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Sports...

SNOW! Tessa Hilton was doing some swinging in the snow early Saturday evening in Stowe Park following the surprise “mini-blizzard” that coated our area with several inches.. She’s the daughter of Jennifer and Jacob Hilton. Photo by Pat Rooney

South Point downs N. Gaston... 6A

Serving Belmont, Mount Holly, Stanley, Cramerton, and McAdenville

Volume 78 • Issue 8 • Wednesday, February 20, 2013

75¢

Living his dream Pageant rescheduled Tyler Brown, rodeo clown Due to inclement weather on Feb. 20, the Miss South Point Pageant has been rescheduled for Saturday, Feb. 23 at 7pm.

Pope’s resignation understood By Alan Hodge Editor Alan.bannernews@gmail.com

Starting with the construction in 1843 of St. Joseph’s church near Mount Holly, and continuing through the decades with the founding of Belmont Abbey and Queen of Apostle’s church, the Roman Catholic tradition is deeply rooted in our area so it was no surprise that last week’s announcement by Pope Benedict XVI that he was stepping down generated quite a buzz among members of that denomination. Benedict cited health as his main reason for stepping aside effective Feb. 28. The 85-year-old pontiff had been showing signs of slowing down in recent months. At his final public Mass, he thanked those who had been praying for him. “Physically, these days haven’t been easy for me,” he was reported to have said. Benedict’s resignation will be the first time in 600 years that a pope has done so. “I did this in full liberty for the good of the church,” he said. Belmont Abbey Abbot Placid Solari praised the courage of Benedict. “I think he is acknowledging that his age and health won’t allow him to live up to his responsibilities of serving others,” he said. “His whole life has been about service and he has the character to realize it is not just all about him. “It takes character to step aside and let someone else step in.” Belmont City Council member Charlie Martin is a member of Queen of Apostles and active in a variety of causes at Belmont Abbey. He also thinks the Pope exhibited character in his decision to retire. “He is a very holy man and we will miss him very much,” Martin said. “But I think he decided to resign due to being unable physically to perform to his own expectations. I saw his final mass and he looked very feeble. However the good thing is he will go back to being a cardinal.” Belmont Abbey College assistant professor of theology Dr. Ronald Thomas sees Benedict as a pivotal person in the history of the Catholic Church. “He has done so much to raise the level of theological discourse as well as raise the liturgical and ecumenical standards,” Thomas said. Thomas also thinks the decision to step down has been carefully thought out and the transition to a new leader will be a smooth one. “I think he acknowledges that the church now is truly dynamic and global and more work than it has ever been,” he said. “He has poured himself out to it and now has little left to pour.” The conclave that will select the next pope is made up of 117 cardinals under the age of 80. Benedict will not be on it. According to the Vatican, come March 1, he will be retired and living in a converted monastery on the edge of the Vatican gardens. Benedict’s last general audience is set for Feb. 27 and the event is expected to draw huge crowds.

By Alan Hodge Editor Alan.bannernews@gmail.com

Most 18-year-olds haven’t decided what their career path will be, but recent East Gaston High graduate Tyler Brown knew what his calling would be the first time he got in a rodeo arena with nothing between himself and a 1,500 pound bull but a plastic barrel and a clown suit. “When I was in fifth grade at Gaston Christian School I did a project and dressed like a rodeo clown,” Brown said. “It kinda went from there.” Brown says the job of a rodeo clown is two-fold. One is to protect the rider when he “gets off” the bull and the other is to provide entertainment to the crowd between competition segments. One photo he has on his laptop shows a large plastic barrel being tossed several feet into the air by an angry bull- and Brown was inside. “It gets scary at times,” he said. “But when a rider is on the ground you have to stay focused and distract the bull. The adrenaline gets flowing and God gives me the strength to do what I need to do.” No matter if they are in the circus or the rodeo ring, every clown has his or her own costume style and Brown is no exception. His outfit is

Photo by Alan Hodge

Robert Jackson has been a volunteer at Community Fire Dept. for 51 years. He was given the Order of the Long Leaf Pine last year for his service. He’s seen holding the certificate that is North Carolina’s highest civilian honor.

Contributed Photo

Eighteen-year-old Tyler Brown of Belmont is pursuing a career as a rodeo announcer and clown. In this photo he and one of his dogs are behind a barrel that’s used to distract a charging bull. a mix of Wrangler clothes and Goodwill shopping and consists of ultrabaggy jeans, a red, white, and blue fringed shirt, cowboy hat, and makeup. Footwear is cleats or tennis See BROWN, 4A

Jackson honored with Long Leaf Pine award By Alan Hodge Editor Alan.bannernews@gmail.com

When 74-year-old Robert Jackson first started volunteering at Community Volunteer Fire Dept. 32 in North Belmont, the guys were stationed in a little shed and had no formal training to speak

of. That was 51 years ago and over those decades Jackson has seen a lot of change and growth leading up to the high-tech and high-class station Community Fire currently operates out of on Perfection Ave. A native of Mount Holly, See JACKSON, 4A

Elizondo joins Belmont police force By Alan Hodge Editor Alan.bannernews@gmail.com

What do you get when you combine Hollywood good looks, a lifelong desire to serve in law enforcement, and a willingness to help others? Answer- Belmont’s newest police officer, 21-yearold Michael Elizondo. A native of New Jersey, Elizondo moved to Asheville with his parents when he was a teenager. After graduating high school, he attended Blue Ridge Community College where he earned his Basic Law Enforcement degree. From

that point, last September he began a serious search for a police job that saw him crisscross North Carolina. “A friend of mine and I took several days and went from town to town stopping at police and sheriff’s department offices and filling out applications,” he said. Just a few of the spots the pair approached included Polk County, Transylvania County, Forest City, High Point, Hendersonville, Greensboro, and Belmont. “We would fill out an application and move on to the next location,” Elizondo said. “By the third day we stopped at the house of my

friend’s girlfriend and went hunting.” Soon, in October, Elizondo got a call from Belmont PD. “I went back and forth between Belmont and Asheville several times during the interview process,” he said. “I took the job and my first day was December 17, 2012.” Elizondo says becoming a police officer lets him do something he really enjoys- helping others. “Even if I can’t completely solve their problems at least I can try,” he said. “I’ve always wanted See ELIZONDO, 4A

Photo by Alan Hodge

Michael Elizondo is Belmont’s newest police officer. Elizondo says he has always dreamed of a job helping people and is glad to be at his post.

Beauty and tranquility of garden brings community together Photo by Alan Hodge

Melvin Graham is seen standing on the bridge in his memory garden on Sandy Ford Road in Mount Holly. Graham and friends built the garden as a place of reflection and peace for everyone to enjoy.

By Alan Hodge Editor Alan.bannernews@gmail.com

There’s an oasis of tranquility, memory, and racial harmony on Sandy Ford Rd. near Mount

OBITUARIES, 2A Marcia Baldwin, Cherryville Angela Barker, Mount Holly Velia Carlisle, Gastonia Thelma Franklin, Gastonia Mildred Hall, Belmont Mary McGinnis, Stanley

Holly and it’s the labor of love by retired Freightliner employee Melvin Graham- and more of his friends than he can name. Graham’s memorial garden is just off the busy intersection of Sandy Ford Rd. and NC 273 behind historic St. Joseph’s Catholic

Church. He says he got the idea for creating it after seeing his son get involved in drugs, then pull his life together again. A marble plaque near an arched bridge and babbling brook on the property reads, “Trail to Recovery”. “The garden is in memory to not just him, but all those in recovery from drugs, alcohol, or whatever,” Graham said. “My son has been clean for nine years now and I am so proud of him.” Other plaques in the garden pay homage to members of Graham’s family. One recognizes those who served in the military going back to World War II. Another lists his parents, grandparents, and uncles on a slab of black granite encased in a stone monument. But Graham’s memory garden is also a place of whimsy. A little grist mill with a waterwheel and rocking chairs on its porch, two See GARDEN, 3A

INDEX Belmont Police Log ................................................................2A Belmont Fire Dept...................................................................3A Classifieds..............................................................................5A Gaston Day Homecoming Court.............................................6A Sports ....................................................................................6A


Page 2A

The Banner News

■OBITUARIES Angela Baker MOUNT HOLLY – Angela Leigh Baker, 37, of 227 Woodlawn Avenue, died on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013. She was t h e daughter of Judy Terry Joye of Mount Holly and the late Thomas Woodrow Baker. She was a member of the Mount Holly Church of God. In addition to her mother, she is survived by an infant daughter Ashlee Caroleann Jeanne Word; one son Trevor Daniel Davis of Mount Holly; fiancÊ Donald R. Word Jr. of Mount Holly; three sisters Cindy Houston and husband Chad of Mount Holly, Candie Elmore and husband Doc of Franklin,

Mildred Hall BELMONTMildred Louise Smith Hall began a new journey on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013. She is on her way to be reunited with cherished loved ones who preceded her in death. At the time of her death, s h e resided at Peak Resource in Gastonia, NC. Mildred was born Oct. 1926 and grew up in and around the Belmont, NC area. She graduated from Belmont High School in 1943. On Feb. 14, 1946 she married Robert S. Hall and shortly after started a family whom she dearly loved with all her heart. She cared very deeply for all relatives in the Hall, Smith, and Perry families. Her children sincerely appreciate all the calls, visits, and just being there if she needed you. She was preceded in death by her husband Robert, parents Raymond and Ruby, sister Dorothy

Velia Carlisle GASTONIA– Velia Mae Carlisle, 71, passed away Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013 at Gaston Memorial Hospital. She was born Sept. 18, 1941 in Cleveland County,

NC, and Meredith Franklin and husband Tony of Bessemer City; a number of aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews; special friends Kimmy Locklear and Christy Kelly. A service to celebrate Angela’s life was held at 4pm Sunday, Feb. 17, 2013 at the Mount Holly Church of God with Reverend Dennis Bean and Reverend Paul Collins officiating. Interment followed at Pineview Cemetery. The family received friends from 2-4pm Sunday at the church and at other times at the home of her mother, 224 Adrian Street, Mount Holly. Memorials may be made to the Mount Holly Church of God, 208 Rankin Avenue, Mount Holly NC 28120. Woodlawn Funeral Home in Mount Holly is serving the family.

Gibson, brothers Kenneth and Raymond, three great grandchildren and 2 son in laws. She is survived by her children Judy and husband Randy, David and wife Sheila, Kathy and husband Calvin and Rob and wife Kim. She also leaves behind seven grandchildren Dawn, Darin, Denise, Stacy, Scott, Hillary and Bobby; 23 great grandchildren and one great great grandchild. All were very precious to her. A service to celebrate her life was held at 3pm Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013 at Woodlawn Funeral Home in Mount Holly, NC. The service was conducted by her grandson Pastor Bobby Owensby. The family received all family and friends one hour prior to the service at the funeral home. Burial followed at Pineview Cemetery in Mount Holly. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to a charity of your choosing. Woodlawn Funeral Home in Mount Holly is serving the family.

NC, to the late William and Lula Mae Farmer Browning. Funeral Service was Friday Feb. 15, at 3pm at Withers & Whisenant Funeral Home. Visitation was 79pm Thursday Feb. 14. Burial was at Greenwood Cemetery Belmont.

■BELMONT Mary McGinnis STANLEY – After a long illness, Mary Randolph McGinnis, age 78, went home to be with the Lord on Saturday Feb. 16th in Stanley, NC. During her decadelong struggle with Frontotemporal Degeneration, Mary displayed courage and dignity, showing until the end her love and appreciation to her husband of 59 years, J i m McGinnis. His devotion and constant care provided a role model to her beloved children and grandchildren. She was born in Gaston County, daughter of the late Cole B. and Erma Gaddy Randolph. She was preceded in death by a brother, Roland Randolph; and a sister Jean Sperling. She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Stanley and retired from McLurdDellinger Insurance Company after over 24 years. In addition to her husband, she is survived by three daughters, Janet Buff and husband Dr. Joe Buff of New Bern, NC, Jane Bumgarner and husband Dale of Stanley, and Lori McGinnis of Belmont; four grandchildren, Joseph Buff and wife Amber of Raleigh, David Buff and wife Mallory of Essex, MA, Jarrett Bumgarner, and Anna Bumgarner both of Stanley; sisters and brothers, Melvene Dowell of

Charlotte, Evelyn Mock and husband Don of Belmont, Rhonda Dellinger and husband Dennis of Stanley, Steve Randolph and wife Joan of Gastonia, Reverend Dr. Richard Randolph and wife Wanda of Myrtle Beach, SC; sister-in-law, Patsy Randolph of Gastonia; brother-in-law, James Sperling of Mooresboro, NC. Mary remembered and adored until the end all of her brothers and sisters. She is also survived by many beloved nieces and nephews. The family wishes to thank Mary’s very special friend, Linda Hendrix, of Cramerton and her many loving caregivers over the years, they were all a blessing and comfort. A service to celebrate the life of Mrs. McGinnis, was held at 2p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, at the First Baptist Church, Stanley with Reverend Dr. Richard Randolph and Reverend Dr. Tony Fulbright officiating. Burial followed at Hillcrest Gardens Cemetery. The family will received friends from noon until 2 p.m. Tuesday at the church and at other times at the home of Jane and Dale Bumgarner, 405 West Plum Street, Stanley, NC 28164. Memorials may be made to “Together We Build� Fund; c/o First Baptist Church, 409 Old Mount Holly Road, Stanley, NC 28164. Woodlawn Funeral Home, Mount Holly is serving the family.

Marcia Baldwin

Thelma Franklin

CHERRYVILLE – Marcia Scruggs Baldwin, 75 of 3707 Eaker Road, went home to be with the Lord Feb. 12, 2013 at Cleveland Regional Memorial Hospital. She was a native of Gaston County, NC born March 15, 1937 to the late Paul and Beatrice Parker Scruggs. A celebration of life service was at 11am on Friday, Feb. 15th at Withers & Whisenant Funeral Home with Pastor Dale Lawing officiating. Interment will be private at a later date at Westview Gardens Cemetery.

GASTONIA – Thelma Lee Franklin, 64 of 1611 Warren Circle passed away Feb.16, 2013 at her residence. She was a native of Gastonia, NC, born March 8, 1948 to the late William Fred and Mattie Paysour White. Funeral service was 3:30 pm Tuesday, Feb. 19, at Withers & Whisenant Funeral Home with Rev. Bo Osborne officiating. The family received friends Monday Feb. 18, from 7– 9pm at the funeral home. Interment was at Gaston Memorial Park.

               

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Feb. 11: Jackie Renee Gillelan, simple physical assault, arrested by Officer M. Elizondo, 117 Ninth St. Feb. 11: Nicholas Neil Lavecchia, larceny shoplifting, simple possession Sch. IV, arrested by Officer M. Kelske, 701 Hawley Ave. Wal-Mart. Feb. 12: Derrick Andre Bowens, communicate threat, arrested by Officer F. Bollinger, Sacco St. and Elm St, Feb. 13: Kristen Vick ONeal, larceny, arrested by

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Officer M. Kaiman, 701 Hawley Ave. Feb. 16: James Christopher Millard II, driving while license revoked, arrested by Officer M. Hall, Forest Hill Rd. Feb. 16: Courtney Dawne Reitler, drug violations, equipment paraphernalia, possessing concealing Sch. II, arrested by Officer K. Wingate K-9, 682 Park St. Feb. 16: Jessica Nicole Payseur, assault inflict serious injury, arrested by Officer M. Hall, 701 Secrest St.

■BRIEFS MEN WHO COOK – an annual fund-raising activity sponsored by the Mt. Holly Rotary Club provides scholarship funds for graduates of East Gaston High School. This event brings together over 50 of Mt. Holly and Gaston County’s finest male chefs. The 17th Annual event is scheduled for Sunday, February 24 starting at 12:15pm at East Gaston. “This is one of my favorite events that we do,� said Men Who Cook chair Joe Black. “We are out in the public serving food to the people that help our community in more ways than one. And at the same time we are raising money for students that need it to further their education.� The event will feature about 40 different types of food to choose from. “It is all you can eat,� said Black. There’s still room for cooks. Interested parties should contact Black at 704-460-0896 or 704-827-8331 or stop by Robert Black Insurance, 108 W. Catawba Ave., Mount Holly as soon as possible. Cooks will be responsible for: preparing a dish of their choice and bringing that dish to East Gaston High School by noon on February 24; bringing a warming tray, sterno, etc. for those dishes that need to stay hot- a warming oven will also be available at the site; bringing serving utensils needed to serve your dish; serving portions of your dish to individuals who have purchased tickets to the event at they come through the serving line; encouraging friends and family to buy tickets and support this effort. Tickets are: adults $10 and kids $5. All of the proceeds go to the annual Rotary Scholarship that helps two to three East Gaston graduating seniors afford college. Mount Holly Rotary typically gives out $10,000 to $12,000 in scholarships to EG seniors annually. All Rotarians have tickets and if you don’t know any, you can see Joe Black or Bobby Black at Robert Black Insurance. (704) 827-8331. PASTA FOR PENNIES – Hawks Nest Intermediate School Pasta for Pennies fundraiser is underway. The school goal is to raise at least $1,000.00 to fight leukemia. The students are very excited about this fundraiser and are eager to not only meet this goal but to double it. Each of the students has a collection box that they take home to collect spare change and money. Each day they bring their box in and deposit their money in their classroom box. The school collects the classroom money daily and keeps track of the totals. The classes are competing against each other to win the pasta party from Olive Garden. Parents can use their debit card to donate online and credit the donation to their child’s class. Just follow the link below, click on donate now, then click on NC and scroll down to find Gaston County SchoolsHawks Nest Intermediate. You will enter in your information, donation amount and the student/teacher name at the end of page: www.schoolandyouth.org. GCS ROBOGASTON COMPETITION – Gaston County Schools will host the countywide RoboGaston competition on March 2, at East Gaston High School. The event will include Robotics teams from all GCS middle and elementary schools. The teams will be judged on robotic programming, teamwork and presentation skills.

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The Banner News

Page 3A

Contributed Photo

The Belmont Fire Department responded to over 500 calls for service during 2012 and saved property owners hundreds of thousands of dollars in potential damage by quick response to fires.

Belmont Fire Department focuses on being proactive By Alan Hodge Editor Alan.bannernews@gmail.com

The Belmont Fire Department has released its 2012 administrative report and the facts and figures it contains reveals everything from how many conflagrations firefighters responded to, to the number of training hours they were given over the course of the year. Fire Chief George Altice praised his staff. “Belmont firefighters continue to exhibit the highest standards of performance and professionalism possible,� Altice said. “I would not have it any other way.� During 2012, the Belmont Fire Department responded to 527 incidents ranging from chimney fires to a water rescue. The largest number of responses, 205, involved rescue and emer-

gency medical service incidents. False alarms and false calls resulted in 79 incidents, followed by 63 service calls. Good intent calls amount to 50 incidents, followed by 28 fires and a like number of hazardous conditions. During 2011, the Belmont Fire Department reported 616 incident responses. Belmont firefighters responded to ten building and vehicle fires in 2012 with a total property loss of $54,202. This compares to $2.5 million value of the property involved in the fires, meaning that quick response of Belmont Fire Department resulted in a 98 percent property saved rate. In addition to statistics, the 2012 report also outlined Belmont Fire Department strategic objectives. One of the top priorities in this regard is the safety of staff

members. Goals that Altice has set in this regard includes regularly scheduled meetings with the Accident Review Committee, physical fitness and wellness training, and monthly meetings with staff on structured safety topics. The report also addresses Belmont Fire Department finances and lays out ways to make the best use of funding. Ideas include applying for state and federal grants, planning expenditures to keep pace with but not exceed growth, and frequent budget reviews. The target is to acquire $1 million in grants over a ten-year period. Staffing, paid and volunteer, got a close look in the report. This included not only the number of folks available for duty, but their training as well. “We want to provide the

GARDEN: brings community together From page 1A life-size figurines of kids fishing, horse hitching posts, and a fountain filled with beautiful stones and ceramic frogs add to the overall effect of happiness and peace. “Sometimes I sit out here on one of the rocking chairs after the traffic has died down and just listen to the real frogs sing,� Graham said. The garden also has a large picnic shelter. Last September, Graham held his second annual Family and Friends Day. The event saw over 200 folks show up for some good old timey fun and food. “I told them don’t bring nothin’ but your appetite,� Graham said. “Black, white, it don’t matter, everyone was welcome.� Graham says he’s shooting for the second Saturday in September this year for the

event’s third anniversary bash. Come spring, Graham will plant dozens of flowers to add color to the garden. Building the memory garden was a lot of work and involved stone masonry as well as carpentry skills. Graham learned to lay rocks and saw boards, but says he could not have done it alone. “I had so many people help that I can’t remember all their names,� he said. As Graham was being interviewed at the site for this story, one of those volunteers, Perry Rozzelle, just happened to walk by and stopped to talk. Rozzelle helped build the picnic shelter and little cabin. “The garden is an eye opener,� he said. “People are always stopping to see it. It’s a great thing for the community.� Graham and his garden

are known far and wide. It’s open to anyone that wants to pull in. Just about every driver going down Sandy Ford Road blows their horn and waves in greeting when they see Graham tending it. Getting all the building materials to make the garden a reality took a considerable amount of money from Graham’s pocket, but he also had help in that regard too. “People from all over donated everything from lumber to rocks,� he said. “They were so generous and giving. I want to thank every one of them.� Even though the memory garden bears Graham’s family name, and is on his property, his philosophy regarding it reflects something that there needs to be more of these days. “I say this ain’t my garden,� he said. “I say this is our garden.�

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citizens of Belmont and commuting traffic through Belmont with a highly trained fire/rescue service which is capable of responding to uncontrolled emergency environments and promptly initiate procedures to eliminate the uncontrolled hazard,� said Altice. Being proactive regarding fire and other forms of safety is something that the Belmont Fire Department has always done and the report provided updated infor-

mation on that subject. One of the key elements in the report addresses child car seat safety and revealed that over 95 percent of them are installed incorrectly. Another program the report outlined relates to smoke detectors and steps the Belmont Fire Department takes to make sure homes have them. “On all routine and emergency responses the fire department personnel check to ensure that residents are pro-

tected by a working smoke detector,� said Altice. Lastly, the report chronicled the number of fire prevention code enforcement building inspections the fire department did during 2012 and the tally was well over 200. “Inspections give the citizens of Belmont and those who are employed here a fire safe environment to work, shop and live in,� said Altice.

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Page 4A

The Banner News

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

JACKSON: honored with Long Leaf Pine award From page 1A Jackson grew up on a farm and then went to work in textiles. One fateful day a guy from Community Fire asked if he would be interested in helping people by joining the volunteers. Jackson jumped at the chance. “Things were different back then,” he said. “We didn’t have but two air packs and two trucks. The original truck was an old International with a 1,000 gallon tank and cotton-jacketed firehose. The night I joined we took delivery on a1962 LaFrance truck. Protective clothing was made of cotton duck, now they have space-age material.” Jackson recalled how the firefighters learned on the job. “We pretty much taught ourselves about firefighting,” Jackson said. “One time a year we went to a state school. That was long before the training facility

we have now at Gaston College.” Firefighting a half-century ago was dangerous too. “We had some close calls due to lack of knowledge,” Jackson said. “The old Boulevard Grocery caught on fire and none of us knew about what would happen if a fire was starved for oxygen. I opened the door and air hit the superheated gas and blew me backwards on my head.” From those humble beginnings, Community Fire has grown in size and scope, with Jackson there every step of the way. Now the station not only has a fleet of modern trucks, it has plenty of safety equipment, up-todate communications, and ample training for volunteers. “We are as good as any fire department anywhere,” Jackson said. Jackson’s stature with the department has grown as well. He served for a total of fire years as chief. Now, he’s

cut back a little but still helps with upkeep on the equipment and filing reports with the fire marshal. “It depends on how I feel,” he said of the extent of his activities. He also started a family tradition at Community Fire. His sons Thomas and Gary, as well as grandson Jason are all volunteers there. He hopes his great-grandson Hunter will join when he’s old enough. “The fire department has given them all good guidance,” Jackson said of his offspring. Jackson is beloved by his men. Marcus Brendle has been a volunteer at Community Fire for over nine years. “Everyone calls him ‘Pop’,” Brendle said of Jackson. “He is a mentor to not only the young guys but to the ones that have been volunteers for years. He is a super-guy and would do anything to help somebody else. He comes in just about every day and even though the

The Jackson family has a long tradition of service at Community Fire Department. Seen with Robert Jackson are from left, his grandson Jason and sons Tommy and Gary. state says he’s too old to fight fires, he does his part to keep the station running smoothly.” Folks far beyond North Belmont know about Jackson’s work with Community Fire. Last year he was given the Order of the Long Leaf Pine, North Carolina’s highest civilian honor. The cer-

tificate, signed by then-governor Bev Perdue was given to Jackson at a dinner at Cramer Mountain Country Club. “I was speechless,” he said. “I never expected such a thing.” Community Fire also dedicated a new tanker truck to Jackson.

Overall, Jackson is glad when he recalls the day he held up his hand to join Community Fire and recommends others do the same. “It’s a good thing to be involved and help the public by protecting their lives and property,” he said. “It is demanding, but very rewarding.”

BROWN: realizes dream of being rodeo clown From page 1A shoes. “Cowboy boots aren’t very good for running around in the arena with a bull,” he said. When he’s not battling an angry bovine, Brown’s act includes an exploding piano routine. He also has two dogs, an Australian shepherd named Jess and a border collie that goes by Bell. The canines do tricks like jumping through a hoop or climbing a ladder. “I wouldn’t trade anything for them,” Brown said. “If it wasn’t for them, I might have been run over by a bull.” More recently, Brown has

branched out in the rodeo world as an announcer. One of the venues he hones his skills at is the Gateway Cowboy Church in Stanley where religion and barrel horse racing make an interesting blend. Last year, he was given a special belt buckle award as Winter Series Announcer of the Year. Brown’s rodeo work carries him far and wide. He’s been as far west as Oklahoma and as far north as Lexington, Virginia and as far south as Florida. “I drive tens of thousands of mile every year,” he said. “I go wherever I can get work.” Brown is also a member of several professional

groups. These include the Southern Extreme Bull Riders Association, the International Professional Rodeo Association, and the American Bull Riders Tour. Brown’s younger brother, six-year-old Gage, also seems to be interested in following in his older sibling’s footsteps. He’s starting out by learning to ride sheep. Overall, Brown seems to have found his niche in the world of bucking broncos and bulls. “Would I consider the rodeo as a permanent career?” he said. “I would say it already is. I’m not making a killing, but it’s paying my bills and I love what I do.”

ELIZONDO: joins Belmont PD From page 1A to help people.” Even though he became a policeman, that goal of doing good deeds for other folks was evident in his second choice for a careerbeing a firefighter. Currently, Elizondo is in the on the job training phase of his law enforcement career. On the beat, he’s often accompanied by veteran officer Cpl. Edward Mason. “Elizondo is a people person with a great attitude and whose jovial and outgoing nature will be a great asset on the job,” Mason

said. “Police departments everywhere need more officers like him, not those with a sour face.” Mason also praised Elizondo’s quick pace at learning job-related technology. “He’s one of the younger generation and picked up on the communications and computer right away,” he said. Even though he’s just started, Elizondo can see a future in Belmont. “It’s a great town,” he said. “I followed my dream and even if I had to go across the state looking for it, I think it’s here.”

Contributed Photo

Community Relief Organization representative Bob Blankenship is seen receiving a grant of $3500 from Food Lion Charitable Foundation. Presenting the award is Fred Peace, manager of the Mount Holly Food Lion store.

CRO receives $3,500 donation from Food Lion Community Relief Organization of Mount Holly has received $3,500 from the Food Lion Charitable Foundation to help local residents, as the cold winter months continue. The CRO will use the gift to provide food assistance to families in Mt. Holly. “The CRO deeply appreciates the Food Lion Charitable Foundation for this generous gift. It will enable the CRO to maintain the pantry at adequate levels, in order to meet the high demand that we experience during the winter months. In addition to this help from the Food Lion Charitable Foundation, the CRO also receives daily donations of food from the local Mt. Holly store, which sponsors the sale and donation of the “Hunger Has A Cure” boxes. We look forward to continuing our relationship with Food Lion at all levels, without which we would be hard pressed to serve the needs of our clients,” said Alice Bayne, Executive Director. The CRO was founded in 1956 by the minis-

terial association of Mt. Holly, which recognized the need for an organized mission to feed people in Mt. Holly, who were experiencing difficulty maintaining adequate nutrition for their families. Since that time, the nonprofit has worked tirelessly to meet the needs of the community. As a United Way partner, as well as a recipient of FEMA and Duke Energy funds, the CRO provides assistance on a limited basis, to help with electricity and natural gas bills, in an effort to avoid termination of services. The organization also maintains a free clothing closet. However, hunger relief is the number one goal, with the distribution of approximately 10,000 pounds of food per month. Established in 2001, the Food Lion Charitable Foundation provides financial support for programs and organizations dedicated to feeding the hungry in the communities it serves. Since its inception, the foundation has awarded more than $9 million in grants.

Fellowship & Faith

Church Service Directory BELMONT Alexander Memorial Baptist Church 208 South Main Street 704-825-3216 Brotherhood/Sisterhood Wncc. 120 Park Street 704-825-1333 Catawba Heights Baptist Church 311 Belmont Avenue 704-827-8474 Catawba Heights Wesleyan Church 101 Beaty Rd., Belmont 704-827-8381 Centerview Baptist Church 2300 Acme Road 704-827-2061 East Belmont Baptist Church 501 Catawba Street 704-825-5780 East Belmont Church Of God 320 E. Catawba Street 704- 825-8845 East Belmont Free Will Baptist 909 Edgemont Ave 704-825-5346 East Belmont Presbyterian Church 901 Catawba Street 704-825-8822 Ebenezer United Methodist Church 120 Belmont-Mt. Holly Road 704-827-3366 First Baptist Church 23 N. Central Avenue 704-825-3758 First Foursquare Gospel Church 8 Elizabeth Street 704-825-5811 First Presbyterian Church 102 S. Central Ave 704-825-3357 First Presbyterian-Belmont 112 S. Central Ave 704-829-0668

First United Methodist Church of Belmont 807 South Point Road 704-825-2106 Forest Pointe Church Meets at Stowe Family YMCA Bldg. 704-825-1709 Fresh Anointing Church of God 71 McAdenville Road 704-825-7283 Friendship Baptist Church 5008 S. New Hope Rd 704-825-3276 Full Gospel Church 106 School St 704-827-9621 Gaston Christian Church 5339 S. New Hope Rd 704-825-8252 Goshen Presbyterian Church Roper Street 704-827-6280 Grace Korean Chr. Assembly-God 124 Georgia Belle Ave 704-829-1091 Grace Wesleyan Church 6014 S. New Hope Rd 704-825-7959 Henry’s Chapel Ame Zion Church 151 Henry Chapel Rd 704-825-0711 Holy Comforter Lutheran Church 216 N. Main St. 704-825-2483 Hood Memorial Ame Zion Church 455 Sacco St. 704-825-6007 Loves Chapel Presbyterian Church 204 Lincoln St. 704-825-8342 Message of Love Church 306 Pearl Beaty Dr. 704-827-6500

Mount Moriah Baptist Church 110 Lincoln St. 704-825-2046 Mount Pleasant Missionary Baptist 212 South Street 704-825-7269 New Hope Presbyterian Church 4357 S. New Hope Rd., Gastonia 704-824-1697 New Life Baptist Church 201 Oak Trail 704-822-6195 New Mills Chapel Fire Baptised 104 Morning Glory Ave. 704-825-5457 North Belmont Church of God 2316 Acme Rd. 704-827-4092 O’Conner Grove Church Ame Zion 613 N. Main Street 704-825-5576 Park Street United Methodist 120 Park Street 704-825-8480 Power of the Spirit Church 118 School Street 704-827-7071

Featured Church of the Week Alexander Memorial Baptist Church Queen Of The Apostles Catholic Church 503 N. Main Street 704-825-9600 South Point Baptist Church 124 Horsley Ave. 704-825-9516 South Point Freewill Baptist 297 Gaither Rd. 704-825-8045 South Point United Methodist 510 Southpoint Church Rd. 704-825-4019 Springwood Freewill Baptist 220 Park Terrace Dr. 704-827-7801

Notice In order to accommodate the number of churches in our communities, we will print two alternating lists of churches each week. If you don’t see the church you’re looking for, be sure to check next weeks paper.

St. Marks United Methodist Church 701 Secrest Ave. 704-825-8175 Stowe Memorial Baptist Church 26 Kee Rd. 704-825-5987 Unity Baptist Church 1005 Catawba St. 704-825-8730 Upper Room United Pentecostal 1405 Armstrong Ford Rd. 704-825-0604 Will of God Church 513 Woodlawn Ave. 704-827-5185


Wednesday, February 20, 2013

The Banner News

Page 5A

Classified Ads Legals

Homes For Rent/Sale

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GASTON NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND DEBTORS The undersigned, having qualified as Executor of the Estate of ERNEST STOWE, JR, late of Gaston County, North Carolina, hereby notifies to all persons, firms and corporations having claims against said Estate to present them to the undersigned on or before May 7, 2013, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to the said Estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This 6th day of February, 2013. Ernest Renard Stowe Estate of: Ernest Stowe, Jr. 419 Creston St., Charlotte, NC 28214 BN10528 (2/06,13, 20 & 27/13)

FOR RENT. – NICE 2 BR/1 BA HOUSE . Nice area of KM, large rooms, re-

finished hdwds, Central H & A, 2 screen porches, blinds, ceiling fans. Appliances furnished. 1 yr.

lease required. Call: 704-7391569. (2/13 &20) MOBILE HOMES AND APARTMENTS FOR

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

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GASTON NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND DEBTORS The undersigned, having qualified as Executrix of the Estate of RANDY EARL PRICE, late of Gaston County, North Carolina, hereby notifies to all persons, firms and corporations having claims against said Estate to present them to the undersigned on or before April 30, 2013, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to the said Estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This 30th day of January, 2013. Marilyn Smith Price Estate of: Randy Earl Price 315 Ridge Drive, Mount Holly NC 28120 BN10526 (1/30, & 2/06, 2/13 & 2/20/13 )

RENT IN KINGS M O U N TA I N Prices starting at $100/week. Call 704-739-4417 or (evening) 704739-1425. (tfn) KM MOBILE HOME for RENT on Linwood Rd â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rec e n t l y remodeled throughout. Very nice & clean. 2 BR & 2 BA. References required and background check. $425/mth + Deposit. 704739-5319 or 704685-2562. (tfn)

(2/20,27& 3/06) PRICES REDUCED! Lots in Gaston, Cleveland and Cherokee Co. some with water & septic, owner financing with low DP. Call Bryant Realty 704-567-9836 or www.bryantrealty.org. (2/20)

Land For Sale

Public Auction

B E AU T I F U L WOODED PARCEL OF LAND FOR SALE at 217 Cameron Drive in Kings Mountain. This is one acre lot in Country Creek with city utilities available. Priced under tax value at $21,000.00. Call: 704-739-2965.

AUCTION -February 21, 2013 at 10:00 A. M. Units 122, 207, 220. Bluejay Self Storage, 2006 Shelby Road, Kings Mountain, N. C. 28086. (2/13 & 2/20)

Misc. For Sale Couch, cafĂŠ table and four chairs, chest of drawers for sale. Call (704) 419-3419. (tfn)

Wanted to Buy CASH

ON

SPOT! Will buy tools or building full of merchandise, or pictures, or anything of value. (704)300 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 0827 or (704)300 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7676. (2/20) Services WILL PROVIDE PRIVATE NURSING CARE for your senior loved one. Experienced in long-term care, licensed to medi c a t e . compassionate and dependable. Reasonable rates. 704-349-3993. (02/20) Yard Sale CHERRYVILLE INDOOR MOVING AND ESTATE SALE, 307 Bates Avenue, Saturday, Feb. 23rd. Everything must go.

THE

Would you like to give the gift of local news? Call Kathy today at 704-739-7496 and send the gift of the Banner News!

S E R V I C E

ASSISTED LIVING

AUTOMOTIVE

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;We buy salvage cars & trucksâ&#x20AC;?

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Belmont - 704.825.5301 www.mcleanfuneral.com

PETS Dog Boarding â&#x20AC;˘ Doggy Wash

Funeral Home 375 Woodlawn Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Mt. Holly

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Off Hwy. 216, between Kings Mtn. & Cherryville, next to Midway Lakes II

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ROOFING

Scrap Iron â&#x20AC;˘ Metals â&#x20AC;˘ Recycling â&#x20AC;˘ Aluminum Cans Appliances â&#x20AC;˘ Household Plastics Grades 1 & 2

CONTAINER SERVICE FOR INDUSTRIALS Tin â&#x20AC;˘ Coppers â&#x20AC;˘ Brasses â&#x20AC;˘ Radiators â&#x20AC;˘ Zinc â&#x20AC;˘ Cast Iron â&#x20AC;˘ Steel

734.1020 Doug & Kathy Toomey

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We Would Like to Earn Your Business EDDIE L. WEBB & NATHAN DAVIS 8AM-NOON â&#x20AC;˘ 1PM-5PM PH: 704-922-5211 â&#x20AC;˘ FA: 704-922-7151 1305 PHILADELPHIA CHURCH ROAD â&#x20AC;˘ DALLAS, NC

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Three Locations to Serve You! 915 N. New Hope Rd, Suite G, Gastonia (704) 671-2337 302 E. Dixon Blvd, Suite 1, Shelby (704) 406-9766 518 N. Generals Blvd, Suite B, Lincolnton (704) 735-5667 www.ultraforcestaffing.com

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Call us today to see how your business can be listed in our Service Directory! in Cleveland County call Rick â&#x20AC;˘ 704739-7496 in Gaston County call Pat â&#x20AC;˘ 704825-0580 or Steve 704750-1125

The Banner News, Cherryville Eagle and Kings Mountain Herald are not responsible for errors in an advertisement if not corrected by the first week after the ad appears.

D â&#x20AC;˘ I â&#x20AC;˘ R â&#x20AC;˘ E â&#x20AC;˘ C â&#x20AC;˘ T â&#x20AC;˘ O â&#x20AC;˘ R â&#x20AC;˘ Y


Page 6A

The Banner News

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

THE GASTON DAY SCHOOL HOMECOMING COURT included: freshmen Nana Boateng and Shanaya Andres; sophomores: Olivia (Livy) Polen and Gray Heath; juniors: Maddison (Maddy) Deely, Margaret (Maisy) Meakin, and Hannah Newcombe; seniors: Caroline Maier (Queen), Holland Haag, Rebecca (Josie) Barger, and Melissa O’Brien. Contributed Photo

Photo by Bill Ward Photo by Bill Ward

South Point High’s Deonte Gaston looks at the scoreboard during last week’s game against North Gaston. Deonte and his teammates knocked out a 59-50 victory in the contest.

South Point High basketball player Ashley Mull gets set for a free throw during last week’s game against Crest. The Lady Raiders came out on the short end of the contest by a score of 57-31 that saw Crest clinch the Big South 3A Conference title.

Photo by Bill Ward

East Gaston Warrior player Desean Murray passes the ball during last week’s season final game against West Mecklenburg. The Warriors fell just a little short by a score of 79-70.

Abbey wins Gardner receives Academic Excellence Award two in a row Brendan Rogers scored four goals to lead the Belmont Abbey men’s lacrosse team past the visiting Shorter Hawks 11-6 on Feb. 16 at Alumni Field. The win moves the Abbey’s record to 2-0, which marks the first time in the program’s history the Crusaders have won their first two games. The Crusaders outscored the Hawks 4-0 in the first as two of Rogers’s four goals came in the opening 15 minutes. Connor Sellars and Tanner Scharr contributed the other two scores. During the second period both teams scored three times as the Abbey took a 7-3 lead at the half. The third period saw the Crusaders surge, as Sellars and William Moore scored goals. Moore’s was his first career score as it moved the Abbey’s lead to 9-4 heading into the final segment. In the final period both teams scored twice, as Rogers and Sellars started and ended the scoring with two goals by Shorter as well. Sellars’s score came at the 5:51 mark and it closed the scoring. Belmont Abbey outshot Shorter 54-27, but the Hawks won 15 of 21 face-offs. The Crusaders were successful on two of their six extra man opportunities, while Shorter was one for two. Connor Doyle led the Abbey with three caused turnovers, while Scotty Steele and Josiah Nash had two each. Brett Lawless made eight saves in the cage.

South Point Red Raiders Player of the Week

Aubrey Gardner of Dallas, NC has been selected as Gaston College’s recipient to receive the 2013 North Carolina Community College System Academic Excellence Award. A representative from the State Board of Community Colleges will present her with this award at the Gaston College Awards Banquet in May. “This is such an honor. I am truly humbled that I was selected for this award. It was a special surprise in my life to be nominated let alone to win the award,” says Gardner. “I am a Senator for the Student Government Association and a Student Ambassador where I assist current and potential students, helping them to acclimate to college life. I have been involved in several “service” type projects including Habitat for Humanity and Opera-

Aubrey Gardner tion Christmas Child while serving as President of the Rotaract Club.” “I am thankful for the opportunity to give back to Gaston College and my community. I will be forever grateful to Gaston College for the opportunities that attending has allowed me to achieve and for the opportunities which are still coming my way,” says Gardner. Annually, each of the 58

East Gaston Warriors Player of the Week

Desean Murray Basketball

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leges within 8 states. Also, Aubrey holds a co-op position with the distance education division and has been assisting with the QEP Initiative by transcribing videos to meet Americans with Disabilities Act standards.” Tanisha Williams, coordinator of Student Activities and Special Projects and Gardner’s SGA advisor at the college says recently Aubrey was awarded the College Study Tour scholarship from the Student Government Association which allowed her to travel to Spain over the Thanksgiving break in November. “Aubrey is one of those students you wish you could clone,” says Williams. If she sees something needs to be done, she does it. She is an early bird, usually the first SGA senator to arrive ready to go to work. You can expect her to be there from the beginning to the completion of the project balancing her classes and volunteer activities in between. She is a leader.” Aubrey will graduate from Gaston College in May with a certificate in Web Technology and two Associate in Applied Science degrees in Information Systems Security and Networking Technology.

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NC community colleges is requested by the system’s office to select one recipient for this award. Division deans receive input from faculty and staff, and select one student to be nominated for the Academic Excellence Award. To be eligible for nomination, student recipients must be enrolled in a North Carolina Community College, completed at least 12 semester hours in an associate degree program and earn a cumulative grade point average of no less than 3.25. The recommended criteria for student selection is consistent with Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. Colleges may employ additional scholarship criteria beyond these minimum requirements that could include recognizing one-year diploma students. “Aubrey is an excellent student “says Michelle Byrd, Dean of Business and Information Technology Division. She is a very organized and high energy person who uses her initiative and excels at everything that she does.” “Over the past year, she has held a work study position in my division and assisted me with an accreditation conference that encompassed over 40 col-

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BN 022013  

Belmont / Mount Holly BannerNews 02-20-2013