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Issue 28 December 2016


CONTENTS Chairman’s Contemplations……………………………………………………….4 New Members…………………………………………………………………...….5 From the Archive………………………………………………………………...….6 Tinsley Clean Up……………………………………………………………………9 Canal Volunteers Helped by Python……………………………………………..10 CCT Santa Specials………………………………………………………………..12 Word Search………………………………………………...……………………...13 Clock Warehouse, Shardlow……………………………………………………...14

Keels and Cuckoos is published on behalf of the South Yorkshire and the Dukeries Branch of the Inland Waterways Association by M H Fielding, 1 Vicarage way, Arksey, Doncaster, DN5 0TG. Printed by Colour Image, Loudwater Views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of The Inland Waterways Association or of the South Yorkshire and the Dukeries Branch Committee

The Inland Waterways Association: Registered Office Island House, Moor Road, Chesham, HP5 1WA Website www.waterways.org.uk Email iwa@waterways.org.uk

Founded in 1946, incorporated in 1958 The Inland Waterways Association is a non-profit distribution company limited by guarantee (No.612245) Registered as a Charity (No.212342)

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CHAIRMAN’S CONTEMPLATIONS I have been wondering, “What does it actually cost the Nation to restore a canal?” I think that the answer is “Not as much as you think”. Let’s take a hypothetical waterway, the Sheffield and Chesterfield Canal, derelict for some fifty years. Estimated cost to restore £10m, well no hope then, in these “austere” times. However money supply is what the government makes it, so it is very easy, at the click of a mouse to “create” £10m, so let’s do that and hand it at once to the SCC Trust, which has a “shovel ready” restoration plan to hand. A contractor begins work on day one, recruiting unemployed but experienced staff that draw a salary, say an average of £40,000 per year. At the end of the year the work is done and the money spent, so some £5,000,000 in wages the rest in materials. Each employee pays an average of 20% income tax and 10% National Insurance so on completion £1,500,000 is immediately in the government’s pocket The employer adds a further 10% NI which is £500,000. For the employees, of their remaining take-home pay, half is spent on food, the rest on petrol, clothes, alcohol, entertainment and tobacco, (which on state benefits they were unable to afford) so another 20% through VAT is back in the government’s pocket, and that’s ££50’000. The other £5,000,000 is spent on materials, but every bag of cement, brick, spade, dumper is made by staff, all paying tax and NI and that money would not be going back to the state if the canal project were not under way. Vehicles used in construction pay tax on fuel burned and so on. I conclusion the Government gave £10,000,000 and received immediately £2,350,000 in extra direct tax on the construction team’s wages. However the staff were previously unemployed so are not now receiving any State benefit which given that 125 jobs have been created could a be a saving of as much as £2,500,000 in State benefits in the year. However restoration of this canal then prompts 30 people to commission a new de-luxe narrow boat at £100,000, plus VAT of £20,000 per boat that’s another £600,000 back to the government in addition to all the income tax NI contributions and VAT paid by the people that construct the boats So in my very simple illustration of the £10m to restore the canal, in the same year sees a measurable return in tax receipts of £%,450,000. Additional tax revenue comes from the employees of the materials supplying companies

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through NI, income tax and VAT, then there is the tax on corporate profits. Given the facilities at a university maths department it would be possible to trace back all tax revenue that the initial grant of £10m produced.

In the end the restoration has actually cost almost nothing, and will have generated a few ongoing, full-time jobs, mooring revenue, cruising licence revenue. In “ capital asset” terms there is a waterway, a green corridor, a cycle way, a footpath, an angling facility and a wild-life corridor and enhanced property values along the route, which again reflect in the stamp duty which surprisingly also goes to the Exchequer. Is it just me or does canal restoration make some sort of sense? You will be reading this towards the year end, so as we approach the 25th of December let’s all pause for a moment and consider just whose birthday we will be celebrating on that date and be glad.

A Happy Christmas and a joyful New Year to you all. David Dawson SY&D branch chairman November 11th 2016

NEW MEMBERS I would like to welcome the following new members to the branch. Mr P & Mrs HJ Hardy of Sheffield Mr P & Mrs E O’Neill of Sheffield Mr J & Mrs S Wigglesworth of Barnsley You are all most welcome JB Shaw Membership Secretary

The Branch AGM is due in May 2017 see the next issue for details . The copy date for the March 2017 issue of KEEL AND CUCKOOS will be Wednesday February 1st. Copy can be submitted by email or by standard post. Contact details are printed on the back page.

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FROM THE ARCHIVE Taken from material rescued from the old S&SYN offices in Sheffield Basin before the basin restoration. MANCHESTER, BOLTON & BURY CANAL March 18th 1949 by W H Pryce Subsidence

I gather that there has been subsidence in the past, particularly on the Bury length, but almost all the coal which can be got economically, the getting of which might affect this canal, has, I am told, has now been taken. Only the Ladyshore Colliery is still working on the Bury branch and remains both to provide a limited coal traffic between the colliery and three mills or factories on the branch, and also to cause subsidence locally on that branch. I gather that the continued working of this Colliery is a very questionable proposition. The cost of bringing the coal to the surface, I am told, is disproportionately high and but for the “political� reasons connected with the transfer of the Mining Community to other areas, this colliery would close down. Some of the coal which they wish to get was, I believe, formerly owned by the Canal, who bought it for support and you should, therefore, presumably be in a position to refuse permission for the coal to be got, unless adequate measures for the support of the Canal are made. It may be rather late in the day to take any action now, but I think this might be investigated more closely by your Mining Engineer in conjunction with the Divisional Waterways Officer (I do not think the Mining Engineer should report on this without the co-operation of the Divisional Waterways Officer, in view of the other questions attached to this). Sale of Sections of the Canal to the Bolton Corporation The fact that not only the length in and next to Bolton has been sold

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to the Bolton Corporation, but also the length from Ringley Locks to Clifton Aqueduct was also included in this extraordinary transfer, the whole of which cost the commission, I understand, the nett loss of £3,000—this fact together with the presumed short life of the Ladyshore Colliery puts out of court any suggestions I might have for reopening any part of the Canal north and west of Clifton Aqueduct; and the only question remains, how to get rid of the liabilities still remaining on that section, including Prestelee Locks, while maintaining a water supply for any remaining Canal kept open below Clifton Aqueduct. The length between Manchester and Clifton Aqueduct is of sufficient interest, I think, to call for further investigation and report before it is condemned and discarded. General Apart from any question of subsidence, past or future, the balance of advantages and disadvantages would appear to have so much in favour of the Canal that one is forced to the conclusion that apart from Coal traffic which has died a natural death by the working out of coal seams, other traffic has been deliberately thrown away in favour of rail. Here you have a Canal of good construction which should have been as easy and cheap as possible to maintain. The Canal flows through a heavily industrialised area, including two power stations ( at least one of which will be fed with coal by rail across the Canal). A large timber works, a cotton mill, China clay works(?), Magnesium works, Exide Batteries, etc. etc. alongside and sited on the Canal. All suggest possibility of traffic by water. Apparently adequate water for traffic, although further information required on this. ( Possibly this has been sold for other purposes at expense of traffic requirements).

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From first superficial survey, I feel compelled to suggest that no further closing should be made without full investigation of possibilities of reopening to traffic, south east of Clifton Aqueduct. Even the possibility of partially keeping open as terminal for through traffic to other Canals should be investigated. This ought to be of first interest to the Bridgewater if and when the Bridgewater is taken over by the Executive: although whilst this remains a private concern it is possibly of no interest. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I will have to further search through the material I have in my possession to ascertain if I have anymore to add to this report. M Fielding ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ A FEW MORE CLEVER WORDS JUST FOR FUN. DORMITORY when rearranged spells DIRT ROOM

PRESBYTERIAN when rearranged spells BEST IN PRAYER ASTRONOMER when rearranged spells MOON STARTER DESPERATION when rearranged spells A ROPE ENDS IT ANIMOSITY when rearranged spells IS NO AMITY SNOOZE ALARMS when rearranged spells ALAS! NO MORE Z’S A DECIMAL POINT when rearranged spells IM A DOT IN PLACE THE EARTHQUAKES when rearranged spells THAT QUEER SHAKE

ELEVEN PLUS TWO when rearranged spell TWELVE PLUS ONE And for the grand finale MOTHER-IN-LAW when rearranged spells WOMAN HILTER Yep! Someone has waaaaaay too much time on their hands ( probably a son-in –law).

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TINSLEY CANAL CLEAN UP It was that time of the year again, back went the clocks by an hour giving us more time in bed but looking forward to very short days, cold weather or snow and ice. But to start this off we had the biannual canal clean up to look forward to. Again we concentrated on the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal again ably assisted by the Abbeydale Rotary Club and some of our grandchildren. There was a smaller turn out this time but this is understandable at this time of the year. As usual two groups set out heading both up and down the canal. One group headed down the Tinsley Flight bagging as much as they could find and stacking it for collection by Adsetts Canal Group on the following Monday. The other group headed up the canal on board the narrow boat “Naburn�. With all litter collected being bagged and put on board the boat. We met several people out for a walk and telling the young ones that they were doing a great job. Needless to say they were delighted by this praise. It was time then to make our way back to Tinsley where pie and peas, provided by the branch was served . So ended another productive and enjoyable day. The next clean up at Tinsley will be held on April 30th 2017 so put this date in your 2017 diary.

Clean up on the Sheffield & Tinsley Canal Tinsley area

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CANAL VOUNTEERS HELPED BY PYTHON The Waterway Recovery Group (WRG) this year held their Bonfire bash on the Chesterfield and Cromford canals at the start of November. Over seventy volunteers came for this annual weekend. The WRGies, as they are known, give up their spare time to go on camps to help restore the nation’s canals. These camps are sometimes over weekends, but often last for one or two weeks. The Chesterfield Canal Trust has hosted very many WRGie camps in the last few years.

The Trust’s Publicity Officer, Rod Auton said: “ We are hugely grateful for the help received from Waterways Recovery Group on projects like the new Staveley Town Lock. It is incredible what a sudden influx of WRGies can do to add to the wonderful work done by our own volunteer Work Party. We have been very lucky that they have been able to come to us so often. The volunteers worked on four sites—Kiveton, Renishaw, and Lowgates on the Chesterfield Canal and Ironville on the Cromford Canal. The Chesterfield gangs were all involved in scrub bashing, i.e. cutting down trees, shrubs and undergrowth to expose the canal. The resulting logs soon disappeared to be used on local log burning stoves, often in return for a donation. The remaining scrub was burned,. These fires, plus the time of the year, lead to the title Bonfire Bash. At Renishaw and Lowgates, the volunteers were removing vegetation along the line of the unrestored canal. At Kiveton, where the canal is in water, they were cutting back trees and saplings that had grown up alongside. They needed a boat to help, so the Chesterfield Canal Trust volunteers brought in Python. Python was built in 1929 and served as a working boat for over seventy years, latterly for British waterways. The Chesterfield Canal Trust acquired it in 2009, when it had become surplus to requirements. It was used as a promotional boat at waterway rallies and carnivals until 2013, when it sprang a serious leak and major repairs were required to the hull. These were completed a year ago and the Trust’s volunteers are currently fitting out a new cabin. Python will continue to be a promotional boat for the Trust in the summer, but will help the Canal and River Trust with maintenance on the canal in the winter. The Trust was also delighted to receive a large donation from WRG North

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West , presented by John Foley. For further information, please go to the Chesterfield Canal Trust’s website– search for Chesterfield Canal.

Bonfire at Lowgates

Bonfire at Renishaw

Python helping out at Renishaw

Scrub bashing at Renishaw

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CHESTERFIELD CANAL TRUST

Santa special cruisers The Chesterfield Canal Trust will again this Christmas running their Santa Special Cruisers from several bases. All the cruiser cost £7.00 per person with a present for each child and a mince pie and a drink for every adult. From Chesterfield the John Varley will be running on Saturdays and Sundays from the 19th November until the 18th December plus 21st, 22nd, 23rd and 24th December . To book telephone 01629 533020. From Retford the Seth Ellis will run from 26th November until 18th December plus 21st, 22nd, 23rd and 24th December. To book telephone 07925 851569. From Worksop the Hugh Hensall will run on the 3rd and 4tgh December . To book telephone 0114 3600460. From Hollingwood Hub trip Boat Madeline will run 3rd to the 18th December plus 21st,22ndand 23rd December. To book telephone 01629 533020

From Shireoaks Hugh Hensall will run on 18th to 18th December plus 21st 22nd 23rd December. To book telephone 01143600460. Departure locations and departure times can be confirmed upon booking. Don’t forget that all these boats can be chartered at other times throughout the year on application to the relevant telephone numbers. WOW FACTS In the STAR WARS film THE PHAMTHOM MENACE, Qui-Gon Jinns communicator was a Sensor Excel razor for women that was slightly modified. Type the phrase “do a barrel roll” into a google and the page will do a barrel roll. The man who once had the longest beard in the world died when he broke his neck after accidentally stepping on it. Humans ants, and chimpanzees, are the only beings that wage organised war on each other.

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WORD SEARCH In the grid below are hidden the names of River estuaries found on the east coast of England They are all single word names. They are spelt either vertically, horizontally, diagonally, backwards or forwards. GOOD LUCK

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ANSWERS WELLAND WEAR YARE MEDWAY STOUR TEES WAVENEY ORWELL CROUCH ESK HUMBER TYNE BLACKWATER THAMES

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CLOCK WAREHOUSE SHARDLOW I have received the following email from Steve Hayes of the Northern Canals Group regarding the Clock Warehouse at Shardlow. Quote:

“I wouldn’t normally circulate this kind of appeal but, as it affects an aspect of waterways heritage I’m making an exception. There is great concern in Shardlow that Marston who own the historic ‘Clock Warehouse’ want to rename it ‘Mill on the Trent’. I’ve copied below part of a letter that John Cook of the Shardlow Heritage Group wrote about the ‘Clock Warehouse’. Marston's are wanting to rename the Clock Warehouse, in Shardlow, to ‘Mill on the Trent’ and make various changes to the building, including removal of the historically important sign ’Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey’ that until recently adorned the front of the building. The significance of that sign is that it was the name given to the proposed canal in the original canal act. They have made a heritage statement which attempts to justify the name, but contains gross errors– the building was NOT “originally built as a corn mill”, it was NOT “originally named Mill No2”, that name coming from F E Stevens c1940. It is Not on the River Trent, it is on the Trent and Mersey Canal. The proposed name will perpetuate the myth that the central arch was to house a water wheel. It was of course for canal boats to stop for unloading and loading directly to the building above. When the site was up for sale in 1781 it was described as “all those large and extensive wharfs and warehouses (advert in the Derby Mercury 18 May 1781). The companies involved from 1780 to 1938 all traded on the canal as general carriers. Only from 1938 to 1975 was it owned by a corn miller, whose principal milling operation was at a different warehouse in the village. (They did set up a temporary mill at the Clock Warehouse on 1940 when their No1 Mill was being renovated after a fire.) In 1980 the building was renovated by Walkerdine Co, Derby and housed a canal museum and tea room. It later was converted to a public house by Hoskins brewery, Leicester and then Mansfield brewery purchased it and carried out an excellent restoration of the building.

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I suggest that if anyone objects to the proposed name that they write direct to Marston’s expressing their opinion and reasons for your opinion. Alternatively you could email mandy.fellows@marstons.co.uk the Area Managers secretary and the objections will be passed on.

T

The historic Clock Warehouse at Shardlow on the Trent and Mersey Canal.

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BRANCH OFFICERS CHAIRMAN David Dawson 21 Smeath Lane Clarborough Retford DN22 9JU

Tel 01777 704224 email dawsondavida@yahoo.com Mobile 07501 803918

VICE CHAIRMAN AND PLANNING OFFICER Colin Crofts Staddlestones South Bramwith Doncaster DN7 5SY TREASURER Pat Davies 55 Rockcliff Road Rawmarsh Rotherham S62 6LX

Tel 01302 841619 email cjcrofts@btinternet.com

Tel 01709 206856 email patdav54@gmail.com

SECRETARY AND KEELS AND CUCKOOS EDITOR Malcolm Fielding Tel 01302 873127 1 Vicarage Way email roc3brn9ros1ark4@aim.com Arksey Doncaster DN5 0TG MEMBERSHIP OFFICER John Shaw 72 Norton Lees Crescent Sheffield S8 8SR PUBLICITY OFFICER Dave Scott 17 Bowshaw Road Batemoor Sheffield S8 8EY COMMITTEE MEMBERS Mavis Paul 116 Sandygate Road Sheffield S10 5RZ Helen Dawson

Tel 0114 258 2535

Tel 0114 237 5327 email acp2004naburn@hotmail.com Mobile 07900 275327

Tel 0114 268 3927 email mavis.brian_paul@btinternet.com Mobile 07725 464611

as David Dawson

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Keels & Cuckoos Issue 28  
Keels & Cuckoos Issue 28