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BeauCo Bees Backyard beekeeping in the city

MAY/JUNE 2013 Washington, North Carolina

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Savory summer dining dishes


At PotashCorp-Aurora it’s our mission to work safely. At the top of the PotashCorp-Aurora list of core values is safety. There is nothing more important than the safety of our people. Our Light Keeper program – an accident prevention process – empowers all employees to change behaviors, reduce exposures to injury and remove barriers to safety.

Helping nature provide. Safety – it’s the most important part of PotashCorp-Aurora’s day-to-day operations.


IN THIS ISSUE

FEATURES & DEPARTMENTS 18

28

22

48 18

62

38 Shopping 14 Honor thy mother:

RIVER LIFE

In the ARTS

28

58

Gifts for mom that will warm her heart

NATURE 18 On the edge:

Wildlife is bountiful along the boardwalk

PASTIMES 32

AT HOME 22

Service with a welcome: Dock attendants welcome boaters

Tribute to the past: A 1920's home reveals its secrets

4 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

BeauCo Bees: Backyard beekeeping in the city

LET'S EAT 38

Herbs 101: A beginners guide to flavor and goodness

48

Savory summer: Summer dining on the shores of the Pamlico

14 IN EVERY ISSUE 6 9 44 47 54 57 66

Re-creation: Making marks a daily devotion

OUR HISTORY 62

Pride in the past: Saving the past for the future

Publisher’s Note The Scene Cast a Line Word on Wine Calendar Advertiser Index Why I Love Washington

ON THE COVER Tom Garcia, backyard beekeeper, talks about raising bees in the city. In the photo, the hive's queen bee, sporting a red dot, is surrounded by hundreds of bees working on building new comb. See BeauCo Bees, page 32. (Photo by Ashley Vansant)

TON G N I H S WA T

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Live A Little


NOTE FROM ASHLEY

A community rich with resources

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ashington is rich with many kinds of resources. Perhaps the most valuable is its people. Those who call Washington and surrounding areas home are first-rate friends and neighbors. They are outstanding professionals and volunteers. They are top-notch stewards, ambassadors and representatives. Through their many and various contributions, they shape our community. In the simplest of terms, they define it. Washington the Magazine is about a celebration of these people and their stories. It’s also a celebration of our unique natural resources — the beautiful Pamlico River and our Eastern North Carolina flora and fauna. Explore a bounty of wildlife along the boardwalk on the Washington waterfront. Read about the ducks, turtles, herons and otters regularly seen from the boardwalk stretching along the manmade wetlands near the North Carolina Estuarium. This is a wonderful time of year to visit. Expand your journey with one of the Estuarium’s educational and enjoyable River Roving tours. Turn to the “Out and About” calendar pages for more information.

Some Washington residents are finding ways to connect to nature in their own backyards. City resident Tom Garcia shares his fascinating new hobby of beekeeping with writer Vail Stewart Rumley. Cast a line with Capt. Richard Andrews as he reports on a local treasure found just below the surface. Read about the speckled trout and other species that delight local anglers and attract others who travel many miles for some irresistible recreational opportunities. There may be no better way to get in touch with nature than getting your thumb green. Our beginners guide to herbs offers tips on what grows best in our region and how they’re used to spice up local fare. I hope this issue of Washington the Magazine inspires you to take another look at the beauty surrounding us here in the Heart of the Inner Banks. There is much to appreciate, celebrate and preserve. Until next time, best wishes.

Ashley Vansant Publisher

would love to hear what you think about Washington the Magazine. Email us at news@ Write We thewashingtondailynews.com or write to P.O. Box 1788, Washington, NC 27889. Letters chosen for publication to us may be edited for length and clarity. All submissions become the property of Washington the Magazine. 6 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


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Publisher

Ashley Vansant Editorial Mona Moore Vail Stewart Rumley Mike Voss Contributors Kevin Scott Cutler Will Preslar Marketing & Sales Dustin Dixon Ed Drew Distribution Sylvester Rogers Art Direction Ryan Webb Contact information Washington the Magazine P.O. Box 1788 Washington, NC 27889 Advertising inquiries 252-946-2144 Ext. 221 Subscriptions & change of address 252-946-2144 Washington the Magazine is published six times a year by Washington Newsmedia, LLC. Copyright 2013, Washington Newsmedia, LLC


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THE SCENE

OUT AND ABOUT

Spring Fling Tenth Street Church of Christ in Washington held its April “Spring Fling” in which the congregation’s seniors are honored with a dinner and dance. This year’s theme was the bow tie, with the ladies acting as judges for the best bow tie in the house.

Nancy Waters, Faye and Jerry Alligood

Carl “C-Bird” Smith and Greg Allen

Donald and Shirley Smith

David and Teresa Mays

Linda Byrd and Tom Little

Joey and Audrey Toler

Barbara and Billy Arnold

Joyce and Charles Boahn

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 9


OUT AND ABOUT

Main Street Managers Conference

THE SCENE

The Washington Harbor District Alliance held a reception to welcome North Carolina Main Street Managers to Washington for the organization’s biennial conference.

Tom Miller and Abby Gentry

Beth Byrd, director of the Washington Harbor District Alliance, City Councilman William Pitt, Sierra Weatherington and Chris Furlough

Lynn Lewis and Jan Harris

Virginia Finnerty, Shelton McNair and Washington Mayor Archie Jennings

Max Sigler and Rich Morin

10 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

Pat Lewis, Claudia Cox and Nancy Furlough

Jayne Meisell, Jennie Jones and Garleen Woolard

Chris Johnson, Virginia Finnerty and Brad Guth

Naomi Riley and Kathy Almond


OUT AND ABOUT

Washington Noon Rotary Reverse Raffle

THE SCENE

The annual Washington Noon Rotary Reverse Raffle took place on April 12 at the Washington Civic Center. Over 200 tickets were sold for a chance at a $2,500 pot. At the end of the night, the four owners of tickets left on the board chose to split the money equally.

Clarissa Phillips and Lucy Walker

Sandy Radcliff and Jennifer Mallet

Billy and Virginia O’Neill

Becky Ward and Suzanne Gray

Wayne Woolard II and Wayne Woolard

Read Allen and John Tate

Donna and Tim McLawhorn

Maj. Kenneth Watson and Lisa Roberts

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 11


THE SCENE

OUT AND ABOUT

BCAC Little Art Show The Beaufort County Arts Council’s Little Art Show drew a big crowd at the Washington Civic Center in March. The fundraiser raffles off artist-donated canvases to participants — a night that ends in lots of trading of little art.

Sadie Fowle, Bev Walker and Judy Chesnutt

Phyllis Schulte and Wayne Stoeckart

Scott Campbell and Alexis Sideris Davis

Rima and Jeff Jakub

John Chrystal and Debbie Ainsworth

American Red Cross Golf Ball Drop The golf ball drop was held at Warren Field Airport as part of the American Red Cross Heroes Campaign, an annual fundraising event. The winner of the $1,000 to prize was LaVon Drake. The golf ball drop raised at least $4,000 for the Greater Pamlico Area Chapter of the American Red Cross. 12 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

Bill Brent, Kay Summerfield and Blackhawk Fornelli

Susan Lindberg and Ed Summerfield


OUT AND ABOUT

Siege of Washington

THE SCENE

The 150th anniversary of the Siege of Washington was celebrated at Festival Park on the Washington waterfront. Area re-enactors, dressed in period costumes, presented a living history lesson that included the firing of cannons, soldiers drilling and firing their weapons and equipment used during the Civil War.

Buzz Cayton and Bill Zachman

John Allen, Nevis Leary, Frank Winsler, Walter Silvertz, Joe Pugh and Tim Lane

David McGuire and Gary Riggs

Shaggin' for a Cause The annual Shaggin’ for a Cause dinner and dance lit up the Washington Civic Center with beach music in March. The fundraiser benefits cancer patients at the Marion L. Shepard Cancer Center by providing free patient services.

Bill and Betty Slade

Cancer Center physician assistant Nicole DaVia, Shepard Cancer Foundation board members Pam Daw and Trish Litchfield and Cancer Center social worker Judy Humphries

Steve and Jean Lee, Pat and Mike Calfee

Cancer Center physicians and their wives Dr. and Mrs. Robert McLaurin and Dr. and Mrs. Charles Knupp MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 13


WHAT’S IN STORE

Honor thy mother Gifts for mom that will warm her heart Written by MONA MOORE PHOTOS by WILL PRESLAR

Sign of the thyme All signs point to beautiful with this garden marker. Identify herbs or choose a decorative marker with a garden theme. The aged metal signs may be found at the Historic Bath Site gift shop, 207 Carteret Street, Bath. $7.50

14 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


She’ll flip The casual style and comfort of Southern Tide is now available to everyone. The company that built a reputation for quality men’s clothing and footwear introduced a women’s collection in March. These Flip Jacks will add just the right amount of flare to any ensemble. Flip Jacks are available at Russell’s Clothing, 118 West Main Street, Washington. $49 to $69.50.

Too cool No one will mind carrying the drinks if it is in this insulated canvas cooler. Find the stylish tote at Nauti Life, 112 West Main Street, Washington. $30.95.

Full of fun The double-insulated Tervis tumblers, bottles and mugs are made to last. They even come with a lifetime guarantee. Tervis products are great for hot or cold beverages. The American-made collection is available in a variety of designs and styles. They are microwave-, freezer- and dishwasher-safe and virtually unbreakable. It is basically, the only tumbler you will ever need. Pick one up at Unique Gifts & Framing, 223 West Main Street, Washington. $8 - $30.

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 15


WHAT’S IN STORE

Day shift

These must-have dresses are the effortless way to look stylish in the office or on the go. Try the green palm print tunic by JoyJoy or the shift dress in lemon, which is the work of Nell Rae. Don’t forget to accessorize. These Moon and Lola necklaces measure about 26 inches in length. Try wearing two at a time for major impact. Find these fashions and accessories at Bloom Women’s Apparel, 100 West Main Street, Washington. $80-299.

Faux chic If monogramming isn’t in your budget, get the look of it with a universal monogram. Look long enough and you will see just about any letter you want on this tortoise bangle. Available at Russell’s Clothing, 118 West Main Street, Washington. $32.

16 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


Good scents Light one of these candles and you’ll feed a child. The makers of Bridgewater Candle Company partnered with Rice Bowls, a nonprofit whose mission is to feed orphaned children worldwide. Each candle’s tag shares a photo and story of a child your purchase may help. Candles come as votives or in 18-ounce and 8-ounce jars. Choose a flameless fragrance in the form of a car freshener or scented sachet. Find the products at Me Time in the Little Shoppes of Washington, 127 West Main Street, Washington. $2 to $22

Your cup of tea Who says dining has to be serious? Not Jeremy Fineman. The potter adds rattles to his mugs and his bug-like bowls are bound to put a smile on your face. Each piece of handcrafted, high fire porcelain is finished with a satin glaze. This functional collection is new to Main Street. Find it at Lone Leaf Gallery & Custom Framing, 101 West Main Street, Washington. $32-400.

Southern charm

East Carolina University professor Daniel Kariko documented the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. This photograph is a part of his series, “Storm Season.” Find the prints at Lone Leaf Gallery & Custom Framing, 101 West Main Street, Washington. $150.

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 17


NATURE

A great blue heron wades in the manmade wetlands, looking for its next fish dinner.

on the edge 18 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


Turtles, and lots of them, call the manmade wetlands home. Sunning is one of the turtles’ favorite activities.

Wildlife is bountiful along the boardwalk

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Written by MIKE VOSS | Photographs by WILL PRESLAR

ashington’s boardwalk provides an excellent platform from which to view wildlife in the Pamlico River and in and around the manmade wetlands east of the North Carolina Estuarium. That viewing is best in the spring, when ducklings, goslings and other wildlife babies are growing up. It is a common sight to see ducklings in convoys behind their mothers, learning to swim and seek food.

Scores of turtles sun themselves on rock, logs and other things protruding from the water. Vibrations from people walking on the boardwalk bring turtles to the water’s surface. Past experience has taught them that somebody on the boardwalk likely will feed them. Waterfowl make their way to the boardwalk, also anticipating bread or other food will be tossed their way. Herons prefer wading in the three pools that make up the wetlands as they use their long beaks to spear

fish. Otters, nutria and other waterloving mammals use the wetlands for recreation and feeding purposes. The boardwalk provides access to an outdoor nature class. “Our daughter has loved coming here to see the ducks, turtles and geese since she was 2. She’s 6 now, but she still wants to come here. She really likes the baby ducks,” said Terri Wilson, of Greenville, on a Saturday afternoon. “I like watching them, too. Wilson and her husband, Mark, said they first learned about the

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 19


The boardwalk (foreground) stretches along the manmade wetlands and the Pamlico River. A train (background) crosses the railroad trestle near where the water from the wetlands makes its way into the river.

boardwalk and the wildlife around it from neighbors who have family in Washington. The neighbors discovered the boardwalk after it was first built and have been frequent visitors since, Wilson said. On this day, 6-year-old Carrie Wilson was enamored with a duckling that had left his siblings and was swimming alone in the water. The duckling’s mother seemed to be quacking a warning. After a few moments, the duckling reversed course and headed toward its mother … and safety in numbers. “I like the baby ducks. … I want to take one home, but mama won’t let me,” Carrie said. As for the turtles that populate the boardwalk area, Carrie’s not that impressed with them. “They’re not as pretty as the baby 20 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

Wildlife around the boardwalk often results in those walking on the boardwalk stopping to look at the variety of wildlife in the area.

ducks,” she said. Washington’s Public Works Department maintains the boardwalk

to make sure it’s as safe as possible for the people using the boardwalk and the wildlife that call it home. “We have folks that walk it weekly to check for issues and everything, not to mention the fact we have several employees citywide, not necessarily in public works, who walk it just about everyday, at least Monday through Friday. If they see any issues, they report it to us. If they report an issue to us, we’ll do something with it … whatever it might be,” said Allen Lewis, the city’s public-works director. Lewis said when city employees are working at or near the boardwalk, they try to disturb the wildlife as little as possible. The city sets aside one day a year for city employees and volunteers to clean up the boardwalk area and wetlands.


AT HOME

Originally a screened-in porch, the Midgetts' sunroom has a bank of windows that look out over the back yard, onto Jacks Creek.

Tribute to the past 22 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


A view of the back: to the right are the heart-shaped pond and birdbath Walter Bowen built for his wife, Hilda.

A 1920's home reveals its secrets

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Written by VAIL STEWART RUMLEY | Photographs by WILL PRESLAR

etween the creek and the river, a lot had been cleared — Block 1, Lot 4. It was a sandy tract wedged between two houses, facing a dirt road and downriver. This was Wanoca, a suburb of an expanding Washington and the year was 1924. All the lot was looking for was a house. They say it came one day, unloaded in pieces from a railcar just down the road, where the railroad tracks cut through the Pamlico waterfront. Assembled, it

became the home of Walter and Hilda Bowen, where Walter built a heart-shaped pond in the backyard for his bride. It’s a place that still resonates with their history in the many treasures unearthed by the home’s current owners, Ray and D.J. Midgett. “I’d always wanted to live in an old house — both of us,” D.J. says, pointing out the original features of wide trim and molding and honey pine wood floors. Nearly a decade ago, Ray, originally from Hatteras, and D.J.,

from the Charlotte area, decided Washington would be an ideal town to move to when they retired. The weekend house-hunting expeditions began and the two toured many Washington listings before they visited the Simmons Street home. According to D.J., it was love at first sight. “We saw it on a Sunday morning and had it signed, sealed and delivered the same day,” she laughs. The home’s pristine condition and its river view from the wide front porch spoke to the Midgetts. MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 23


Beige brick in the fireplace surround attests to the Arts & Crafts kit home’s Chicagostyle influence.

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The broad front porch gives the Midgetts a fantastic view straight downriver.


Miss Hilda’s eyeglass rest on a table next to the fireplace.

A Caribbean getaway awaits the Midgetts at the storage facility/ tiki bar they built that looks over Jacks Creek and the Pamlico. MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 25


Above: 108 Simmons Street as it stands today. Below: A photo of 108 Simmons Street when it was first erected by Hilda and Walter Bowen in 1924.

Since living there, though, their appreciation has grown to include the home’s history. Both have a passion for the past and the two embarked on a project to uncover their home’s secrets. Ray hunted down the original deed and found the Bowens’ son, Bo, still living in Washington. The information they sought came pouring in. The home Bo’s parents built was a Sears Chicago-style, Arts & Crafts kit house delivered by rail, the beige brick of the fireplace pointing out its Chicago origins. The back porch was added onto the house in the ‘40s or ‘50s and later enclosed with a bank

26 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

of windows on the West and South sides, creating an oasis of light and quiet in the back. Lee Bowen, Bo’s son, and his wife Cyndi lived in the home, as well. Their contribution included opening up doorways and rooms to create an airiness throughout the first floor, adding architectural elements like pocket doors and shelves between living room and dining room. But the Midgetts made discoveries of a more tangible sort, as well: four “secret,” unfinished rooms in the four upstairs corners of the cross gabled roof; and some that are more personal. In D.J.’s travels through


Ray and D.J. Midgett in the enclosed sunroom—an oasis of calm and quiet on the back side of the house.

— and beneath — the house, she discovered a long-hidden love letter from Walter to Hilda Bowen wedged behind a drawer of a built-in bureau in the downstairs bathroom, a letter that upon hitting air began to deteriorate right before her eyes. She found a metal tray painted with lemons and various antique bottles and containers (including a can of Prince Albert tobacco) buried in the yard. D.J. opens a cabinet and pulls out a dinner plate — one of four, in a delicate lavender pattern on white porcelain — and holds it up. “I found a set of china in the sand

under the house,” she laughs. “It’s platinum-rimmed, so don’t ask me why it was under the house.” All these finds are proudly displayed in the comfortable home that practically breathes history when one enters, and none more proudly than Bo’s contributions: a framed picture of “Miss Hilda” and Walter decorates a side table in the den along with a copied photo of the home taken when it was first assembled so many years ago. D.J. shares the story of how Bo showed up at the house one day with a gift: Miss Hilda’s eyeglasses, the ornate frames attesting to their age.

“He said, ‘Now, you can keep them, but you have to keep them near the fireplace,’” D.J. says, adding that it was the place where Bo said his mother always laid them. So there Miss Hilda’s eyeglasses stay. As does the heart-shaped stone pond Walter built, which in summertime is now filled-to-bursting with herbs. While the Midgetts’ name may have been on the deed for the past nine years, in many ways, it’s not just their home. It’s a tribute to those who came before, one built on Miss Hilda and Walter’s foundation of home and family.

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 27


RIVER LIFE

Dock attendants are easy to find along the waterfront. Just look for this golf cart as dock attendants make their rounds. Nat Gladding, the longest-serving dock attendant, takes a trip along the waterfront promenade.

Service with a welcome 28 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


Above: The dock attendants’ office is nestled under a tree at the west end of Stewart Parkway. Inset Rendering: A dock master’s office, part of a new building that includes amenities for boaters and public restrooms, is planned for a nearby location.

Dock attendants welcome boaters to Washington Written by MIKE VOSS | Photographs by WILL PRESLAR AND VAIL STEWART RUMLEY

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hey greet boaters arriving at Washington’s docks. They help boaters tie up at those docks. They direct boaters to restaurants, laundry facilities and boating-related businesses. They provide historical information about the city. They are the Washington dock attendants. They share a commonality — the enjoy helping those who visit the waterfront, which they patrol with a

golf cart. “I love meeting people. I love making people feel welcome to our fair city,” said Jimmy Page, one of

the dock attendants and a former educator. “I do enjoy interacting with people, answering questions and helping people and just being a good host here at the dock station.” And that’s what the dock attendants do primarily — be a good host who helps people (not just boaters) who visit the waterfront and answers their questions. For many of the boaters, their first contact is with someone associated with Washington is a dock attendant. Keeping that in mind, the dock MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 29


Finding out boaters’ needs and helping boaters meet those needs are an integral part of the dock attendants’ responsibilities. That’s what dock attendant Nat Gladding (left) does on a regular basis.

attendants try to be as friendly and helpful as possible, knowing that they often are providing a boater his or her first impression of Washington. The dock attendants never know what they may run into while on the job. “We have to deal with everything from homeless people to mega-yachts to wayward kids,” Blackwell said. Guy Blackwell also finds the appeal of helping others a key factor in his decision to become a dock attendant. “In many cases, especially when they come in on weekends, we’re the only city employees that they’ll actually have contact with during their visits. So, we try to make the best impression we can and encourage them to tell their friends about us and come back and see us 30 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

again,” Blackwell said. “I enjoy helping people out. I enjoy helping boaters out, telling anything they need to know about the area,” said Gladding, the longserving veteran among the trio. The dock attendants also provide an element of security at the docks. “One of the main things we do … is we observe the boats first thing in the morning, throughout the day for anything unusual. We know most of these boat owners personally. If an issue comes up and we have a question, we can contact the boat owner immediately,” Page said. During a multiple-day stay at the waterfront, Chris and Gretchen Witzgall, on a two-year cruise aboard the sailboat Alchemy, made use of the dock attendants’ services and knowledge. Gretchen Witzgall said she did not expect the level

of service provided to her and her husband. “I really wasn’t expecting this kind of service. I will say other places where we’ve stopped along the way, even when we are paying them for service, the people aren’t as friendly as Guy and Jimmy and Charles have been,” Gretchen Witzgall said. “They pointed out a good restaurant to us. … It was good,” Chris Witzgall said. “Guy let us borrow this book,” Gretchen Witzgall said, picking up a copy of the Historic Washington Walking Tour kept in the dock master’s station. “Guy and Jimmy have really been great. They’re just really friendly, making sure we’re taken care of. They’re good,” Gretchen Witzgall said.


Chris and Gretchen Witzgall spent several days on the Washington waterfront as part of a two-year cruise. The couple said the service provided to them by dock attendants is the best they’ve come across in their travels. MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 31


PASTIMES

BeauCo Bees Backyard beekeeping in the city Written by VAIL STEWART RUMLEY | Photographs by ASHLEY VANSANT

32 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


In constant motion, most of a bee colony is out gathering pollen during the day.

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 33


Beekeeper Tom Garcia observes bees building comb on a bar from one of his beehives. Notice Garcia is barefingered — his bees are pretty laid back about his presence.

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t’s a warm and breezy spring day, and the whir of many tiny wings in constant motion is dominant in a quiet, sundappled backyard. Occasionally, a bee breaks from the ranks and buzzes quickly by. The rest simply go about their work. “I think a lot of people have misconceptions about bees,” says Tom Garcia. “They’re social organisms, all dependent on each other. But they’re not vicious.” On days like this, Garcia can often be found sipping coffee in a lawn chair a few feet away from his hives, while he quietly contemplates bees. It’s a new endeavor for him, the

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act of beekeeping, but one that has fascinated him since he was child. “My father was a rancher in Texas, but he didn’t want to ranch bees,” Garcia laughs. But Garcia always hoped that one day he’d have bees. Now, after a 17-year career in the U.S. Air Force, followed by a few years working for a private contractor, Garcia and his wife, Nancy St. Clair, have settled in Washington and have gone about the business of ranching bees. Garcia first checked with the city to make sure there were no ordinances against beekeeping within city limits. Next, he visited his Eleventh Street-area neighbors and

told them his plans. Then he built two hives, approximately 1 ½ feet by 4 feet troughs, and placed them beneath a stately pecan tree in the backyard. And finally, he bought some bees — about six pounds of Italian honeybees. The weight measures out to somewhere between 15,000 and 20,000 bees. Garcia has many reasons to break into the beekeeping field, but most revolve around sustainability and environmental protection on behalf of bees. As much as a third of all U.S. crops (including almonds, peaches, soybeans, apples, pears, cherries, raspberries, blackberries, cranberries, watermelons, cantaloupes, cucumbers


Bees fly in and out of their entrance to the beehive. Usually it's the only entrance until Garcia takes the weather-proofing "lid" off.

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 35


Bees hard at work building the comb that will house the next bee generation and pounds of honey.

and strawberries) rely on pollination by bees. According to a Cornell University study, the U.S. crop value wholly dependent on honeybee pollination is estimated to exceed $15 billion each year. But over the past several years, a drastic rise in the disappearance of North American honeybee colonies, a phenomena called Colony Collapse Disorder, has been cause for environmental and economic concern: per year, bee losses run at an approximate 30 percent and farmers, who often contract out for bee pollination, have faced increasing costs for pollination services. Colony Collapse Disorder’s suspected origins are pointed at many sources, from malnutrition to electromagnetic radiation, but 36 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

studies on widely used pesticides using neonicotinoids have led the European Food Safety Authority to state that neonicotinoids pose an unacceptably high risk to bees, and that the industry-sponsored science upon which regulatory agencies' claims of safety have relied is flawed. Considering the number of Beaufort County crops that rely on honeybee pollination, backyard hives like Garcia’s are the equivalent of an agricultural community service — one that Garcia hopes to foster in others. The desire to see thriving beehives in the area led to his creation of the Beaufort County Beekeepers Association. At the first meeting in March, Garcia expected perhaps six people to show up. What

he got was 20 attendees and crosssection of the Beaufort County population: young, old, organic farmers, master beekeepers and those interested becoming so. “I want to educate the community — inform folks how important it is to take care of their bees,” Garcia says. “My love for bees is just the fact that we depend on them.” It’s apparent in the way Garcia handles them — calmly and gently. They don’t seem to mind his presence at all as he gingerly pulls a single wooden bar from the many that lie flush against each other across the top of the hive. Draping down from the bar, hundreds of bees are at work, building row after row of hexagonal cells that make up the comb.


Garcia uses smoke to calm his Italian honeybees — not too much though, because the smoke will irritate their eyes when they're given too big a dose.

“This is a highly technical comb guide,” Garcia says, his bare hand pointing to where the comb attaches to two downward protrusions running the bar’s length. “As you can see, those are popsicle sticks.” He turns to place the bar back in its place, a tight fit to help keep the hive weather-proof. “Now the trick is getting all these back together tightly without smooshing bees,” he laughs. In a well-established hive, each one of the bars represents about five pounds of honey. Garcia plans to wait until next year to do that kind of harvesting so his bees have time to establish a strong hive. But when the harvest does come in, he’ll be putting it to good use: with gifts to neighbors and a line of homemade

soaps and lotions, an entrepreneurial endeavor he hopes will eventually provide some jobs in Beaufort County. In the meantime, Garcia is taking good care of his bees, dosing them with an all-organic brew of tea tree oil, thyme, spearmint, and lemon oil that wards off beekilling parasites and sugar water to get their strength up. In his bee journal, Garcia writes about all things bee, including their moods — on cold, rainy days, they tend to get a little grumpy, not unlike humans, Garcia laughs — and the support of his elderly neighbors, who watched over the fence the day he brought his bees home, cheering him on with “We love bees, too!”

Tom Garcia

For more information about the Beaufort County Beekeepers Association, visit the Facebook page, BeauCoBeekers. The meetings are open to anyone interested in beekeeping or just learning about bees. MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 37


LET’S EAT

Herbs

101

38 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


A beginners guide to flavor and goodness STORY AND PHOTOS by MONA MOORE

“ Sage

This right here, this is a cancer-fighter,” said Asif Daher, owner of Zaitona’s restaurant as he pointed to a pile of cumin on his display tray. The Mediterranean restaurant keeps the display of ground herbs above their buffet to introduce the meek to new Mediterranean flavors. And for Asif, nothing provides more flavor than herbs. “Most of the seasonings here are from herbs,” he said. “I mix a few of them together — rosemary, cumin, thyme — and season a lot of things.” The flavor is only half the appeal of growing and cooking with herbs. Asif and his wife, Sharaz, listed dozens of ailments that could be relieved by the herbs on the tray. “Turmeric is an anti-inflammatory, an antioxidant and a cancer-fighter. It also treats gas, colic and jaundice,” Sharaz said. “Cumin is good for heart patients. Thyme is good for the skin. Sage is good for the common cold, cough, bronchitis, sore throat and diarrhea.” Sharaz said people back home in Jerusalem

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 39


Mint Rosemary

Mother of Thyme

Taragon

40 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


used to steep sage in hot water and drink it, especially when they were sick. Sage can also be steeped in tea. The Dahers use dry herbs at the restaurant, but grow fresh thyme, oregano, rosemary and mint at home. “Most of it can grow in this area,” Asif said. Master gardener Julie Parker loves to cook and uses a variety of herbs when she does. “I think herbs are very interesting and you can use them in place of salt,” she said. She dries sage and flavors her poultry dishes with it. “And basil, parsley, oregano and marjoram are used in Italian,” she said. Parker likes to use basil for bruschetta. She tops the toasted bread with tomatoes, basil, garlic and olive oil. “Basil is really nice for that. You can buy dry basil, but it really is nice when served fresh,” Parker said. Many of the most common herbs can withstand the cooler months of Beaufort County and would do better here than a hundred miles west in Raleigh. She said coriander, cilantro and dill do well here. “Dill is a good cooler weather crop,” she said. “Dill will come back (each year). It re-seeds itself.” If starting from seeds, you can plant basil, sage and chives as late as June. Parker said chives do especially well here. Master gardeners have an herb garden at the Beaufort County Extension office. “We’ve tried several things here,” Parker said. “Oh you’d be surprised at what are herbs.”

Asif Daher keeps sample spices on display at his restaurant, Zaitona’s.

The list includes catnip (good for teas) and scented geraniums. “They (scented geraniums) are not edible. A lot of herbs aren’t,” she said. There are things like garlic and horseradish. Herbs like mint, lemon grass, lavender and anise are popular for teas and fragrances. These days, you can find a large variety of mint plants. Orange mint, apple mint and chocolate

mint all live up to their names. Any variety will be a hardy addition to a Beaufort County garden. “They are pretty much perennials because once you get them, you can never get rid of them,” Parker said. Mint has a reputation for taking over gardens. Ideally, they should be grown in containers or a raised, contained bed. Herbs can be annual, biennial or perennial. Other popular perennial MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 41


Curley parsley and Lemongrass. All photographs of herbs were taken at Raindrop Ridge Farm.

herbs are lemon verbena, parsley and lemon grass. Herbs are ideal for a gardener who is a beginner. They require very little water. In fact, herbs will not grow in wet soil. Herbs are not plagued with many diseases and do not need fertilizer. The strongest herbs to start with are winter savory, sage and rosemary. Sweet basil, dill, marjoram, thyme, tarragon and mint do well here, in Beaufort County. “Some of them are very easy to grow. Aloe is easy to grow and that’s an herb,” Parker said. “You can even buy the garlic from the grocery and plant the cloves.”

42 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

Herbs are perfect for container gardening. Parker would not advise attempting to grow them indoors, though many people do so successfully. Harvest your herbs after the dew has dried from the leaf. Preserve the herbs by freezing, drying or by immersing them in vinegar. Parker freezes her chives. She cuts them into small pieces then stores them in a Ziploc in her freezer. She dries her bay leaves and uses them in soups. Another alternative is to layer herbs and coarse salt in an airtight container. The salt will absorb oils from the herbs and take on its flavor.


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CAST A LINE

River provides livelihood, recreation Written by CAPT. RICHARD ANDREWS

A

s Washington residents, we are so blessed by the natural resources that the Pamlico River provides. It offers some a livelihood, some with recreation activities and some a sense of place and home. Many local anglers have enjoyed fishing on the Pamlico for generations. Its relatively undeveloped shorelines, quaint waterfront communities and bountiful wildlife create an attraction that is irresistible for nature lovers. As a guide, I primarily carry anglers from outside of our area, many of whom have never been to Washington, much less fishing on the Pamlico River. With each new fishing party, I have grown eager to gauge their initial impressions of the area once the ice is broken and we start some friendly conversation during the beginning of our excursion. Both beginner anglers and those who have traveled all over the world to fish are typically overwhelmed by the sheer beauty of the river, its tributaries and, if the fish do their job, our fishing. We have such a unique resource and each citizen in our community has a responsibility to protect and preserve it for the future. Pamlico anglers should expect the continuation of great speckled trout fishing, although the bite might slow down during the middle of the day on really hot days. Topwater fishing in the early morning hours around active baitfish schools should produce some nicer fish. Natural colored topwater "walk-the-dog" style baits such as Zara Spooks, Top Dawgs and Skidderwalks will likely draw a vicious strike from a three- to five-pound speckled.

44 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

Eastside Bait and Tackle is your source for quality topwater speckled trout baits. In the early summer as temps heat up, live bait will also be effective for the specs. Live croaker, spot, pinfish, mud minnows or finger mullet will be the best choices. The puppy drum fishing will also be outstanding during the late spring and early summer. Schools of undersized drum (16"-18") will be the most numerous with the occasional lower slot fish (18"-22"). Anglers should fish areas with baitfish concentrations around shorelines with structure such as stumps and blown-down trees. For the most dedicated anglers, a few of the giant "Old Drum" might be cruising the shoals or creeks in the higher saline waters of the Pamlico Sound a bit earlier than normal. Some of those big fish are around much earlier than most people think, so keep your eyes peeled for some of the giants in May and June. Get out there and check out what our fishery has to offer. You might have the same reaction that new, visiting anglers have to our home waters, and you might be lucky enough to be surprised by a chance encounter with a trophy fish or be overwhelmed by the natural beauty of our home! Capt. Richard Andrews is a resident of Washington and the owner of a local year-round guide service offering fishing excursions on the Pamlico and nearby rivers. He can be reached at 252945-9715 or richard@ tarpamguide.com


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WORD ON WINE

Keeping it cool, serving it right

W

Written by James McKelvey and Yvonne Sedgwick

hen the days get longer and the nights get warmer, the Wine Guy’s thoughts turn to wines for summer. We want something light and refreshing, wines that go with afternoons on the dock and evenings on the screened porch, barbecue and fresh seafood. Fortunately, there’s a lot to choose from. Everyone’s first thought for summer is “white” wines, because they are served cold. But what kinds of whites? If you want something that can be served ice cold and that is dry (not sweet) and refreshing, you can’t go wrong with Vinho Verde from Portugal. It’s got a little fizz and its alcohol level is not much more than beer. You can even serve it over ice or with a slice of lime. Another dry white that’s growing in popularity is Torrontes, the signature white wine grape of Mendoza, Argentina. It’s got some aromatic notes like fresh flowers and citrus fruits and it’s very refreshing. If you want something a little more substantial, maybe to go with locally caught fresh seafood, reach for Sauvignon Blanc. It ranges from the tangy and “grassy” version from New Zealand, to the fruitier styles of northern California. And if you like a white that’s not as dry as these, try Vouvray (Chenin Blanc) from France’s Loire Valley or an off-dry German Riesling. Our all-time favorite style of wine for summer is dry rosé. These are made from any red grape and range from the light bistro styles of Provence to the more full-bodied, almost red style of the Pacific Northwest. And if you want to stick with red wines, reach for a light-bodied, fruity wine from Portugal or Northern Spain.

Finally, if you want a fruit punch style of wine, you don’t have to settle for artificially flavored “wine coolers.” There are several wine and fruit traditions around the world, notably Sangria from Spain and the sparkling Prosecco/fruit blends from Italy. In the latter category, you’ve got Bellinis that are a blend of sparkling wine and white peach puree, mimosas that are sparkling wine and orange juice, and we’ve even seen blends with Mango or other tropical fruits. Make your own or pick up convenient bottles that are already blended. Finally, how do you serve these wines, other than “chilled?” One device we think really suits our summer weather are the acrylic wine “chillers.” These are somewhat misnamed, in that they don’t actually “chill” the wine. You do that in the refrigerator. When you’re ready to serve, you just open the bottle and slide it into the chiller. The insulated walls keep the bottle cold; and, most important in our climate, the beads of condensed humidity slide down into the chiller instead of across the top of your table. And if you’re worried about broken glass on your dock or porch or boat deck, there are many styles of acrylic and polycarbonate wine glasses available. The stemless ones are easier to handle and present less risk of tipping. Ah, summer. A glass of chilled wine, a bowl of steamed shrimp, some late night jazz. Life is good. James “The Wine Guy” McKelvey and “Chef Yvonne” Sedgwick are proprietors of Wine & Words ... & Gourmet in downtown Washington. MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 47


LET’S EAT

Savory summer

48 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


Dill Potato Salad

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 49


Marinated Cole slaw prep

Summer dining on the shores of the Pamlico Written by KEVIN SCOTT CUTLER PhotographS AND Food PREPARATION By VAIL STEWART RUMLEY

S

ummer time and the living is easy ... just ask any Washington resident. The sultry season conjures up memories of backyard barbecues, river outings and picnics along the shores of the Pamlico. Those summer taste sensations are more than just a memory thanks to these tried and true recipes. A savory, oversized burger ­­— coupled with grilled corn on the cob ­­— will make any occasion one to remember. Add a couple of cool summer salads, a pitcher of refreshing lime tea ...

50 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

who could ask for anything more? But wait, no party would be complete without a dish of homemade ice cream. Now, that's some good eating. Make your own summertime memories this year with these tempting recipes, courtesy of the Washington Daily News' Pamlico Pantry cookbook collection. Pamlico Pantry offers recipes from our area's best cooks, all the while promoting fundraising cookbooks published by local churches and nonprofit organizations. Enjoy!

Not Your Boring Burger Mack Simpson St. Thomas Episcopal Church 1 1/2 pounds 85 percent lean ground beef; 1/2 medium sweet onion, finely chopped; 1/2 cup hickory barbecue sauce; 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce (preferably Lea & Perrins); 1/2 teaspoon Texas Pete; 1/4 teaspoon Mongolian Fire Oil (optional). Combine all ingredients into a large bowl and mix with your hands (wash 'em first) until fully blended. Shape into six large burger patties. Place patties onto medium charcoal or gas grill and cook until done. Serve on bun with choice of condiments and enjoy!


Tomato & Feta Cheese Salad Prep

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 51


Marinated Coleslaw

Refrigerator Pickles

Sadie Fowle

Tamara Clark

Beaufort County Arts Council

Saint Peter's Episcopal Church

1 large head of cabbage, shredded; 1 green pepper, thinly sliced; 1 large onion, thinly sliced. Place in layers in the above order in a large bowl.

3 quarts cucumbers, sliced thin; 1 pound onions, chopped; 1 large green pepper, chopped; 1 large red pepper, chopped; 1 tablespoon celery seed; 1/3 cup salt; 3 cups granulated sugar; 2 cups vinegar.

Pour over all: 1 cup sugar (do not stir). Combine: 3/4 cup oil; 1 cup vinegar; 1 teaspoon dry mustard; 1 teaspoon celery seed; 1 teaspoon salt.

Place cucumbers, onions and peppers in gallon or larger jar or plastic container. Mix last four ingredients and pour in container. Refrigerate 24 hours before serving. It keeps up to two weeks. Yield: six to eight pints.

Bring to the boiling point. Pour over cabbage while hot. Do not stir. Refrigerate overnight. Yield: 10 servings.

Dill Potato Salad Sandy Fenn Red Cross 6 new or red potatoes, cooked in skins and cooled; 1/4 cup cider vinegar; 1/2 cup salad oil; 2 teaspoons seasoning salt; 2 teaspoons dried dill weed; 1 medium onion, sliced thin; 1/2 teaspoon basil; 1/8 teaspoon dry mustard. Slice potatoes. Combine remaining ingredients, except onions. Pour over potatoes. Add onions and toss. Best when served the next day. Can be served chilled or at room temperature. Yield: six to eight servings.

Tomato & Feta Cheese Salad Lou Hollowell Beaufort County Arts Council 2 to 3 tomatoes, diced; 1 red onion, sliced; 1 tablespoon fresh basil; 1 (4-ounce) package feta cheese, crumbled; 2 tablespoons olive oil; 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar; 1 tablespoon mustard. Mix well for a good summer salad. Yield: four to six servings.

52 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

Refreshing Lime Tea Zippy Vegetable Dip Daphne Harbinson Grace Lutheran Church 1 cup mayonnaise; 1 cup cream-style cottage cheese; 1/4 cup grated onion; 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce; 1/2 teaspoon caraway seed; 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard; 1/2 teaspoon pepper; 1/4 teaspoon salt; 1/8 teaspoon garlic salt; 1/4 teaspoon celery seed; 1/8 teaspoon hot sauce. Combine all ingredients; mix well. Chill one to two hours; serve with assorted fresh vegetables. Yield: about 2 1/4 cups.

Loraine Babcock Saint Peter's Episcopal Church 2 family-size tea bags; 1 (6-ounce) can frozen limeade concentrate; 1/2 cup sugar; 7 cups water. Boil one cup water. Add tea bags and steep for five minutes. Remove tea bags and add sugar and limeade concentrate. Stir until dissolved. Add remaining water. Serve over ice with a mint sprig. Yield: 1/2 gallon.

Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream Brenda Yert

Corn on Grill Melinda Woolard Church of God of Prophecy 6 ears unhusked corn; 1/4 cup salt; melted butter or herb butter. Cooking time: 15 minutes. Place unhusked corn in large container and cover with water. Add salt; soak two hours. Place unhusked corn on grill. Cook and turn until entire outside husk is black. Remove from grill and husk corn (or leave on and pull downward). Brush off silks. Pour butter onto corn.

Tri-Community Ruritan Club 2 cups milk; 3/4 cup sugar; 2 eggs, well beaten; 1 tablespoon flour; 1/4 teaspoon salt; 1 cup half and half; 1 cup heavy cream; 2 teaspoons vanilla extract. In large saucepan, beat together milk, sugar, eggs, flour and salt. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until mixture reaches 160 degrees or until just coats a metal spoon. Cool quickly by placing pan in bowl of ice or cold water; continue to stir mixture. Add half and half and heavy cream; combine well. Add vanilla extract. Freeze according to ice cream maker's instructions.


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CALENDAR

OUT AND ABOUT

Every Saturday Saturday Market • Downtown Washington • 8 a.m. - Noon. The Market begins on April 20th and runs through October. Our market features local growers of fresh fruit, vegetables, plants and flowers. Our fishmongers offer fresh seafood from local waters. You will also want to try some delicious, fresh baked goods. You never know what you might find; the products are always changing! Call 252-946-3969 for more information.

Wednesday through Friday River Roving Educational River Tours • N.C. Estuarium • Learn about the history and habitats of the Washington waterfront. These boat tours cruise the Pamlico River Wednesday through Friday at 10:30 and 1:30, and Saturdays at 10:30. No admission fee or other cost is involved for the tour, but advance reservations are required. Riders should check in 15 minutes in advance. Children must be at least 6 years old to ride; a responsible adult must accompany children under 16. Call 252-948-0000 for reservations.

May 3-4 Beaufort County Relay for Life • Washington High School • 6 p.m. The journey to end cancer starts with a single step. The American Cancer Society invites you to take that step with us by joining the global Relay for Life movement. When you walk to end cancer at a Relay event, it's your opportunity to not only honor cancer survivors and remember loved ones lost, but also to raise awareness about

Washington’s annual Summer Festival offers amusement park-style rides for children. what we can do to stay well from cancer and raise money to help fuel the world's largest walk to end cancer. Call 252-481-2694 for more information.

May 3 & May 4 Spring Song concerts by the Beaufort County Choral Society • Washington Civic Center • • St. Thomas Episcopal Chapel in Bath • Join the BCCS in welcoming Spring, its new life and the growth of a glorious season. Concerts are Friday, May 3, at 7:30 p.m.

54 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

at the Washington Civic Center, and Saturday, May 4, at 3 p.m. at St. Thomas Episcopal Chapel in Bath — great acoustics, but limited seating in Bath. Please come out and share this wonderful time with us! Admission is free.

May 4 Race for the River Kayakalon • Goose Creek State Park • 9 a.m. This annual triathlon with a twist benefits the Pamlico Tar River Foundation.  Call 252-9467211 or riverkeeper@ptrf.org. 

May 9 ArtWalk • Downtown Washington • 6 p.m. This free-to-the-public showcase of local visual art runs from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Main, Water and Gladden streets on the second Thursday of February, May, August, and November.  The quarterly happening features art in galleries open to browsers, collectors or the plain curious, with refreshments and live entertainment thrown in for good measure.  Call 252-946-3969 for more information.  


OUT AND ABOUT

May 9, June 13 Senior Dance

CALENDAR May 18-19 Washington Triathlon Series

• Washington Civic Center • 7 p.m. Singles and Couples over 50 are welcome to come and dance the night away. Admission is $7.00.  50/50 drawing.  Door prizes.   No Alcohol/No Smoking/No Children.

• Washington Park • The Finish Strong Series brings a variety of triathlon events to Washington for this annual endurance event. Visit  www. fsseries.com for details.

May 9 - August 3 'Bluegrass Legends' screen prints by Joshua Holton

May 24-26 20th Annual Aurora Fossil Festival • Aurora • There will be expanded food vendors, games for kids, amusement rides, classic car show, street vendors, local live entertainment, helicopter rides, a sanctioned “lawn mower” tractor pull, Sunday gospel service/ singing, and a street dance. Festivities include the ever-famous Fossil parade featuring local marching bands and the crowd favorite Shriner units from eastern North Carolina along with floats and fun.

• Lone Leaf Gallery & Custom Framing • A native of Little Washington, and former band member of Carolina Still, Asheville artist Joshua Holton creates a warm and nostalgic look with his artworks featuring bluegrass legends.

May 17 – June 27 Annual BCAC Members’ Exhibit • Washington Civic Center Gallery • Opening reception May 16, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Call 252-9462504 for more information.  

May 17-19 Pirates on the Pungo Regatta • Belhaven • This annual fundraiser for the Pungo District Hospital Foundation includes a regatta and Buccaneer Bash. Visit www.piratesonpungo. org for more information. 

May 17 Music in the Streets • Downtown Washington • 6 p.m. Enjoy a wonderful evening with your friends and neighbors in Historic Downtown Washington. No matter what

From 8 a.m. to noon every Saturday through October, Saturday Market offers fresh produce and locally produced jams, relishes and baked goods. your musical taste, you will find entertainers to delight you in this monthly musical event. Downtown Washington comes to life, shops stay open late and the restaurants are glad to see you. Call 252946-3969 for information.

May 18 Bath Fest • Historic Bath • 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. This year’s town-sponsored arts festival will have a patriotic theme and will feature arts and crafts vendors, music and theatrical performances, food booths, hands-on arts and craft activities

for children. Free, scheduled tours of the Palmer-Marsh and Bonner houses will be offered during the day. Free of charge. For more information, call 252-923-3971.

May 18 Annual Cutthroat Croquet Tournament • Historic Bath • 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Join the Beaufort County Community College Foundation as a participant or spectator as it sponsors the ninth annual Cutthroat Croquet Tournament. Charge for players, free for spectators. For more information, call 252-923-3971.

June 8 Lecture America Without Indians: An Imaginary Journey • Historic Bath Visitor Center • 10 a.m. Road Scholars lecture by Dr. David LaVere. He will ask audience members to imagine that the Western Hemisphere is truly a virgin land, devoid of Indian peoples and then start on a journey of how the nation might have developed, allowing all to come away with an understanding of just how essential Indians were to the development of the United States.   This project is made possible by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Free. Call 252-9233971 for more information.

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 55


CALENDAR

OUT AND ABOUT

June 7-8 Washington Summer Festival • Downtown Washington • The Washington Summer Festival is a community festival committed to providing a variety of family-centered activities held downtown Washington. This year’s activities include the annual street fair featuring food, arts & crafts and commercial vendors, free concerts, a kids’ zone with children’s entertainment and activities and much more.   This event attracts around 25,000 people annually. For more information call 252-946-9168.  

June 9 North Carolina Symphony • Festival Park, Downtown Washington • The North Carolina Symphony will perform at Festival Park at 7:30 p.m. Bring blankets and chairs to experience an exciting evening on the Washington waterfront. At 6 p.m., symphony musicians and staff will demonstrate the instruments of the orchestra at an Instrument Zoo at the Festival Park gazebo. Both events are free and open to the public. Prior to the performance, a ticketed reception ($40 per person) sponsored by PotashCorpAurora will be held at the North Carolina Estuarium from 5:30 to 7 p.m. For more information about the event, please call 252-9469168.

June 24-28 Youth Art Camp • Washington Civic Center • 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Call the Beaufort County Arts Council for registration information, 252-9462504.

River roving educational tours are offered at the N.C. Estuarium on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.

June 21 Music in the Streets

June 25-26 Junior Ranger Days

• Downtown Washington • 6 p.m. Enjoy a wonderful evening with your friends and neighbors in Historic Downtown Washington. No matter what your musical taste, you will find entertainers to delight you in this monthly musical event. Downtown Washington comes to life, shops stay open late and the restaurants are glad to see you. Call 252946-3969 for information.

• Goose Creek State Park • 9 a.m. - 12 noon. Is your child between the ages of 7 and 11? Does he or she show passion or excitement for the great outdoors?   This is their chance to become a sworn Junior Ranger by working through our exciting program.   A parent or guardian must be present with the child.  Call 252-923-2191 for information or directions.  

June 29-30 The Promised Land production • Ormond Amphitheatre • The Promised Land production is in its 7th season brought to you by Walk in the Light Productions and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at the Ormond Amphitheatre in Bath. This production is the story of one family’s struggles for freedom from patriot to pioneer. Preshow entertainment begins at 7 p.m. and the production begins at 8:40 p.m.  Dinner is available for purchase.  Admission is free to the public.   Visit BathTheatre.org for more information or call 252-9230999.


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Edward Jones, 21 Feyer Ford, 2 Flanders Corporation, 5 Gail Kenefick, 57 Gerri McKinley, 57 Golden Way Home, 57 Gregory Poole Equipent Co., 8 Innerbanks Financial Partners, 61 Leggett Farm Organics, 46 Lone Leaf Gallery, 46 On the Waterfront, 46 PotashCorp, 3 Ryan Whitford, 61 Scott Campbell, 45 Select Bank & Trust, 5 South Market Antiques, 57 Stewart's Jewelry, 7 Tayloe Hospital Pharmacy, 53 Vidant Health, 68 Vortex Shade Solutions, 57 Washington Eye Center, 45 Washington Montessori Public Charter School, 61 Washington Yacht and Country Club, 8 Wells Fargo Advisors, 53 WimcoCorp, 3 Wine & Words ... & Gourmet, 53

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 57


IN THE ARTS

Re-creation 58 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


Making marks a daily devotion

T

Written by VAIL STEWART RUMLEY | Photographs by WILL PRESLAR

he first thing that speaks to you is the luminosity. Next comes a barrage of color, some of it bright, some muted, all of it bold and sweeping. Finally, the lines paint a portrait of nature: a leaf here, a petal there. Some might shrug and say, “It’s a flower.” But to artist Ellen Rodman Hathaway, a flower is so much more. “I have just always loved flowers, from the time I was little and Daddy and I would walk around the yard — he always gardened — I would love walking around with him and surveying the camellias. Mother would always make arrangements of camellias, azaleas,” Hathaway explains. “Flowers always meant you were either going to be with someone you loved or there was going to be a party,” she laughs. “Every flower is unique, they’re like people, individual, like us — there are just so many layers of why they appeal to me and what they symbolize all around.” The desire to create came early to Hathaway, a Washington native who still calls North Carolina home though she’s lived in Virginia for 27 years. Back then, her mother, Mavis Rodman (later Peele), encouraged her daughter’s talent, enrolling her in every art class available at the time, though they were few and far between. “I would get in trouble for scratching on furniture with pens — it was sort of like ‘Ellen was here.’ I always loved making marks,” she

Above: Ellen Rodman Hathaway. Opposite page: Blooming from the wallpaper: a bouquet of tulips that graces the breakfast nook in the home of Hester Anne Kidd, Hathaway’s godmother.

laughs. Later, her father, Clark Rodman, suggested she study art in college — she declined. “When I painted, it was a sort of place that I went, a protected place and I was so scared to expose what art meant to me, to be judged by professors,” Hathaway explains. Rather, she studied media relations at Carolina, where she met her husband, Curtis. It was only after she’d married, gotten a master’s degree in teaching and had two children, Anne Clark and Brooke,

that she fell in love with children’s books, a happenstance that would allow the latent painter to emerge. Initially, Hathaway decided to write her own children’s stories, and took a writing course, putting pen to paper. The intention led to an entirely different result. “I said, ‘I think I’ll try to illustrate them.’ I pulled out the watercolors and started painting something to go with these little stories and after that, it was just painting,” Hathaway says. “I never went back.” A friend hooked her up with MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 59


"Where the heart is,” a Hathaway painting that Kidd bought from Greenville’s City Arts, where Hathaway’s work is prominent.

Charlottesville, Va., gallery owner Lyn Bolen. Soon after, Hathaway’s paintings began to sell, though they hung in a back room of Bolen’s Les Yeux du Monde gallery. An invitation to be a part of an exhibit of established and emerging artists pulled those paintings off the back wall and put them, and Hathaway, in the spotlight. “When I first walked in and saw these paintings — which were flowers — saw them on the walls, it was like seeing a nude exhibit of me,” Hathaway laughs. “I never thought about anyone else seeing them.” Now, many exhibits and sold paintings later, Hathaway’s life is steeped in art. “I do something with art every day,” Hathaway says. “It may not be putting paint on canvas. Sometimes 60 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

it’s journal writing; sometimes it’s learning about other artists. It may be learning about techniques. The process of painting teaches me about myself — it talks to me.” The self-realization has much to do with connections, she says: between the art and artist, or the art and the viewer, or the viewer and the artist — all simultaneous conversations happening on different planes. It’s those connections that have allowed Hathaway to tap in to a larger picture, one in which making art is a consequence of the divine. “When I am in a posture of making art, God talks to me. He’s whispering a lesson to me. When my head gets so noisy with things like whether or not I need more paintings, or I’m being judged on my work, all that noise just

messes up my creative process and messes up my ability to hear what God has to say,” Hathaway explains. “Art is truly about prayer for me.” Hathaway says that people often ask her whether she can “paint anything else” besides flowers. The answer, “Not right now,” is understandable given all that flowers represent for her: family, home, the cycles of both nature and hope, from winter’s stasis to spring’s glorious rising, and, most importantly, prayer. For now, the subject works — and works well — for Hathaway. It just may stay that way, and with good reason: just as God’s proof is evident in the perfection of a simple bloom, that depth and luminosity is apparent in the work of those with the power to recreate it.


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Our Students Know.


OUR HISTORY

Pride in the Past

Washington Area Historic Foundation members Dee Congleton and Don Stroud believe moving Singleton Primitive Baptist Church from North Market Street to Clark’s Neck Road to help save it is the foundation’s best project — so far.

62 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013


Saving the past for the future

I

Written by MIKE VOSS | Photographs by WILL PRESLAR

n its 20 years of existence, the Washington Area Historic Foundation’s been busy preserving and protecting Washington’s history, culture and architectural showpieces. From hosting tours of Washington for out-of-town visitors to having a carriage built for an antique cannon found when the Washington waterfront was

renovated, the foundation is doing what it can to make sure the city’s inventory of historic buildings and places does not disappear. Don Stroud and Dee Congleton have been involved with many, if not all, of the foundation’s projects. “We try to give back to the community every way we can,” Congleton said.

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 63


Harding Square provides a landscape jewel between the end of Market Street, the Stewart Parkway promenade and the Pamlico River. It is among the many projects completed by the Washington Area Historic Foundation in the past 20 years.

“We do that through education efforts, advocacy,” Stroud said. “I would say the biggest project we’ve done is moving the Singleton Primitive Baptist Church out to Clark’s Neck Road. … Marvin Mason donated land for the church to be put on. … I would say that’s the first big project,” Congleton said. “The second one is, old City Hall, stabilizing that, the cupola … the windows, the doors.” Congleton also takes pride that the foundation, with assistance

64 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

from the Washington Garden Club renovated Harding Square at the southern end of Market Street. The foundation is about more than just saving historic houses from deteriorating to the point of falling down or being condemned and being torn down. It helped secure grants that led to the construction of Festival Park. The foundation donated money to help with that project. “We played an instrumental role in developing Festival Park, helping

with the grants and getting that off the ground,” Stroud said. The foundation also assisted with the renovation of the skipjack Ada Mae, which spent some time at Washington’s waterfront before moving to New Bern. The Ada Mae was built in 1915 at Rose Bay in Hyde County. It was restored at McCotter’s Marina in Beaufort County. The foundation also organizes and hosts home tours, with the next one scheduled for 2014. The


tours allow people to get close, inside looks at many of the historic homes in Washington. The foundation places plaques on historic structures, identifying them as such and when they were completed. Yearly, it produces Christmas-tree ornaments that are based on historic structures in the area. This year, the ornament features Washington’s First Baptist Church. “Whenever a sister organization wants to have a tour, the group, like Dee and others, puts together a bus tour and takes those people around. We had a whole busload from Moore County,” Stroud recalled. “Ray Midgett and I wrote a little tour and we did a tour of the historic area. I guess we were longwinded. We only got one section, one end. We never got to the other end,” Congleton said. Foundation members are not above getting their hands dirty, participating in efforts to clean up downtown Washington. “The thing that we do nonstop over the years, and I think it’s just as important as the bricks-and-mortar things we do, is that as a group we advocate for the preservation of the buildings and the landscape. That probably takes up the most of our time. To monitor what’s going on, to be an advocate before the Historic Preservation Commission and the City Council,” Stroud said. The stabilization of old City Hall is another project in which the Washington Area Historic Foundation takes pride.

MAY/JUNE 2013 | WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE • 65


Y’ALL COME BACK

Why I love Washington

Overlooking the river

I

Written by Laura SCOBLE PHOTOGRAPHY by WILL PRESLAR

broke up with Fort Lauderdale 10 years ago. South Florida didn’t overlook anything — there were great restaurants, thrilling theater, broad beaches, swaying palms, frosty beverages and easy access to the Keys. So, it wasn’t just because the town trained terrorists to fly into buildings. Mostly, it just lost its appeal for me with the never-ending traffic and road rage, coupled with an overly generous helping of oppressive humidity and health-stealing stress. It was just too much. And then I found Washington: bundled up against fall’s first chill at the PTRF Oyster Roast. Then a profusion of flowers that transforms my back yard into a spring Easter basket. Backwater Jack’s in summer flies by in a blur of friendly faces that give the illusion we are all family now. Why do I love Washington? It’s mothers and daughters sharing a Friday “Teach-arita” … and the man in the cap keeping watch. It’s the laughter of a child making the first ring toss…the faces of the men from Stocks & Taylor who made us whole again after the beating we took from Hurricane Irene … it’s in the expectant faces of all those faithful customers who unfailingly returned after nine long months … it’s music lovers dancing on Pebble Beach. It’s burgers, beer and rum runners. Are there things in Florida that I miss? Nope. The only thing Washington overlooks for me is the river. Ah … the river.

66 • WASHINGTON THE MAGAZINE | MAY/JUNE 2013

Laura Scoble, Owner, Backwater Jack’s Tiki Bar and Grill


BCCC Foundation Golf Tournament Friday, September 20 Washington Yacht & Country Club

Sponsored by Potash Corp - Aurora

Join the dozens of people in our area who have donated money to the Beaufort County Community College Foundation. This spring those donations have provided over two dozen scholarships totalling more than $17,000 to students like Christy Smith, a student in BCCC’s Machinist Program. This spring, Smith received a scholarship funded by a bequest made by Beaufort County attorney John A. Wilkinson. “I’m going to go ahead and do everything I can WRÂżQLVK´VKHVDLGÂł:LWKDQDVVRFLDWHÂśVGHgree, I’ll be able to go out there and do any job WKH\SXWEHIRUHPH´

Four person super ball. Team Prizes awarded in each of three flights Hole-in-One Prizes sponsored by Lee Chevrolet-Buick and Park Boat Company Four Closest-to-the-Pin Prizes

Proceeds provide scholarships for BCCC students!

Donate hope and opportunity to your community!

For more information, contact

Judy Meier Jennette, Director Beaufort County Community College Foundation P.O. Box 1069, Washington, N.C. 27889 By telephone at 252-940-6326, by email at judyj@beaufortccc.edu or visit us at www.beaufortccc.edu

The BCCC Foundation

20th Annual


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