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Issue 25 March 2016


CONTENTS Chairman’s Contemplations……………………………………...3 Spring Clean Up……………………………………………..…….5 CRT Trustees Reception………………..……………………….6 From the Archives………………………………………….……...7 Branch Annual General meeting…………………….…….……..9 S&T Lock Gate Replacement…………..……………………….10 New Heel Post Design…………………………………………...12 Word Search…………………………………...…………….…...13 Invasive Plants and Balsam Bash………...………...………….14 Word Search Answers…………………………………………...15 Town Fields Gala…………………………..……………………..15 Keels and Cuckoos is published on behalf of the South Yorkshire and the Dukeries Branch of the Inland Waterways Association by

M H Fielding, 1 Vicarage way, Arksey, Doncaster, DN5 0TG. Printed by Colour Image, Loudwater Views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of The Inland Waterways Association or of the South Yorkshire and the Dukeries Branch Committee The Inland Waterways Association: Registered Office Island House, Moor Road, Chesham, HP5 1WA Website www.waterways.org.uk Email iwa@waterways.org.uk Founded in 1946, incorporated in 1958 The Inland Waterways Association is a non-profit distribution company limited by guarantee (No.62245) Registered as a Charity (No.212343)

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AN APOLOGY I must apologise to our Branch Chairman for my mistake in his “CHAIMAN’S CONTEMPLATION” in the last edition of this magazine. Throughout the article It stated the Bradford and Dearne and Dove Canal, this Should have read The Barnsley and Dearne and Dove Canal.

CHAIRMAN’S CONTEMPLATIONS When I first saw a report from C&RT relating to the use of locks on a year by year basis I assumed that this would be just something else for the round filing cabinet. However it’s really interesting reading. The Sheffield and South Yorkshire for example has seen the use of locks fall by 12% on average along its length, with the use of Long Sandall Lock falling by 24% whereas Sprotbrough Lock has seen an increase of 16%. The average use of locks across the North Eastern Waterways has fallen by an average of 10% when 2015 is compared with 2014. The data is collected by telemetry so happily no staff were dispatched with clip boards, to monitor these locks. As one walks the tow path, each year there seem to be more and more boats on the waterways. As the scrapping of modern narrowboats is not yet on the horizon, and most boat builders are busy this is no surprise. However if the C&RT report is accurate, and there is no reason to think that is isn’t, then there is an anomaly. Why are there less lock passages? Well, nationally there seem to be fewer hire boats, and as hire boats are upgraded so are the hiring costs, which would suggest that there are fewer hirers cruising fewer miles in fewer boats. Then for the private boater the transfer from “red” to road diesel has seen, in part of 2015 at least the cost of a litre of diesel rise to almost £1.50.This makes a day’s run a more financially challenging prospect for many. There is of course another problem. The club house expert will tell you how he queued for four hours at Lapworth, Fradley, Trent Lock, usually a well known junction. This might not deter the newcomer who then decides to potter about locally as queueing is not why he bought a boat. Truth is that many boats never leave the marina so the genuine “cruiser”, Thorne to Liverpool in “the week”, usually has a traffic free run but believes that he was just lucky.

The weather may be an influence, summer 2015 was not the sunniest on record. Then there is the question of rallies. The slightly reduced focus by IWA, as I understand the situation, on the “National” has been replaced by many more local events. I recall nationals when many hundreds of boats traversed the waterways to attend, some taking totally illogical routes in order to gain the “Longest Distance Travelled

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Award”. I recall going from our mooring at Napton to Titford Pools via a spur to Northampton and then to round to via Leicester with that in mind. I failed totally in that endeavour. Many years ago the IWA ran the Silver Sword Scheme which encouraged boaters to venture “off the beaten track” . Many waterway groups offered a Head of Navigation Plaque for the same reasons. So what of the future. Hopefully we won’t see the waterways reduced to a string of massive marinas, each one full of floating cottages. Equally if every boat owner decided to go cruising there would be bottle necks from London to Birmingham. So maybe there is no drama in one year’s figures and moored boats do at least contribute to C&RT’s income but don’t wear out the waterways. On the subject of Rallies, please do note that the IWA Trail Boat Festival is to be held in Staveley on the Chesterfield Canal on May 28th and 29th. We still need a few more volunteers to support the branch at this event. Just an hour or two is all we ask and there will be lots to see, and of course the trip boats, beer tent, theatre, canoes and so on. Our job will be to talk to visitors about the waterways in general and the work IWA in particular. Anyone with experience of “WOW” or who is or has been a teacher will be very welcome as the branch is hoping to staff the WOW area of the rally site. Do call me on 01777 704224 if you have experience of ideas, or ping an email if that’s easier for you. Contact information is on the back cover. The Trail Boat festival will be run, in the main, by the Chesterfield Canal Trust volunteers, but it is an IWA event and we really do need a few IWA stalwarts on site to give a few hours each—PLEASE. Finally a thought for those of you caught in the recent floods, your homes, your boats, even your favourite tree or mooring may have been damaged. Those of us fortunate enough to have escaped these tribulations do feel for you. Hopefully your insurance company did not make a drama out of a crisis and treated you well. Sadly for much of the northern waterways the money for repairs will come from either reserves or be covered by funds diverted from elsewhere. This is no time for NIMBYs, repairs need to be carried out and if that means that there is less to spend on cutting the grass, or painting a fence, hosting receptions or changing the logo, so be it. We need our waterways back, quickly and better than before. David Dawson IWA SY&D Branch Chairman February 2nd 2016

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BRANCH ANNUAL CLEAN UP Please note the date of the spring clean up has had to be altered due to a clash of dates.

This event w ill now take

place on Sunday 3rd April 2016 Meet at Tinsley Marina 10.00am. Please wear warm clothing and strong shoes. Protective gloves will be provided.

Pie and peas will be served in Tinsley Boat Club House after the event.

Thank you for supporting this biannual event.

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SPRING CANAL CLEAN UP The branch will be running the first of its bi -annual canal clean ups of 2016 on the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal on Sunday the 3rd of April. We will be meeting at Tinsley Marina, Lock House Walk off Shepcote Lane, Sheffield at 10.00 am. All tooling will be supplied but please come in strong shoes and warm clothing. We will spilt into groups covering as much of the canal as possible. We will be looking for any type of rubbish that has been deposited in or by the canal. As usual the branch will be providing pie and peas after the event. Let us hope that enjoy reasonable weather, as is our norm, and that we can again make a difference to the canal environs for the future.

CRT TRUSTEES’ RECEPTION On January 12th 2016 Canal and River Trust Waterways Partnership held a networking reception at the Hilton Hotel, Victoria Quays, Sheffield. Pat Davies, Dave Scott and I from the branch committee and Peter Scott , Regional Chairman and partnership member were in attendance. People from varying organisations and companies from the North East were also in attendance . The organisation they represented varied from AC Marine Aggregates, Adsetts Group, Bamford Barges, Don Catchments River Trust Don Gorge Community Group Environment Agency, IWA West Riding , Leeds and Sheffield City Councils, Shire Cruisers, Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and Manchester, Yorkshire Water, Yorkshire Wildlife Trust and numerous others. The reception was the precursor to a full CRT board meeting to be held the next day at the Hilton. It is CRT policy to have these meetings in different parts of the country thus enabling as many people as possible to have some input to the board. We were welcomed by the Partnership Chairman, Mark Penny who then invited everyone to circulate and talk to one another. We had the opportunity to talk to several board members who showed and interest in the branch and Adsetts Group s activities. The stated objectives of CRT in the North East are to:improve people’s health and well-being enhance communities protect our environment Impact on local economy. For more information go the CRT website www.canalrivertrust.org.uk and look for Shaping our Future on the About Us page. Malcolm Fielding

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FROM THE ARCHIVE SHEFFIELD AND SOUTH YORKSHIRE NAVIGATION COMPANY BY OUR TRADE COMMISSIONER The following article is taken from materials found in the old Head Office of the Sheffield and South Yorkshire Navigation Company and dated 24th June 1938 and published here with the kind permission of Sheffield Newspapers Limited.

RAILWAYS TAKE POSSESSION In 1849 the Sheffield and Tinsley and the Stainforth and Keadby Canal were amalgamated in the River Dun Navigation Company. At this time the British railways were emerging from their childhood and, if their future as regards transporters of goods and produce was not to be jeopardised, something would have to be done to prevent competition from the cheaper mode of transport provided by the canal companies. Accordingly, seeing that the railways had extensive and influential financial backing it was by no means a difficult task for the railways to obtain permission from Parliament to take over the new canals up and down the country; and, in 1859, the South Yorkshire Railway obtained possession of our canal. Then in 1864 the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railways Company took over the connecting waterways connecting Sheffield with the sea. There was of course another influence at work which added to the railways taking over the canals. Canal proprietors at the end of the 18th century had not foreseen the coming of the railways, and the consequent competition, and in many cases shrewd people were only too glad to part with their holdings. By this time the industrial development of Sheffield was proceeding on a rapid scale, and the pioneers of the city’s trade were not the sort of people to sit by quietly while being exploited by the railway companies. And so we see a further swing of the pendulum , because, following continued strong representation to Westminster by practically the whole of Sheffield’s manufacturers, the canal passed into the hands of the Sheffield and South Yorkshire Navigation Company the present owners, in 1889.

PRESENT COMPANY The Company has a called up capital of £1,189,858, of stock of which £625,000 is in Preference stock and £564,858 in Ordinary.

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There are ten Directors, five of whom are appointed by the preference shareholders and five by the London and North Eastern Railway Company . The Present members of the Board are:- The Hon. Eric Brand Butler-Henderson; Sir William H Ellis, G.B.E. Mr Montague Mark Firth; Mr Walter Gair; Sir Ronald W Matthews; Mr W .H. Oliver; Sir Samuel Roberts, Bt.; Mr Victor H. Sandford; Mr Edward W. Senior, and Mr H.F.B. Stephenson. The Secretary and general Manager is Mr. W.H.Pryce. O.B.E. The waterways completely owned by the Company are:- The River Dun Navigation , the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal, and the Stainforth and Keadby Canal; and, jointly with the undertakers of the Aire and Calder navigation , a canal from the River Dun navigation (near Bramwith Lock) to the Knottingley and Goole Canal (near Sykehouse Bridge). A point I ought to make quite clear is that the Sheffield and South Yorkshire navigation Company’s sole function is to keep the banks and locks of the waterway in good repair and maintain the canals in a navigable condition. It has nothing whatsoever to do with transport of goods on the water. This is left to the Canal Carriers, or Byetraders as they are called.

SOURCE OF REVENUE Where the Navigation Company does come into it’s the transport picture, however, is in its mobile fleet of motor lorries which do the beginning and ending jobs for collection to and delivery from its wharves. From whence does the Company obtain its revenue? is a that is bound to turn up in your mind. This is derived almost entirely from tolls and wharfage.

The tolls charged are limited by statutory powers and are based upon tonnage per mile according to the class of goods to be carried. Thus customers are safeguarded from profiteering on the part of the Company; and, the Company is saved the trouble of haggling over prices. Present day traffic from the Humber ports to Sheffield includes large supplies of grain, both in bulk and in bags; flour; cement; carbide; iron and steel, ferrochrome and other metal alloys for our steel manufacturers; timber; hardwood; (for tool handle makers); cabinet wood; canned goods; sugar (for our large confectionery factories); sand, etc. No provision however is made for bonded goods. Down or outward traffic mainly concerns the transport of coal, and something like 250,000 tons pass up to Hull and Goole every year.

TOM PUDDINGS At Hatfield what are known as “Tom Puddings” are introduced to the canal. These

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consist of “compartment” boats, to give then their proper name, which are rectangular in shape, constructed of steel and each capable of holding 40 tons. After loading at the Colliery they are made up into a train of about 19 compartments and towed by a tug to Goole Docks. Away back in the early days, before Sheffield came into possession of its valuable waterway, the Sheffield Town Trustees made a handsome contribution to what may be termed preliminary expenses, so that even though the undertaking is a company incorporated by special act, the general business community may be said to have a vested interest in it. Because of the varying classes of goods carried on the canal it is not possible to give a general idea of how the cost of transport by water compares with that rail or road. All that can be said is that it is definitely cheaper. The question of speed naturally does not come into comparison.

Although the present tendency is for more and more traffic to pass up and down the canal there is still plenty of scope for increase; and one is tempted to ask whether or no, the deviation of certain heavy traffic from our roads, for urgency, to our waterways would not go some way to relieve the |Ministry of Transport from some of its most disturbing nightmares. In conclusion I must acknowledge a debt of gratitude to Mr. E. Mennell, the Company’s representative in traffic matters, for providing me with historic and other data. P.H In the next issue GRAND UNION CANAL A Romance of Canal Transport

BRANCH AGM The Branch AGM will be held on Wednesday 11th May at Arch 16, Victoria Quays, Sheffield, the home of A&G Passenger Boats Ltd; from 19.00 (7.00pm). Jonathan Hart-Woods, CRT’s environmental manager will be the speaker talking about invasive species and the Waterways Followed by a question and answer session.

NATIONAL TRAILBOAT FESTIVAL Don’t forget this event on 28th & 29th May 1000 (10.00am) until 1700 (5.00pm) at Staveley Town Basin on the Chesterfield Canal. We would appreciate some help, if only for an hour or two. Please contact David Dawson, contact details on the back page if you can volunteer. The branch are looking to man the WOW stand. Thank you

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SHEFFIELD AND TINSLEY CANAL LOCK CLOSURES AND GATE REPLACEMENT CRT have are carrying out gate replacement and other maintenance on the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal. There was a somewhat tongue in cheek interview on local television when one of the CRT engineers told viewers to give their partners a treat on Valentine’s Day by taking to look round the drained lock to see the work in progress. This was a well organised day with local CRT staff on hand with information and guidance, Chief Executive, Richard Parry and Region Manager, Jon Horsfall, volunteer lock keepers and Woodseats Explorer Scouts with their one million helping hand project led by our Branch Publicity Officer, Dave Scott among them. The ground underfoot was dry considering the wet weather of the last week and the sun shone although it was very cold and colder still at the bottom of the lock. As usual at these lock openings Health and Safety must be a major consideration. The pathway to the lock from both directions was well fenced off and an excellent staircase was provided to get down into the lock where CRT staff could explain what was work was being carried out and to answer the many questions the general public. One of the questions frequently asked was will the debris in the canal bed be cleaned out. The answer generally was the large pieces and supermarket trolleys would be but the smaller stuff would be left in as this would not cause a hazard to boats. Richard Parry is an interested, well travelled CRT Chief Executive, whom I have met at several of these events, I think is good for CRT’s public relations as he makes a point of being at most of them and talking to as many people as he possibly can during his stay. Good Show! The opportunity to carry out gate repairs to some of the other locks on the flight has been taken while this work is being carried out. Malcolm Fielding

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NEW HEEL POST DESIGN On the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal during the latest open day CRT staff were busy explaining to visitors the latest on heel post quoins. Hollow Quoins are explained as:- the recess into which the heel post of a lock gate is fitted, and in which it partially revolves when being opened and closed. These quoins are usually cone shaped with the dish of the cone sunk into the lock floor and the solid cone shaped piece fitting into this dish. This being only about four inches long. The problem being inn the past has been that foreign bodies and silt settles into the dish base causing movement and wear. The latest thinking is to reverse this and to dispense with the cone shaped quoin. A solid block is turned from the square with a hundred millimetre diameter boss at one end. This is then located on the lock floor in the same place as the hollow quoin used to be located. On the heel post of the lock gate instead of a shaped cone a metal block with a slightly smaller hole is inserted into the heel post of the lock gate. It is then just a matter of lowering the new lock gate onto the quoin base with some waterproof grease and final fitting. This system means that debris cannot sit in the hollow quoin causing wear and movement problems.

Tinsley, old and new lock gates showing the old cone system and the latest straight boss system with reversed system of fixing the heel post to the quoin in the lock floor.

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WORD SEARCH In the grid below are hidden the names of Canal carrying Companies, for example XXXXX Carrying Company. All have one or two name titles followed by Canal Carrying Company and can be spelt forwards, backwards, vertically, horizontally or diagonally. GOOD LUCK

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DID YOU KNOW The Store Street Aqueduct on the Ashton Canal in Manchester was built in 1798 at an angle of 45 degrees to the road it crosses, and was the first major aqueduct of its kind and the oldest still in use today. Bridges on the Bridgewater and Taunton Canal were mined with charge chambers containing the explosive ammonal, during WW2.

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INVASIVE PLANTS Himalayan balsam Impatiens glandulifera, also known as Policeman’s helmet, Booby top and Kiss-me-on-the-mountain, is a pretty pink flowering annual related to the Busy Lizzie. It grows 1-2m high, and is known for its explosive seed pods, one plant can 800 seeds up to 7m when pods are touched. First introduced in 1839, the plant has become an invasive weed along waterways throughout the UK. It flowers from June—August providing a good source of nectar, attracting bees and other pollinating insects, making it a popular plant with beekeepers. However, being such a good source of nectar, means that pollinators are drawn away from native wold flower plants growing nearby. This, coupled with the explosive nature of the 2-3cm long seed pods, means that the plant soon out competes native British plants. The plant forms dense stands that suppress the growth of native plats, leaving river and canal banks bare of vegetation in autumn and winter and liable to erosion. There is also a knock on effect for the food chain, and birds ,bats and mammals depending on native plants as a food source. Because Himalayan balsam grows annually from seed, control needs to be carried out before the seed pods have formed , but ideally before the plant flowers. Cutting with a machine or by hand is easy provided there is adequate access. A single cut is only effective if the plant is cut below the lowest node, or the plant will regrow and flower later in the season. Regular mowing can control the plant provided it is frequent enough to supress the formation of flowers and seeds. The plants can easily be pulled up as they are shallow rooted.

The River Don around Hexthorpe is badly affected and the branch has organised a BALSAM BASH on June 5th on the River Don at Hexthorpe. Meet adjacent to Doncaster Rowing Club, Hexthorpe Flats from 10.00am. Gloves and strong shoes should be worn. It would be advisable to bring some food and a warm drink.

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WORD SEARCH ANSWERS RIPON……………………….…….The RIPON Canal Carrying Company ANDERTON…………..….…..…..The ANDERTON Canal Carrying Company CANAL………………………...…..The CANAL Carrying Company WARWICKSHIRE………….……..The WARWICKSHIRE Canal Carrying Company EREWASH……..…………….…....The EREWASH Canal Carrying Company

WILLOW WREN………………......The WILLOW WREN Canal Carrying Company SEVERN & CANAL…………….....The SEVERN & CANAL Carrying Company GRAND UNION…………………...The GRAND UNION Canal Carrying Company PEAK FOREST…………………....The PEAK FOREST Canal Carrying Company GLOUCESTER SHARPNESS....The SEVERN & CANAL Carrying Company

NEW MEMBERS I sholuld like to welcome some new members to the branch area. You are most welcome. Mr M & Mrs P Bowley of Doncaster Mr J & Mrs L Baker

of Rotherham John Shaw; Branch Membership Secretary

DONCASTER AND BASSETTLAW KIDNEY ASSOCIATION TOWN FIELD GALA This year the branch will be attending The Townfields Gala to be held on Doncaster Town Fields on July 17th from 12.00 until 17.00. This is an annual free entry event which used to be organised by Doncaster MBC but since 2015 Doncaster and Bassetlaw Kidney Association has been responsible for its organisation. There should be live entertainment , family activities, information stand, games, Police and Fire displays, fairground, food and drink and of course the SY&D’s IWA stand. Onsite car parking will be available with the entrance adjacent to Thorne Road /Town Moor Avenue traffic lights

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BRANCH OFFICERS CHAIRMAN David Dawson 21 Smeath Lane Clarborough Retford DN22 9JU VICE CHAIRMAN AND PLANNING OFFICER Colin Crofts Staddlestones South Bramwith Doncaster DN7 5SY TREASURER Pat Davies 55 Rockcliff Road Rawmarsh Rotherham S62 6LX

Tel 01777 704224 email dawsondavida@yahoo.com Mobile 07501 803918

Tel 01302 841619 email cjcrofts@btinternet.com

Tel 01709 206856 email patdav54@gmail.com

SECRETARY AND KEELS AND CUCKOOS EDITOR Malcolm Fielding Tel 01302 873127 1 Vicarage Way email roc3brn9ros1ark4@aim.com Arksey Doncaster DN5 0TG MEMBERSHIP OFFICER John Shaw 72 Norton Lees Crescent Sheffield S8 8SR PUBLICITY OFFICER Dave Scott 17 Bowshaw Road Batemoor Sheffield S8 8EY COMMITTEE MEMBERS Mavis Paul 116 Sandygate Road Sheffield S10 5RZ

Tel 0114 258 2535

Tel 0114 237 5327 email acp2004naburn@hotmail.com Mobile 07900 275327

Tel 0114 268 927 email mavis.brian_paul@btinternet.com Mobile 07725 464611

Helen Dawson as David Dawson Mary Crofts as Colin Crofts

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Keels & Cuckoo, Issue 25, March 2016  
Keels & Cuckoo, Issue 25, March 2016