in 1903, in order to support the educational needs of working men and women, the WEA has maintained its commitment to provide access to education and learning for adults from all backgrounds, and in particular those who have previously missed out on education. http://www.wea.org. uk/

3

National Association for Voluntary and Community Action (NAVCA) is the national voice of local third sector infrastructure in England that aims to ensure communities are well served by the local third sector by supporting members and their work with over 160,000 local groups and organisations. www.navca.org.uk/

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successful in contacting and working co-operatively with an impressive range of partner organisations from key government offices and empowerment partnerships through to regional and local community groups and agencies keen to be involved in empowerment initiatives of this kind. The project has been able to identify and confirm clearly some key ground-rules for effective ways of working with local communities in the interests of active learning for active citizenship. Furthermore, the project has increased demonstrably the confidence, skills, and knowledge of a range of participants in affirming them as Take Part Trainers, so that they in turn can enable greater active citizenship within their own local communities. Finally at its most basic level the project has broadened grassroots understandings of community activism encouraging groups and individuals themselves to engage as participants in and as organisers of activities in their own local communities. This end of programme evaluation of the Train the Take Part Trainers has been conducted by the Workers’ Educational Association (Yorkshire and Humber Region) and the approach has encompassed both quantitative and qualitative processes from research work and in-depth interviews, and focus groups through to project records of attendance, and participant profile at courses and activities. The report offers an overview of the learning programme, its key achievements, outputs and impact.

Trish Land WEA Project Manager Train the Take Part Trainers

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2 Background, context and getting started If liberty and equality, as is thought by some, are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in the government to the utmost. Aristotle (The Community Empowerment White Paper, Communities in Control Chapter 1, p. 11) In his book ‘Why We Hate Politics’, Colin Hay says: “In recent years the term ‘politics’ has become synonymous, for many, with notions of duplicity, corruption, dogmatism, inefficiency, undue interference in essentially private matters, and a lack of transparency in decision making.” (Polity Press 2007 PP4/5) The major political parties have all expressed concern at these widely held public views and their negative effects on the engagement of adults in participation at all levels of the political process. All parties have committed themselves in various ways to re-engage adults in political activity at local, regional and national levels. The last Labour Government, through the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), introduced a number of initiatives to address what is described as the ‘democratic deficit’ and the current Coalition Government has also adopted a variety of its own initiatives including a ‘Community Organisers’ programme.

2.1

Why this initiative?

The Train the Take Part Trainers (TTPT) programme is just one of a number of Empowerment Initiatives to grow out of The Community Empowerment White Paper, Communities in Control: Real people, real power. Its overarching themes are democracy and how democratic practices and ideals can be applied today. Key principles include perspectives on citizenship learning; people being active within their own communities; taking part in public life; developing voice and influence, and bringing about change. A number of initiatives were already underway in various parts of the country to develop local programmes of democratic activity including the Take Part Pathfinder programme.

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Activity focused on: l Programmes of learning that build skills and confidence, within a community context – this would include active shared learning, leading to increased individual and collective voices, action and influence l A community leadership programme that offers tailored support into civic activism and/or lay governance roles l Information about the availability of opportunities for influence and lay governance roles across the public sector in the locality, and support for greater mobility between such roles l Access to accreditation for citizenship learning and skills development where it is required Those activities demonstrated to DCLG that there was real value in providing learning opportunities focused on building the confidence, skills and knowledge of local people and developing them in particular as trainers in their own communities. In that context, DCLG took the decision to build upon and extend those same opportunities throughout all the English regions. At the time of the announcement The Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) was already involved in a number of Take Part Pathfinder (TPP) programmes acting as lead body in some regions. The newly proposed Train the Take Part Trainers was seen as an opportunity to build on that work. The WEA has a long history of working with communities and a wealth of experience in delivering social purpose education, from programmes with tenants and trade unionists going back to the 1970s, the development of community-based working class women’s education and unemployed workers’ movements in the 1980s, through to ‘Getting Organised,’ SPARC,4 and community development activities right up to the present. Over the last decade many of those latter activities found themselves increasingly defined as programmes focusing on ‘citizenship’. One of those, the Active Learning for Active Citizenship Project (ALAC) developed a number of learning hubs across England and created a very useful active citizenship learning framework. (‘See Active Learning for Active Citizenship,’ An evaluation report by Professor Marjorie Mayo and Dr Alison Rooke, Togetherwecan, 2006).

4

SPARC – Strengthening Participation: a Regional Comparison. The SPARC project was an attempt to promote community-based learning and link it to the regeneration of isolated, disadvantaged communities. It was undertaken in two specific areas, the Forest of Dean and Barnsley in South Yorkshire, which offered a degree of rural/urban contrast. It was funded by the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation and was co-managed by NIACE (the National Institute of Adult and Continuing Education) and the WEA (the Workers’ Educational Association), two leading bodies for adult education.

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Hand in hand with those developments the WEA has also pioneered a variety of community-based tutor training programmes, both non-accredited as well as accredited, first of all in-house for its own aspiring and often ‘home grown’ tutors, and broadening in to work with other voluntary and community sector groups and organisations. Most recently the WEA has offered the City and Guilds 7303 Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (PTLLS) course. The WEA in partnership with the National Association for Voluntary and Community Action (NAVCA) were successful in their bid to run the 17 month TTTP programme. There would be two delivery phases:

l phase one (training of first cohort) October 2009 to March 2010

l phase two (training of second cohort) April 2010 to October 2010

The WEA managed the project as the lead and accountable body. NAVCA was responsible for directing activities that focused on ‘strengthening local democracy’ with local infrastructure organisations, and public sector bodies. WEA and NAVCA both have longstanding community learning traditions and widespread community networks.

2.2

Getting Started

A Project Manager, three Project Organisers and an Administrator were appointed with responsibility for raising the profile of the programme and for ensuring the resources were targeted appropriately. The Project Organisers worked across regions – covering North East and North West; Yorkshire and Humber, East and West Midlands; Eastern, London, Southern, and South West regions. This approach sought to maximise the benefits of partnership working. The programmes were delivered by WEA and NAVCA qualified teaching teams based in each of the nine English regions. In one case a City and Guilds 7303 course was delivered by a partner organisation, Council for Voluntary Services, based in the South West region. A WEA Project Board established effective programme management structures including an Operational Group to support programme delivery, development, contractual and decision making processes, and to keep the project on track financially. In addition, the project team was concerned to make use of local, regional and national networks and knowledge, to ensure the best use of resources and where possible either work together with partners to build on existing work, or to offer new ‘training of trainers’ opportunities, and to make sure the project did not duplicate already established activity.

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2.3

Programme Development

In order to meet the project objectives the WEA and NAVCA were concerned to build on existing best practice in Training of Trainers (ToT) where it existed. Therefore a first step was to carry out an initial piece of research which looked into what training of trainers courses already existed and what could be said to work well. This was not only to avoid ‘re-inventing the wheel’ but also to harness the expertise that existed amongst TPP bodies. As expert practitioners, it was felt that TPPs would be able to help to identify ‘gaps’ in provision, models of good practice and ‘what works’. The objective of this initial research stage provided a starting point for new WEA project organisers and in this sense offered a ‘bridge’ to the next part of the project by informing both best practice models as well as curriculum development. In terms of ‘what works’ and best practice, evaluations were limited in terms of number, however, where either written or verbal ‘evidence’ from respondents was provided, the Project Team were not surprised to find that participative, democratic and learning centred approaches work best. Moreover, the research identified that a great deal of general active citizenship work was already taking place within Take Part Pathfinder areas and by organisations and agencies working in related fields. However, without looking in detail at subject related active citizenship work, here are some examples of why TPP lead organisations wanted to develop ToT programmes: l To deliver Active Citizenship training and workshops through Active Citizenship hubs

l To train people in Take Part methodologies

l To ‘grow’ and develop local activists/ citizens to deliver back into their community and to train others l To train people into having a full understanding of the skills needed to be an effective citizen l To offer continuing personal development to potential and existing trainers and activists – through accreditation and/or skills acquisition l To help new trainers develop relevant skills, knowledge and understanding of the Take Part Pathfinder project and its aims and objectives l For ToT to help people gain confidence in themselves so they can work with others l To train trainers to help public services and communities deliver together on local concerns for people & communities

l To train trainers as Community Learning Champions (CLCs)

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l To train trainers to work with groups not usually reached

l To train local people as trainers and facilitators so that ‘we can find out what needs really are rather than what we think they are’.

l To help contribute towards community cohesion

l To help people understand that they can get involved and can make a difference

l To facilitate networking and project management

l To help empower communities in rights and responsibilities

l To train people so that they can train others to link local politics and structures to equalities (A short report on ‘work in progress’ into Training of Trainers activity – is available from WEA Y&H region) A next step was to organise a ‘Curriculum Conference’ to feed back the findings of the initial research, to deliberate and to contribute to the development of what might be the programme offer. Twenty seven participants attended the event from across eight of the nine English regions. Partners included: Praxis, CDF, Take Part Network, NAVCA, Church Action on Poverty, and the Working Lives Research Institute together with WEA colleagues from across the regions. This was considered a more then respectable attendance given that the project was only in its first month of planning. Overall feedback was positive in terms of personal benefits gained and training methods used and a host of ideas were generated that formed the basis of what became the learning offer. A ‘Train the Take Part Trainers’ outline programme was agreed. This included short non-accredited introductory courses and day schools, through to an accredited course on teacher training. The project team embarked on the task of designing and producing the learning materials. (See section 3 – The Learning Programme)

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At the heart of the provision were four WEA ‘active citizenship’ focused courses:

l Introduction to Active Citizenship

l Introduction to Train the Trainers

l City and Guilds - Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (PTLLS ) in Active Citizenship

l ‘Strengthening Democracy’ day Conferences

In addition, NAVCA, developed a series of Democracy day conferences around how local public decision making structures work; how community members can be involved in and influence change; the role of the voluntary and community sectors in supporting community engagement and participation; and exploring how local people and organisations can influence national policy making.

2.4

Delivery Methodology

At this stage the project team had a range of key targets, learning outcomes and outputs. To include:

l Development of marketing, publicity and display materials

l Development and delivery of a learning programme

l Development of new course content, material and resources

l Development of a Train the Trainers website

l Development of a curriculum resource file

l Development of a data-base of tutor/trainers

l Development of partnership networks

The original ‘Commissioning’ document suggested that the programme should seek to provide support for the Pathfinder projects, as well as to target resources outside of the original 18 Pathfinder areas to develop ‘Take Part’ approaches to increase participation in training of trainers programme. In order to meet these priorities the project team committed itself to working in: l Areas with established networks in place, willing and able to co-operate with the project. This was particular pertinent at the beginning of phase one given the challenging shortage of lead-in time. l Areas that sought to build on the work of the Take Part Pathfinder programme in specific localities l Adults in other marginalised communities with less developed Take Part networks, programmes and infrastructure

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l Adults in any of the targeted communities with an interest in active citizenship and experience in community involvement wishing to develop teaching and training skills The team took a principled decision that all learning programmes would be delivered in community settings, venues and environments where local people would feel comfortable. The fact that most WEA regions were already delivering active citizenship and teacher training courses meant that there was considerable existing teaching capacity and experience to drawn upon across the regions.

2.5

Evaluation process and approach:

This end of project evaluation has been conducted by the WEA Yorkshire and Humber region and adopted a process of encompassing qualitative as well as quantitative approaches based on:

l Project records of attendance, and participant profile at courses and activities

l Tutor and organiser reports

l Interviews with project organisers

l Interviews with participants

l Interviews with the administrative and management team

l Interviews with partners

l Collection of participant evaluations at courses

l Questionnaires, case study reports

l Focus group activities

l A small number of evaluations were conducted by telephone or Skype

This evaluation focused on:

l Personal and group benefits

l Skills and knowledge gained

l What has been the successes and impact

l Lessons learned

Evidence of key outcomes and successes can be found throughout this report and in the appended case studies.

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3 The Learning Programme: outcomes, evidence of success and added value This section gives an overview of the courses and activities offered by the project. Included is a summary of the course aims and content. In addition evidence is offered of success and impact from participant feedback and case studies. More in depth case studies can also be found at the end of the report as well as on the Take Part website www.takepart.org. The learning programme was delivered across all nine English regions by the WEA and NAVCA qualified team of tutor / trainers, experienced in community-based adult education. The project team committed itself to working in areas with established networks in place, willing and able to co-operate with the project, areas that sought to build on the work of the Take Part Pathfinder Programme; adults in other marginalised communities with less developed Take Part networks, programmes and infrastructure.

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3.1

Courses and activities

At the heart of the provision were a series of ‘active citizenship’ focused courses. Each developed with the aim of being flexible, responsive to need, and at the same time acknowledging and building on previous models of good practice.

l

Introduction to Active Citizenship

l

Introduction to Train the Trainers

l

City and Guilds 7303 – Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship

NAVCA Democracy Day Conferences

l

l

Strengthening Democracy Day Conferences

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Subject Venue

Start Date

Introduction

Sheffield

Nov 2009

14

Mansfield

Dec 2009

16

to Active

Reading

Jan 2010

15

Citizenship

Morpeth

Feb 2010

9

Leeds

Feb 2010

12

Bridlington

Feb 2010

13

Birmingham

Jun 2010

12

Sunderland

Jun 2010

10

Burnley

Nov 2010

8

Total

Number of Learners

109

Summary This is a 10 hour non-accredited course and explores the meaning of active citizenship, theoretical and practical, as well as the values and principles that underpin social purpose education.

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The course is designed to encourage and motivate participants to relate these ideas to their own experiences and practice, and is of particular interest to those who are interested in becoming active within their own community and who want to explore active citizenship and tutor/training further. The course content enables participants to: l Define what is meant by active citizenship and understand active citizenship values and principles l Critically engage with these ideas/definitions in relation to their own experiences and expectations

l Demonstrate how ‘taking part’ can and has brought about significant change

l Develop some personal ‘tools’ for taking part in active citizenship

l Explore being a potential active citizenship tutor/trainer

Courses were offered in partnership with a range of organisations to include:

l Sure Starts and Children’s Centres

l A Women’s Health education project in Sunderland

l Take Part Pathfinder Yorkshire and Humber region

l Take Part Pathfinder East Midlands region.

l Refugee Education and Training Advisory Service

l The Key Centre, in Bridlington aimed at getting young people into work

l Councils for Voluntary Service

l Voluntary and Community Sector organisations

Evidence of Success

4 Increased awareness and involvement in the project

4 Community groups and networks supported

4 Individuals reporting that they feel more confident and motivated to ‘get involved’

4 Increased take-up of volunteering opportunities

4 Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in active citizenship and tutor/ trainer methods and approaches 4 Increased knowledge about local government structures and how to influence decision-making at a local level

4 Increased take-up of other educational opportunities, including involvement in teacher training programmes such as Introduction to Train the Trainers and PTTLS courses

4 New curriculum materials development (see section 4.4 Curriculum Resources File)

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Participant feedback: I will now be able to tackle things with greater knowledge and confidence’ - Burnley participant

The course has given me greater knowledge of our rights and responsibilities as British citizens - Bridlington student

the course was a positive and motivating experience for all involved, and has encouraged members to become more active in their own communities – with some working on a project to improve health awareness in cervical screening and provide a community listening service

Additionally feedback from the Women’s Health Organisation suggested,

An ‘added’ value activity included the tutor on the Burnley course supporting participants with developing a funding application for a community project.

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Case Study: Bridlington Course A two-day Introduction to Active Citizenship was offered at the Key Centre in Bridlington to a group of young people in their late teens and early twenties. The course encouraged lively debate around the ideas of active citizenship, rights and responsibilities, taking part and bringing about change. Day 1 included an exercise looking at what they would like to change. The subject of bullying came up and the group invented BABA (Bridlington AntiBullying Alliance) and became very engaged in discussing ways in which they would go about setting up such a group and how they might get the message across. On day 2, the group explored further what it means to be a citizen or subject, rights and responsibilities, what changes in the world have ever been brought about by citizens grouping together, why migrants / immigrants work so hard for so little, understanding the words ‘dogmatic’ as opposed to ‘pragmatic’. This was a very positive couple of days where young people, who had admitted to usually ‘being bored out of their skulls’, were able to engage in discussions about abstract ideas and concepts, to ponder on modes of thinking that were totally unfamiliar to them including the nature of society, class, where things like ‘rights’ came from and whether or not anything might be changed – for them or the world.

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Subject Venue

Start Date

Number of Learners

Barnsley

Jan 2010

18

Brighton

Mar 2010

12

South Shields

Mar 2010

13

Preston

Mar 2010

10

Hartlepool

May 2010

16

Portsmouth

Jul 2010

11

Southampton

Nov 2010

10

London

Nov 2010

11

Blackburn

Nov 2010

13

Introduction to Train the Trainers

Total

114

Summary This is a 10 hour non-accredited course and aims to build confidence, skills and knowledge of teaching and learning methods and approaches within an active citizenship context.

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The course is designed for participants including those who are interested in becoming adult educators, through to those who are active in their community and want to explore tutor/training, as well as active citizenship, further. The course content enables participants to: l Identify the role, responsibilities and boundaries of a tutor/trainer within an adult education context l Define what is meant by active citizenship and understand active citizenship values and practice l Engage with ideas/definitions in relation to their own experiences and expectations l Explore the potential of moving on to the City and Guilds in Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector Courses were offered in partnership with a range of organisations to include:

l Community Workers in partnership with the Primary Care Trust in Barnsley

l South Tyneside Council (Democracy Services)

l Councils for Voluntary Service, including Brighton,

l Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, including Black and Minority Ethnic groups and organisations

l Take Part Pathfinder (Skills Share) in the North East region

l Take Part Pathfinder in Portsmouth

l Take Part Pathfinder Brighton and Hove

l Regional Take Part Champions – London Civic Forum and Southern region

l Hartlepool Community Housing project

Evidence of Success

4 Increased awareness and involvement in the project

4 Community groups and networks supported

4 Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in tutor/trainer methods and approaches

4 Increased opportunity for community activists to become tutor/trainers

4 Increased take-up of other educational opportunities, including involvement in teacher training programmes such as PTTLS and Certificate in Education courses 4 New curriculum materials development (see section 4.4 Curriculum Resources File)

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Participant feedback:

A good introduction to the role of the trainer Developed my skills as a health trainer

Participants from the Barnsley and London courses said, the course provided:

I really enjoyed the course and am more likely to pursue a career in teaching and training

I felt I learnt lots on this course about training and would like to do the PTTLS course

Enhanced my career prospects

The group interaction and team work was well worth it as it gave me loads of new ideas

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Case Study: Barnsley Course For the activity of the mini-project on planning a session, learners worked in teams and were encouraged to plan a session that they could deliver in their locality. One team did their planning around a walking activity on Phoenix Park in the Dearne Valley and produced an excellent resource pack to go with their presentation. The walk is going to take place in February with a group of hard to reach clients and they have used the slogan “Be Active Choose Walking.The team hadn’t planned anything like this before and were nervous about doing the presentation, but are now very excited about putting it into practice – and getting people active who may then want to go on to other activities. One of the other teams decided to plan their session around reducing salt in your diet. They went out to all the Working Men’s Clubs in their area of Athersley and New Lodge in Barnsley and asked if they could come in on planned dates to talk to people, provide information and do activities around their topic. They carried out their planned sessions this week and showed great commitment in seeking to engage some hard to reach people in quite a challenging area. This was a new challenge for this team of young adults new to community development work. They developed new skills and also grew in confidence.

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Subject Venue

Start Date

Sheffield

Jan 2010

18

Exeter

Jan 2010

15

London

Feb 2010

15

Carlisle

Feb 2010

12

City & Guilds 7303 – Preparing to Teach in

Norwich

Apr 2010

14

Leeds

Jun 2010

14

the Lifelong

Durham

Jul 2010

10

Learning Sector

Preston

Jul 2010

9

Stockton

Jul 2010

13

Mansfield

Aug 2010

12

Stoke

Sep 2010

14

Sutton

Oct 2010

15

Hastings

Nov 2010

15

Bradford

Nov 2010

16

Total

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Number of Learners

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Summary This course is accredited with City and Guilds and was offered as a 40 hour programme. It aims to build a wide range of skills and knowledge related to teaching and training within an adult education context. The course is designed for participants who are interested in becoming adult educators, as well as those who are active in their community and want to explore tutor/training as well as active citizenship further. It provides a ‘first step’ into their teaching and learning journey as well as a recognised qualification. The course content enables participants to: l Identify the role, responsibilities and boundaries of a tutor/trainer within an adult education context

l justify appropriate teaching and learning approaches in a specialist area

l demonstrate session planning skills

l explain how to deliver inclusive sessions which motivate learners

l explain the use of different assessment methods and the need for record keeping l define what is meant by active citizenship and relate these ideas and definitions to their own experiences and practice

l explore the idea of being an active citizenship tutor/trainer

Courses were offered in partnership with a range of organisations to include:

l Take Part Pathfinder Yorkshire and Humber region

l Take Part Pathfinder Southern region

l Take Part Pathfinder Sutton

l Take Part Pathfinder Thurrock

l Inspire East

l Take Part Pathfinder East Midlands region.

l Refugee Education and Training Advisory Service

l Councils for Voluntary Service including Exeter, Carlisle, Preston and Southwark

l Citizen Advice Bureau

l Sure Start and Children’s centre in Carlisle

l Voluntary and Community Sector organisations including BME and asylum seekers and refugee groups in Preston and Stockton

l Asian Women’s group in Bradford

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Evidence of Success 4 Increased awareness and involvement in the project 4 Community groups and networks supported 4 Increased joint working, particularly to promote teacher/ training skills in active citizenship 4 Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in tutor/trainer methods and approaches 4 Increased opportunity for community activists to become tutor/trainers 4 Increased take-up of other educational opportunities, including involvement in teacher training programmes such as PTTLS and Certificate in Education courses 4 Increase in individuals gaining a City and Guilds recognised teacher training qualification 4 Individuals reporting that they feel more confident to apply what they have learned on the course to their work in the community 4 New curriculum materials development – PTTLS in active citizenship (see section 4.4 Curriculum Resources File)

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Participant feedback:

I feel I can deliver learning in a much more inclusive way

I have become ‘less stale’ in the methods I use

The course has helped me achieve the qualification needed to seek employment with FE providers of adult education

One local authority officer on the Sheffield course suggested:

I would like to continue with another teaching course – and looking to do the CTTLS (Certificate to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector) course

I will be applying my learning to my work

And finally a participant on the Bradford course said:

The course has increased my confidence in the delivery of activities and a desire to develop new courses to improve understanding of community cohesion policy and practice

Comments from a participant on the Sutton course said: I plan to apply my learning (newly acquired skills) to my volunteering position

I have greater confidence with teaching and learning methods

The course has been very good for community cohesion – we could do with more opportunities like these to meet women from other cultures

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An ‘added’ value activity: given that the PTTLS course is assessed at level 3 it was important for the project to offer additional study skills support including the provision of literacy, numeracy and ICT. A number of the participants on the Bradford PTTLS course commented that the extra help and support offered was brilliant.

Case Study: Sheffield Course ‘In November 2009, I was accepted as a volunteer facilitator for community justice panels in Sheffield. At interview they mentioned that there may be opportunities for me to become an accredited restorative justice practices trainer which would involve me training more volunteer facilitators in the city. I was excited to hear about this course because it would be useful for me in preparing to take up future opportunities offered by the Safer Communities department of Sheffield City Council so that the community justice panels could be expanded in the city. The learning on this course goes way beyond my own learning. It equipped me and all other learners on the course with skills, knowledge and recognised qualifications to go out into communities to support others in becoming more active citizens in a variety of ways. This course made a difference to my life and it will make a difference to the lives of those that I and other learners will work with as tutors. The course will enable us to have a positive social impact on those we interact with in our jobs, in our voluntary activities and in our political campaigning.

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Subject Venue

Start Date

Oxford

Mar 2010

26

NAVC

Portsmouth

Mar 2010

41

Day

Southwark

Mar 2010

8

Conferences

Cumbria

Jun 2010

24

Nottingham

Jul 2010

29

Norwich

Jul 2010

22

Bolton

Jul 2010

37

Cornwall

Jul 2010

25

Total

Number of Learners

212

Summary The NAVCA day conferences built upon the work of the Take Part programme and explored civic structures and local decision-making procedures.

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The NAVCA Day Conferences sought to enable participants to: l Develop an understanding of how local public decision making structures work and how community members can become involved and gain influence l Develop an understanding of the voluntary and community sector and its role in supporting community engagement and participation l Gain an awareness of how local people and organisations can influence national policy making l Further develop effective tutor/ trainer skills Format and approach NAVCA worked in partnership with Local Infrastructure Organisations (LIOs) across England, WEA organisers, Parliamentary Outreach, and public sector bodies to provide a combination of national and local expert information, including: l Nottingham Council for Voluntary Service l Concrete Solutions l Voluntary Sector North West l East Cornwall Council for Voluntary Service l Cornwall Council l Take Part Cornwall l Community First Portsmouth l Portsmouth County Council l Bolton Council for Voluntary Service l Bolton Council l Voluntary Action Norwich l Cumbria Council for Voluntary Service l Cumbria Strategic Partnership l Oxfordshire County Council l Local Councillors and Member of Parliament The conferences used a variety of different learning approaches including open forum workshops and the use of social media and new technologies to explore the democratic system and develop new ways to influence decision-making processes. Evidence of Success 4 Increased awareness and involvement in the project 4 Increased awareness of NI4 indicators – how to get involved and influence 4 Increased awareness of local and national decision-making processes 4 Increased confidence in personal ability to bring about change 4 Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in active citizenship and tutor/ trainer methods and approaches 4 Improved networks for information, resources and skills sharing and active engagement with the project 4 Increased awareness of community ‘empowerment’ agendas

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Participant feedback:

Thank you – I learnt a lot and feel more empowered as a UK citizen – Oxford

I am overwhelmed by the information and knowledge gained - Southwark

This is something our project will benefit from - Nottingham

I can explain it to other Polish people - Nottingham

Really interesting and valuable… Interesting and knowledgeable speakers... Varied topics and differing ideas given Nottingham

Inspiration for use of media and facebook and wireless for campaigning and communication - Nottingham

It’s given me the confidence to become a more active member of my own local community - Southwark

Much better understanding of how Parliament structures work and how to use them - Portsmouth

This is something our project will benefit from, gaining additional skills and being more positive about influencing policies and services

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Participant feedback:

In the year I have been a county councillor and prior to that two years as chair of a campaign group, I am still amazed at the apathy of most people. Unless someone is actually affected by certain matters they usually have no interest in becoming involved. This is a tragic indictment of our society today; anything we can do to change this attitude would be a bonus

When taking an active part in community work its easy to become discouraged due to lack of support by local and national authorities. These courses will hopefully help to focus our efforts to become more effective

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Case Study: Democracy Days The style of the events was both informal, fast moving, and open to the differing needs of the audience who were educated and entertained in equal measure. The project drew on NAVCA’s membership network in order to create events with a local emphasis and expertise whilst also having the national policy expertise in the Improving Local Partnerships Unit (ILPU). At a local level, officers of NAVCA’s member organisation and of the local authority were involved in delivery and workshop discussions enabling the connection between the national and the local to be drawn. WEA organisers were closely involved in the planning and delivery of the events. Feedback has confirmed that the events were enjoyable as much as they were informative. Here are a few comments from participants. Thank you – I learnt a lot and feel more empowered as a UK citizen – Oxford I am overwhelmed by the info and knowledge gained – Southwark Inspiration for use of media, Facebook and wireless for campaigning and communication – Nottingham Inspired me to go away and use and get more benefits from technology – Bolton There was good evidence from the feedback from events that participants felt very positive about their ability to influence – a potentially positive outcome in relation the NI4 (% of people who feel they can influence decisions in their locality). Whilst the events were highly successful, as evidenced by the feedback analysis, they also built capacity and connections for NAVCA that have resulted in further delivery of Democracy Days beyond the end of the Train the Take Part Trainers project. NAVCA’s flagship training in representation and partnership, called Skilling Up for Stronger Voices, also benefited from having a highly complementary event format that will now be used alongside the development and delivery of the Skilling Up programme to add value to this training. The event has also involved participants who would not normally be targeted by a Skilling Up event and yet are future participants in it as partnership and representative arrangements at a local level change considerably with the new policy landscape created by the coalition government.

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Subject Venue

Start Date

Number of Learners

Curriculum Conference

Sheffield

Sept 2009

27

Women Making a Difference

South Shields

Feb 2010

19

Climate Change/E-democracy

Stoke

Mar 2010

17

Study visit to Parliament

Leeds/London

Mar 2010

21

Introduction to Active Citizenship

Slough

Mar 2010

17

Tutor Briefing

London

Mar 2010

21

Strengthening Democracy

London

Mar 2010

16

Active Citizenship

Durham

Mar 2010

14

Active Citizenship

Bridge Sulgrave

Mar 2010

14

Strengthening Democracy

Stoke

Jun 2010

13

Strengthening Democracy

Leicester

Jun 2010

18

Climate Change

Hastings

Jun 2010

12

Women be Heard

Slough

Jul 2010

18

Understanding Migration

Hastings

Sep 2010

13

Citizenship Workshop

Manchester

Sep 2010

10

Citizenship Workshop

Cumbria

Sep 2010

10

Citizenship Workshop

Liverpool

Sep 2010

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Subject Venue

Start Date

Women & Politics/Study Visit to Parliament

Bradford/London

Oct 2010

28

Women & Politics - Does Poltics need Parliament

Bradford

Oct 2010

28

Making Women Heard

Hastings

Oct 2010

8

Democracy in the Big Society

London

Oct 2010

11

Democracy

Adur

Nov 2010

12

Sharing Resources

Sheffield

Dec 2010

12

Total

Number of Learners

369

Summary

These one day or two day workshops provided an opportunity to explore a range of ‘active citizenship’ themes, ideas and definitions, as well as build broader political perspectives. Course content: To l promote critical thinking and develop theoretical approaches to active citizenship education

l explore teaching methods and approaches

l share models of practice from the UK and elsewhere

l provide resources and materials for trainers

Format and approach The format of the day conferences largely drew upon the short, active citizenship courses developed by the Transformation Fund project including the Strengthening Democracy tutor pack. Others were offered based on the needs and interest of the group. The 5 hour sessions covered a range of political and campaigning issues such as:

l Climate Change

l E-Democracy

l Understanding Migration

l Challenging Racism

l Why Vote?

l Women Be Heard

l Introductory active citizenship / political education courses linked to Study Visits to the Houses of Parliament

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The events gave an opportunity for existing tutor/trainers to further develop their teaching skills and knowledge as well as provide new and interesting teaching materials for them to use in a variety of community context. Courses were offered in partnership with a range of organisations to include:

l Take Part Pathfinder Tower Hamlets

l Take Part Northumberland

l Take Part Pathfinder Brighton and Hove

l Voluntary Action Hastings

l Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups and organisations in Leeds, Stoke, Slough and Adur l Work with women including BME communities in Adur, Bradford, Hastings, Slough, and South Shields

l Regional Take Part Champions – London Civic Forum

l Creative Communities - Stoke University

l Staffordshire University

l Southwark Council

l Southwark Volunteer Centre

l Local Councillors and Members of Parliament

Evidence of Success

4 Increased take-up of volunteering opportunities

4 Increased take-up of other educational opportunities

4 Greater opportunity for community activists to become adult educators/ community leaders

4 Greater awareness of how to campaign effectively

4 Greater involvement by local councillors and Members of Parliament

4 Increased awareness of the role of MPs and how Parliament functions

4 Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in active citizenship and tutor/ trainer methods and approaches 4 Increased awareness of community ‘empowerment’ agendas, including Big Society 4 Increased engagement of under-represented groups in civic activism, and participation, including community leadership roles 4 Community organisations aware of and using the curriculum resources developed by the project 4 New ‘Strengthening Democracy’ curriculum materials developed – (see section 4.4 Curriculum Resources File)

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Comments from Strengthening Democacy participants:

I have gained a better understanding of how Parliament works

The course has improved my knowledge of politics, and the civil liberties agenda, as well as helped to gain insights into active citizenship values and principles

I am able to apply what I have learned on the course to my work in the community

I feel more confident to speak out on issues that concern me at a local level

Bringing out the best of what people can do

To encourage people to understand/debate and involve themselves in such important issues

The learning materials are innovative, well produced, and will be very useful in my role as a community tutor

Changes can occur when likeminded people join together

Having the motivation to research ideas and move forward a project which will involve the setting up and running of a community shop/cafĂŠ run by volunteers

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An ‘added’ value activity included a sharing of curriculum resources event which brought together colleagues from four WEA regions to include, North East, North West, East Midlands and Yorkshire and Humber regions. New materials have been developed to support the work of a range of community empowerment initiatives from Tackling Race Inequalities, Transformation Fund, Learning for Community Involvement, Take Part Pathfinder, Regional Take Part Champions, and Train the Take Part Trainers programme.

Case Study: Women be Heard Course, Hastings It was a good course. I liked reviewing history, the suffragette movement, that put things into context. A discussion arose about the difference between suffragettes and suffragists. Some of the women had never heard of them in their education, so it started a discussion about voting and women’s rights. I enjoyed working through some personal issues and looking at how you can make them into a campaign; it broadens the personal into a wider political context. One of the women on the course has a son who is being picked on by a security officer at Tesco so we looked at the issues involved about security, the use of security cameras and child-protection. It was about using the personal to look at your rights and explore what you want to do about it. The woman concerned was able to write to Tescos as a result of this. The input of the local councillor was interesting. She was a good role model as she was ‘ordinary’, a young mum who wanted to do something in her own community in Hollington about the local BNP and it spurred her on to be a councillor. It’s made me go back to looking at the Fawcett Society. I did a presentation on one of their papers on ‘stereotyping in the workplace.’ It was something I was aware of, but it was useful having this as a resource to use as well as my own personal experience of the issue. Since the course I’ve looked into other networking and activities. I went to the Feminist Conference in London; so it’s given me stuff to build on. As far as Women’s Voice goes, it’s giving me good networking opportunities so I can function better in my role as secretary. Women’s Voice is concerned with the empowerment of women locally, especially marginalised and isolated women. Doing the course has helped me to think about ways we can support them. Hastings course participant

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Study visits to Parliament Parliament Trips – organised with the Parliamentary Outreach Team 49 participants from Leeds, Bradford and Wakefield attended study visits to the Houses of Parliament The visits included both men and women from a diverse range of ethnic backgrounds and ages The following MP’s were involved in some part of the day MP Area Covered

Met/Contribution to trip

John Battle Greg Mulholland Fabian Hamilton Terry Rooney

Labour - Leeds West Liberal Democrat - Leeds North West Labour - Leeds North East Labour - Bradford North

Learners met the their MP’s

Yvette Cooper Paul Truswell

Labour - Pontefract & Castleford Labour – Pudsey, Horsforth & Aireborough

MP’s not able to meet learners but provided tickets for gallery)

Hilary Benn

Labour – Leeds Central

Sent message of support

Women learners Bradford attended on 20 October 2010 - 28 attended David Ward Gerry Sutcliffe

Liberal Democrat – Bradford East Labour – Bradford South

Learners met the their MP’s

The visits to Parliament helped build trust in the democratic process, particularly important in the wake of the MPs’ expenses scandal, and strengthened relations between communities and their elected members. Members of Parliament supported the Train the Take Part Trainers project and made time to meet learners and provide information about how Parliament works as well as explaining the role of an MP. These events were also supported by the Parliamentary Outreach team. Evidence of Success

4 Increased engagement of under-represented groups

4 Improved personal confidence and self-belief

4 Increased knowledge and skills

4 Increased take-up of volunteering opportunities

4 Increased take-up of other educational opportunities, including the accredited PTTLS course

4 Greater opportunity for community activists to become adult educators

4 Increased communication and engagement with Members of Parliament and local councillors

4 Increased awareness of the role of MPs and of how Parliament functions

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Participants liked the course and the study visit because:

One woman from Bradford course commented,

It made me think about what I could do

They saw different and active roles in the community

there are a lot of people from different backgrounds in Bradford that would benefit from the study visit. Many females feel they don’t have a place in that sort of things. We are all getting to know each other... more awareness. How to get in touch with your MPs, how to be active and the benefits of being involved as a group of women

We looked at how politics works. Seeing and telling is a different story

I learnt about local MP surgeries. It made me feel positive that I could have things taken further. We will follow it up now. It makes us feel better

The parliamentary visit taught them a great deal about how government works but also about themselves:

There’s a lot of jargon but we asked questions of our MP. We asked him why Bradford was so run down? What he was going to do about it?

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Now we have awareness about what politics is about. I’ve watched it on TV but the experience of going was an eyeopener. It’s detached on television but when you are there, you think you can have an impact. We never thought we would go


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As well as focusing on contemporary issues, and raising these directly with MPs, participants also explored issues in political history relevant to today. One outcome, particularly exciting for WEA, was the establishment of a new WEA Women’s Branch in Bradford. The Big Society at large!

Future actions include: “I would like to be a community leader – get more Asian women into politics because in Pakistan it’s different to here. We need to get girls interested at schools etc.” “We need for women to get out more and be more aware of what is going on. It’s about bringing women together. It’s socializing, bringing people together. It’s exploring similarities.” “I’d like to become a volunteer, get more women involved in training, maybe become involved in paid tutoring.” “I’m doing a Key Stage 2 assembly in the local school based on my visit.” “I would like to be a school governor, would give voluntary time as long as I can work it round my family.” “I want to go down the road of more understanding. I have no understanding of European politics and how it affects us.”

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3.2

Learning Methods

All the provision aimed to be learner-led recognising and building upon learners’ previous experiences and expectations. Participants were encouraged to see themselves as part of a wider social purpose education movement, with a strong historic legacy, and were asked to consider ways in which they might be able to contribute to community life beyond the courses. The initial research activity into ‘training of trainers’ identified models of what might work best. The following principles were seen as best practice approaches: In one excellent TP evaluation participants were asked what made a good ToT programme. (de Oteyza, C, (2007) Community Education and Social Change, Training the Trainers, Community Audit and Evaluation Centre MMU and Take Part, Manchester). The evaluation highlighted the need for provision which was:

l participatory

l full of ideas from everyone

l challenging

l well resourced and well managed

l fit for purpose and useful

Courses should:

l have excellent facilitators

l have great group work and relevant activities

l be friendly, lively and fun

l encourage and build confidence

l be diverse

l share really useful knowledge

l make participants feel they have really learnt something

l have great learning techniques and theories and relate them practically to active citizenship In that context the programme was planned with ‘Active Learning for Active Citizenship’ at its heart, and placed firmly within a framework of good democratic teaching and learning methodology in order to provide practical development opportunities for the range of potential trainers. The learning activities would be experiential, participative and would draw participants own experiences and expectations. ‘Active participation’ and open, transparent dialogue would be central to the learning experience at all times, within an ethos of reflective and critical dialogue.

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This was further supported by the Bradford Women who confirmed a need for accessibility: “Classes are convenient, comfortable; timing is good, tutor friendly, everyone in the same circumstances and at the same level.” “It didn’t feel as if we were in a classroom.” “We did a questionnaire – how many MPs there are but it was fun – Really learnt about how Parliament worked. I thought it was all in one place, all the same people.” “I wondered about it at first but it was all just a fantastic experience – not too much boring stuff. It just sunk in.” Additionally other respondents said that in their experience Training of Trainers programmes had ‘worked best’ when, ‘people felt connected to local activity and they could go out after their training and make an impact’ and ‘when the training fitted in to their life and they really understood it and it was genuinely accessible’. Finally one respondent said: “Training of Trainers is most effective when you relate training to real issues. For example what better example can you have for getting people to use their vote than when a BNP candidate is standing for election?”

3.3

Evidence of added value

The programme of courses proved successful in their own right but there was “added value” which will sustain some of the best work developed through the prospect and will lead to new initiatives in the future. These were: l

Memorandum of Understanding developed between NAVCA and WEA Chief Executive’s which aims to build closer links nationally and amongst members locally, and on developing shared policy positions. This collaboration builds on NAVCA and WEA’s shared interests and values

l

Train the Take Part Trainers activity has made a quantifiable difference in some areas – case studies showcasing evidence of impact of active citizenship in practice and which demonstrates increased levels of participation and engagement by both individuals and members of community groups and organisations

l Some existing community partnerships have increased in strength and confidence as a result of the project. Elsewhere, new partnerships and innovative ways of working have emerged l There is evidence of active citizenship /tutor training work developing beyond those areas funded through the Take Part Pathfinder programme

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l Some individuals report increased communication and engagement with Members of Parliament and local councillors arising out of study visits element of the programme l

Support from Government Office and National Empowerment Partnerships has led to increased engagement in other community empowerment initiatives, including WEA regions bidding successfully to the Regional Take Part Champions and Development Fund. DCLG looked to the project to increase community active citizenship/tutor training activity in these areas in line with their priorities

l

Some areas successfully attracted additional funding for active citizenship/ tutor training activity. For example: contact with Thurrock Pathfinder project led to a new funding opportunity for WEA, Eastern region. £10,000 was procured to:

- offer a briefing to WEA organisers and tutors in the newly developed City and Guilds 7303 in Active Citizenship course - offer the course to those involved in the Take Part Pathfinder project either as community citizenship ‘mentors’ and/or local activists - 17 participants completed the course and further courses have been planned

l NAVCA is continuing to organize and extend ‘Democracy’ day conferences into new areas and with new learners – these have developed out of contact with Parliamentary Outreach and Concrete Solutions – both have been contributors in activities offered by the Train the Take Part Trainers programme

l NAVCA and local partner organisations are continuing to support previous learners by making resources available

l Regional level events are being conceived in some areas e.g. a ‘Strengthening Democracy’ day event has been planned with Local Councillors and Adur CVS to focus on active citizenship within the context of the Big Society

l Community organisations and groups are making use of the curriculum materials produced by the project. For example Carmel Bridge, London Civic Forum, Hounslow Council and CVS who are using Active Citizenship materials to carry out further work

l The Curriculum Resources file is being shared across WEA regions and are available ‘free of charge’ on the Take Part website – www.takepart.org Overall, new relationships have been formed which will contribute to the sustainability of these types of programmes, those proven ways of working, and the values and principles embedded at all levels.

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3.4 Participant progression

Number of As a Learners percentage

Learning Outcomes Achieved

885

96%

Learning Outcomes Not Achieved

36

4%

Of those participants who declared information, 4.5 per cent had gone into new paid employment: 17.44 per cent continuing with existing programmes of study, and 10.37per cent had progressed on to further or higher education. In addition, 12.45 per cent had progressed to a volunteering opportunity and a further 1.24 per cent went on to volunteer with the WEA.

Learner Destinations Continuing existing programme of study

42

17.44%

New programme of study within the WEA

45

18.68%

Further education

20

8.30%

Higher edcuation

5

2.07%

New/changed employment

11

4.56%

Continuing current employment

71

29.46%

Other adult education outside the WEA

13

5.39%

Not intending to stay in learning

1

0.41%

WEA volunteer work

3

1.24%

Other volunteer work

30

12.45%

4 In terms of practical application participants anticipated using their new skills in a number of ways: One participant said, “I am planning on using this knowledge in training people in my community to challenge some problems there. I have recently been working on guns, gangs and crime in a Sheffield neighbourhood and we have got the community together to address that. We have had a day conference with speaker and a Question Time panel with the Director of Education. A lot more is going to come out of that. I have had to really concentrate my mind and I have just applied to do the City and Guilds course.�

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And “Doing the course has given me the confidence to set up Pennine Way School Supporters Association – It’s like a PTA but opened it out to community. And doing PTLLS has given me a boost like chairing meetings and stuff… I no longer feel intimidated whoever’s there – be Head, Deputy Head, anybody. The course has given me a lot more confidence.” Finally one participant said “My oldest son … wasn’t going to go and vote but I made him sit down and watch the debates on the telly when it was time for voting. I said to him ‘how are we ever going to change anything…?’ So he sat and watched it and rang me to say ‘I’ve voted’ I was dead proud of him.”

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4 Project Results - Outputs and Outcomes The project successfully reached over 1,000 participants. The planned targets were set against the number of activities to be delivered and individual participants reached.

Target Output

Actual Output

Planned Activity Number of Number of courses Participants

Number of Courses Delivered

Number of Participants Reached

Introduction to Active Citizenship

9

90

9

109

Introduction to Train the Trainer

6

60

9

114

City & Guilds 7303 (PTTLS) Course

9

135

14

192

Strengthening Democracy Day Conferences

18

360

23

369

Democracy Day Conferences (NAVCA)

9

180

8

212

4.1

Reasons for participation

The reasons for participation in the Train the Take Part Trainers project were varied, and in line with the key outcomes of the project. Participants commented via a precourse questionnaire that they wanted to: l Develop their confidence, skills and knowledge to become a Take Part Tutor/ Trainer

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l Improve their employment prospects

l Become qualified in their subject

l Gain a recognised teaching qualification

l Develop an awareness of active citizenship concepts and approaches

l Become an active citizen

l Become a community leader

l Encourage more women into politics

l Provide a ‘next step’ on their learning journey


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The project was successful in involving participants from a wide variety of different backgrounds, cultures and educational experiences and expectations. To include individual participants, members of community-based groups, through to local councillors, employers, public, community and voluntary sector employees and community activists. A large majority of the participants enrolled on one or more of the courses because they were already ‘active citizens’ and had an interest in developing their work, and finding out more, or because they were already tutor/trainers or keen to become one. For example One participant who attended an Introduction to Active Citizenship course and is a school governor of an NHS Care Trust said: “I do a lot in my community, but I want to know more, I want to do more. I feel like I really need to keep on top of what is happening – as a citizen - and I want to make sure that I meet others who want to make a difference.” And another seeking more concrete information about how to become more effective said: “I want to familiarize myself with democracy and how local organisations function’ and her colleague said: “I want to learn more about being actively involved in democratic groups and how to be most effective with them… to know how community groups can successfully interact with the local authority.” Finally one participant said: “I do a lot of voluntary work around mental health – including promoting walking in the city. I’ve come along because I have the desire to become more active as a citizen. I’ve not been active for a long time.” For others, participation is an opportunity to ‘retrain’ and to gain confidence. In the words of one participant who has completed an Introduction to Active Citizenship course and intends to enrol on the City & Guilds 7303 course: “When you come to a new country, if you are not very confident and have become isolated (I am usually outgoing) you just lose your confidence. You don’t speak because if you are speaking no one is going to listen to you. When this happens you withdraw and you let a lot happen in your life that you should do things about. I am a trained teacher and I want to teach again in my community as an active citizen.”

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4.2 Participant Profile In order to meet the project objectives the team committed itself to working with multiple community groups and individuals, with one of its priorities to target some of its resources at working with ‘members of marginalised communities with less developed Take Part networks, programmes and infrastructure’. All planned targets were set against the number of activities to be delivered and individual participants reached. Of the participants whose gender was recorded, 71 per cent were women, 29 per cent male. And whilst the project team actively sought the involvement of men this is in line with the expected proportion of men for informal adult and community learning, where traditionally male participation is low. (see Figure 1)

TTP Percentages of All Enrolments - National Level

Figure 1

Over 45 per cent of participants lived in disadvantaged post-code areas. Where disability was recorded, 20 per cent of participants stated they had either a physical or learning disability. Of the participants whose ethnicity was recorded, over 27 per cent were from Black and Minority Ethnic groups and organisations. Only 12 per cent of participants started the courses with a below level 2 qualification as opposed to 69 per cent who started with a level 2 qualification or higher. This reflects the higher level of skills required to become an adult education practitioner, and was a particularly important requirement for the PTTLS course.

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The most common age group for all participants is 25–54 with 70 per cent of participants reached in this age group. (see Figure 2) Of those declared 2 per cent are 16-18; 9 per cent are 19-29; 19 per cent are 25-34; 29 per cent are 35-44; 22 per cent are 45-54, and19 per cent aged 55 and above.

TTP Percentages of All Enrolments - National Level

Figure 2

NB: Based on Enrolments with Age Known & valid

It could be seen that the engagement of younger participants (48 per cent aged between 25 and 44) might reflect the potential employment opportunities being offered by the project aimed at: increased, confidence, skills and knowledge, increased opportunity for community activists to become tutor/trainers, and an opportunity to gain a recognised teacher/ trainer qualification and so forth. Further, the evaluation questionnaire noted that many participants asked for more qualification-based courses which could be seen as a desire to improve individual employment prospects. The statistics are based on 826 recorded participants, out of a total of 1,083 participants who engaged with the programme.

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Regional perspectives The project was delivered in all English regions and there are some noticeable regional variations, differences and similarities including: l Overall achievement and success rates on accredited courses were over 85%, and over 96% on non-accredited courses l Average achievement rates were over 90%; with day schools and conferences achieving 100%; this is not surprising given the nature and mode of delivery of the day schools and short courses

l PTTLS courses achieved higher success rate in some regions; for example South West region recorded 100% success rates, this may be due to the fact that only one PTTLS course was offered in region; Eastern, North West and Southern all achieved over 90% success rates on accredited programmes; Y&H region recorded the lowest success rates of just over 55.6% during phase one. This was largely due to the high level of additional support needs required by some participants

l Higher proportions of male participants were recorded in Yorkshire & Humber, East Midlands and London regions, and particularly during phase one Yorkshire & Humber and East Midland regions recorded 34.5% and 50% respectively; London region recorded 40.9% of male involvement during phase two. These are much higher percentages than those funded through the Adult Safeguarded Budget for 2009–10: 75% female and 25% male

l Fewer physically disabled learners in London but twice the national average in East Midlands l Over three times the national average of enrolments from people with learning disabilities in the South West region l Over half of all participants engaged in North West region were from BME communities l Lower proportions of BME participants in North East, Eastern and South West regions l Higher percentage of participants living in disadvantaged post code areas in the North East, North West and London regions l People with the highest levels of qualifications on entry lived in South West, Eastern and London regions l People with the lowest levels of qualifications on entry lived in East Midlands, West Midlands and Southern regions Clearly resources were being targeted appropriately and in line with the agreed objectives.

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4.3

Outputs and outcomes

The project team had a range of key targets, learning outcomes and outputs to achieve and included the organisation and development of a programme around two delivery phases involving 825 participants:

l phase one (training of first cohort) October 2009 to March 2010

l phase two (training of second cohort) April 2010 to October 2010

The project team successfully involved a total of 1,083 participants throughout the lifetime of the project.

4.3.1 Phase One: Project Outputs Overall 25 learning opportunities were organised and attended by a total of 433 participants. Eight out of the nine English regions engaged with the programme and the following outputs were achieved:

l Participants recruited to the learning programme: Introduction to Active Citizenship

involved 76 participants

Introduction to Train the Trainers

involved 52 participants

PTLLS in Active Citizenship

involved 60 participants

Strengthening Democracy’ day conferences

involved 116 participants

NAVCA ‘Democracy’ day conferences

involved 75 participants

l Curriculum Conference held involving 27 participants from a range of partner organisations

l New course content, material and resources produced

l Marketing, publicity and display materials produced

l A train the trainers website developed

l A data-base of tutor/trainers developed and participants actively signing up to it l Existing partnerships strengthened and new partnerships and networks developed

l Evaluation strategy process and method adopted

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4.3.2 Phase One: Project Outcomes

4 Increased awareness and involvement in the project

4 Community groups and networks supported

4 Individuals reporting that they feel more confident and motivated to ‘get involved’ in civic and democratic activity

4 Increased confidence, skills and knowledge

4 Increased take-up of other educational opportunities, including teacher training programmes such as Introduction to Train the Trainers and PTTLS

4 New progression opportunities accessed in Teacher Training programmes

4 Increased knowledge about local government structures and how to influence decision-making at a local level

4 Increased awareness of how to campaign effectively

4 Increased awareness of the role of MPs and how Parliament functions and involvement of local councillors and Members of Parliament 4 Increased involvement of under-represented groups in civic activism, and participation, including community leadership roles The evaluation activities undertaken during phase one activity led to a number of points which needed to be considered when planning for phase two delivery. The main points to consider included: l More work was required to define active citizenship concepts and language e.g. what is meant by ‘active citizenship’ l A greater emphasis needed to be placed on initial engagement activities targeted at those with no prior knowledge of active citizenship l Equality, diversity and inclusion are promoted through the work of project, but it was felt that some tutors required an increased level of support particularly when dealing with these issues l Learning programmes needed to create more space for debate and discussions to take place outside of the main course time l More work was required to develop greater links with Regional Take Part Champions and Development Fund l New geographical locations would be prioritised with the aim of building new partnerships as well as programme delivery. Eastern region was identified as one such area

l The participation of men should be expanded

l The number of City and Guilds PTTLS courses in Active Citizenship should be increased to meet demand for the programme These actions formed the basis of planning for Phase Two.

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4.3.3 Phase Two: Project Outputs Overall a further 37 learning opportunities were organised and attended by a total of 650 participants. All nine English regions engaged with the programme and the following outputs were achieved:

l Participants recruited to the learning programme Introduction to Active Citizenship

Involved 30 participants

Introduction to Train the Trainers

Involved 61 participants

PTLLS in Active Citizenship

Involved 132 participants

Strengthening Democracy’ day conferences

Involved 203 participants

NAVCA ‘Democracy’ day conferences

Involved 212 participants

l What Next? Flyer produced

l Curriculum Resources file produced to include scheme of work, session plans, teaching and learning materials, resources and handouts, useful references and websites l A data-base of tutor/trainers maintained and approximately 300 participants actively signed up to it and details entered onto the newly developed Take Part resources website. l Existing partnerships strengthened and new partnerships and networks developed

l Evaluation strategy process and methods adopted

l

An event held on ‘Sharing Best Practice’ approaches to Training of Trainers activity and involved 12 participants from across four WEA regions. The day looked at a range of new active citizenship curriculum materials that have been developed by community empowerment initiatives and programmes

It is clear from the above table that the project team were successful in organising more PTTLS courses to meet the demand of participants, as per the project’s action plan from phase one, though were not quite so successful with increasing the involvement of men; the figures remained largely the same at 28 per cent compared to 29.9 per cent during phase one. However, the involvement of men is comparable to those percentages funded through the Adult Safeguarded Budget for 2009–10: 75% female and 25% male.

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4.3.4 Phase Two: Project Outcomes

4 Increased awareness and involvement in the project

4 Community groups and networks supported

4 Greater involvement of local councillors and Members of Parliament

4 Individuals reporting that they feel more confident and motivated to ‘get involved’ in civic and democratic activity 4 Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in active citizenship and tutor/ trainer methods and approaches 4 Increased take-up of other educational opportunities, including teacher training programmes such as PTTLS 4 Increased number of participants gaining the PTTLS teacher training qualification 4 New progression opportunities accessed into Teacher Training programmes, including take up of Certificate in Education courses with other providers

4 Increased opportunity for community activists to become tutor/trainers

4 Increased knowledge about local government structures and how to influence decision-making at a local level

4 Increased awareness of how to campaign effectively

4 Increased awareness of the role of MPs and how Parliament functions and involvement of local councillors and Members of Parliament 4 Increased involvement of under-represented groups in civic activism, and participation, including community leadership roles 4 Increased awareness of community ‘empowerment’ agendas, including Big Society

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In terms of accreditation outputs the following results were achieved: Learner Accreditation Region Location

Number Registered

Number Certificated

Yorkshire & Humber

Sheffield

18

10

Yorkshire & Humber

Leeds

14

12

Yorkshire & Humber

Bradford

16

15

South West

Exeter

15

15

Eastern

Norwich

14

10

Southern

London

15

15

North West

Carlisle

12

11

North West

Preston

9

9

North East

Durham

10

8

North East

Stockton

13

10

East Midlands

Mansfield

12

10

West Midlands

Stoke

14

10

London

Sutton

15

15

Southern

Hastings

15

14

192

164

Total

This represents a success rate of 85.42 which is comparable to success rates generally. Developing relationships at all levels - locally, regionally and nationally has been crucial to the work of the project, particularly when reaching into communities to recruit to the project. The project team was successful in developing partnerships with an impressive number of community groups and organisations whose help and support has been essential to the overall success of the project. Partnership organisations involved include: Take Part Pathfinders, Regional Take Part Champions, Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, through to Local Authorities, Regional Empowerment Partnerships as well as Government Office. These and others are evidenced in section 4 The Learning Programme. Moreover, developing strong partnerships is not only vital for effective working, but also important for sustainability of work of this nature.

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4.4

The Curriculum Resources File

Summary The Curriculum Resource file was produced in response to the key aims of the project and included to: l Generate a national body of trainers to deliver Take Part programmes across England

l Capture evidence on best practice approaches to training Take Part Trainers

l Develop a source of expertise on the best ways of ensuring that trainers are equipped to deliver Take Part programmes The Curriculum Resources file developed out of the experiences of practitioners, participants and partners involved in the project. It is aimed at supporting adult educators working in a variety of community Context, and is designed for tutors/ trainers working with adult learners from diverse backgrounds and with different experiences and expectations; you will find a number of courses and learning materials relating to Active Citizenship adult education within the file. Not every aspect of active citizenship education is covered but the contents do reflect a particular focus and intent. First is the aim to offer a series of ‘good practice’ models for the tutoring of various active citizenship approaches and the related development of active citizenship tutor/trainers. Models are based on delivery, evaluation, feedback, reflection and experiences over time. Second is a concern to ensure that the approach taken to active citizenship teaching and learning properly reflects the WEA ‘philosophy’ of active citizenship. As experienced adult education practitioners, acting learning pedagogies are part of the WEA craft so, in terms of delivery, this is compatible with contemporary approaches to the teaching of active citizenship. However active citizenship for this project was not based on a ‘subject’ to be ‘taken off the shelf’ like geography or history. Rather it is a ‘doing’ philosophy – an approach and process concerned with becoming active and taking part in the world of citizens. In this project we defined active citizenship education as: 1 a learning process – democratic, experiential etc 2 underpinned by a value base including social justice, equality, co-operation and collectivism 3 and linked to a variety of subjects The overriding aim of the materials is to encourage people to engage politically to help make a difference at all levels of society.

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Contents: The materials in the Curriculum Resources file include:

l Scheme of Work

l Session Plans

l Teaching and Learning Materials

l Resources and Handouts

l Useful References and Websites

Topics include: l Introduction to Active Citizenship l Introduction to Train the Trainers l City and Guilds 7303: Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship l How Does the UK Political System Work? l Strengthening Democracy – Day Conferences l Political values and ideas for activists Certain criteria must be met – i.e. learning outcomes, but activities, and the materials themselves, should be flexible and be able to accommodate all possible groups. The materials indicate the main area of delivery from the tutor/trainer as well as associated activities. These are timed. The courses can be delivered in a number of different ways – in five hour blocks as day schools, over a number of linked evenings or days, or in any other way appropriate to a group of participants. Again flexibility is important. All the learning materials can be found on the following websites: WEA (Yorkshire & Humber Region): http://www.wea.org.uk/yh/ Take Part: www.takepart.org

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4.5 The Tutor/ Trainer Database Learners signed up for the Database Region

Men

Women

Total

East Midlands

6

5

11

Eastern

4

6

10

North East

11

44

55

North West

4

21

25

South West

0

3

3

Southern

19

52

71

West Midlands

19

17

36

Yorkshire & Humber

10

23

33

NAVCA

12

24

37

Pathfinders

0

2

2

Totals

85

197

283

Summary One of the objectives of the Train the Take Part Trainers project was to create a ‘bank’ of new Take Part Trainers who can be accessed and deployed by interested parties wishing to develop Take Part activities. Every participant who attended a project activity was invited to join the tutor / trainer database to promote their areas of educational expertise, qualifications and availability to become engaged in new provision.

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The details of those interested in joining the tutor/trainers database have now been entered on to the newly developed Take Part website at www.takepart.org. Therefore if you are interested in using the Take Part approach and are looking to find a Take Part trainer near to you then please check out the website. The website offers insights in to the skills and experiences of participants involved in the project in relation to their:

l Subject Qualification

l Teaching Qualification

l Any Specialism

l Teaching/Training Experience

l IFL Registration

Please note that the WEA cannot take responsibility for the accuracy of, or provide endorsement for the contacts on this database. The database contains tutor trainers with a diverse range of skills - some are community members who have completed one of the introductory courses, others were already accredited tutor trainers who have further developed their skills and knowledge of active citizenship. We recommend that you undertake your own assessment and quality assurance of trainers for the purpose required.

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Case Studies - Appendix 1

Train the Take Part Trainers: Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship (a group experience - working in partnership with refugees and asylum seekers in Leeds) A project funded by: Department for Communities and Local Government

helped gain insights into the ‘inspirational nature’ of adult education at its best

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1 Project purpose The Train the Take Part Trainers is a national project and is open to anyone with an interest in developing an awareness of active citizenship and tutor training skills and knowledge within an adult education context. At the heart of the provision were four ‘active citizenship’ focused courses. Each was developed with the aim of being flexible, responsive to need, and at the same time acknowledging and building upon previous best practices.

l Introduction to Active Citizenship

l Introduction to Train the Trainers

l City and Guilds - Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (PTLLS ) in Active Citizenship

l ‘Strengthening Democracy’ day Conferences

1.1 Context: The Learning programmes were delivered in community-based settings, covering all 9 English regions. Project organisers developed the work in partnership with a range of voluntary, community and statutory organisations; Project organisers split the work into three areas to give maximum reach and potential for partnership working: 1 North West, North East Regions 2 Yorkshire & Humber, East Midlands, West Midlands Regions 3 Eastern, London, Southern & South West Regions 1.2 First steps –developing the programme: Initial contact was made via the Refugee Council in Leeds with the Refugee Education Training Advice Service. RETAS already sponsored a project developed with the WEA, ‘Refugees into Teaching.’ This is aimed at those with a desire to work in schools or with adults. Many refugees were experienced teachers at different levels in their own countries, primary, secondary or higher education. Some of these became learners on the project. Within this context RETAS became an obvious partner to develop the work of the Train the Take Part Trainers project. The basic aim of RETAS is to try to help refugees and asylum seekers in West Yorkshire to integrate through supporting them into education and training, providing assistance with learning and improving English language skills, and helping individuals into employment. Activities include delivering courses in situ with partners, or getting learners into colleges or universities, finding work placements or volunteering opportunities. The whole focus is to give individuals intensive support and get them ‘job-ready.’

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RETAS sees itself as an open, accessible and welcoming resource for local people at the heart of its community. Its ethos involves sustaining a ‘family atmosphere’ where people can feel at home. RETAS is proactive in offering space for learning and, given the specific needs and complexities of its client base, is particularly keen to support initiatives that can offer opportunities for accreditation to its learners. Representatives of the organisation were keen to comment on how the project organiser and course tutors manifestly embraced its ethos and values and were able to embed the same perspectives into their teaching. This is hardly surprising since the WEA has pioneered work with disadvantaged learners in working class communities characterised by its traditional aims and values such as:

l Putting the learner at the centre of everything we do

l Challenging barriers to learning

l Being responsive in the heart of communities

l Valuing the lives of all adults as rich resources for learning

l Equipping individuals with the means to challenge discrimination and to change their lives and communities Experience suggests that successful work of this nature occurs when partners who share a range of similar values are able to work together. As a corollary to the above RETAS remarked on the low numbers of teachers from refugee backgrounds actually working in colleges, particularly given the significantly high numbers of learners who are refugees and asylum seekers so the idea of refugees becoming teachers seems like responding to an opening in the market.

2 Project activity The ‘Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship course (PTTLS) was organised with the Refugee Education Training and Advice Service in Leeds (RETAS). This course is accredited with City and Guilds and offers 40 hours of study. It aims to build a wide range of skills and knowledge related to teaching and training within an adult education context. The course is designed for participants who are interested in becoming adult educators, as well as those who are active in their community and want to explore tutor/training as well as active citizenship further. It provides a ‘first step’ into their teaching and learning journey as well as a recognised qualification.

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The course involved 14 participants, both men and women, and was enriched by the presence of so many different nationalities with diverging views and experiences (See individual Learner Voices below); twelve participants completed and submitted their portfolios for accreditation with City and Guilds – and certificates have been awarded. Participants many of them teachers from a range of countries shared their widely ranging experiences of how learning is or should be conducted. The accreditation was perceived as very important by all learners and they were very keen to learn about opportunities for progression. One issue emerging out of this was the potential costs for learners of any future course. The course is designed to enable participants to: l Identify the role, responsibilities and boundaries of a tutor/trainer within an adult education context

l justify appropriate teaching and learning approaches in a specialist area

l demonstrate session planning skills

l explain how to deliver inclusive sessions which motivate learners

l explain the use of different assessment methods and the need for record keeping l define what is meant by active citizenship and relate these ideas and definitions to their own experiences and practice

l explore the idea of being a potential active citizenship tutor/trainer

A number of participants suggested that they are currently involved in ‘volunteering’ in some capacity either by taking part in community consultation, campaigns or petitions, or by being a member of a community group or association, or religious group. Therefore a key aim of the course was focused on developing tutor/trainer confidence, skills and knowledge. Individual hopes included: ‘To learn more about training in an active citizenship context’ ‘To gain a recognised qualification to teach in the further education colleges’ ‘To improve my performance as a trainer’ ‘To increase my ability to deliver effective training to volunteers’ Why is it important that these courses are available to active citizens? When asked this question the following comments were offered, ‘To make society aware of their rights’ ‘To empower them to take an active part in their community – locally and nationally’ ‘Because active citizens could be an untapped resource in helping to achieve community cohesion’ ‘To cascade knowledge and understanding to other citizens’

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3 Evidence of Success:

l Increased awareness and involvement in the project

l Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in tutor/trainer methods and approaches

l Increased opportunity for community activists to become tutor/trainers

l Increased take-up of other educational opportunities in teacher training programmes including PTTLS and Certificate in Education courses l Increase in individuals gaining a City and Guilds recognised teacher training qualification l Individuals reporting that they feel more confident to apply what they have learned on the course to their work in the community

4 Individual Learner Voices – the following comments were offered by two of the participants on the course: David and Lester. All had attended the PTTLS in Active Citizenship course and all had been teachers in Zimbabwe. Lester and David both expressed great enthusiasm for the course, and were unanimous that the course had given them “a lot of confidence.” Interview with Lester: As a community activist in Zimbabwe, Lester described how meeting people in Leeds with similar concerns was exciting and in some ways issues such as economic depression, economic squeeze, government bringing ideological answers to economic problems were surprising familiar. In Zimbabwe Lester had taught variously English, History and General Science courses, and commented on low levels of confidence amongst Zimbabweans generally that he’d met in Britain epitomised by those on the course, in terms of writing CVs for example, and what he described as the culturally determined notion of ‘selling yourself.’ At the start of the course Lester was not familiar with the concept of ‘active citizenship’ and when asked now to define it Lester commented “that it’s a perspective that brings in a lot of different topics…it’s about politics, it’s about democracy, human rights, responsibilities, community health, entrepreneurship… makes it very exciting… the course made me think.” Lester commented that “discussions were particularly useful… made me change my views on some issues’. For example, “even with my experience as teacher… developing schemes of work always a bit of a grey area…course sorted it out for me… getting into habit of doing learning outcomes very useful.” Lester is now teaching English voluntarily to other refugees and wants to go on to university to do a PGCE course

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Lester commented on how the course, “helped gain insights into the ‘inspirational nature’ of adult education at its best. Interview with David: In Zimbabwe David was a maths teacher with lots of experience in secondary schools up to A-level. Latterly he has been a lecturer at Teacher-training College. David found the course ‘enjoyable’. The only grey area for him was the production of schemes of work in such a short period. He found the course ‘very condensed’ and on occasions ‘found it a struggle breaking down the course content into week by week segments to fit in to a scheme of work document’ and commented on how he could have done with more practical examples of how to do it.” On reflection David added that he would have found it more useful to have attended the Introduction to active citizenship course beforehand - without that background it took him a while to latch on to what was meant by active citizenship. In terms of the course itself David found that, “small groups of 3 or 4 were a useful and stimulating way to learn.” He now wants to go on to teach in FE sector or with adults. Never-the-less he was able to hone his ITC skills significantly.

4 How Take Part support/funding helped make the project more effective The funding for these programmes enabled the courses to take place – providing costs for the tutor, room hire, accreditation fees, learner materials and resources, as well as providing for the additional needs of learners. For example the project provided support with transport, childcare needs and refreshments. Important when trying to provide access to education and learning for adults from working class backgrounds, and in particular those who have previously missed out on education.

5 Overcoming barriers Getting the format right and the active engagement of the partner organisation, RETAS, was essential to the overall success of the course. Good communication ensures that lessons were learned and ideas shared. Experience suggests that successful work of this nature occurs when partners who share a range of similar values are able to work together.

Contact details Person: Trish Land Organisation: Workers’ Educational Association Telephone: 0114 261 5423 Email: tland@wea.org.uk Website: www.wea.org.uk/yh

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Case Studies - Appendix 2

Introduction to Active Citizenship (an individual experience - working in partnership with refugees and asylum seekers in Leeds) A project funded by: Department for Communities and Local Government

bringing about positive change

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1 Project purpose The Train the Take Part Trainers is a national project and is open to anyone with an interest in developing an awareness of active citizenship and tutor training skills and knowledge within an adult education context. At the heart of the provision were four WEA ‘active citizenship’ focused courses. Each was developed with the aim of being flexible, responsive to need, and at the same time acknowledging and building upon previous best practices.

l Introduction to Active Citizenship

l Introduction to Train the Trainers

l City and Guilds - Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (PTLLS ) in Active Citizenship

l ‘Strengthening Democracy’ day Conferences

1.1 Context: The Learning programmes were delivered in community-based settings, covering all 9 English regions. Project organisers developed the work in partnership with a range of voluntary, community and statutory organisations; Project organisers split the work into three areas to give maximum reach and potential for partnership working: 1 North West, North East Regions 2 Yorkshire & Humber, East Midlands, West Midlands Regions 3 Eastern, London, Southern & South West Regions 1.2 First steps – developing the programme: Initial contact was made via the Refugee Council in Leeds with the Refugee Education Training Advice Service. RETAS already sponsored a project developed with the WEA, ‘Refugees into Teaching.’ This is aimed at those with a desire to work in schools or with adults. Many refugees were experienced teachers at different levels in their own countries, primary, secondary or higher education. Some of these became learners on the project. Within this context RETAS became an obvious partner to develop the work of the Train the Take Part Trainers project. The basic aim of RETAS is to try to help refugees and asylum seekers in West Yorkshire to integrate through supporting them into education and training, providing assistance with learning and improving English language skills, and helping individuals into employment. Activities include delivering courses in situ with partners, or getting learners into colleges or universities, finding work placements or volunteering opportunities. The whole focus is to give individuals intensive support and get them ‘job-ready.’ RETAS sees itself as an open, accessible and welcoming resource for local people at the heart of its community. Its ethos involves sustaining a ‘family atmosphere’ where people can feel at home.

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RETAS is proactive in offering space for learning and, given the specific needs and complexities of its client base, is particularly keen to support initiatives that can offer opportunities for accreditation to its learners. Representatives of the organisation were keen to comment on how the project organiser and course tutors manifestly embraced its ethos and values and were able to embed the same perspectives into their teaching. This is hardly surprising since the WEA has pioneered work with disadvantaged learners in working class communities characterised by its traditional aims and values such as:

l Putting the learner at the centre of everything we do

l Challenging barriers to learning

l Being responsive in the heart of communities

l Valuing the lives of all adults as rich resources for learning

l Equipping individuals with the means to challenge discrimination and to change their lives and communities

2 Project activity An Introduction to Active Citizenship course was organised with the Refugee Education Training and Advice Service in Leeds (RETAS). This is a 10 hour nonaccredited programme. The course involved 12 participants, 6 female and 6 male, and was enriched by the presence of so many different nationalities with diverging views and experiences (See individual Learner Voices below). The course enabled participants to:

l discuss what is meant by active citizenship, locally and globally;

l engage critically with debates around rights and responsibilities;

l demonstrate an understanding of how ‘taking part’ can and has brought about significant ‘change’

l begin to see themselves as potential agents of ‘change’;

l work towards plans, individual or shared, for becoming active in their chosen group or community. Many were already involved in ‘volunteering’ in some capacity either by taking part in community consultations, campaigns or petitions, or by being a member of a community group or association, or religious group. Therefore a key aim of the course focused on increasing awareness of active citizenship and ways to get involved locally.

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Individual hopes included: ‘To become a trainer’ ‘To be of benefit to the community – by bringing about positive change’ ‘To develop the skills and knowledge to be an effective active citizen’ ‘To get to know how to teach adult people and get the relevant qualification’ ‘To participate in the community in order to be a useful citizen’ When asked, why is it important that these courses are available to active citizens? ‘Many reasons’ was suggested by one participant to include building confidence to take part, to learn new skills, respecting cultural values and differences, and to bring about a sense of belonging and recognition to be an active citizen.

3 Evidence of Success:

l Increased awareness and involvement in the project

l Increased involvement of Black and Minority Ethnic people in civic participation and democratic activity l Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in active citizenship and tutor/ trainer methods and approaches l Individuals reporting that they feel more confident and motivated to ‘get involved’ l Increased take-up of other educational opportunities, including teacher training programmes such as the PTTLS course

4 Individual Learner Voice Interview with Grace: Grace had taught physical education and science for eight years in a secondary school in Zimbabwe “Doing Introduction to Active Citizenship was quite an eye-opener for a lot of people.” “It gave me lots of insights into how society works.” Grace commented on the difficulties of coming into a different culture. Quote… “a different political system, a different society altogether… it is difficult to fit in, because you don’t know what is right, what is wrong or what is expected of you… you tend to keep to yourself, that way you are out of trouble… you lose confidence and the sense of possibility of fulfilling your own potential.”

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Grace progressed on to the PTTLS (City & Guilds Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in active citizenship) course with the project and said, “the course was brilliant.” She had ‘never done ‘powerpoint’ or anything like it.” Even though she had taught physical education and science for eight years in a secondary school in Zimbabwe, it was a bit of a culture shock. Quote…”you don’t know how it is to teach in the UK and you need some kind of stepping stone…you can go to a school to volunteer but it is not the same as facing a group of learners on your own.” “Coming to England and seeing school children, reading about schools and teachers, talking to people, etc I still wasn’t confident enough to teach here.” For example, “child protection laws are non-existent in Zimbabwe… I felt I would have to learn all that first… it was very difficult.” “I am still struggling with idea of handling children but more confident about going into adult education… I would love to work with WEA… since doing PTLLS I’m much more confident but need more practice to build up confidence to do it on my own.” Grace described how she enjoyed “the socialising part of it. It was quite a mixed group…we learned a lot from each other… both sides had something to learn from each other. I enjoyed the activities a lot and will use them too in the future.” “Everyone had the opportunity to say what they wanted. I liked the small groups which kept changing every day and gave everybody chance to express themselves.” Grace felt that she needed a bit more time: “most people struggled not because the course was difficult but because most had not been in education for a number of years… for me it was the first time ‘of’ writing 500 words for ten years…it’s just a matter of getting back into it…it took us all a little while… I would have liked a longer period.” Grace would also have liked more micro-teaching: “that’s where you gain most of your confidence…30 minutes of micro-teaching is not enough at all…you need to do it four or five times for you to feel “I can do it.” In addition, “to develop your skills in powerpoint you need more time to practise’. “Learning how to use schemes of work was completely different to how we used to do it in Zimbabwe, and learning outcomes was new and quite different to ways we used to operate…so it helped me to unlearn some old ways and to learn new ways of doing things.”

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“Support during assignments was very good… with quick responses to any emails, and a lot of one-to-one if required.” Grace would like to do DTTLS (Diploma level) hopefully at Bradford University, but her final comment was brief and to the point, “Can I do PTTLS again?”

4 How Take Part support/funding helped make the project more effective The funding for these programmes enabled the courses to take place – providing costs for the tutor, room hire, accreditation fees, learner materials and resources, as well as providing for the additional needs of learners. For example the project provided support with transport, childcare needs and refreshments. Important when trying to provide access to education and learning for adults from working class backgrounds, and in particular those who have previously missed out on education.

5 Overcoming barriers Getting the format right and the active engagement of the partner organisation, RETAS, was essential to the overall success of the course. Good communication ensures that lessons were learned and ideas shared. Developing relationships at a local level has been crucial to the work of the project, particularly when reaching into communities to recruit to the project; partners help and support has been essential to the overall success of the project. And experience suggests that successful work of this nature occurs when partners who share a range of similar values are able to work together.

Contact details Person: Trish Land Organisation: Workers’ Educational Association Telephone: 0114 261 5423 Email: tland@wea.org.uk Website: www.wea.org.uk/yh

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Case Studies - Appendix 3

NAVCA: Democracy Day Conferences (a group experience) A project funded by: Department for Communities and Local Government Democracy Days provided information, stimulation and a great deal of discussion amongst attendees. The events gave a ‘big picture’ view of democracy, engagement and getting your voice heard for delegates from a very wide range of backgrounds. It also gave people the chance to discuss their issues and ideas with a diverse group of people. For NAVCA, the events helped it to create and refine an event that helped introduce people to the ideas of representation and voice that are the basis of its key training programme called Skilling Up for Stronger Voices. NAVCA is the national voice for local third sector infrastructure in England with a membership approaching 400 local support and development organisations. The Improving Local Partnerships Unit within NAVCA developed and organised the Democracy Days as part of its role in the ‘Train the Take Part Trainers’ project.

How easy it is to access Parliament, it’s not that scary!

The benefits of social media - This is something our project will benefit from

Absolutely excellent! Learnt a great deal

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1 Project purpose To develop and deliver an event to generate discussion and provide learning around representation and active citizenship as part of the Train the Take Part Trainers project.

2 Project activities Organising and delivering Democracy Days – one day conference/seminar events in locations across England. The project drew on NAVCA’s membership network in order to create events that had a local emphasis and expertise whilst also having the national policy expertise in the Improving Local Partnerships Unit (ILPU). This meant that events were copresented by partners who included Parliamentary Outreach and Concrete Solutions. At a local level, officers of NAVCA’s member organisation and of the local authority were involved in delivery and workshop discussions enabling the connection between the national and the local to be drawn. The project also helped build the existing relationship with the WEA and regional organisers of the Train the Take Part Trainers were closely involved in the planning and delivery of events. The style of the events was both informal, fast moving, and open to the differing needs of the audience who were educated and entertained in equal measure. Feedback has confirmed that the events were enjoyable as much as they were informative. Here are a few comments from participants: “Thank you – I learnt a lot and feel more empowered as a UK citizen” – Oxford “I am overwhelmed by the info and knowledge gained” – Southwark “Very well presented and the workshop excellent” – Penrith “This is something our project will benefit from” – Nottingham “I can explain it to other Polish people” – Nottingham “Inspiration for use of media, facebook and wireless for campaigning and communication” – Nottingham “Really interesting and valuable… Interesting and knowledgeable speakers... Varied topics and differing ideas given” – Nottingham “Inspired me to go away and use and get more benefits from technology” – Bolton “Run more of these. Put me on your mailing list. Thoroughly enjoyed and I learnt a great deal” – Bolton

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3 Project outcomes Whilst the events were highly successful, as evidenced by the feedback analysis, they also built capacity and connections for NAVCA that have resulted in further delivery of Democracy Days beyond the end of the ‘Train the Take Part Trainers’ project. NAVCA’s flagship training in representation and partnership, called Skilling Up for Stronger Voices, also benefited from having a highly complementary event format that will now be used alongside the development and delivery of the Skilling Up programme to add value to this training. The event has also involved participants who would not normally be targeted by a Skilling Up event and yet are future participants in it as partnership and representative arrangements at a local level change considerably with the new policy landscape created by the coalition government. There was good evidence from the feedback from events that participants felt very positive about their ability to influence – a potentially positive outcome in relation to the National Indicator 4 (% of people who feel they can influence decisions in their locality). The strengthening of the relationship between NAVCA and the WEA at a national level is also an important outcome. The two organisations recently revised and updated and their Chief Executives re-signed - a Collaboration Agreement.

4 How Take Part support/funding helped make the project more effective The funding for this project enabled the event development to take place in addition to the delivery with the overall impact being significantly greater.

5 Overcoming barriers Getting the format right involved active engagement with the partners involved and good communication to ensure that lessons were learned and ideas shared.

6 With hindsight Greater involvement of the WEA regional organisers earlier in the development and delivery stages might have been valuable though we don’t believe this had a deleterious effect on the events and was made up for in later collaborations.

7 When project funding finishes... NAVCA is now left with a strong product and a commitment to deliver it into the future. The relationship with the WEA has been strengthened. The project created the foundations for further development and delivery of support to NAVCA’s members and its members’ members.

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8 Quotes “The Train the Take Part Trainers project has been an important landmark in the development of NAVCA’s training and support to people in communities who are active in representing the views and needs of local communities.”

Contact details Person: David Gray Organisation: NAVCA Telephone: 0114 289 3992 Email: david.gray@navca.org.uk Website: www.navca.org.uk

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Case Studies - Appendix 4

Women’s Voices (Hastings) Women Be Heard (a group experience) A project funded by: Department for Communities and Local Government

Women’s Voice is a voluntary organisation which aims to support and empower marginalised women. Women Be Heard is a course to encourage greater involvement in public life. The WEA Southern Region delivers a range of community learning programmes in Hastings targeted in communities of social, educational and financial disadvantage. We work with a range of community and voluntary groups and organisations.

I learnt that as a woman I am a bit reluctant to be politically active. Through doing this course, I could make my voice heard, with lots of encouragement. It was a very supportive atmosphere

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1 Project purpose To enable women to come together and share their experiences of volunteering and working within communities. To provide skills, information and knowledge to enable women to pursue greater community engagement, understand and influence local democratic structures.

2 Project activities WBH responded to a need to deliver learning specifically tailored to address the barriers that exclude women from engaging with communities and public life. The WEA worked with Gill Knight from Women’s Voices to find a local venue and publicise the course through community groups and voluntary organisation networks in Hastings and St Leonards. The course was predominantly discussion based, with topics negotiated with learners. The group covered topics on:: communication, presentation skills, assertiveness, the context of the women’s movement, transferable skills, understanding local power structures and working within the public arena. A local councillor was invited in as a speaker. The group made several suggestions as to how women’s issues should be included in the Community Development Strategy. The councillor took feedback from learners to the relevant committee.

3 Project outcomes

l Recognising and using personal experiences in the public domain

l Improved Confidence

l Improved communication skills

l Improved Assertiveness

l Greater understanding of local power structures

Bringing together women from different backgrounds to increase cultural understanding and find common ground to work together.

4 How Take Part support/funding helped make the project more effective This project would have not have happened without Take Part Funding.

5 Overcoming barriers The greatest barrier was finding a time to run the course which fitted with many women’s caring commitments and the fact that some of them did shiftwork. Finding a local venue which is non-denominational, central and fit for purpose was also difficult. Being able to provide childcare where needed was vital to at least one woman’s attendance.

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6 With hindsight More one to one development work/outreach work with women and local groups may have resulted in greater numbers coming along. Many women seemed to have problems understanding the nature of the course. Reviewing the way it is publicised and marketed may also be beneficial. The feedback from participants said overwhelmingly that they wished the course was longer. The tutor felt that building in a visit to council meetings and/or giving participants time to work on practical citizenship activities whilst they were on the course would have provided a good model of reflective practice which would be beneficial in supporting campaigning, community activism or volunteering.

7 When project funding finishes... The WEA is continuing to meet with Women’s Voices and CUPP (Community University Partnership programme) to explore funding streams to enable us to take the course forward and develop it for local women.

8 Quotes “It was good to have a local councillor come in. I think they should do this more often on courses. I probably didn’t agree with her politically but it’s good for councillors to come in so they are more aware of the issues people are discussing and what’s important to people” Juliet “I want to get into training. I’ve worked in the voluntary sector for years as paid staff and as a volunteer. I’ve become aware that I’ve got lots of practical experience in the areas the Big Society is looking at” Juliet “It’s been good for my confidence as well as learning skills. I’m going to start a degree in January. I’ve been meaning to do this for sometime, but the course made me realise that it’s really important to do it, so I’ve got the education behind me and my voice can carry more weight” Theresa “After finishing the course I did some research on the Fawcett Society. I used to be afraid of the word ‘feminism’ but it was interesting to find out more about modern feminism. I have introduced at least ten women from other organisations and encouraged them to do volunteering as they are often isolated and depressed” Shiva “The contact I had with the Women’s Commission was very helpful, and enabled me to pass on a lot of material to the women” Course tutor

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“The input of the local councillor was interesting. She was a good role model as she was ‘ordinary’, a young mum who wanted to do something in her own community in Hollington about the local BNP and it spurred her on to be a councillor” Jill “I have made contact with the University of Sussex CUPP PROJECT (Community University Partnership Programme). They are helping us explore ways we can identify women’s needs locally and support empowerment practically. We are snowed under with an International Children’s Day Event at the moment but after that we are going to look at how we can develop our ideas into a strategy plan” Jill

Contact details Person: Chris Sanders Organisation: WEA Telephone: 07984 659121 Email: csanders@wea.org.uk Website: www.wea.org.uk

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Case Studies - Appendix 5

Train the Take Part Trainers: Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship (an individual experience) A project funded by: Department for Communities and Local Government

Inspired by the subject

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1 Project purpose The Train the Take Part Trainers is a national project and is open to anyone with an interest in developing an awareness of active citizenship and tutor training skills and knowledge within an adult education context. At the heart of the provision were four WEA ‘active citizenship’ focused courses. Each was developed with the aim of being flexible, responsive to need, and at the same time acknowledging and building upon previous best practices.

l Introduction to Active Citizenship

l Introduction to Train the Trainers

l City and Guilds - Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (PTLLS ) in Active Citizenship

l ‘Strengthening Democracy’ day Conferences

1.1 Context: The programme offers a range of accredited and non-accredited learning opportunities from introductory courses, day schools, and conferences through to the City and Guilds 7303 Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in active citizenship Learning programmes are delivered in community settings, covering all 9 English regions. Project organisers developed the work in partnership with a range of voluntary, community and statutory organisations; Project organisers split the work into three areas to give maximum reach and potential for partnership working: 1 North West, North East Regions 2 Yorkshire & Humber, East Midlands, West Midlands Regions 3 Eastern, London, Southern & South West Regions This Case Study reflects an ‘Individual learner experience’: Gemma’s story The case study is being presented as an example of how the Train the Take Part Trainers Project helps to:

l Build confidence and self belief

l Support community involvement and networks of interest

l Enhance existing tutor/trainer skills and experiences

l Provide progression routes to further educational opportunities and or civic participation and democratic activity

l Provide wider benefits to individuals, families and communities

Gemma is a qualified and experienced exercise tutor working in South Tyneside, and is keen to get more involved in her local community, but suggested that she lacked the experience, confidence and understanding of how to do this.

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The questions reflect Gemma’s overall thoughts on the course and personal and family outcomes gained. 1.2 First Steps – developing the programme Initial contact was made with a variety of partners to include Take Part Northumberland, Sure Start, Government Office North East and the Community Development Network. The work of the project was discussed and the ‘Introduction to Active Citizenship’ course was offered in Morpeth, Northumberland as a starter course. Partners were already aware of the ‘take part’ approach and other Take Part Pathfinder programmes were already running successfully in the North East area. WEA, North East region were also deeply engaged in developing learning programmes with disadvantaged learners in working class communities characterised by its traditional aims and values such as:

l Putting the learner at the centre of everything we do

l Challenging barriers to learning

l Being responsive in the heart of communities

l Valuing the lives of all adults as rich resources for learning

l Equipping individuals with the means to challenge discrimination and to change their lives and communities Developing relationships at a local level has been crucial to the work of the project, particularly when reaching into communities to recruit to the project; partners help and support has been essential to the overall success of the project. 2 Project activity: Introduction to Active Citizenship The course involved 9 participants and consisted of both men and women. All were keen to sign up to the tutor/trainer database. The course is a 10 hour non-accredited course and enabled participants to:

l discuss what is meant by active citizenship, locally and globally;

l engage critically with debates around rights and responsibilities;

l demonstrate an understanding of how ‘taking part’ can and has brought about significant ‘change’

l begin to see themselves as potential agents of ‘change’;

l work towards plans, individual or shared, for becoming active in their chosen group or community. Many indicated that they were already involved in ‘volunteering’ in some capacity participating in a local group or association, taking part in community consultations, campaigns or petitions, or by being a member of a community group or association, or religious group. One participant is involved as a Trade unionist and another as a WEA Committee Member.

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More generally participants suggested that they were interested in volunteering, becoming a ‘take part’ trainer, becoming a councillor, school governor, community leader, etc, or learning more about their subject. Group feedback included: “The course was interesting and not as frightening as I thought” “Teaching was inclusive and delivered in a ‘take part’ way with positive feedback throughout” “I was inspired by the subject” “The course provided excellent resources to take away and use”.

3 Individual Learner Voice: Gemma’s experience Why is it important that these courses are available to active citizens? “So that everyone can work together to build better communities” “To gain awareness of active citizenship” “It’s important for everyone to understand their local community and how things work” How did you find the citizenship course? “Lots of different people were there that I hadn’t met before and they came from all different backgrounds...everyone brought their own experience and that was nice to see. It made me think a lot more about the community. I didn’t really have an idea what an active citizen was, but it showed me that it reaches into everyone’s lives in all different parts of the community and it made me think about my area and what I could do in that.” What has it enabled you to do? “I went and did some teaching in Washington Women’s Centre… it helped me develop my confidence.” How was the approach different on this course? “Learners bringing their contribution and learning from each other… more like workshop-based and people sharing ideas, rather than just being directed… I can learn from everyone bringing their own different ideas and as well and their experience.”

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Why are these courses important to communities? “It has made me think about the community a lot more and that not everything is government funded. And it gives me a chance to give something back, as well as volunteering as a homeopath.” Gemma also commented on her desire to put together a project around locally produced fruit and vegetables. Could anything have been done better? “The course could have been better advertised and across the networks.” Can you identify any barriers to stop you progressing in your own learning? “More detailed feedback would have been useful.” Nevertheless Gemma is now doing a Certificate in Education course with South Tyneside College. “I want to get more teaching experience and think about the way I deliver courses. It has also helped me progress as a person and it helped me network with different people and think about my own teaching methods as well. As part of WEA’s ongoing commitment Gemma is being provided with a WEA mentor helping her to evaluate her teaching. In your view why is adult education important in communities? “Courses in health are a good base for adults to get back into education…looking at their health as a whole and progress from there.” “And bringing people together socially and just getting back into the community and mixing with people. It brings folk together socially.” Any other benefits to you? Your family? “The benefits are that it has helped my daughter to get more involved as well’. For example, “she’s doing a ‘shoebox’ to send abroad for children who don’t have Christmas presents. And getting her friends to talk about the issues – such as access to the local park and need for zebra crossing has raised awareness that local action might bring about change.” “The course has provided a good stepping stone to get people involved as a community… I’d like to see more and do more and push the course out to more people in the community… rather than it just filtering down it can filter back up and it also helps my confidence as an individual, to want to make me progress, to teaching other things and certainly do more volunteering as well’.

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4 Evidence of impact:

4 Increased awareness and involvement in the project

4 Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in active citizenship and tutor/ trainer methods and approaches

4 Increased confidence and motivation to ‘get involved’

4 Increased take-up of other educational opportunities, including teacher training programmes such as Certificate in Education course

5 How Take Part support/funding helped make the project more effective The funding for these programmes enabled the courses to take place – providing costs for the tutor, room hire, accreditation fees, learner materials and resources, as well as providing for the additional needs of learners. For example the project provided support with transport, childcare needs and refreshments. Important when trying to provide access to education and learning for adults from working class backgrounds, and in particular those who have previously missed out on education.

6 Overcoming barriers Gemma felt that “more detailed feedback would have been useful.” Nevertheless Gemma is now doing a Certificate in Education course with South Tyneside College. Gemma is also being supported by a WEA mentor, helping her to evaluate her teaching practice. Getting the format right and the active engagement of local partner organizations was essential to the overall success of the course, particularly when reaching into communities to recruit to the project; Good communication ensures that lessons were learned and ideas shared.

Contact Details Person: Joy Nancarrow and Trish Land Organisation: Workers’ Educational Association Telephone: 0114 261 5423 Email: tland@wea.org.uk Website: www.wea.org.uk/yh

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Case Studies - Appendix 6

Train the Take Part Trainers: Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship (a group experience) A project funded by: Department for Communities and Local Government

Doing the course has given me the confidence to set up Pennine Way School Supporters Association

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1 Project purpose The Train the Take Part Trainers is a national project and is open to anyone with an interest in developing an awareness of active citizenship and tutor training skills and knowledge within an adult education context. At the heart of the provision were four WEA ‘active citizenship’ focused courses. Each was developed with the aim of being flexible, responsive to need, and at the same time acknowledging and building upon previous best practices.

l Introduction to Active Citizenship

l Introduction to Train the Trainers

l City and Guilds - Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (PTLLS ) in Active Citizenship

l ‘Strengthening Democracy’ day Conferences

1.1 Context: The programme offers a range of accredited and non-accredited learning opportunities from introductory courses, day schools, and conferences through to the City and Guilds 7303 Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in active citizenship Learning programmes delivered in community settings, covering all 9 English regions. Project organisers developed the work in partnership with a range of voluntary, community and statutory organisations; Project organisers split the work into three areas to give maximum reach and potential for partnership working: 1 North West, North East Regions 2 Yorkshire & Humber, East Midlands, West Midlands Regions 3 Eastern, London, Southern & South West Regions This ‘Case Study’ reflects a groups’ experience and expectations of the City and Guilds 7303 – Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship course (PTTLS). 1.2 First steps – developing the programme: Initial contact was made with a range of voluntary and community groups in the area and in particular with those organisations that provide learning opportunities for families – to include Sure start, Barnardos as well as the Harraby Community centre where a variety of community education courses and activities are offered for adult learners, including family learning activities. WEA, North West region were also deeply engaged in developing ‘Take Part’ programmes working with disadvantaged learners in working class communities characterised by its traditional aims and values such as:

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l Putting the learner at the centre of everything we do l Challenging barriers to learning l Being responsive in the heart of communities l Valuing the lives of all adults as rich resources for learning l Equipping individuals with the means to challenge discrimination and to change their lives and communities Developing relationships at a local level has been crucial to the work of the project, particularly when reaching into communities to recruit to the project; partners help and support has been essential to the overall success of the project.

2 Project activity The ‘Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector in Active Citizenship was offered at the Harraby Community Centre in Carlisle. This course is accredited with City and Guilds and offers 40 hours of study. It aims to build a wide range of skills and knowledge related to teaching and training within an adult education context. The course is designed for participants who are interested in becoming adult educators, as well as those who are active in their community and want to explore tutor/training as well as active citizenship further. The course involved 12 participants and consisted of both men and women with different experiences and abilities. For example previous qualifications ranged from first and higher degree through to those who had no previous qualifications. All were keen to sign up to the tutor/trainer database. Many indicated that they were already involved in ‘volunteering’ in some capacity by attending public forums and or council meetings, taking part in community consultations, campaigns, or helping out at their local school/parents group. The course content enables participants to: l Identify the role, responsibilities and boundaries of a tutor/trainer within an adult education context l justify appropriate teaching and learning approaches in a specialist area l demonstrate session planning skills l explain how to deliver inclusive sessions which motivate learners l explain the use of different assessment methods and the need for

record keeping

l define what is meant by active citizenship and relate these ideas and definitions to their own experiences and practice l explore the idea of being a potential active citizenship tutor/trainer

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The course provided a ‘first step’ into their teaching and learning journey and the City and Guilds qualification provides an entry point and introduction for those new to teaching and training or those wishing to get involved in being a tutor/trainer. See examples below Evidence of Success: l Increased awareness and involvement in the project l Increased confidence, skills and knowledge in tutor/trainer methods and approaches l Increased opportunity for community activists to become tutor/trainers l Increased take-up of other educational opportunities in teacher training programmes including PTTLS and Certificate in Education courses l Increase in individuals gaining a City and Guilds recognised teacher training qualification l Individuals reporting that they feel more confident and motivated to ‘get involved’ l Individuals reporting that they feel more confident to apply what they have learned on the course to their work in the community.

3 Individual Learner Voices: Personal outcomes evidenced via a focus group activity using a flip video and then transcribed. Participants included Teresa, Jackie, Zoe, Carol, Gordon, Helen and Robert Did you enjoy the course? “Initially I did get a fright… being dyslexic and seeing the file for the first time… I thought I would never be able to manage…. got a lot of support and help from the group.” And another commented “I loved it… really enjoyed it… because you go through what you do, why you’re doing it and what you want to get out of it.” How did you find the following elements of the course? 1 Microteaching and Planning: “I was terrified of doing the micro-teaching element…. started to enjoy the course about half way through… makes it easier if you talk about something you’re passionate about.”

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“I felt relieved when it was finished, though I did enjoy it once it was done! I wanted people to have fun, wanted it not to be boring… liked seeing what everybody’s different views were. “Found it challenging, even though I already deliver sessions. The paperwork was different to what I was used to, but I now plan to use a different format for planning and things. 2 Active Citizenship: “Interesting… I liked the discussions at beginning and looking forward to the debates… hearing people’s different views on things and to realize you live somewhere that you’re totally ignorant about’, ‘when they said “citizenship” at the start didn’t even know what word meant’. “I can see where the Government is coming from with the Big Society thing. Myself and Tracy was interviewed by BBC – it was on the Andrew Marr Politics Show’. What I’m keen for now and other people in our group – is another citizenship course… this would benefit new members.” And another said, “any Community Development or Citizenship course, especially with organizations that work with groups of people in the community – they need to give them something first – a better understanding of citizenship. I got somebody to vote for first time in their life this year. She was that proud I took a photograph of her – standing next to the ballot box... She said it was down to me speaking to her and explaining the different choices that she had about her future and the government that she wanted to go and vote.” Further, “People need the equipment to work in their communities… we want people to volunteer but they need to be given the tools to be able to do that.” And additionally, “people don’t think that their voice matters… just that they’re a little person in a community that’s already set up. If communities ran more citizenship courses I think they would empower more people to get involved rather than local Council saying ‘what do you want for your community? – I don’t know what I want… Councils need to change the way they deliver their community development within communities.” Another participant said, “I enjoyed the active citizenship element most of all.” And one excited participant said, “On 25th November you’ll see me on TV… I’m on the PTA at my daughter’s school and we’ve submitted a bid to develop an adventure playground for rural community within the grounds of the school. Doing the PTLLS and Community Development and Regeneration course together has enabled me to write a 21 project page plan for Big Lottery and hopefully we’ll win it!” The course really helped me to be able to write a document that talked about the criteria about developing the rural community and enhancing children’s potential.”

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Has the course motivated you to get involved? “Yes. Doing the course has given me the confidence to set up Pennine Way School Supporters Association – It’s like a PTA but opened it out to community. And doing PTLLS has given me a boost like chairing meetings and stuff… I no longer feel intimidated whoever’s there – be Head, Deputy Head, anybody. The course has given me a lot more confidence.” Do you feel able to go out and deliver training? “I could do… would like to… and I’m confident that I can see what the needs and issues are around costs and funding. I like the whole thing about doing some training.” “We need to empower people, without that the Big Society is nothing really… we should consider going into 6th forms….they’re at that age to teach them about ‘rights’ and stuff… they’re our next generation of voters. Many don’t vote because don’t really understand.” “I’ve done a community Parents Course and now Maths and English which was very interesting and I did enjoy it’. I’ve now got one family that I’m supporting and doing PTLLS has helped me to listen to people and to take on board their views as opposed to me jumping in with my opinion.” I’m more confident and critical about what is a good teaching and learning experience/environment.” “The bit that always comes up with us when we go into a new group, if we’re getting taught something is we always look at the lay out and come out saying wasn’t that set up awful?? References were made to poor room arrangement, learners sitting with backs to tutors etc. Has anyone contacted their local councillor or MP over an issue that has affected them or their community? A couple of participants said, “Yes. Doing the PTLLS course has made me more passionate, passionate enough about education to actually write to the PM and say ‘You’re not doing it right’. “I spoke to my MP… I went to see him when he was doing a surgery in a caravan up at the top shops one day…I had quite a good conversation with him about the community and about ‘Together We Can’.” “I’ve been to scrutiny meetings too. We took the mike and a few of them said we were good speakers…we asked them why should we come into the city centre, when we’ve got to pay for public parking etc, they said they would come to our community and they did!”

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And another said, “I’m the Secretary of a Parent’s Group and we expressed unhappiness at Council ignoring the community’s views on the naming of new Children’s’ Centre after being asked to initiate consultation. And said, we all got together and gave the councillor a good earful.” What Next? Many said that they would like to move on the Certificate level and considering progression onto a local college course. Future actions l Plea for more training round Community Development and active citizenship perspectives l Need to bring this kind of training into Community – nearest is Lancaster University. And finally, one participant said, “my oldest son wasn’t going to go and vote but I made him sit and watch the debates on the telly when it was time for voting. I said to him ‘how are we ever going to change anything? So he sat and watched it and rang me to say ‘I’ve voted’ I was dead proud of him.”

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Afterword

The WEA is pleased to have been involved in the Train the Take Part Trainers project and remains committed to delivering adult education with a ‘social purpose’ within all its provision. The personal testaments highlighted within the report provide evidence of how adult education can and has brought about change. The project activities have developed out of the experience of working with participants, practitioners, and our commitment to partnership working. Partners involved in the project, range from the very local community groups and organisations through to national associations, local authorities and other statutory bodies. If you would like any further information about the Train the Take Part Trainers project please contact Trish Land, Project Manager, WEA Yorkshire and Humber Region on 0114 261 5423 or tland@wea.org.uk


Profile for Workers' Educational Association

TTT Evaluation File  

The project represents one strand of the Take Part National Support Programme which was funded by the Department for Communities and Local G...

TTT Evaluation File  

The project represents one strand of the Take Part National Support Programme which was funded by the Department for Communities and Local G...

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