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EAC Conventio

DON’T MISS Keynote Speaker Susan Moore Johnson Closing Session featuring Carol Grace Anderson Flu Shots | Blood Drive


WELCOME

Welcome to the 2010 WEAC Convention! As WEAC’s president, I am proud to welcome you to this annual professional development conference, uniting Wisconsin educators for high-quality education. This year’s WEAC Convention features a host of sessions, designed to give you flexibility in your choices depending on your interest and greatest professional need. And don’t forget about General Session speaker Susan Moore Johnson, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and director of the Project on the Next Generation of Teachers. Johnson will give national perspective to what teachers and their unions are doing and can do to improve their workplace and their work.

Mary Bell

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Whether you are employed in a preK-12 school, a technical college, a state school, or elsewhere – you’re an important part of our union. Whether we deliver our instruction through a virtual network, in a regular classroom, in the office as a school secretary or on the field as a coach – as educators, we make a difference in the lives of our students and we care deeply about improving the quality of our profession. Your union has deep roots in education advocacy, from supporting early learning programs to helping new educators get off to a good start. We are on the forefront of creating research-based education standards for licensing and professional development, and supporting legislation that creates safe learning environments. Each small step we take as individuals – like attending this year’s conference – contributes to our collective position as a force for quality in our profession and schools. Where we go from here depends upon these many small steps, all on the same path toward strong schools in the Wisconsin tradition. While you are here, I hope you will take time to learn more about the benefits and resources available to you because of your WEAC membership, and consider becoming more involved at the local, state or national level of our association. Have a great Convention! Sincerely,

Mary Bell President of the Wisconsin Education Association Council

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CONVENTION OVERVIEW

Thursday, October 28, 2010 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Exhibits Open – Alliant Energy Center Exhibit Halls C and D

10:00 am – 10:30 am

General Session Entertainment Madison East High School Orchestra, Jackie Dhoore Becker, Director Alliant Energy Center Exhibit Hall A

10:30 am – 12:30 pm

General Session featuring Susan Moore Johnson, Professor, Harvard School of Education & Director of the Project on the Next Generation of Teachers Alliant Energy Center Exhibit Hall A

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Workshops and Sessions – Alliant Energy Center / Clarion Suites / Sheraton Madison Hotel

Friday, October 29, 2010 8:30 am – 1:00 pm

Exhibits Open – Alliant Energy Center Exhibit Halls C and D

8:30 am – 2:30 pm

Workshops and Sessions – Alliant Energy Center / Clarion Suites / Sheraton Madison Hotel

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm

Closing General Session – “Get Fired Up without Burning Out” featuring Carol Grace Anderson Alliant Energy Center Exhibit Hall A

The annual WEAC Convention is developed and planned by Ron Jetty, PhD, Consultant, WEAC Teaching and Learning, with the assistance of Ann Reynolds, staff assistant. Ann also coordinates all physical arrangements and scheduling. Exhibits are coordinated by Dianne Hellenbrand. The design and composition of the program and coordination of program printing is done by Laura DeVries.

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AT-A-GLANCE EDUCATION ISSUES

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Human Growth and Development: Exploring SkillBased Instruction NASA Resources and STEM Education NEW Air, Air Everywhere Activity Guide SMART Boarding in the Classroom: Become a SMARTer Teacher

Beyond the Funeral Flowers: Schools Helping to Mend a Grieving Heart

Cheers, Tears and Fears: The Seventeenth Annual Sharing Workshop for Beginning Teachers

The ART of SMART Boarding in the Classroom: Work SMARTer Not Harder

Hook, Line and Thinker Make Discipline a Breeze: A Love and Logic Approach

Taking Time for Teamwork

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Dating Violence: DPI’s Instructional Response Wisconsin Education Network, Online Materials and Resources

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From the Bag of Tricks: Quick and Engaging Diversity Activities for the School and Classroom Make Discipline a Breeze: A Love and Logic Approach

Protecting and Investing Your Pension

Traveling the Neural Highway: Brain-Based Early Reading Instruction

What’s New in Children’s Literature

Nuts and Bolts of Peer Drama

Developing Writers through Inquiry: Surprising Possibilities

Shake It Down, Turn Around: Let’s Move Our Body!

It Takes Courage: Preventing and Addressing Anti-Gay Bullying and Harassment

The Mindfulness Way: Helping Children Find Inner Wisdom and Peace

FOCUS ON CLOSING ACHIEVEMENT GAPS

Eating Disorders and Obesity: Exposing the Storm Within The ART of SMART Boarding in the Classroom: Work SMARTer Not Harder

The Mathematics and Literature Connection Four House Mysteries

Moving the Pencil: Interactive Approach to Teaching Writing

Best Practices and Instructional Design for SMART Boards: Building SMARTer Lessons

Four House Mysteries

A Jewish History of the State of Wisconsin Online Curriculum

Going Global: Elementary Collaborative Projects E-Waste Not, E-Want Not

Climate Change, Classroom and Community

SMART Boarding in the Classroom: Become a Systems for Assessing Teacher and Principal Effective- SMARTer Teacher ness in Wisconsin: A Public Dialogue Connecting Character Education with Literature and Creative Strategies for Motivating Students You Can the Fine Arts Use on Monday Morning The MathCAST Project: Building Digital Learning F R I D A Y Objects to Enhance Student Learning in Mathematics Moving the Pencil: Interactive Approach to Teaching Writing Musical Books: An Engaging Pathway to Early Learning Bullying Prevention: DPI’s Response

SUPPORTING NEW TEACHERS T

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Give Me an Hour and l’ll Give You the Power! Classroom Management Strategies

Reality Classroom! Top Teaching Techniques Caught on Film

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Using Multiple Representations of Linear Functions to Make Connections in Algebra Using Web 2.0 Applications to Differentiate Instruction and Engage Today’s Learners Impact Teaching F

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Greeks, Romans, and Saxons! Oh, My! A Deeper Understanding of Fractions, Decimals, and Percents Storytelling: A Brain-Based Instructional Approach Singing the Words: Using Lyric Writing in Elementary Curricular Areas Achievement Gaps Strategies for Culturally Linguistic Diverse ELL Students, Communities and Families Teaching with Technology

Sidekick or Super Hero? Transitioning All Generations to Success 2

Repeated sessions are indicated in session descriptions.

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AT-A-GLANCE SPECIAL EDUCATION T

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EDUCATION SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT T

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Hoarseness in Children: Identification and Management in the Classroom

Junior Achievement Capstone Programs

Spirit of a Champion

Response to Intervention: The WEA Academy Movie

Indiana Jones Demystified

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Working with Challenging Students F

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Hoarseness in Children: Identification and Management in the Classroom

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Health Information and Tools for Educational Support Professionals Creating Peaceful Spaces in the Preschool and Elementary Classrooms

HIGH SCHOOL REFORM / 21ST CENTURY SKILLS

Working with Challenging Students Step up to Writing

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Learning Strategies and Study Strategies for Students Using Moodle and Interactive Whiteboards to Offer with Disabilities Math and Computer Science Hybrid Student Intervention Monitoring System Is Computational Thinking a 21st Century Skill?

PI 34 LICENSURE SUPPORT T

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Documenting Completion of Your Professional Development Plan: Navigating the Process Incorporate Environmental Education into Your PDP F

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Videagogy: An Innovative Approach to Connecting Videos, Technology, and Teaching Documenting Completion of Your Professional Development Plan: Navigating the Process Wisconsin Schools of Recognition Teacher Fellowship Information Session

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Energize Your Educational Environment F

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Investing 101: Retirement Savings and the Keys to Success Combining Healthy Lifestyle Information with Employee Wellness Strategies National Board Portfolios: Starting off Correctly Using Travel for Professional Development Teacher as Hero The Spirituality of Teaching: Remembering the Reasons We Teach Don’t Be Jack!: A Financial Learning Game Finances 101: Seven Mistakes New Members Make with Their Money Integrating Health Education and Physical Education with Employee Wellness Programs

Meeting Student Information Needs Around the Clock Hitting the Bull’s Eye: Promoting WEMTA How Does a Computer Do That?

PERSONAL GROWTH TRACK T

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Retirement Planning: It’s More Than Money Managing Conflict with Power and Presence One Breath for One Human Project National Board Certification: Getting Started

PI 34’s Professional Development Plan and the Next Steps

Becoming a Teacher Leader

After Goal Approval: Get Ready for PDP Verification

Wisconsin Retirement System: Understanding Your Benefits

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Don’t Be Jack!: A Financial Learning Game

Repeated sessions are indicated in session descriptions.

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WISCONSIN TEACHER STANDARDS Wisconsin Standards for Teacher Development and Licensure Standard 1 – Content The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of the subject matter meaningful for students. Standard 2 – Educational Psychology The teacher understands how children with broad ranges of ability learn, and provides instruction that supports their intellectual, social, and personal development. Standard 3 – Learning Styles The teacher understands how students differ in their approach to learning and the barriers that impede learning, and can adapt instruction to meet diverse needs of students, including those with disabilities and exceptionalities. Standard 4 – Teaching and Technology The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies, including technology, to encourage student’s development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

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Standard 5 – Classroom Management The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and selfmotivation. Standard 6 – Communication and Technology The teacher uses effective verbal and nonverbal communication techniques, as well as instructional media and technology, to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Standard 9 – Self-Evaluation The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his or her choices and actions on students, parents, professionals in the learning community and others, and actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally. Standard 10 – Community Relations The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support student learning and well-being, and acts with integrity, fairness, and in an

Standard 7 – Lesson Plans The teacher organizes and plans systematic instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, the students, the community, and curriculum goals. Standard 8 – Assessment The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner.

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Wisconsin Pupil Services Standards

Standard 1 The pupil services professional understands the Ten Wisconsin Teacher Standards. Standard 2 The pupil services professional understands the complexities of learning and knowledge of comprehensive, coordinated practice strategies that support pupil learning, health, safety, and development. Standard 3 The pupil services professional has the ability to use research, research methods, and knowledge about issues and trends to improve

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practice in schools and classrooms. Standard 4 The pupil services professional understands and represents professional ethics and social behaviors appropriate for school and community. Standard 5 The pupil services professional understands the organization, development, management, and content of collaborative and mutually supportive pupil services programs within educational settings. Standard 6

The pupil services professional is able to address comprehensively the wide range of social, emotional, behavioral and physical issues and circumstances which may limit pupils’ abilities to achieve positive learning outcomes through development, implementation and evaluation of system-wide interventions and strategies. Standard 7 The pupil services professional interacts successfully with pupils, parents, professional educators, employers, and community support systems such as juvenile justice, public health, human services and 5


GENERAL INFORMATION Admission to Sessions Admission to all meetings is restricted to WEAC members and guests. Questions about membership will be answered at the WEAC Information Booth in the Exhibit Hall in the Alliant Energy Center. Exhibits/Exhibit Hours The exhibit area is one of the most popular Convention features. It is open to all educators and their friends as well as the general public. A full listing of exhibitors and an exhibit floor plan will be distributed at the Exhibit Hall at the Alliant Energy Center. Exhibits Open Thursday, October 28 8:30 AM-4:30 PM and Friday, October 29 8:30 AM-1:00 PM Lost and Found Items found can be returned to or claimed at the WEAC Office at the Exhibition Hall at the Alliant Energy Center.

Location of Meetings Convention sessions have been scheduled at three facilities. Workshop and presentations are scheduled at the Alliant Energy Center, Sheraton Madison Hotel and the Clarion Suites. There is a walkway between the Alliant Energy Center and the Clarion Suites. The General Session is scheduled for 10:30 AM on Thursday, October 28 at the Alliant Energy Center, 1919 Alliant Energy Way, in Hall A of the Exhibition Hall. The closing general session will be held in the same hall on Friday, October 29 at 1:00 PM. Directions From Green Bay: (North) I-90 to exit 142A, West on Hwy 12/18 (5) miles to Rimrock Rd. Ext 262. From Milwaukee: (East) I-94 West, I-90 South to exit 142A, West on Hwy 12/18 to Rimrock Rd. Exit 262. From Southwest: (south) Hwy 151N to Hwy 12/18E to Rimrock Rd. Exit 262. Parking Members will enjoy free convention parking at the Alliant Energy Center grounds just off Rimrock Road. Free shuttle bus service will be available to take members to and from the Alliant Energy Center and the Sheraton Madison Hotel where sessions will also be held.

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Free Shuttle Bus Service Shuttle bus service between the Sheraton Madison Hotel and the Alliant Energy Center Exhibition Hall will run on Thursday, October 28 from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. Pickup will be at the front doors or each location. On Friday, October 29, the shuttle buses will run between the two locations from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM. Hotel Reservations Clarion Suites 2110 Rimrock Rd Madison,WI 53713 608.284.1234 gm.clarion@charterinternet.com $89 single $99 double There is a small block of rooms set aside for WEAC members. Please indicate you are with WEAC to receive this room rate. Cut-off date: Monday, September 27, 2010. Interpreting Accommodations American Sign Language interpreters are available for WEAC members at Convention who are deaf or hard of hearing. WEAC has contracted with “Interpreting Solutions, Inc� to provide free interpreting services for members at the General Session. Jill Kenehan-Krey can be reached at phone: 414.226.8191 or Fax: 414.226.8192, or Email jill@interpretingsolutionsinc.com.

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GENERAL INFORMATION Special Accommodations If you have a disability and require special accommodations in order to fully participate in convention activities, please contact Ann Reynolds at WEAC at 1.800.362.8034, ext 217. WEAC will make every effort to accommodate reasonable requests. ESP and Paraeducators ESP and ParaEducators requiring Verification of Hours (VOH) forms for their Certification requirements should visit the WEAC office, and ask for Denise Maney to register and get their VOH forms for each session they attend at convention. Licensing Questions Staff from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) will be on-site to provide consultative services to members who have questions related to licensing. This service will be available at the DPI booth on the exhibit floor of the Exhibit Hall.

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PDA ESP Certificate program Credit toward the ESP Certificate Program, administered by the WEA Academy, can be earned by attending the WEAC Convention. A maximum of 10 hours may be awarded in the elective category of Professional Conferences. Most convention sessions can qualify, including the General Session and the majority of workshops. Sessions not qualifying deal with personal topics such as financial or retirment issues. Individuals will need to keep track of the sessions in which they participate so that attendance hours from all workshops can be totaled. To receive credit, participants must sign the attendance sheet at the WEAC Information Office after attending all sessions. At that time, you will also receive the Verification of Hours form for your own records. The WEAC Information Office will be open from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM on Thursday and from 8:30 AM to 2:30 PM on Friday. No Verification of Hours forms will be distributed after the convention. For questions, contact Denise at the WEA Academy at 1.800.362.8034, ext 202.

New Member Stipend A stipend of $50 is offered as a special incentive for WEAC members only who are in their first three years in the profession and who are attending the WEAC Convention for the first time. Attendance forms will be available each day at the WEAC Membership Booth in the Exhibition Hall at the Alliant Energy Center. Members must attend both days to receive the stipend. Forms must be submitted to WEAC by mail by January 1, 2011. Stipends can only be earned once. Please do not submit forms this year if you received a stipend for a previous year of attendance at the WEAC Annual Convention.

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER SUSAN MOORE JOHNSON General Session, Thursday 10:30 am – 12:30 PM Teachers today are at the center of intense efforts to improve schools. Depending on the policymakers, teachers are either treated as the agents of change or the targets of change. In some districts, teachers join with administrators to develop better approaches for hiring, induction, professional

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growth, evaluation, and compensation. In other districts, where the potential of teachers to lead change is largely ignored, new policies are adopted that prescribe and regulate teachers’ work. In this session, Susan Moore Johnson will explain what teachers and their unions are doing and can do to improve their workplace and their work. Johnson, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and director of the Project on the Next Generation of Teachers, has been studying teachers’ work for more than 30 years. Johnson has written four books about teachers and their work: Teacher Unions in Schools (1984) focuses on the role of teachers unions in the day-to-day work of schools; Teachers at Work (1990), examines the school as a workplace for teachers. Finders and Keepers (2004) focuses on supporting new teachers. Recently, Johnson coauthored Redesigning Teacher Pay, in which she proposes a new career-based plan for compensating teachers. A former high school teacher and administrator, Johnson advises policymakers, administrators, and teachers about how best to advance the learning of students by enhancing the work of teachers.

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special event GET FIRED UP WITHOUT BURNING OUT! Carol Grace Anderson, M.A., Nashville, TN Friday Closing Session 1:00 – 2:15 p.m. Are you ready for some good news? Here it is. Yes, you really can GET and KEEP fired up professionally and personally. Sound unrealistic? Let’s break it down. It’s simple and easier than you think. Small steps taken every day bring huge results. It’s like climbing any mountain—it takes just one step at a time no matter how high the mountain is. Are you feeling a spark already? Today is the perfect time to get started. Here are three steps: 1. REACH into new ways of thinking. 2. RISK new actions. 3. REFUEL. You can’t run on empty! If we don’t take time for ourselves, everything else will suffer. But, is this selfish? No! Self-care is vital for our health, happiness, and productivity. When we have balance in our life, we’re on top of our game and can give our best… to ourselves and to everyone else. Choose to get fired up now! Carol Grace Anderson, M.A., is a national speaker, former Psychology teacher, and best-selling author based in Nashville. Her dynamic and entertaining programs keep audiences on the edge of their seats. Through her own life challenges along the way, she knows first-hand how to get fired up. Her book, GET FIRED UP WITHOUT BURNING OUT, has been translated into four languages. And her story in CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE COLLEGE SOUL has inspired millions. Carol is a favorite with educational organizations across the country. We’re glad she’ll share her fired-up secrets with us! http://www.getfiredup.com/

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Thursday, October 29 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM

Developing Writers through Inquiry: Surprising Possibilities Surprising possibilities exist when using the inquiry approach to develop writers. This session focuses on two units of study – historical fiction and literary nonfiction – and the strategies, lessons, and anchor charts used to develop these units. The list of mentor texts selected for each genre will be shared. In addition, student writing samples will be highlighted as well as video clips of students reading their pieces. While these units were developed in multi-age first and second grade classrooms and demonstrate what is possible with young writers, the inquiry approach to the teaching of writing can be used across grade levels. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 1 ( Kathy Champeau Muskego-Norway School District ( Laurie McCarthy Muskego-Norway School District ( Tara Krueger Muskego-Norway School District Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 9

Eating Disorders and Obesity: Exposing the Storm Within Understanding the dynamics of eating disorders and obesity are vital for counselors and teachers. Miss Quast explains the underlying issues and co-morbid diagnoses that feed such disorders. She explains one’s psychological needs, her personal recovery and the four components in the development of all three eating disorders. Tools and activities for recovery are provided. She also offers a nine-step curriculum for a model to recovery, which includes CBT (Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy) and DBT (Dialectic Behavioral Therapy). Rachel Quast, M.A. is an author, counselor and support group leader for those experiencing anorexia, bulimia 10

and compulsive overeating and has been specializing in this work for over nine years. In addition, she teaches graduate classes on counseling eating disorders. She is a resource person for Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders and an official member of National Eating Disorders Association. She shares great insight as a person in recovery from these disorders. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection B ( Rachel Quast, M.A. SHED (Self-Healing through EDucation) Teacher Standards: 2, 5, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 4, 5, 6, 7

Give Me an Hour and l’ll Give You the Power! Classroom Management Strategies Teachers lose five to nine hours of teaching time per week dealing with classroom behavior problems. Imagine how much more productive your classroom would be with that time spent on instruction. Learn strategies for effective classroom management that will end student-teacher power struggles, stop the need for repeated warnings, greatly reduce the need for discipline referrals, and improve academic performance. Forget the gimmicks and paperwork overload by teaching your students appropriate school behavior. Give me an hour of your time and I’ll give you the power to take back your teaching time. Learn practical, positive, and powerful classroom management strategies that you can put into use right away.

Hoarseness in Children: Identification and Management in the Classroom Hoarseness can negatively impact student performance in school, as well as perceptions by peers and adults. Voice disorders affect an estimated 6-24% of children, and an estimated 57% of teachers. This session will provide information on identification of voice disorders in children, appropriate recommendations for evaluation, support of students with voice disorders in the classroom, and prevention of voice disorders in students and in teachers. There will be a presentation of video and audio clips of common voice disorders and education on causes and presentation of common voice disorders. Participants will have the opportunity to train their ears to recognize disordered voice quality. Appropriate recommendations for evaluation and strategies for collaborating with medical voice professionals including physicians and speech-language pathologists will be provided, as well as ways that teachers can help support students with voice disorders in the classroom. L Special Education G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 6 ( Sherri Zelazny University of Wisconsin Madison Teacher Standards: 3 Pupil Serv. Standards: 6

L Supporting New Teachers G Clarion-Superior ( N. Germaine Seidler Greenfield School District – Retired Teacher Teacher Standards: 5, 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 6

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Thursday, October 29 Human Growth and Development: Exploring Skill-Based Instruction Skill-based human growth and development is critical to helping youth build the skills necessary to access accurate information, make informed decisions, communicate effectively and succeed in managing their own health. This session will explore a strategy that shifts the emphasis from knowing health facts to developing lifelong health skills. Problem-based learning and the skill of accessing accurate information will be used to explore sexually transmitted diseases and contraception. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 7 ( Emily Holder Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 4 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

Indiana Jones Demystified Archaeologists are popularly viewed as detectives who search for clues to solve the mysteries of the past. But they’re also highly trained specialists who bring a range of scientific and humanitiesbased approaches to this unusual work. How do archaeologists work in the real world? How do archaeologists turn broken bits of trash into a picture of what really happened in the past? This session will provide an introduction of how archaeologists work and will suggest some resources and lessons that you can use to bring archaeology into your classroom. L Special Education G Sheraton-Connection 1

Impact Teaching Effective outcomes in the classroom environment hinge on the ability of the facilitator to effectively communicate the subject matter. To be effective, that material must be presented using methods that acknowledge and respect all learning styles and levels of attention. In this seminar, Carl will present information and practical examples of how to get to this level of understanding. This seminar will provide the participants with ways to: Acquire strategies to enhance school standardized test scores; learn three types of experiential activities and how to use them to enhance learning; examine timely, relevant resources for further study; energize and recharge themselves and their staff for the challenges of teaching and educational collaboration; practice proven techniques and activities for making more in-depth teacher/ learner connections; understand the importance of team building and group engagement to improve student success; use new experiential tools to directly apply to individual teaching situations; examine the experiential learning cycle including the teacher’s role at each stage; identify methods of putting fun into learning; and practice and understand the three levels of effective processing and the relationship to desired learner outcomes. L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Sheraton-Inspiration

Junior Achievement Capstone Programs Junior Achievement of Wisconsin’s Capstone programs combine practical applications in real world situations with classroom learning. JA BizTown and JA Finance Park allow students to learn work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy concepts by putting learned skills into simulated communities and workplace settings. Elementary school students aren’t old enough to work, vote or be the boss; at JA BizTown they are! This program combines in-class learning with a day-long visit to a fully interactive, simulated town. Students leave understanding the relationship between what they learn in school and how their contributions to the city keep our community robust. Teens rarely think about buying health insurance. At JA Finance Park students receive life scenarios and visit 15 businesses to purchase family needs. They create a budget, allocate expenses and make investments. As the sole provider they must meet the needs of the family while remaining within their set budget. L Education Support Professional Support G Sheraton-Connection 4 ( Melisse’ Wen Junior Achievement of Wisconsin, Inc. ( Sara Logar Junior Achievement of Wisconsin, Inc. Teacher Standards: 1, 4, 5, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 7

( Carl Olson Energizer Olson Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 4, 7

( Bonnie Jancik University of Wisconsin – La Crosse, Mississippi Valley Archaeology Center ( Jean Dowiasch University of Wisconsin – La Crosse, Mississippi Valley Archaeology Center Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 4, 6, 7

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Thursday, October 29 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM

Is Computational Thinking a 21st Century Skill? What is Computational Thinking (CT)? How is it related to computers, computing and computer science and information technology? Where does it occur and how might it affect K-12 education? Is it a 21st Century Skill? Are there some examples of computational thinking in the curriculum already? We’ll look at several recent documents and symposia that have considered these questions and begin to develop some possible answers. L High School Reform/21st Century Skills G Clarion-Michigan A ( Joseph Kmoch Milwaukee Public Schools Teacher Standards: 1, 4

NASA Resources and STEM Education Do you know what STEM stands for? Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. A statement by Fortune STEM 1000 Companies reports that 55% of those companies are currently experiencing a shortage of human capital in those areas. How can teachers adequately prepare their students for jobs in the STEM areas? Where can you find engaging STEM activities? Join Jeanine Gelhaus, a NASA Solar System Educator, and learn how to access free STEM activities and other NASA resources. Participants will conduct an actual STEM investigation during the workshop. Gelhaus will facilitate the STEM process as teacher participants design, test and redesign a thermal protection system using simple, cheap materials. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 8

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( Jeanine Gelhaus Medford Public Schools Teacher Standards: 1, 4, 7

NEW Air, Air Everywhere Activity Guide Try out some of the activities from the “NEW Air, Air Everywhere Activity Guide” written by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to teach kids about air quality as well as its impact on our health and the environment. The guide features an activity to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Clean Air Act and help kids understand how far we’ve come since the signing of the Clean Air Act in 1970. Written for a 3rd-5th grade audience, this guide includes both brand new activities and a couple updated activities from our old “Where’s the Air” study guide. Join us and discover how easy it is to incorporate air education into daily lessons. During the session we will showcase a few of the activities and each participant will receive a copy of the new guide. L Education Issues G Clarion-Michigan B ( Christal Campbell Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources ( Mary Hamel Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 4

Protecting and Investing Your Pension Public pension funds are under attack throughout the country. Like other funds, the Wisconsin Retirement System (WRS), which provides pensions for present and retired teachers and other school personnel, suffered during the worst downmarkets since the Great

Depression. However, because of the design and investment strategies used by the State of Wisconsin Investment Board (SWIB), which manages and invests the assets of the WRS, the WRS came through the recession in better shape than many of its peers. Sandy Drew, who is Legislative and Beneficiary Liaison for SWIB, will describe, 1)the recession’s effect on the WRS, 2)how the funds are managed and invested, 3) strategies that SWIB uses to protect the fund in both good and bad markets, 4) what today’s educators can expect when they retire, and 5)the need for vigilance to protect the fund. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection C ( Sandy Drew State of Wisconsin Investment Board

Retirement Planning: It’s More Than Money Planning ahead can help determine whether you view retirement with anticipation or apprehension. Many teachers look forward to retirement as a release from a job that dictates the structure of their day. On the other hand, many dread the day when they won’t have a job to define who they are and how they live. Planning can ease the transition into retirement and help identify ways to stay involved in mentally stimulating and emotionally rewarding activities. This session can help define personal retirement goals and ways to help meet them. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Connection 3 ( Bob Albrightson WEAC–Retired Teacher Standards: 10

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Thursday, October 29 Sidekick or Super Hero? Transitioning All Generations to Success Sidekick or Super Hero – how do you identify different generations within your school or teaching teams? Whether you are a beginning teacher or a teaching mentor, this session will help you learn more about generational characteristics of your teammates, allowing you to launch everyone to the status of super hero. Specifically you will learn about: expectation disconnects between generations; non-negotiable items within your team adaptable team communication; and techniques that help everyone succeed. L Supporting New Teachers G Alliant Energy Center-Wingra ( Sarah Gibson Accent Business Communication, LLC Teacher Standards: 9

SMART Boarding in the Classroom: Become a SMARTer Teacher Are you looking for ideas to bring your teaching into the digital age? Then this Introductory Session is for you. Come and experience the latest SMART Board software with exciting new features. Interact with a SMART wireless slate and learn how to control your SMART Board from anywhere in your room. Discover content and standard-based ideas for higher student achievement, teaching strategies for differentiated instruction, innovative classroom management designs, and how to interact with your computer while integrating technology seamlessly into the classroom. SMART Boarding techniques, free online training, in- service information, grant ideas and ideas on how to develop positive administrator support for technology will also be shared.

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L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 4 ( Julie Ann Sawall The ART of SMART Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3

Spirit of a Champion Bobbie Malone of the Wisconsin Historical Society will introduce this session on Badger Biographies, where you’ll hear Bob Kann, author of “Cindy Bentley: Spirit of a Champion.” You will be introduced to Cindy herself. Find out what inspired this champion and how she inspires others! Cindy was born with an intellectual disability due to her mother’s abusive use of alcohol when pregnant, and Cindy grew up in foster homes and at the Wisconsin Southern Center. No one, not even Cindy, thought she would ever succeed at anything. But with the encouragement of a teacher at the Center, Cindy began to run and also began to compete in Special Olympics. After she became a leader among Special Olympics athletes and traveled around the globe, she became an advocate encouraging others with disabilities to speak up for their rights. Copies of the biography will be available throughout the convention, and Cindy and Bob will autograph copies after the session. L Special Education G Sheraton-Reflection D ( Robert Kann Professor of Education ( Bobbie Malone Wisconsin Historical Society Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3

Using Moodle and Interactive Whiteboards to Offer Math and Computer Science Hybrid In this session, I will demonstrate how I have used Moodle and SMARTboards to meet the needs of more of a variety of learning styles and tailor the class to the growing needs of 21st century digital learners. I will demonstrate features of moodle including assignments, forums, messaging, links, surveys, and recording. L High School Reform/21st Century Skills G Alliant Energy Center-Monona ( Lori Hunt Middleton Cross Plains Area School District Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10

Using Multiple Representations of Linear Functions to Make Connections in Algebra Participate in activities at the Algebra level that help students find the connections between a rule, graph, table and context for linear functions. Learn ways to help students move from each representation to the others, developing deep understanding of multiple ways to solve problems. The lessons presented are very visual and can be effectively used with all types of students to create and enhance understanding. Teachers will receive ideas and materials that they can use in their own Algebra classrooms. L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Alliant Energy Center-Kegonsa ( Mark Ray DeForest Area School District Teacher Standards: 2, 4, 5

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Thursday, October 29 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM

Using Web 2.0 Applications to Differentiate Instruction and Engage Today’s Learners This session will introduce instructors to the world of Web 2.0 applications that exist on the Internet and can be used to engage all learners in today’s classrooms. Apps such as Animoto, VoiceThread, ToonDoo, Fotoflexer, Skethcast, SurveyMonkey, Blogger, Kerpoof, and others will be presented. Not only are these applications engaging to students, but they allow for differentiation at a high level. Here is where students can use digital tools to develop creativity, collaborate and communicate....and they can work with their teachers to set educational goals, explore answers to their individual and group questions, monitor their own progress toward those goals and assess their final products. Join the Web 2.0 world and learn to build these exciting tools into your classroom! L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 5 ( Christine Longe Chris Longe Consulting Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

( Mary Lou Harris-Manske Book Look (Children’s Bookstore) Teacher Standards: 2, 4, 5, 6, 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 6

1:00 PM – 4:00 pm

Be a Cool Refuser: Keep Your Friends and Maintain Your Dignity It’s not very often that a stranger pressures you to do something unhealthy. Most of the time it is a friend who does the pressuring. In a world where just saying “No” isn’t enough, these skills can keep anyone out of trouble and keep your friends at the same time. This five-step process brings to life what kids go through during adolescence. This presentation is high energy and requires some audience participation. Prepare to have fun!!! You’ll leave this session with the ability to teach effective refusal skills to your students. L High School Reform/21st Century Skills G Alliant Energy Center-Waubesa ( Chris Peterson Independent Facilitator Love & Logic Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 6

What’s New in Children’s Literature Books that teach, touch the heart, and tickle the funny bone will be shared. Participants will be introduced to a vast array of books that enhances the curriculum and supports core content areas. These literature selections are sure-fire hits to spark interest, motivate and deepen student engagement. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection E

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Managing Conflict with Power and Presence How can we begin to change our relationship with conflict? Whether in the classroom or the conference room, conflict is a significant part of school life and impacts our relationships with colleagues, students, and staff. Most of us see conflict as negative, a perception that has a profound impact on how we manage it. This three-hour session is a lively and interactive workshop that uses principles and techniques from Aikido, the Japanese art of reconciliation. You will discover how to use the energy of conflict to manage

your reactions, maintain presence in difficult situations, and turn adversarial relationships into partnering ones. And you will come to understand why it’s not what happens in life that determines your state of mind but how you manage your thoughts and reactions that makes the difference. L Personal Growth Strand G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 3 ( Judy Ringer Power & Presence Training Teacher Standards: 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 4, 7

National Board Certification: Getting Started During this presentation, National Board candidates will be assisted in ‘unpacking the entries.’ Unpacking refers to understanding what is required to successfully begin working on each entry, i.e. answering entry questions, examining video taping requirements, and reviewing the requirements for gathering student work samples. Open-ended discussions will be held throughout the presentation and there will be opportunities to ask specific questions. Candidates will be encouraged to bring their certification requirements, rubrics, standards, and any other pertinent information. Handouts and schedules of area candidate support groups will be available to those interested. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Reflection A ( Jo Christianson Wisconsin National Board Network ( Deanna Brunlinger Wisconsin National Board Network Teacher Standards: 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1

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Thursday, October 29 One Breath for One Human Project We use our breathing muscles 22,000 to 26,000 times per day. Breathing is non-negotiable, but it is also subject to mastery. As the fundamental system in the human body, upon which all other systems depend, its function is critical to physical and mental health and the potential for cognitive excellence. 30 percent of students today have asthma. If they are not getting breath to the bottom third of their lungs, they are not thinking effectively and are in a chronic low-grade state of “fight or flight.” Not at all the platform from which to learn. Or teach. “Inspiration” is the act of inhaling. Join Kathleen in this act of inspiration. In ten steps you learn to breathe and to teach one other person to breathe. Re-energize your body, your spirit and your students. Conklin transitioned from a career in law and has taught more than 25,000 hours of pilates and other cognitive movement. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Connection 2 ( Kathleen Conklin Body Conscious LLC at PilateSpa ( Susan Jane Watson Verona Area School District Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

Response to Intervention: The WEA Academy Movie Participants will be introduced to the RtI video recently produced by the WEA Academy. The video includes an introduction to RtI, core principles of RtI, how RtI might be implemented in other schools/districts, and progress monitoring using CBM. Participants will view video footage that demonstrates effective student and educator components of RtI. Access to the RtI video along with hands-on activities that can be used in conjunction with the video will

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be provided. The video, along with suggested activities, will create a strong framework for a trainer of RtI staff development that could be used at the building or district level.

Cheers, Tears and Fears: The Seventeenth Annual Sharing Workshop for Beginning Teachers

L Education Support Professional Support

Beginning teaching can feel like a bobsled ride at the Olympics. Scared at the start. Racing around the curves at a million miles an hour. Heart pounding. A big cheer at the end. And then getting ready to do it all over again. Share your ride with other beginning teachers as you reflect on your experiences as a beginning teacher: from the serious or the incredibly funny; to the unforgettable or totally forgettable; to the expected or completely surprising. Emphasis will be on a balanced perspective that is easy to lose in the blur of daily work demands. This workshop is intended for beginning teachers with three or fewer years of teaching experience. Student teachers should consider attending the session entitled “Making the Most of Your Student Teaching Experience.” Tom Ganser is a former high school teacher who has facilitated sharing workshops for beginning teachers for 20 years. Tom also assists in designing, implementing, and evaluating mentoring programs for beginning teachers.

G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 2 ( Lynn Johnson Stoughton School District Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 5, 7, 8

2:30 AM – 3:45 PM

Becoming a Teacher Leader This workshop will take a close look at the topic of teacher leadership. What is a teacher leader? How does a teacher leader differ from an effective teacher? What kind of training is being requested by today’s teacher leaders? Why should we value teacher leaders in our classrooms and schools? What does current research say? What are some of the possible leadership routes available to teachers besides leaving the classroom to pursue an administrative avenue? Participants will learn about the latest information on this topic through a PowerPoint presentation and a group discussion. Participants will also complete a teacher leadership readiness instrument. Information and resources, including questions and answers concerning the U.S. Department of Education-Teacher Ambassador Fellowship program that Ms. Gelhaus was involved with will be shared.

L Supporting New Teachers G Sheraton-Reflection B ( Tom Ganser University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Teacher Standards: 9, 10

L Personal Growth Strand G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 8 ( Jeanine Gelhaus Medford Public Schools Teacher Standards: 9, 10

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Thursday, October 29 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM

Creative Strategies for Motivating Students You Can Use on Monday Morning This workshop explores dynamic strategies for motivating students. Dr. Bob Kann draws upon ideas gleaned from working with teachers for more than 30 years as a classroom teacher and Professor of Education; from writing books for children and curriculum guides for teachers; from performing motivational school assembly programs, and leading workshops on creativity; to presenting a fantastic collection of motivational techniques. Providing students with role models of kids who have changed the world, stream-ofconsciousness writing, magic, juggling, storytelling, humor, puppets, The Amazing Bubble, US presidents, and improvisational theater are but a few of the many sources of motivation presented. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection D ( Robert Kann Professor of Education Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10

Documenting Completion of Your Professional Development Plan: Navigating the Process This session will assist participants as they endeavor to understand the final steps of the PDP process. Information will be presented that will allow session attendees to better understand how to document completion of their PDPs. Specifically, tips on the types of evidence an educator can provide will be shared. Through interactive activities, educators will gain insights into writing rationales in order to document the ways their artifacts evidence professional growth and affect student learning. Additionally,

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general PI 34 information will be provided regarding the PDP processes and protocols. Information will be provided for teachers and pupil services professionals. Handouts will be available. L PI 34 Support G Clarion-Superior ( Catherine Cullen Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Don’t Be Jack!: A Financial Learning Game Sharpen your pencils and put your thinking caps on! It’s time to take a lesson from Jack and Jill. In this fun-filled seminar you will learn about members’ most common financial mistakes and how to avoid them. We start off by explaining the story of Jack and Jill. They started out on equal footing – same school, same job, same salary – but very quickly their financial situations parted ways. Jack made choices that negatively impacted his financial position and future, while Jill avoided common financial mistakes and got on the fast track to a secure future. You and your team will compete in our Don’t Be Jack board game. You will leave with the information you need to follow in Jill’s financial footsteps. This presentation is geared toward new members, but all members (educational support professionals and certified staff) are welcome and sure to learn something new.

Energize Your Educational Environment Be prepared to leave this workshop with many practical ideas to liven up your class, team or group. An engaged group will learn better and both the instructor and student will enjoy the process. Carl Olson believes that energizers are calisthenics for the mind. He feels that we need to stimulate the mind in order to enhance effective learning. In this presentation, Carl will advocate the experiential model for learning and many hands-on, practical examples will be given. The workshop will have applications for anyone who is involved as an educator, adviser or coach at any level. It will be fast paced, hands-on and inspirational. Carl draws on his 36 plus years of experience and his diverse background to build a case for these experiential instructional methods. When students are actively involved in the learning process, achievement is elevated. With elevated achievement, the teacher’s role is more enjoyable and they derive more fulfillment from their careers. This presentation will cause you to look at teaching as a valuable asset to our society. Be ready to laugh, learn and enjoy the experiential process! L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Inspiration ( Carl Olson Energizer Olson Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 4, 7

L Personal Growth Strand G Clarion-Michigan A ( Ana Bonjour WEA Trust Member Benefits ( Katie Cantrell WEA Trust Member Benefits

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Thursday, October 29 E-Waste Not, E-Want Not Learn about new state laws regarding disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) and discover activities to teach about the importance of recycling materials such as computers, televisions, MP3 players and cell phones. These activities will help you educate your students about how responsibly recycling e-waste can preserve valuable resources and reduce toxic contaminants in our environment. Activites can be tied into several subject areas, including science, basic math, social studies and consumer education. You can also learn how you can help your school or community ensure that e-waste is properly recycled. Additional recycling education booklets and resources will be available. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Connection 1 ( Marcy McGrath Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Teacher Standards: 1

Four House Mysteries What do you get when you put a classroom of detectives together with a mystery? Fun and excitement! They think it’s game time, but you know, as a teacher, that they are practicing important skills. The best of both worlds! Four House Mysteries is a student-centered activity that will involve and challenge the whole class. Each student will have a clue with which they will need to interact with the other students’ clues in order to deduce the answers to the mysteries. This will encourage the students to

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make connections and use their higher level thinking skills. Solving the mysteries, through a classroom game, will excite and involve your students to use their thinking, communication and listening skills. Now that’s what we call a great game! Recommended for grades 3-5. Come join us as we play detectives and solve the mysteries! L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection E ( Russell Gilbert Learning Loft ( Eileen Nemec Learning Loft Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Going Global: Elementary Collaborative Projects Are you interested in expanding the classroom walls? Are you interested in having your elementary students participate in projects that will connect them with other students and classrooms from around the world? If so, this session is for you. Learn about a wide variety of projects available on the Web that are appropriate for all elementary grades as well as some of the tools you’ll need to connect with other classrooms. Walk away with simple ideas you’ll be able to use with your students.

Hook, Line and Thinker Hook, Line, and Thinker (HLT) is a two-part program designed for upper middle school and high school students that addresses life sciences and related social issues through the eyes of an angler. The first part, “HLT - Science Guide,” uses water and fish as focal points for teaching broader life science concepts. The second, “HLT - Field Guide,” is aimed at physical education students or those in after-school programs, summer camps, or other places that have the ability to provide an angling field trip. We encourage instructors to work together to give their students the full HLT experience. Time will also be allotted in the workshop to review the Junior Angler Program suitable for grades 4-8. This workshop will provide hands-on experiences to make teachers comfortable delivering all aspects of this program which reinforces many Wisconsin academic standards in environmental education, science, social studies, language arts, and physical education. L Supporting New Teachers G Clarion-Michigan B ( Theresa Stabo Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Teacher Standards: 2, 4, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 5, 7

L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Kegonsa ( Chad Lehman West Allis-West Milwaukee School District Teacher Standards: 2, 4, 6

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Thursday, October 29 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM

Incorporate Environmental Education into Your PDP Ever wonder how you can link your interest in the environment to your professional development? Walk through the process and begin developing your own Professional Development Plan to incorporate environmental education (EE) into your classroom. EE encompasses a broad range of topics, from energy to water, that fit into any subject, from art to social studies. EE is relevant to all aspects of your students’ lives. Concern and conversation about environmental topics have increased in recent years and you can help your students learn about current environmental issues in any subject and at any grade by infusing EE into your existing curriculum. Professional development opportunities in EE are easy to find, so you’ll have plenty of options to fulfill your PDP requirements. Join us for this hands-on session using example PDPs to help you take the first steps to creating your own environmentally-focused PDP. L PI 34 Support G Sheraton-Connection 4 ( Sarah Gilbert LEAF, Wisconsin K-12 Forestry Education Program ( Gretchen Marshall LEAF, Wisconsin K-12 Forestry Education Program Teacher Standards: 9

and Logic is a philosophy of teaching children that allows adults to be happier, empowered, and more skilled in the interactions with children. Love allows children to grow through their mistakes. Logic allows children to live with the consequences of their choices. Love and Logic is a way of working with children that puts teachers back in control, teaches children to be responsible, and prepares young people to live in the real world, with its many choices and consequences. Be prepared for a high-energy session with stories and just enough philosophy and pedagogy to make it “click.” L Supporting New Teachers G Alliant Energy Center-Waubesa ( Chris Peterson Independent Facilitator Love & Logic Teacher Standards: 5, 6, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 7

Moving the Pencil: Interactive Approach to Teaching Writing Why do some students say, “I don’t know what to write.” More importantly, how do we move their pencils instead of their lips? In this interactive workshop, you will experience and acquire prewriting exercises that will move the most reluctant pencils. You will also gain an understanding of why some students assert that they can’t write and you will return to your classrooms with remedies. Come prepared to play. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Monona

Make Discipline a Breeze: A Love and Logic Approach Who should be tired at the end of the day? The kids! Is that usually the case? A large percentage of our time is not spent on instruction. The use of a discipline model that allows the student to be accountable is critical. Love

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( Katie McKy Children’s Literature Network Teacher Standards: 1

Protecting and Investing Your Pension Public pension funds are under attack throughout the country. Like other funds, the Wisconsin Retirement System (WRS), which provides pensions for present and retired teachers and other school personnel, suffered during the worst downmarkets since the Great Depression. However, because of the design and investment strategies used by the State of Wisconsin Investment Board (SWIB), which manages and invests the assets of the WRS, the WRS came through the recession in better shape than many of its peers. Sandy Drew, who is Legislative and Beneficiary Liaison for SWIB, will describe, 1)the recession’s effect on the WRS, 2)how the funds are managed and invested, 3) strategies that SWIB uses to protect the fund in both good and bad markets, 4) what today’s educators can expect when they retire, and 5)the need for vigilance to protect the fund. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection C ( Sandy Drew State of Wisconsin Investment Board

School Refusal: How Do You Get Them Back? The school counselors at Sheboygan South High School have been working to establish a best practice in working with students who are considered school refusers. After understanding significant mental health as a root for school refusal, school counselors and other school staff are challenged to develop a re-integration plan for students to successfully continue working toward their full potential in their academic classes. The school counselors at SSHS have identified several factors as being key elements for the re-integration plan. In this session, attendees will see

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Thursday, October 29 a specific case from SSHS where the counselors were successful in developing a re-integration plan for a student. The presentation will provide a step-by-step description of the plan with anecdotal evidence from the family through recorded interviews. L Wisconsin School Subject-Area Associations – “Invitation Only” G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 6 ( Kevin Formolo, NBCT Sheboygan Area School District ( Steve Schneider, NBCT Sheboygan Area School District Teacher Standards: 3 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 3, 5, 6, 7

Sidekick or Super Hero? Transitioning All Generations to Success Sidekick or Super Hero - how do you identify different generations within your school or teaching teams? Whether you are a beginning teacher or a teaching mentor, this session will help you learn more about generational characteristics of your teammates, allowing you to launch everyone to the status of super hero. Specifically, you will learn about expectation disconnects between generations; non-negotiable items within your team adaptable team communication; and techniques that help everyone succeed. L Supporting New Teachers G Alliant Energy Center-Wingra ( Sarah Gibson Accent Business Communication, LLC Teacher Standards: 9

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Systems for Assessing Teacher and Principal Effectiveness in Wisconsin: A Public Dialogue Created in December, 2009, the Forum on Advancing Educator Effectiveness in Wisconsin is a jointly-sponsored, collaboratively-led initiative with a single goal – to support a public dialog on measuring both the effectiveness of educators and the PK-12 education entities in which they work. The Forum is addressing the following question: What are the signature features of state and local education systems that continuously improve standards-based instruction and educator effectiveness? This session will feature: 1) an overview of the Forum’s preliminary frameworks for assessing teacher and principal effectiveness; and b) an extended conversation about the guiding principles, resources, policies, commitments, and improvements needed to implement educator effectiveness systems in Wisconsin. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 7 ( Ronald Jetty WEAC ( Allen Phelps University of Wisconsin – Madison Center on Education and Work Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1

The ART of SMART Boarding in the Classroom: Work SMARTer Not Harder Are you looking for the next level in SMART Board interactive whiteboard technology? In this Intermediate Session, concepts include: linking, Internet, pod casting, documentation, movies, video recording, Web sites, incorporating other hardware, transparency mode, Ink Aware

functionality, and much more. Start building a collection of notebook files to fit your classroom needs, get your advanced questions answered, and see the next level of this technology in action. Learn tips and tricks to work SMARTer not harder. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 4 ( Julie Ann Sawall The ART of SMART Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3

Using Web 2.0 Applications to Differentiate Instruction and Engage Today’s Learners This session will introduce instructors to the world of Web 2.0 applications that exist on the Internet and can be used to engage all learners in today’s classrooms. Apps such as Animoto, VoiceThread, ToonDoo, Fotoflexer, Skethcast, SurveyMonkey, Blogger, Kerpoof, and others will be presented. Not only are these applications engaging to students, but they allow for differentiation at a high level. Here is where students can use digital tools to develop creativity, collaborate and communicate....and they can work with their teachers to set educational goals, explore answers to their individual and group questions, monitor their own progress toward those goals and assess their final products. Join the Web 2.0 world and learn to build these exciting tools into your classroom! L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 5 ( Christine Longe Chris Longe Consulting Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 6

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Thursday, October 29 Wisconsin Retirement System: Understanding Your Benefits

Working with Challenging Students

This presentation covers many of the WRS benefits administered by the Department of Employee Trust Funds (ETF). Topics include retirement, separation and survivor benefits, and life and health insurance. The presentation will illustrate retirement calculations and explain annuity options. Service purchases, military service credit, and additional WRS contributions will also be covered.

Today’s educators need to be able to work with a variety of students, even those with challenging behavior. This session will be full of proven strategies to help educators at all levels deal with those students whose behaviors get in the way of their learning.

L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Connection 3 ( Pam Licht Wisconsin Retirement System (WRS)

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L Special Education G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 1 ( Mary Modder Kenosha Education Association Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 6 Pupil Serv. Standards: 6

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FRIDAY, October 29 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM

Activities That Teach Diversity Going beyond the traditional methods of instruction is necessary to understand the complex topic of diversity. Using his experience with the experiential method of teaching and learning, Carl has developed some great methods of tackling the topic of diversity. In this workshop, Carl centers the instruction on two areas that will help educators convey the ideas of personal understanding of other peoples and the world that we live in. Carl believes that by improving interaction and connecting with students, we can foster a positive climate in our groups, classes or teams. This workshop will present methods and activities to help educators improve in those areas. Carl stresses that understanding the stages of group development is essential in realizing their influence on our educational climate and ability to learn. Carl has broken down group development into seven easy categories that will be covered in the workshop. In this process, the participants will be introduced to activities and methods to help their groups understand where they are and how to get to where they want to be. The workshop is engaging, informative and fun! L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Connection 1 ( Carl Olson Energizer Olson Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 4, 7

After Goal Approval: Get Ready for PDP Verification Get your PDP ready for verification. This session is designed for educators who have already completed goal approval (but all are welcome). Initial educators and professional

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educators will learn how to complete Step III (Annual Review), Step IV A (Documentation of Professional Growth and the Impact on Student Learning), and Step IV B (Reflection and Summary). The presenter will show examples of verified PDPs, including exemplary evidence of professional growth and student growth over time. She will also show how to document that evidence. The presenter will also take the educators through the paperwork needed when they apply for their professional educator license. The presenter will be able to answer any additional questions on licensure and the PDP process. L PI 34 Support G Alliant Energy Center-Wingra ( Veronica Ellingson Hudson School District Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Climate Change, Classroom and Community Looking for a way to warm up to teaching about climate change that will engage your students in a constructive, inquiry-based manner? Sample multi-disciplinary activities from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Climate Change. Receive a Wisconsin Activity Guide and use Aldo Leopold Nature Center’s Nature Net resources to explore how those activities might be extended within their own communities. Designed to teach 7-12th grade students (and applicable to other grades) about how climate change affects all, we’ll introduce participants to climate change basics and activities/strategies for English/ language arts, environmental ed, math, science, art and social studies. Using the activity guide and resources in the community, teachers can help students investigate the evidence and causes of climate change, examine impacts,

discuss cultural perspectives, and get involved. Nature Net will be explored to identify appropriate partners and teaching resources outside schools and in communities. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection D ( Kathe Crowley Conn Aldo Leopold Nature Center/Nature Net ( Mary Hamel Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Teacher Standards: 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

Connecting Character Education with Literature and the Fine Arts Remember the positive values of cooperation, honesty, and compassion you learned while growing up? This session expands pedagogy by connecting character education to your standardsbased curriculum. Participants are encouraged to explore their own thinking in a fun and creative approach. Experience the literature selections of “Hen Lake,” “Knuffle Bunny,” “I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More,” “Dimity Dumpty,” and “The Recess Queen,” plus more, in a unique approach to learning. You will discover your creative talents through the fine arts, enhance your lessons, and promote peace and nonviolence in your school community. L Education Issues G Clarion-Superior ( Lynn Marcks Non Profit NIC Foundation Teacher Standards: 1, 5 Pupil Serv. Standards: 4

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FRIDAY, October 29 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM

Don’t Be Jack!: A Financial Learning Game Sharpen your pencils and put your thinking caps on! It’s time to take a lesson from Jack and Jill. In this fun-filled seminar you will learn about members’ most common financial mistakes and how to avoid them. We start off by explaining the story of Jack and Jill. They started out on equal footing – same school, same job, same salary - but very quickly their financial situations parted ways. Jack made choices that negatively impacted his financial position and future, while Jill avoided common financial mistakes and got on the fast track to a secure future. You and your team will compete in our Don’t Be Jack board game. You will leave with the information you need to follow in Jill’s financial footsteps. This presentation is geared toward new members, but all members (educational support professionals and certified staff) are welcome and sure to learn something new. L Personal Growth Strand G Clarion-Michigan A ( Ana Bonjour WEA Trust Member Benefits ( Katie Cantrell WEA Trust Member Benefits

Finances 101: Seven Mistakes New Members Make with Their Money Making wise financial choices can have a significant impact on your future financial security and give you peace of mind. Find out how to avoid the seven most common financial mistakes made by new members. Learn how having a written budget can give you permission to spend. Learn about the new credit card legislation and what it means to you. Recognize the value of employee benefits and how to use them. Find out the advantages of different savings options. Learn about paying yourself first and how it can improve your financial future. Discover resources available to help you make sound financial decisions. You will leave with the information you need to start your career on the right financial foot. This presentation is ideal for new members, but all members (educational support professionals and certified staff) will benefit. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Connection 3 ( Marty Richards WEA Trust Member Benefits

Hitting the Bull’s Eye: Promoting WEMTA (Wisconsin Educational Media and Technology Association) Are you looking for ways to get students excited about books and reading? Discover how school media specialists, teachers, and administrators are motivating students to read through the successful statewide WEMTA Battle of the Books program. Looking for a way to incorporate voting in your school? Consider actively participating in the Wisconsin student’s choice award – the Golden Archer Award. Help select the author to be honored by Wisconsin students. A DVD full of ideas, historical, and timeline information promoting these two WEMTA programs will be highlighted. Help children hit the target as they read award winning books, compete with other Wisconsin students on the Internet, read titles recommended by Wisconsin students, and choose the author to receive the annual Golden Archer Award. This session will conclude with a drawing for special prizes. L High School Reform/21st Century Skills G Alliant Energy Center-Kegonsa ( Jeffrey Carpenter Wisconsin Educational Media and Technology Association ( Sandra Wurdeman Wisconsin Educational Media and Technology Association Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 3

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FRIDAY, October 29 Integrating Health Education and Physical Education with Employee Wellness Programs A presentation on obesity, poor eating habits, and sedentary lifestyles will serve as an example of the type of presentation that can be made at K-12 teacher in-services. In addition to illustrating the health problems that develop from these risk factors, Dr. Borkowicz will provide participants with realistic lifestyle modifications for combating them. Besides increasing the length of an individual’s life, modification of these risk factors can also enhance the quality of life. Along with providing information on healthy lifestyles, this session will provide suggestions for school district employee wellness programs. Dr. Borkowicz has been assisting schools and businesses with employee wellness programs for over ten years. He often speaks at state and national conferences. The information is presented in an interesting manner and provides opportunities for audience interaction. Resources for the various topics will also be provided. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Inspiration ( Ron Borkowicz Port Washington-Saukville Schools – Retired Teacher Teacher Standards: 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 3, 5, 7

Reality Classroom! Top Teaching Techniques Caught on Film

applying the art of teaching. Some focus on general classroom management and others show responses to specific challenging behaviors. This resource is free and accessible to all for individual use, professional development and communication with parents. Join the collaborative learning discussions in this workshop. L Supporting New Teachers G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 1 ( Sue McKenzie InHealth WI Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 5, 6, 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 6, 7

Shake It Down, Turn Around: Let’s Move Our Body! The session will feature songs that encourage active involvement through the elements of movement: body parts, actions, space and its quality and relationship to movement, partner, circle songs, clapping games, and dances that can be adapted to individual and small space situations. Original and traditional songs will be presented by award-winning performers and teachers. Their newest workshop with a whole lotta shakin’ and movin’ will encourage exercise and healthly bodies!

SMART Boarding in the Classroom: Become a SMARTer Teacher Are you looking for ideas to bring your teaching into the digital age? Then this Introductory Session is for you. Come and experience the latest SMART Board software with exciting new features. Interact with a SMART wireless slate and learn how to control your SMART Board from anywhere in your room. Discover content and standard-based ideas for higher student achievement, teaching strategies for differentiated instruction, innovative classroom management designs, and how to interact with your computer while integrating technology seamlessly into the classroom. SMART Boarding techniques, free online training, in- service information, grant ideas and ideas on how to develop positive administrator support for technology will also be shared. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 4 ( Julie Ann Sawall The ART of SMART Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3

L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 5 ( Colleen Hannafin North Side Music ( Brian Schellinger North Side Music Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

Film clips from real classrooms (grades K3-MS) create case studies for discussion of strategies that work to make positive connections and engage ALL children in learning. Observe a variety of teachers in Wisconsin schools

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

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FRIDAY, October 29 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM

Step up to Writing Everyone who has been introduced to the activities and strategies that “Step Up to Writing” offers loves them. Teachers, schools and school districts who use “Step Up...” sing its praises. It’s a product that is NOT a curriculum but a set of tools to use when assigning writing pieces. The presenter used “Step Up...” as a teacher for over 10 years and has been presenting the power of the product, nationally, for four years. During this session, the presenter will show you some of the best ideas that you can use in your classroom TOMORROW. Please attend this session if you are seeking to further your knowledge and expertise in the field of writing instruction. L Special Education G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 6 ( Bruce Stout Cambium Learning Sopris Teacher Standards: 2 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

Student Intervention Monitoring System Participants will learn about the Student Intervention Monitoring System (SIMS) software that is designed to help teachers and other staff document the ways they are intervening with students who are struggling in school. SIMS incorporates critical features of RtI, including universal screening, high quality instruction, collaborative problem solving, and the use of data to make educational decisions, all of which will be described in the session. The SIMS software was developed with the support of the Department of Public Instruction in an open source format and is available to all school districts in Wisconsin. It was piloted in several school districts in Wisconsin in the spring of 2008-2009, 24

and training for broader implementation is being provided through CESAs during the current school year. Attend this session and learn about the software, listen to school personnel who are using it and find out how your district can access it and get training and technical support at a minimal cost. L Special Education G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 8 ( Jonas Zuckerman Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction ( Sara Halberg Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7

Taking Time for Teamwork “Taking Time for Teamwork” involves learning ways to get students to think critically and to work together. The session will focus on group problemsolving activities which engage students through creative challenges. These activities promote team building, communication and higher-level thinking skills. We have seen the benefits of these activities for students of various ages and across many different curricular areas. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection C ( Shawdi Nesbit Sun Prairie School District ( Robyn Kademan Sun Prairie School District Teacher Standards: 4, 5

Teaching with Technology This presentation will demonstrate how you can differentiate instruction using technology- and game-based learning. Come and experience e-learning curriculum that addresses: Bullying Prevention for grades 4-8; Obesity Prevention for grades K-8; and Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Prevention for grades 4-8. All programs are game-

based, success-loaded, student- and teacher-friendly and meet the National Standards. They can be implemented with little preparation and have shown remarkable results. The confidential student assessment for all programs is both formative and summative in nature and measure not only content knowledge but attitude, behavioral intent and behavior. The assessment protocol and evaluation components for the programs have already been tested and proven. Bluekids e-learning programs are designed and developed by Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Children’s Health Education Center. L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Alliant Energy Center-Waubesa ( Richard Schafer Children’s Health Education Center, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin ( Kolleen Nesheim Oregon School District Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 3

The MathCAST Project: Building Digital Learning Objects to Enhance Student Learning in Mathematics The MathCast Project is a collaborative endeavor among high school teachers, mathematics faculty, and the Institute for Innovations in Undergraduate Research and Learning at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. To date, this partnership has created over 400 mathematics podcasts and 200 digital learning objects designed to enhance learning in both high school and college level courses. These digital materials are aligned with the Wisconsin Model Academic Standards and the UW System Mathematics Competencies and Placement Tool. In this session, participants will explore the MathCAST collection of over 50 digital learning objects that can be used for teaching mathematics. Each learning object is focused on a mathematical weac.org


FRIDAY, October 29 question and includes a video podcast of the solution, supplementary self-check problems, and tutorials for students to examine. Participants will also learn how to use free technologies to create their own mathematical learning objects. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 2 ( Jennifer Kosiak University of Wisconsin - La Crosse ( Bob Hoar University of Wisconsin - La Crosse ( Maggie McHugh University of Wisconsin - La Crosse Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6

The Spirituality of Teaching: Remembering the Reasons We Teach Teaching is more than a job, it is a calling, a vocation, and a spiritual journey. Together we will use this session to explore life-transforming opportunities that are given to those who teach and those who are being taught. Far beneath the noise of standardized tests, achievement goals, and learning benchmarks lies the profound truth of what teaching can and should be about: transforming lives. When we are open to viewing the work we do as an authentic opportunity to connect, affirm, and cultivate hidden potential, we are able to participate in the evolution of a humanity based on liberation and peace. When understood from this perspective, we can better address the stresses and challenges before us and look upon our daily work as our contribution to making the world a better place. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Connection 2 ( Cathleen Haskins Teaching for Peace Teacher Standards: 2, 5, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 4, 6, 7

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

Traveling the Neural Highway: Brain-Based Early Reading Instruction

language learning. Learn about NEA’s English Language Learner culture, Equity, Social Justice and Academic Language Priorities.

There is a great deal of research consensus on teaching reading, and some of the most exciting findings come from the field of neuroscience. This session will provide an in-depth look at what we know about the importance of creating “neural pathways” in the brain, and how that translates into practical classroom application in beginning reading instruction. The big ideas addressed in this session: 1. Why learning to read is not a “natural” skill; 2. The points of research consensus on teaching reading; 3. The brainprocessing systems involved in reading; 4. Key instructional practices that are critical for any beginning reader. This interactive session will provide foundational information as well as practical tips.

G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 3

L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 7 ( Kathy Barclay Professor of Early Childhood and Reading Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 7, 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 3

8:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Achievement Gaps Strategies for Culturally Linguistic Diverse ELL Students, Communities and Families Learn about how to be engaged in teaching strategies and gain resources designed to close the achievement gaps for Culturally Diverse English Langage Learners. Focus on ELL achievement in literacy across the curriculum. Explore instructional practices and strategies. Identify cultural and equity assumptions and develop culturally and linguistically relevant instruction to create classroom and school environments that facilitate

L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps ( Linda Ana Cabral National Education Association Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

*All Day* 8:30 AM – 2:30 PM

Health Information and Tools for Educational Support Professionals This 5-hour workshop provides Educational Support Professionals (ESP) with background information and skills to support their health as well as the students’ health when interacting in classrooms, hallways, and playgrounds. It covers a range of topics including how Wisconsin schools are organized to support children’s health, strategies to foster students’ connections to school and create a welcoming school environment, and realistic strategies to use when working with students with specific health conditions. The instructor will facilitate the workshop using a variety of activities including presentation, brainstorming, discussion, games, reflections and video. This session qualifies for ESP certification hours and runs from 8:30 AM – 2:30 PM. L Education Support Professional Support G Clarion-Michigan B ( Narra Cox University of Wisconsin – Madison, Division of Continuing Studies

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FRIDAY, October 29 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM

A Deeper Understanding of Fractions, Decimals, and Percents Come join us in an active visual approach to teaching fractions, decimals and percents!!! You will do some lessons with the visual strategies that enhance student retention and understanding of fraction-decimal-percent conversions, as well as adding, subtracting, and multiplying fractions. The lessons that you can take with you and use in your own classrooms will show ways to teach students fractions using multiple methods and graphic organizers. L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Alliant Energy Center-Kegonsa ( Mark Ray DeForest Area School District Teacher Standards: 2, 5, 6, 7

Beyond the Funeral Flowers: Schools Helping to Mend a Grieving Heart When a loved one or a classmate is dying or dies, a child embarks upon a grief journey that is slow and emotionally painful - especially if traveled alone. Children and teens are often described as “the forgotten grievers.” Although they grieve differently than adults, they do experience the sadness, anger, guilt, physical symptoms, spiritual questions, and social isolation that come with grief. All educators, school counselors, school psychologists, nurses, and administrators play an important role in the lives of grieving children and teens. Children and teens usually don’t tell anyone that they are grieving, but their actions often speak for them. Especially in a school setting, grief may be exhibited through many reactions: academic, behavioral, emotional, social, cognitive, and physical. This workshop will assist educators to help grieving students learn healthy coping skills, 26

how to honor and memorialize the person who died, and recognize their inner capacity to heal. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection D ( Patricia Morrissey MargaretAnn’s Place Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

productivity will also be illustrated. Dr. Borkowicz has been assisting schools and businesses with employee wellness programs for over ten years. He often speaks at state and national conferences. The material is presented in an entertaining manner and provides opportunities for audience interaction. Resources for the various topics will also be provided. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Inspiration

Bullying Prevention: DPI’s Response This workshop will explore the elementary and middle school antibullying curriculum, “Time to Act and Time to React,” developed by the Department of Public Instruction and distributed free of charge by WEA Trust. It will cover the findings of the statewide evaluation of these curricula and it will review the requirements of an anti-bullying policy. There will be door prizes for participants. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 5 ( Jon Wayne Hisgen Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teacher Standards: 1, 3, 4, 7, 8 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 3, 6

Combining Healthy Lifestyle Information with Employee Wellness Strategies The objectives of this presentation include: 1) providing employers with suggestions for worksite modifications that can promote employee wellness, and, 2) providing all of the participants with realistic modifications for combating obesity, poor eating habits, and a sedentary lifestyle. In addition to increasing an individual’s lifespan, the information can contribute to a higher quality of life. The correlation between healthier workers and improved worksite

( Ron Borkowicz Port Washington-Saukville Schools – Retired Teacher Teacher Standards: 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 3, 5, 7

Creating Peaceful Spaces in the Preschool and Elementary Classrooms Join us as we explore ways to create peaceful spaces in your classroom environment. From a chair by a window to a corner in a room, you can provide a place of respite and renewal for the children in your classroom. We’ll explore the purpose and benefits of a peaceful area, and how to choose a location and furniture, and we’ll look at various materials to incorporate into your peaceful place – ranging from a fish bowl to a simple tabletop Japanese rock garden. This can be created for little or no money – it simply takes a a bit of creativity and a desire to create this very special place for children. I’ll bring a short PowerPoint with examples and then you can plan your own peaceful classroom place. Come and share with us. You’ll leave inspired! L Education Support Professional Support G Sheraton-Connection 2 ( Cathleen Haskins Teaching for Peace Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 5 Pupil Serv. Standards: 5, 6

weac.org


FRIDAY, October 29 Documenting Completion of Your Professional Development Plan: Navigating the Process This session will assist participants as they endeavor to understand the final steps of the PDP process. Information will be presented that will allow session attendees to better understand how to document completion of their PDPs. Specifically, tips on the types of evidence an educator can provide will be shared. Through interactive activities, educators will gain insights into writing rationales in order to document the ways their artifacts evidence professional growth and affect student learning. Additionally, general PI 34 information will be provided regarding the PDP processes and protocols. Information will be provided for teachers and pupil services professionals. Handouts will be available. L PI 34 Support G Clarion-Superior ( Catherine Cullen Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

From the Bag of Tricks: Quick and Engaging Diversity Activities for the School and Classroom We are going to demonstrate several activities that trigger the sometimes difficult discussions about gay and lesbian issues, race, class and other issues that students, staff and others need to have! For each activity we will quickly experience and then discuss applications, variations, set-up and processing, and suitability for a variety of settings/audiences. This will be fun, fast and will help you fill up your own bag of tricks!

G Sheraton-Connection 4 ( Brian Juchems Gay Straight Alliance for Safe Schools Teacher Standards: 1, 4, 5 Pupil Serv. Standards: 4, 6

Greeks, Romans, and Saxons! Oh, My! Get your students excited about words and increase their vocabulary at the same time! This session begins with the Anglo-Saxons, many of whose words we still use today. From these early times, learn how invasions of the Norsemen brought new words to English. Discover how the dictionary traces this history through etymologies. Then, using dictionaries with etymologies, you will do some detective work to infer what the lives of these early English speakers were like. Break the code of Greek- and Latin-based words, for many words are related to the same root in meaning and spelling. Then, use these activities with your students to build vocabulary and spelling. You will leave this session with materials from “The Spelling Scholar� including an invasion map, a timeline, Web resources for lists of Greek and Latin roots, and project and game ideas to reinforce student knowledge of root families. This session is for teachers of grades 4-8 and others interested in the history of English. L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps

Hoarseness in Children: Identification and Management in the Classroom Hoarseness can negatively impact student performance in school, as well as perceptions by peers and adults. Voice disorders affect an estimated 6-24% of children, and an estimated 57% of teachers. This session will provide information on identification of voice disorders in children, appropriate recommendations for evaluation, support of students with voice disorders in the classroom, and prevention of voice disorders in students and in teachers. There will be a presentation of video and audio clips of common voice disorders and education on causes and presentation of common voice disorders. Participants will have the opportunity to train their ears to recognize disordered voice quality. Appropriate recommendations for evaluation and strategies for collaborating with medical voice professionals including physicians and speech-language pathologists will be provided, as well as ways that teachers can help support students with voice disorders in the classroom. L Special Education G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 6 ( Sherri Zelazny University of Wisconsin Madison Teacher Standards: 3 Pupil Serv. Standards: 6

G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 7 ( Eileen Mattmann New Berlin School District ( Rosanne Cowan West Bend Teacher Standards: 1, 7

L Supporting New Teachers

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

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FRIDAY, October 29 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM

Investing 101: Retirement Savings and the Keys to Success This seminar is designed to teach employees of all ages the basics of investing and retirement planning. Find out how to determine your retirement income needs. Learn what retirement income sources are available to you as a public school employee. Learn the importance of reducing product fees and get tips about how to make your money work harder for you. Find out the advantages of different savings options including Roth IRA, Traditional IRA, TSA or 403(b), and deferred compensation. Learn how to properly diversify your investment dollars. This presentation will provide the information you need to achieve your long-term financial goals. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Connection 3 ( Kim Schultz WEA Trust Member Benefits

Musical Books: An Engaging Pathway to Early Learning This workshop will show how the connection between songs and books provides a unique pathway for every type of learner. When songs are paired with thematic books, visual materials and movement activities, children can develop language, basic concepts and early literacy skills while increasing self-esteem and building community with others. Songs and books presented will be a combination of original and traditional songs, as well as visual materials, published and self-published books. This approach captures the interest and imagination of children as they also learn essential skills. It is an approach that enlivens the classroom (and the teacher!) as the children learn to “read to sing” and “sing to read” independently or as part of a group. The creation of classroom books will also be presented, demonstrating how the children can personalize a song, illustrate it and produce their own book. Come learn how to put a new focus on your professional direction! L Education Issues

Moving the Pencil: Interactive Approach to Teaching Writing Why do some students say, “I don’t know what to write.” More importantly, how do we move their pencils instead of their lips? In this interactive workshop, you will experience and acquire prewriting exercises that will move the most reluctant pencils. You will also gain an understanding of why some students assert that they can’t write and you will return to your classrooms with remedies. Come prepared to play. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Monona ( Katie McKy Children’s Literature Network Teacher Standards: 1

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G Alliant Energy Center-Wingra ( Fran McKinney Screen Porch Music Teacher Standards: 2, 3 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

National Board Portfolios: Starting off Correctly National Board Portfolios are an extremely specialized form of writing and it is not enough to be a strong writer in order to present best teaching practices. Writing must be clear, consistent and concise, while integrating several subtle strands to demonstrate teacher excellence. Many candidates begin writing only to realize they are not fully understanding this unique writing process. This timely presentation will present

portfolio information, applicable to all certifications areas and all portfolios with the exception of Documented Accomplishments. Writing that spirals from bulleted questions, to unit/ lesson goals, embedded standards and finally the five core propositions will be covered. Vital links in entries will also be discussed. Candidates will receive invaluable information that will help them avoid rewrites and learn to recognize and demonstrate the teaching skills that help lead to National Board Certification. Questions concerning the process will also be addressed. L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Reflection A ( Wendy Sondrol Mukwonago School District Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Storytelling: A Brain-Based Instructional Approach In this session, teachers will learn basic storytelling techniques and approaches which they can apply in their classrooms to increase student learning, motivation, and understanding. Using folktales as a foundation, storytelling builds on students’ natural strengths in oral communication. Recent brain research reinforces the centrality of storytelling in how our brains organize our view of the world. Simple, accessible techniques offer teachers tools that can immediately improve their instruction and enhance their classroom community. L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Sheraton-Connection 1 ( Stuart Stotts Musician, Storyteller, Author Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

weac.org


FRIDAY, October 29 Taking Time for Teamwork “Taking Time for Teamwork� involves learning ways to get students to think critically and to work together. The session will focus on group problemsolving activities which engage students through creative challenges. These activities promote team building, communication and higher-level thinking skills. We have seen the benefits of these activities for students of various ages and across many different curricular areas. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection C ( Shawdi Nesbit Sun Prairie School District ( Robyn Kademan Sun Prairie School District Teacher Standards: 4, 5

Using Travel for Professional Development If you like to travel and have a limited budget, this workshop is for you. Jeanine Gelhaus has worked/traveled around the world through grants or scholarship programs. Because she has experience as a Field Reader for the U.S. Department of Education Fulbright Program, she is able to provide potential candidates with tips on completing applications. Sample travel experiences as well as Web sites for free and reduced travel for educators will be provided. Jeanine will discuss how these travel experiences can be worked into Professional Development Plans or into the Documented Accomplishments for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. L Personal Growth Strand G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 8

The ART of SMART Boarding in the Classroom: Work SMARTer Not Harder Are you looking for the next level in SMART Board interactive whiteboard technology? In this Intermediate Session, concepts include: linking, Internet, pod casting, documentation, movies, video recording, Web sites, incorporating other hardware, transparency mode, Ink Aware functionality, and much more. Start building a collection of notebook files to fit your classroom needs, get your advanced questions answered, and see the next level of this technology in action. Learn tips and tricks to work SMARTer not harder. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 4 ( Julie Ann Sawall The ART of SMART Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

( Jeanine Gelhaus Medford Public Schools Teacher Standards: 9, 10

Videagogy: An Innovative Approach to Connecting Videos, Technology, and Teaching This presentation provides the theory and research behind using videos as part of your teaching pedagogy. In addition, practical examples will be utilized to demonstrate how to use short, funny digital videos to enhance the learning environment. Participants will view examples of the videos and learn to use the proper video to enhance their teaching techniques. The presentation will be humorous, educational, and interactive. Research indicates that teachers are using more multi-media because the millennials are very connected electronically. The use of digital videos as a teaching tool for this population group has proven to be successful.

L PI 34 Support G Clarion-Michigan A ( Peter Jonas Doctoral Leadership Department, Cardinal Stritch University Teacher Standards: 4, 6

Wisconsin Schools of Recognition Teacher Fellowship Information Session During the 2009-10 school year, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction launched a new program for teachers in Wisconsin Schools of Recognition, the Teacher Fellowship Program. This fellowship provides an opportunity for teachers in Wisconsin Schools of Recognition to design summer learning experiences focusing on teacher growth and learning, student growth and learning, and benefits to the school and community. Fellowships this past year included a study of early literacy practices in New Zealand, an investigation of ecological diversity in Costa Rica, and an exploration of Revolutionary War era historical sites in New England. During this workshop, Teacher Fellows will share their experiences, and DPI staff will explain how teachers from Wisconsin Schools of Recognition can apply to the program. L PI 34 Support G Alliant Energy Center-Waubesa ( Jonas Zuckerman Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction ( Lara Kain Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teacher Standards: 1, 9

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FRIDAY, October 29 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM

Working with Challenging Students Today’s educators need to be able to work with a variety of students, even those with challenging behavior. This session will be full of proven strategies to help educators at all levels deal with those students whose behaviors get in the way of their learning. L Special Education G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 1 ( Mary Modder Kenosha Education Association Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 6 Pupil Serv. Standards: 6

11:30 AM – 12:45 PM

A Jewish History of the State of Wisconsin Online Curriculum This workshop provides information about a unique online curriculum called “A Jewish History of the State of Wisconsin.” The student curriculum and associated Teacher’s Guide offer Wisconsin educators dynamic material to supplement instruction related to Wisconsin history. The curriculum includes chapters on “An Introduction to Judaism,” “Immigration: The Push and the Pull to Wisconsin,” “The Holocaust,” “Jewish Businesses and Jobs,” “Giving Back to the Community: Philanthropists, Jewish Arists,” “Sports and Jews,” and “Fixing the World: Wisconsin Jews and Politics.” Learn about a resource you can use to teach yourself and your students the ABC’s of Wisconsin Jewish history - including why learning and community are important to Jews, tales of Holocaust survivors, how and why Jewish immigrants came to Wisconsin, and stories of noted Wisconsin Jews including Harry Houdini, Bud Selig,

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Russ Feingold, Golda Meir, and many more. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection D ( Robert Kann Professor of Education Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10

Best Practices and Instructional Design for SMART Boards: Building SMARTer Lessons In this Advanced Session, learn best practices for constructing digital lessons to engage the digital native. See a SMART Board interactive whiteboard and SMART Notebook software in action and learn how to engage students with multimedia and digital content. Online resources with an emphasis on using SMART’s Gallery Essentials, The SMART Exchange, and the Lesson Activity Toolkit will also be shared. Concepts include linking, Internet, pod casting, creating themes, aligning objects, documentation, movies, video recording, Web sites, incorporating other hardware, transparency mode, Ink Aware functionality, and much more. Leave with many tips and tricks to build SMARTer lessons. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 4 ( Julie Ann Sawall The ART of SMART Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 6, 7 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3

Dating Violence: DPI’s Instructional Response This presentation will review the nine-lesson Dating Violence prevention curriculum developed by the Department of Public Instruction. Jon Hisgen, the lead writer of this unit of instruction, will cover the major

components of this multi-strategy document. Many times this form of bullying is a major barrier to learning. Each participant will get a copy of the unit for their use. L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 5 ( Jon Wayne Hisgen Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teacher Standards: 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 5, 7

Four House Mysteries What do you get when you put a classroom of detectives together with a mystery? Fun and excitement! They think it’s game time, but you know, as a teacher, that they are practicing important skills. The best of both worlds! Four House Mysteries is a student-centered activity that will involve and challenge the whole class. Each student will have a clue with which they will need to interact with the other students’ clues in order to deduce the answers to the mysteries. This will encourage the students to make connections and use their higher level thinking skills. Solving the mysteries, through a classroom game, will excite and involve your students to use their thinking, communication and listening skills. Now that’s what we call a great game! Recommended for grades 3-5. Come join us as we play detectives and solve the mysteries! L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection B ( Russell Gilbert Learning Loft ( Eileen Nemec Learning Loft Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

weac.org


FRIDAY, October 29 Greeks, Romans, and Saxons! Oh, My! Get your students excited about words and increase their vocabulary at the same time! This session begins with the Anglo-Saxons, many of whose words we still use today. From these early times, learn how invasions of the Norsemen brought new words to English. Discover how the dictionary traces this history through etymologies. Then, using dictionaries with etymologies, you will do some detective work to infer what the lives of these early English speakers were like. Break the code of Greek- and Latin-based words, for many words are related to the same root in meaning and spelling. Then, use these activities with your students to build vocabulary and spelling. You will leave this session with materials from “The Spelling Scholar” including an invasion map, a timeline, Web resources for lists of Greek and Latin roots, and project and game ideas to reinforce student knowledge of root families. This session is for teachers of grades 4-8 and others interested in the history of English. L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 7

It Takes Courage: Preventing and Addressing Anti-Gay Bullying and Harassment

Learning Strategies and Study Strategies for Students with Disabilities

Often, for good reason, school professionals are reluctant to broach the topic of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues. But recent headlines remind us that anti-gay bullying and harassment continue to be prevalent in schools, sometimes with disastrous results for both gay and straight students alike. So, what to do? Stop by this workshop and learn from a panel of educators and administrators from various settings what they have done to get the ball rolling. Using small and group activities we’ll explore ways to address obstacles, to find allies, to articulate a rationale for taking action, and to prioritize simple first steps. Leave with concrete ideas and activities that can be used immediately at your school.

Teachers will learn researched-based learning and study stragegies for elementary, middle school and high school students with special needs. Notetaking, remembering information, making use of study time, preparing for tests, writing strategies and much more will be presented in a collaborative hands-on format. Teachers will walk away with ideas that can be used in their classroom and assist students in studying at home. This session is for any teacher who works with students with special needs.

L Supporting New Teachers

Teacher Standards: 3, 4, 5, 7

G Sheraton-Connection 4

Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 3

L Special Education G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 3 ( Darylann Whitemarsh Marian University

( Brian Juchems Gay Straight Alliance for Safe Schools Teacher Standards: 5, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 4, 6

( Eileen Mattmann New Berlin School District ( Rosanne Cowan West Bend Teacher Standards: 1, 7

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FRIDAY, October 29 11:30 AM – 12:45 AM

Make Discipline a Breeze: A Love and Logic Approach Who should be tired at the end of the day? The kids! Is that usually the case? A large percentage of our time is not spent on instruction. The use of a discipline model that allows the student to be accountable is critical. Love and Logic is a philosophy of teaching children that allows adults to be happier, empowered, and more skilled in the interactions with children. Love allows children to grow through their mistakes. Logic allows children to live with the consequences of their choices. Love and Logic is a way of working with children that puts teachers back in control, teaches children to be responsible, and prepares young people to live in the real world, with its many choices and consequences. Be prepared for a high-energy session with stories and just enough philosophy and pedagogy to make it “click.” L Supporting New Teachers G Clarion-Superior ( Chris Peterson Independent Facilitator Love & Logic Teacher Standards: 5, 6, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 7

Meeting Student Information Needs Around the Clock Help your students build important information literacy skills by offering them access to the AskAway virtual reference service. Whatever time of day your students need information and assistance with homework, the AskAway virtual reference service is online and ready to help. Learn how your students can connect with a network of public and academic librarians across the state and country when your library media center may not be open or fully staffed. See how

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librarians working with your students 24/7 can help them select among the resources of your library media center and your local public library, and use those resources to their best advantage. The Department of Public Instruction is committed to expanding access to this valuable service. L High School Reform/21st Century Skills G Alliant Energy Center-Monona ( Martha Farley Berninger Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teacher Standards: 4, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 3, 5

National Board Portfolios: Starting off Correctly National Board Portfolios are an extremely specialized form of writing and it is not enough to be a strong writer in order to present best teaching practices. Writing must be clear, consistent and concise, while integrating several subtle strands to demonstrate teacher excellence. Many candidates begin writing only to realize they are not fully understanding this unique writing process. This timely presentation will present portfolio information, applicable to all certifications areas and all portfolios with the exception of Documented Accomplishments. Writing that spirals from bulleted questions, to unit/ lesson goals, embedded standards and finally the five core propositions will be covered. Vital links in entries will also be discussed. Candidates will receive invaluable information that will help them avoid rewrites and learn to recognize and demonstrate the teaching skills that help lead to National Board Certification. Questions concerning the process will also be addressed.

Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Pupil Serv. Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Nuts and Bolts of Peer Drama This hands-on workshop will get participants up on their feet as they learn about the basics of using drama and improvisation to help teach youth about the “drama” of teen life. Dozens of school-based teen support groups and peer helping groups in Wisconsin are utilizing this interactive approach to teaching and learning. Conference participants will be introduced to clear and concise information about why role play works and will view segments from powerful and entertaining skits developed by area troupes. Then they’ll learn some simple exercises that they can use in the classroom and in their extracurricular peer support programs such as Peer Helping, SADD or TATU. Join us to hear and experience how Wisconsin schools are using skits and peer drama to reach and teach students. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Reflection C ( Laura Clark Hansen Cornerstone Productions LLC ( Paul Hansen Cornerstone Productions LLC Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 5 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

L Personal Growth Strand G Sheraton-Reflection A ( Wendy Sondrol Mukwonago School District

weac.org


FRIDAY, October 29 PI 34’s Professional Development Plan and the Next Steps The WSRA PI 34 Task Force has practical plans to help educators in Years 1, 2, and 3. For Year 1 Initial Educators, we will help write the Professional Development Plan (PDP). For Year 2 and 3 educators, we will present and clarify the verification/ annual review to document what is good evidence for professional growth and student learning. Please bring your laptop and PDP!! L PI 34 Support G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 8 ( Luann Dreifuerst Wisconsin State Reading Association ( Pat Sowls Wisconsin State Reading Association ( Sharon Tilton Wisconsin State Reading Association

Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 5, 6, 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 6, 7

Shake It Down, Turn Around: Let’s Move Our Body! The session will feature songs that encourage active involvement through the elements of movement: body parts, actions, space and its quality and relationship to movement, partner, circle songs, clapping games, and dances that can be adapted to individual and small space situations. Original and traditional songs will be presented by award-winning performers and teachers. Their newest workshop with a whole lotta shakin’ and movin’ will encourage exercise and healthly bodies! L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Wingra

( Stephanie Malaney Wisconsin State Reading Association

( Colleen Hannafin North Side Music

Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 9, 10

( Brian Schellinger North Side Music Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Reality Classroom! Top Teaching Techniques Caught on Film Film clips from real classrooms (grades K3-MS) create case studies for discussion of strategies that work to make positive connections and engage ALL children in learning. Observe a variety of teachers in Wisconsin schools applying the art of teaching. Some focus on general classroom management and others show responses to specific challenging behaviors. This resource is free and accessible to all for individual use, professional development and communication with parents. Join the collaborative learning discussions in this workshop. L Supporting New Teachers G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 1 ( Sue McKenzie InHealth WI

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

Singing the Words: Using Lyric Writing in Elementary Curricular Areas In this workshop, participants will learn songwriting techniques and music methods which can improve student learning in curricular areas. By exploring song structure and pattern, participants will learn to use songs as templates for student writing in daily groups or in individual activities. Songs draw on different learning styles and motivate children to engage with core subjects. Reading specialists and special education teachers will also benefit from this workshop. Resources for further study will be available. Teachers will learn structures and terms about the art form of lyric writing. Teachers will

learn relevant standards in music and songwriting. Teachers will appreciate connections between music and differentiated instruction. Teachers will learn where to find further resources. Teachers will be able to lead students in group songwriting activities. Teachers will be able to assess student learning in curricular subjects and in lyric writing aesthetics. L Focus on Closing Achievement Gaps G Sheraton-Connection 1 ( Stuart Stotts Musician, Storyteller, Author Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7

Step up to Writing Everyone who has been introduced to the activities and strategies that “Step Up to Writing” offers loves them. Teachers, schools and school districts who use “Step Up...” sing its praises. It’s a product that is NOT a curriculum but a set of tools to use when assigning writing pieces. The presenter used “Step Up...” as a teacher for over 10 years and has been presenting the power of the product, nationally, for four years. During this session, the presenter will show you some of the best ideas that you can use in your classroom TOMORROW. Please attend this session if you are seeking to further your knowledge and expertise in the field of writing instruction. L Special Education G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 6 ( Bruce Stout Cambium Learning Sopris Teacher Standards: 2 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2

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FRIDAY, October 29 11:30 AM – 12:45 AM

Teacher as Hero Every teacher has a story. Experience a different kind of professional development where we acknowledge the reality of what it takes to be a teacher hero. This session is NOT about how to make you better at your job, but how to make your job better for you. We will have a conversation, talk about teacher traits, tell hero stories, discuss how to maintain the joy and combat hero fatigue, and how to keep our intellectual life alive. Participants will receive the book written by author and former teacher Laurel Schmidt called “Classroom Confidential: The 12 Secrets of Great Teachers.” This session is for every teacher. L Personal Growth Strand G Alliant Energy Center-Waubesa ( Johnna Timmes Teachscape Higher Education and Cardinal Stritch University Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 5

The Mathematics and Literature Connection Introducing mathematics concepts and procedures through quality children’s literature creates a positive atmosphere that enables students to be actively involved in mathematical learning. By showcasing the connection between research and best-practice instruction, this session will explore how to expand a student’s conceptual understanding, procedural facility, and productive disposition by making meaningful mathematical connections to numerous children’s books. Throughout the session, participants will be engaged in hands-on activities as they explore numbers and operations, geometry and measurement, and probability and statistics. Participants will also explore multicultural connections through the use of a new bilingual children’s book

34

that integrates Hmong culture and mathematics. Participants will leave the session with classroom activities and lessons that integrate literacy and math in an engaging way for students.

Traveling the Neural Highway: Brain-Based Early Reading Instruction

L Education Issues

There is a great deal of research consensus on teaching reading, and some of the most exciting findings come from the field of neuroscience. This session will provide an in-depth look at what we know about the importance of creating “neural pathways” in the brain, and how that translates into practical classroom application in beginning reading instruction. The big ideas addressed in this session: 1) Why learning to read is not a “natural” skill; 2) The points of research consensus on teaching reading; 3) The brainprocessing systems involved in reading; 4) Key instructional practices that are critical for any beginning reader. This interactive session will provide foundational information as well as practical tips.

G Alliant Energy Center-Mendota 2 ( Jennifer Kosiak University of Wisconsin - La Crosse ( Maggie McHugh University of Wisconsin - La Crosse Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 4, 6, 7

The Mindfulness Way: Helping Children Find Inner Wisdom and Peace The mindfulness movement is building momentum and mindfulness practice is being implemented in public schools across the country. It’s easy to understand why. Scientifically, it is now known that mindfulness improves focus and concentration, cultivates calm, improves impulse control, helps children to deal with difficult emotions, builds empathy and compassion, and is a natural form of conflict resolution. The concepts are as applicable for teachers as they are for students. In this interactive workshop, we will explore simple mindfulness practices for teachers, as well as mindfulness activities that can be easily implemented in your classroom. They are free of cost, (no materials involved), can be taught in short periods of time, and benefit students and teachers alike. Handouts and resources are provided.

L Education Issues G Alliant Energy Center-Kegonsa ( Kathy Barclay Professor of Early Childhood and Reading Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 3, 7, 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 3

L Education Issues G Sheraton-Connection 2 ( Cathleen Haskins Teaching for Peace Teacher Standards: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 Pupil Serv. Standards: 2, 5, 6

weac.org


FRIDAY, October 29 Videagogy: An Innovative Approach to Connecting Videos, Technology, and Teaching This presentation provides the theory and research behind using videos as part of your teaching pedagogy. In addition, practical examples will be utilized to demonstrate how to use short, funny digital videos to enhance the learning environment. Participants will view examples of the videos and learn to use the proper video to enhance their teaching techniques. The presentation will be humorous, educational, and interactive. Research indicates that teachers are using more multi-media because the millennials are very connected electronically. The use of digital videos as a teaching tool for this population group has proven to be successful. L PI 34 Support G Clarion-Michigan A ( Peter Jonas Doctoral Leadership Department, Cardinal Stritch University

Wisconsin Education Network, Online Materials and Resources At a time when resources are in low supply, the Wisconsin Education Network provides teachers with free and cost-effective instructional materials to meet Wisconsin education requirements. Act 31 and the Bureau of Indian Affairs education materials are examples of the kinds of resources that are available via this network. These free, online resources are easily accessible, and sure to be welcome additions to your school’s teaching tools. Other examples of the instructional materials available on the Wisconsin Education Network include Wisconsin county government, agriculture, and dairy, among others. L Education Issues G Sheraton-Connection 3 ( Katherine Stout Retired Teacher, Formerly of WEAC & DPI ( Todd Maahs Discover Mediaworks, Inc. Teacher Standards: 1, 2, 4, 6, 7

Teacher Standards: 4, 6

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

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EXHIBITS

Note: This is a partial listing. The entire list will be available at the Convention Exhibit Hall. Abrams Learning Trends/ Brightpoint Literacy Access/WEAC Savers Club

Follett Educational Services

National Archery in the Schools Program

UW Milwaukee School of Education

Gay Straight Alliance for Safe Schools

National Geographic Shool Publishing National Railroad Museum

UW Oshkosh College of Educ & Human Services

George Williams College of Aurora University Goodheart Willcox Publisher Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission

National Stuttering Association National-Louis University Nature Net NEA Directors

Green Bay Packers

Noah’s Ark Waterpark

Harrison and Company

North Side Music

Hemisphere Educational Travel

Northern Lakes Impact Center

Herff Jones/Nystrom

Pearson- www.pearsonschool.com

Heritage Makers

Perfection Learning

Heritage Treasures Screen Print & Embroidery

Perma-Bound Books

Horace Mann

Quality Educator Interactive

Britannica Digital Learning

Houghton Mifflin/Harcourt/Holt McDougal

Rethinking Schools

All Out Candles Alverno College American Cancer Society: Coaches vs Cancer Autism Society of Wisconsin Bathfitter Benchmark Education Book Look

QB’s Magnetic Jewelry ID Badge Holders

Cambium Learning Sopris

ide@s

Cardinal Stritch University

Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of WI - Madison

Junior Achievement of Wisconin, Inc.

Cardinal Stritch University/Teachscape

Ron’s Rocks and Gems

Keyboarding First

Carroll University, Waukesha, WI

Rowland Reading Foundation

Knowledge Emporium

Cave of the Mounds, National Natural Landmark

Scholastic Classroom & Library Group

Kradwell School/Aurora Behavioral Health Serv

School Funding

Celebrate Children Foundation

Lamers Bus Lines

Central WI Environmental Station

Learning Loft, LLC

Children’s Health Education Center/ Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

Lemberg Sign & Lighting

Concordia University Wisconsin

Livescribe

Conserve School

Mackenzie Environmental Education Center

Correctional Education Association Wisconsin

Management Training Consultants, Inc.

CPM Educational Program Davidson Titles, Inc.

Marian University Market Baskets On The Go

School House Signal Press Slapstick Dry-Erase Boards SmileMakers Staples State Bar of Wisconsin State of Wisconsin Investment Board Student WEA That’s Amazing

UW Platteville UW Whitewater Voyageur Magazine WAFLT Waukesha County Museum WEA Academy WEA Credit Union WEA Trust WEA Trust Member Benefits WEAC Education Support Professsional Committee WEAC Exceptional Education Committee WEAC Human Relations Committee WEAC Legislative Committee WEAC Minority Affairs Committee WEAC Public Relations Committee WEAC Retired WEAC Winter Conference WI Center for Environmental Education WI Challenge Academy WI Council for the Social Studies WI Department of Natural Resources WI Farm Bureau - Ag in the Classroom WI Labor History WI Milk Marketing Board WI State Reading Association Wisconsin 529 College Savings Program Wisconsin Anti-Violence Effort Wisconsin Council on Problem Gambling

Marshfield Book and Stationery

The Children’s Health Market

Master of Educ-Prof Development - UW LaCrosse

The Learning Shop

McDonald’s Restaurants of Wisconsin

The Pampered Chef

McGraw Hill School Education Group K-12

The Red Bell

Wisconsin PTA

East Troy Railroad

McGraw Hill/Intervention/Supplemental

Trees for Tomorrow - Natural Resource Specialty School

Wisconsin Retirement System

Edgewood College

Wisconsin Right to Life Education Fund

Educators Credit Union

Mid-Continent Railway Museum

Usborne Books

Wisconsin State Senate Scholar Program

EMC Publishing/Paradigm Publishing/ JIST

Milwaukee Public Museum

UW Madison - Division of Continuing Studies

Wisconsin Vision

UW Madison - School of Education

WTCS

Delta Kappa Gamma Society International Sigma State - WI Dept of Public Instruction Dream Flight USA

Energizer Olson Presentations EPS School Specialty Literacy and Intervention 36

Mondo Publishing Mount Mary College Mt. Olympus

The College of St. Scholastica

UW Madison - Visitor & Information Programs

Wisconsin Destination Imagination Inc. Wisconsin Historical Society Wisconsin Mathematics Council

WisconsinEducationNetwork.org

weac.org


floor plans

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

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38

weac.org


Thursday, October 29

Simply by purchasing a Celebrate Children license plate, you make a permanent contribution to young children in Wisconsin. Your support helps foster vibrant and engaging early learning opportunities – the kinds of experiences that prepare kids for success in school and beyond.

Get your plate or donate today

Children Celebrate

www.celebrate-children.org Mount Mary College Offers Options for Professional Educators

Master of Arts in Education – Professional Development Master of Science in Counseling – School Counseling Concentration School counselor license code 54 W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

Milwaukee, Wisconsin www.mtmary.edu 414-256-1252

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Graduate Education Programs

*Art Education *Family Studies

*Educational Technology *Educational Administration *Environmental Education *Curriculum and Instruction Early Childhood Education Special Education *Counseling *Reading *Check out our online courses 262.243.4248 or 800.330.9866 graduate.admission@cuw.edu

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WWW.CUW.EDU weac.org


Thursday, October 29

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

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History. Math. Art. Culture. Whether you were born to be wild-or mild-it makes no difference at the Harley-Davidson Museum® in Milwaukee. More than a nostalgia trip for motorcycle enthusiasts, the Museum offers a glimpse of American history and culture like you’ve never seen it before. Design and engineering exhibits bring the cool back to math and science. This one-of-a-kind destination will fuel your students’ dreams and passion for learning. For information on School Group Tours visit h-dmuseum.com.

Teachers: FREE in November Teachers get in free with valid teacher ID. Present coupon to receive this offer. Not available online or on previous purchases. Subject to availability. No cash value.

EXHIBITS | SHOP | RESTAURANTS | FREE PARKING

400 W. Canal St. • Milwaukee, WI • h-dmuseum.com

Valid between November 1 - 30, 2010 Code: WEAC10

University of Wisconsin-Stout

Flu Shots Available at Booth # 631-633 Thursday 9 AM – 3PM Friday 9 AM – Noon Non-WEA members $30 (must pay cash). WEA members must show their insurance card.

School of Education www.uwstout.edu/soe Wisconsin’s Polytechnic University 42

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Thursday, October 29

for educators

for reviewers

for providers

Are you a Wisconsin PK-12 teacher, administrator, pupil services professional or pre-service educator? Create, edit and share your professional

development plan online with the Quality Educator Interactive.

myqei.org

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

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 ˆ 0IWWSRTPERWWXYHIRXERHXIEGLIV[IFVIWSYVGIWEPPWIPIGXIHXIWXIHERH   GEXEPSKIHF];MWGSRWMRXIEGLIVW  ˆ ,MKLUYEPMX]TYFPMGHSQEMRHMKMXEPMQEKIWJSV;MWGSRWMRWXYHIRXWERHIHYGEXSVW  ˆ :MHISGPMTWSR;MWGSRWMRTISTPILMWXSV]ERHTPEGIW  ˆ 7IVZMGIPIEVRMRKVIWSYVGIW

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JNBHF

Ide@s is sponsored by the University of Wisconsin System and the University of Wisconsin-Extension, Division of Continuing Education, Outreach and E-Learning. 44

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notes ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

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Thursday, October 29

EVALUATION FORM

1. Please rate this year’s convention in terms of useful professional development opportunities by circling the appropriate number. Very useful Not relevant 5 4 3 2 1 2. Please rate the convention facilities (lodging and meeting rooms) by circling the appropriate number. Excellent Not adequate 5 4 3 2 1 3. What types of events and activities do you expect to find at the WEAC Convention?

4. What events and activities did you find most valuable at this year’s convention?

5. Please list one change or addition to improve the convention.

6. Please suggest topics and speakers for future conventions.

7. How long have you been a WEAC member? r Less than 5 years r 5-10 years r 11-15 years

r 16-20 years

r 21-25 years

r More than 25 years

8. How often do you attend the WEAC Convention (please mark all that apply)? r Annually r Somewhat regularly r Occasionally r Rarely r Only in Madison r Only in Milwaukee r Both venues 9. My job assignment is: r Classroom teacher r Specialist r Technical college faculty r Educational support staff (staff assistant, custodian, etc.) r Other________________________________ 10. Please tell us what local association you are from: ________________________________________________

Please detach and leave at the WEAC Convention Information Booth or mail to: Ann Reynolds WEAC Convention P.O. Box 8003 Madison, WI 53708 Note: I f you do not attend the WEAC Convention, we want to know what programming we could offer that would prompt your attendance. Please e-mail your response to reynoldsa@weac.org.

46 E A C C O N V E N T I O N 2 0 1 0 W

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notes ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010

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Thursday, October 29

Join more than 45,000 Wisconsin public school employees who trust us with their financial future.

ved Appro vider r p ) o 403(b e than r in mo ricts. ist d 0 43

This is your organization.

WEA Trust Member Benefits is a not-for-profit organization created by WEAC to enhance the financial well-being of members like you. • Talk with a live person when you call. • Save for your future with a low-cost 403(b) and IRA. • Financial Planning Services for every stage of your life.

• Better-than-your-parents’ insurance, and easy-on-the-budget payment options. • Share the benefits with family—spouse, children, grandchildren, parents, and parents-in-law may also participate in many programs. Some restrictions apply.

Call us at 1-800-279-4010 or 1-800-279-4030 Visit weabenefits.com Auto Insurance

Homeowners & Renters Insurance

Additional Liability Insurance

Individual Long-Term Care Insurance

Tax Sheltered Annuity

WEAC IRA

FInancial Planning Services

TSA program securities offered through WEA Investment Services, Inc., member FINRA. The Trustee for the WEAC IRA program is First Business Trust & Investments. All investment advisory services are offered through WEA Financial Advisors, Inc. Auto and home Insurance underwritten by WEA Property & Casualty Insurance Company. Long-term care insurance products are underwritten by multiple LTC insurers.

W E A C CO N V EN T I O N 2010


Carol Grace Anderson “Motivating - Inspiring - Dynamic - With Results!” with

Friday, October 29 • Alliant Energy Center • 1 p.m.

plus

! n r ea

l .

nal erso art p r u st yo Give es a jump c finan nding a n: te t a essio by s t u ko ess brea Succ o t s > Key Jack ’t be ) n o D > game (the s 101 ance n i F >

taste! Indulge in our selection of home-made p cupcakes.

*During closing ceremonies.

win!

Atte n Up” d “Get F on F ired r you can iday and re a ch ance gister f or fabu t lous o WIN* prize d s inc oor l udin >Aw g: eeke awa y to nd getD Coun ty, oor > An iPad , > An d mo re.

Cupcakes and prizes compliments of WEA Trust Member Benefits. Registration for the prize drawings will be available at the WEA Trust Member Benefits booth and at the door of the “Get Fired Up” closing session on October 29. *Must be present to win and must be a WEAC member. One prize per person.


WEAC 2010 Convention program  

WEAC 2010 Convention program

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