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September 2013

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Claudelands a winner - Page 11

Northland eyes mineral wealth Karen Phelps Millions of dollars look likely to be spent in Northland over the next few years after the recent mineral exploration permit offers to three companies as a result of the Northland 2012 Competitive Tender. “We now have five new exploration permits [being offered] in an area that hasn’t seen much exploration at a time when global exploration funds are limited,” says New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals national manager of minerals Sefton Darby. “That’s really bucking the international trend and is a substantial increase in exploration activity in Northland.” New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals received a total of 11 permit applications from five companies. Five permits have been offered to three companies – Tai Tokerau Minerals Limited, Waimatenui Exploration Limited and De Grey Mining Limited. The five-year permits allow exploration to be undertaken in defined areas of Northland. Prior to the tender, Northland only had one operating exploration permit offered to De Grey Mining Limited. The others are new companies formed especially to apply for bids under the tender. Far North mayor Wayne Brown, who is one of the directors of Tai Tokerau Minerals Limited, says he got involved when he got told to put his money where his mouth was. “I was saying to people it [the Northland 2012 Tender] was a good thing and they should get involved. Someone said ‘why don’t you put some money in then’,” he says. “We’re [the company] a bunch of people prepared to take a bet and live with the financial consequences of not finding anything. We also have the capacity to do something with it if we do.” Tai Tokerau Minerals Limited expects to invest up to $2m over the next three years and all going according to plan will start a drill programme in 18 months drilling 300 metres in the first year and 1000 metres in the second. Waimatenui Exploration Limited has been formed by a group of local sheep and beef farmers - Arthur Rushton, Bruce Morris, Roddy McDonald and John Schepens - who believe they might be sitting on top of mineral rich land. Morris, who is a keen rock collector, has suspected that his land is mineral rich for 20 years since he found rocks when wandering around his farm which tested positive for traces of gold, silver, zinc and copper. His findings led him to take a walk around his neighbours’ farms where he made similar discoveries.

INSIDE

The permit offered to Waimatenui Exploration is for an area north of Lake Taharoa, most of which is located on the farmers’ own land. “We have found some individual small areas that are rich enough to mine so we wanted the prospecting license to drill more deeply and hopefully find bigger deposits. If we find them we will get in to mining them,” says Morris. The farmers plan to invest around $300,000 up front to either hire or purchase a drilling rig to take samples over the next three years for analysis. If their suspicions prove correct it could be a nice windfall for these hill country farmers. Morris says that even if they don’t choose to personally complete the mining they could either sell the mineral rights to a mining company or join with one in a joint venture. Morris says for him the venture is not just about money – it’s a personal passion. “I’m the most interested person. The others don’t seem to be very good at finding interesting rocks but I find them. ‘We’ve had a geologist and a geophysicist take surface samples and they think the signs are great too. We’re not just a bunch of farmers dreaming.” De Grey Mining Limited has been awarded the other two permits. De Grey is an exploration company listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) with epithermal gold-silver projects in the Deseado and Somuncura Massifs, Argentina and various interests in Western Australia. It recently secured by transfer the Puhipuhi exploration permit in Northland. The parties now have to clarify the exact ownership of the minerals in the land and when they have done so the permits will be officially granted, says Darby. “We are confident that five permits will be awarded. When you look at the exploration commitment in these permits there will be $7-7.5m spent in the next three years potentially rising to $13m over five years. ‘In Northland that’s a massive step up in exploration activity. “In the long term we are looking for that to convert to mineable deposits which could mean hundreds of millions of dollars of revenue, hundreds of jobs and big potential for downstream suppliers.” Wayne Brown says there have been some murmurings of opposition locally but he feels most people are in support. “People have said isn’t it terrible multinationals are coming here. Now they’re saying isn’t it terrible we’ve only got tin pot locals [who have been offered permits]. “It’s much more low key than what people might think. It’s a small area of land.”

Newmont to appeal conditions - PAGE 2

Growth curve for Tauranga.... Prime Minister John Key officially opens the Port of Tauranga’s new container terminal facilities this year, watched by port chief executive, Mark Cairns, left, and chairman, John Parker. The new facilities include a $30 million, 170-metre extension of the wharf at the Tauranga Container Terminal, while a new ship-to-shore twin-lift gantry crane has been installed increasing the number of the terminal’s container cranes to six, with a seventh crane to be commissioned next year. The development reflects ongoing growth in the port’s container shipping - story page 6.

Coromandel dredging concerns - PAGE 2

Chatham Rock on the rise - PAGE 3

www.waterfordpress.co.nz


September 2013

www.waterfordpress.co.nz

Claudelands a winner - Page 11

Northland eyes mineral wealth Karen Phelps Millions of dollars look likely to be spent in Northland over the next few years after the recent mineral exploration permit offers to three companies as a result of the Northland 2012 Competitive Tender. “We now have five new exploration permits [being offered] in an area that hasn’t seen much exploration at a time when global exploration funds are limited,” says New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals national manager of minerals Sefton Darby. “That’s really bucking the international trend and is a substantial increase in exploration activity in Northland.” New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals received a total of 11 permit applications from five companies. Five permits have been offered to three companies – Tai Tokerau Minerals Limited, Waimatenui Exploration Limited and De Grey Mining Limited. The five-year permits allow exploration to be undertaken in defined areas of Northland. Prior to the tender, Northland only had one operating exploration permit offered to De Grey Mining Limited. The others are new companies formed especially to apply for bids under the tender. Far North mayor Wayne Brown, who is one of the directors of Tai Tokerau Minerals Limited, says he got involved when he got told to put his money where his mouth was. “I was saying to people it [the Northland 2012 Tender] was a good thing and they should get involved. Someone said ‘why don’t you put some money in then’,” he says. “We’re [the company] a bunch of people prepared to take a bet and live with the financial consequences of not finding anything. We also have the capacity to do something with it if we do.” Tai Tokerau Minerals Limited expects to invest up to $2m over the next three years and all going according to plan will start a drill programme in 18 months drilling 300 metres in the first year and 1000 metres in the second. Waimatenui Exploration Limited has been formed by a group of local sheep and beef farmers - Arthur Rushton, Bruce Morris, Roddy McDonald and John Schepens - who believe they might be sitting on top of mineral rich land. Morris, who is a keen rock collector, has suspected that his land is mineral rich for 20 years since he found rocks when wandering around his farm which tested positive for traces of gold, silver, zinc and copper. His findings led him to take a walk around his neighbours’ farms where he made similar discoveries.

INSIDE

The permit offered to Waimatenui Exploration is for an area north of Lake Taharoa, most of which is located on the farmers’ own land. “We have found some individual small areas that are rich enough to mine so we wanted the prospecting license to drill more deeply and hopefully find bigger deposits. If we find them we will get in to mining them,” says Morris. The farmers plan to invest around $300,000 up front to either hire or purchase a drilling rig to take samples over the next three years for analysis. If their suspicions prove correct it could be a nice windfall for these hill country farmers. Morris says that even if they don’t choose to personally complete the mining they could either sell the mineral rights to a mining company or join with one in a joint venture. Morris says for him the venture is not just about money – it’s a personal passion. “I’m the most interested person. The others don’t seem to be very good at finding interesting rocks but I find them. ‘We’ve had a geologist and a geophysicist take surface samples and they think the signs are great too. We’re not just a bunch of farmers dreaming.” De Grey Mining Limited has been awarded the other two permits. De Grey is an exploration company listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) with epithermal gold-silver projects in the Deseado and Somuncura Massifs, Argentina and various interests in Western Australia. It recently secured by transfer the Puhipuhi exploration permit in Northland. The parties now have to clarify the exact ownership of the minerals in the land and when they have done so the permits will be officially granted, says Darby. “We are confident that five permits will be awarded. When you look at the exploration commitment in these permits there will be $7-7.5m spent in the next three years potentially rising to $13m over five years. ‘In Northland that’s a massive step up in exploration activity. “In the long term we are looking for that to convert to mineable deposits which could mean hundreds of millions of dollars of revenue, hundreds of jobs and big potential for downstream suppliers.” Wayne Brown says there have been some murmurings of opposition locally but he feels most people are in support. “People have said isn’t it terrible multinationals are coming here. Now they’re saying isn’t it terrible we’ve only got tin pot locals [who have been offered permits]. “It’s much more low key than what people might think. It’s a small area of land.”

Newmont to appeal conditions - PAGE 2

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NEWS »

Business North / September 2013

Newmont appeals conditions Karen Phelps

Growth curve for Tauranga.... Prime Minister John Key officially opens the Port of Tauranga’s new container terminal facilities this year, watched by port chief executive, Mark Cairns, left, and chairman, John Parker. The new facilities include a $30 million, 170-metre extension of the wharf at the Tauranga Container Terminal, while a new ship-to-shore twin-lift gantry crane has been installed increasing the number of the terminal’s container cranes to six, with a seventh crane to be commissioned next year. The development reflects ongoing growth in the port’s container shipping - story page 6.

Coromandel dredging concerns - PAGE 2

Chatham Rock on the rise - PAGE 3

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Newmont Waihi Gold has appealed parts of the decision for land use consent for the Golden Link project saying that the project would be unfeasible if certain conditions remain unchanged. “Some of the conditions as they stand will make it difficult for us to construct and operate the mine,” says Newmont Waihi Gold external affairs coordinator Kit Wilson. The decision of the independent commissioners’ hearings panel considering Newmont Waihi Gold’s application under the Resource Management Act granted consent for the proposed Correnso underground mine but subject to a range of conditions. It has not granted consent for the wider Golden Link Project Area that was originally sought by Newmont Waihi Gold. Newmont Waihi Gold is appealing the area which has been granted and has also appealed some of the conditions relating to the construction and operation of the proposed Correnso mine. Wilson says that it is not possible to comment in more detail at this stage as the process is still underway but says the granting of the consent for the Correnso underground mine is a step in the right direction. “It’s a good step forward because it shows the panel accepted the majority of our experts’ evidence and understood we have the ability to construct and operate this mine in the community,”says Wilson. “But it’s only one step in the process. “Any proposal of this complexity will always have people disagreeing. It’s to be expected. “We had anticipated that this application could be appealed to the Environment Court.” Wilson says that it continues to be Newmont Waihi Gold’s job to get alongside members of the community who have concerns and to work with them to address issues. “The ore body is where the ore body is. “We can’t change that. But what we can do is ensure we construct and operate this mine in the most socially and environmentally responsible manner possible while we still have a viable operation as a base. “That means modifying our mining method in

Should the Correnso proposal proceed, underground mining would occur at considerable depth below some properties in Waihi East. the higher parts of the mine, backfilling all voids and stopes and modifying our blast techniques. “We believe that the longer term financial and social benefits of the project for the community far outweigh any perceived short term negatives.” Newmont Waihi Gold is currently engaging in informal discussions and court assisted mediation with groups and individuals who are part of the appeal process as they work towards a mutually agreeable solution. If agreement on all matters cannot be reached through this process an Environment Court hearing will be scheduled for later in the year. The proposal named Golden Link, which could extend gold and silver mining operations to at least 2020, comprises two parts. The Martha Exploration Project is a small underground exploration programme located within the existing Martha mining licence area and the pit

rim. It involves the construction of an underground exploration decline within the north wall of the pit. There will be two portals. If it goes ahead the programme will require a variation to the existing Martha mining licence. The other part of the proposal called Correnso is a potential underground mine in Waihi East which, if it proceeds, would replace the existing underground Favona and Trio mines. This will require consents under the Resource Management Act. Should the Correnso proposal proceed, underground mining would occur at considerable depth below some properties in Waihi East. The mining would occur in blocks starting at the bottom of the ore body, which is 350 metres below the surface and working up to the top of the ore body, at approximately 130 metres below the surface.

Coromandel plans raising concerns Karen Phelps New Zealand company Seagroup Holdings has been granted a prospecting permit to search McGregor Bay at Coromandel for precious minerals raising community concerns over the potential for toxic heavy metals to be released into the environment. The area in question is Section 4 land and under Section 61 of the Crown Minerals Act access is only permitted for minimal impact activities but not mining. Seagroup Holdings is looking at how it can work with local council in order to remove the sediment. However the move has upset some locals. “The key issue is that dredging those minerals will do precisely the opposite of cleaning up – it will contaminate,” says marine biologist Michael Donoghue who has previously worked as a marine policy adviser with the Department of Conservation for 23 years and today runs a private chartered vessel business in the Coromandel. “The metals are locked away and biologically inert. In my opinion it’s better to leave them where they are.” Renee Annan, coordinator of Coromandel Watchdog, a group which aims to protect the Coromandel from mining, has questions regarding Seagroup Holdings motivation to remediate the site considering the limited community consultation. “If they really want to clean up the harbour this is the most ridiculous way to go about it. The way they’ve behaved why would the community trust them?

The key issue is that dredging those minerals will do precisely the opposite of cleaning up – it will contaminate.” “Coromandel Watchdog has been supporting a more community based process of consultation where we look at if the site is contaminated and if so what we can do about it. “Not an approach that seems to be commercially based - how can we get the gold out and make it look like we’re doing a favour to the community.” The Thames-Coromandel District Council has stated that it is supportive of an investigation into the removal of the historic mine tailings discarded into the Coromandel Harbour during the gold-rush of the late 1800’s. “In reality, much of the harbour is actually a tailings dumpsite, which over the years has trapped silt from the rivers which has turned a beautiful deep-water harbour into mud-flats” says Mayor Glenn Leach. “The anti-mining groups have to realise that these minerals aren’t in their natural state; they don’t belong in the harbour and the community and the environment could benefit greatly from the remediation. If the industry that created the mess in the first place can clean it up once and for all, then I think it’s worth investigating and for the business case to

be ultimately tested by the very high environmental standards set out in the Resource Management Act.” Annan says Coromandel Watchdog will continue to support the local community who wish to oppose the mining and raise awareness in the community of potential impacts. “It also plans to work with council and appropriate other local bodies to determine the best future for the Coromandel Peninsula. “If it was to be ruined the impacts would be devastating for the local community. Our economy, environment, tourism and community is based on the marine environment. If Seagroup Holdings continue to proceed with their proposal they will come against resistance from the community.” Seagroup Holdings director Marcus Jacobson declined to comment when contacted. Sea Group Holdings was formed in November 2010 by Jacobson and NZ Oil & Gas chief executive Andrew Knight. The permit granted to Seagroup Holdings allows the company to explore 3.92sqkm of harbour for the next two years and take 80 core samples from the seabed.


Business North / September 2013

NEWS »

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Chatham Rock on target for 2015 Jo Bailey Chatham Rock Phosphate (CRP) continues to take significant steps towards its 2015 production target. In early July the company submitted New Zealand’s first Marine Consent application under the new EEZ regime to the Environmental Protection Authority – the culmination of three years work and a $20 million investment, says chief executive Chris Castle. “We’ve worked pretty hard to get to this point and it is exciting to be the first cab off the rank under the new regime. “The application is making history and will also be a test case for everyone involved, including the EPA and anyone taking either a positive or adverse approach to it.” Castle says he is not too worried about opposition to the company’s plan to mine medium grade rock phosphate from the Chatham Rise, 450km offshore, as it is the “nature of the beast” when it comes to the mining industry. “We’ve done the work so know what’s out there on the Chatham Rise and what the effects of our activities will be. We intend to operate in a way that minimises possible damage to the sea floor as much as possible.” CRP holds a prospecting licence over 4726 square kilometres (sqkm) of ocean on the Chatham Rise with a well defined deposit of 25 million tonnes of medium grade rock phosphate with an in-situ value of around $US4.3 billion. The Environmental Impact Assessment forming the centrepiece of Chatham’s Marine Consent application will be considered under the new Exclusive Economic Zone environmental consenting regime, which came into force on June 28 as part of the EEZ and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) legislation. The main document presented as part of CRP’s application runs to more than 330 pages and there are about 30 appendices including a large number of scientific reports and models. The team has summarised the key findings to assist potential submitters to work through the documentation. Castle says the company is currently working closely with Boskalis (the project’s contract miner and one of three cornerstone investors alongside Subsea and Odyssey Marine) on detailed design work relating to the vessel, riser system, onboard separation system, sinker system, and drag head that will carry out the marine mining. “The drag head is in essence a power vacuum cleaner that fluidises a thin layer of sea floor, made up of 85 percent sandy silt and 15 percent rock phosphate nodules. “This material is sucked up to the surface where the rock phosphate is extracted. The remaining sediment is then returned to the sea floor.” Castle says Boskalis already has hundreds of drag heads in operation around the world, but is adapting the technology for the nature of the Chatham Rise deposit. He says the marine mining process leaves a “tiny footprint” compared to the fishing industry.

CRP chair Linda Sanders and iwi adviser Toko Kapea during a consultation visit to the Chatham Islands. “We are putting back 85 percent of the material we extract, with the net effect being a lowering of the sea floor by two inches over the 30sqkm mined annually. We will extract phosphate from selected areas only once.” “From that we will earn roughly $9m per sqkm, in contrast to the fishing industry that bottom trawls 50,000sqkm repetitively each year with significantly lower economic benefit that we estimate to be around $10,000 to $20,000 per sqkm.” CRP’s Initial Public Offer of shares and options closed in mid July and raised $1.58m. Castle said while it was disappointing not to reach the target of $4m, the non-brokered offer successfully raised the profile of the company and attracted 120-plus new investors. CRP has now raised $23.5m of the estimated $30m needed for production, with much of the funding sourced in “very difficult market conditions”, he says. “With an existing market capitalisation of $50.4m we expect to be able to progressively raise the last $6.5m as we require it.” The company also remains focused on the progression of its Mining Licence application with New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals; its plans to list the company on the Toronto Stock Exchange; and further talks with potential overseas investors.

Above, phosphate nodules on the seafloor; right, the Chatham Rise site is located 450km offshore.


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NEWS » New Zealand Sign and Display Association

Business North / September 2013

Excellence rewarded: the country’s top apprentices for 2012 were recognised recently at the New Zealand Sign and Display Awards.

Awards showcase sign-writing skill Sue Russell If the standard of entry in this year’s 17th annual New Zealand Sign and Display Association awards is anything to go by this country is home to some seriously talented and innovative sign-writers. Held in Blenheim in April the awards showcased over 390 entries, straddling 18 signage and display categories, including vehicle, illumination, dimensional, traditional, glasswork right through to ten entries from the country’s top up and coming apprentices. The New Zealand Sign and Display Association traces its beginnings back to a break-away from the Painters and Decorators Association nearly 50 years ago. Current Secretary/General Manager Brian Fairchild says that moment was pivotal in the professionalising of the signage and display industry and many benefits now flow to its 230 members.

“Our members can use our logo in their marketing, and they have our backing should there be any question over the quality of their work. “It’s all about quality and all about trust in this industry. The quality of work produced by any member is guaranteed by us and we stand by that guarantee,” says Fairchild. In the 17 years he has been secretary there have been just nine complaints about members work. Of these, eight were found in favour of the customer and when one of the eight failed to correct the problem that company’s membership of the association ceased. “We’re that serious about the professionalism and standards we expect our members to work to and they’re just as serious as us. “We don’t represent every sign-maker but we do represent 100% of the good ones,” Fairchild says. He goes back far enough in the industry to recall the impact the invention of the silicon chip had on the craft and art of sign-writing.

It’s all about quality and all about trust in this industry. The quality of work produced by any member is guaranteed by us and we stand by that guarantee.

Trade displays are a popular part of the NZSDA annual conference.

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Business North / September 2013

NEWS » New Zealand Sign and Display Association

5

The finishing touches are added to a large wall mural. While there is an aspect of lamenting the demise of the old guild days, which saw the hard-grind of trainee sign writers perfecting free-hand lettering, Fairchild says some good things have come about since computers arrived. “Using these technologies and with the advent of wide-format printing, two dimensional work has a certain perfection about it. “You can tell that the piece has been created through the computer. “Anything that is hand brushed has an inherent imperfection; just as in nature, perfection doesn’t exist.” The association is actively involved in lobbying councils on signage by-laws and in developing health and safety policies that meet site safe standards. Members can also access favourable supply deals. With just 52 apprenticeships in the system, Fairchild says there are never enough. “In a small industry like ours with a relatively small pool of qualified sign writers it is vital we keep promoting apprenticeships.

“The NZSDA is fully behind any businesses that take on an apprentice for the four or five year period of training, depending on their speciality,” says Fairchild. He knows the work and aims of the association are worthwhile. Fiarchild only needs to look at the growth in business of many of its members from small owner-operated firms, typical of the 1990’s, to where they are now, expanding, employing and most importantly training up the next generation of sign and display craftspeople. The association’s website showcases all the entries in this year’s highly coveted awards. A real treat to view!

NZ Sign and Display Association 09 473 9109 www.nzsda.net.nz

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6

SHIPPING » Port of Tauranga

Business North / September 2013

Hub port trend driving growth Karen Phelps The worldwide trend towards hub ports has partly been responsible for Port of Tauranga’s recent expansion of its container terminal facilities, says Port of Tauranga chief executive Mark Cairns. “Whereas in the past smaller vessels used to arrive in our port the increasing trend is for larger vessels to arrive then discharge cargo for distribution by either small vessels or land in a process called transhipment,” says Cairns. “We have had nearly 90% growth in transhipment volumes.” The Port’s capital expenditure programme has included a $30 million extension to wharf length at the Tauranga Container Terminal, increasing it by 170 metres or 28%. A new Liebherr Super-Post Panamax ship-to-shore twin-lift gantry crane has been installed increasing the number of the terminal’s container cranes to six. A seventh crane is to be commissioned next year. Six new straddle carriers have been purchased to transport containers to and from the cranes, and over the last two years ground slot capacity has been increased by 30% and refrigerated container outlets by 60%. A new rail siding - including reconfiguration of the existing area to allow up to four trains to

be loaded and unloaded at once - has also been constructed. Before the changes the port could only handle two vessels at a time – now it can handle three meaning a faster, more flexible service. “Ships are often off schedule due to weather etc so this allows us more flexibility,” says Cairns. “We can also now apply increased crane intensity on a vessel to get goods off-loaded quicker,” he says. Port of Tauranga has just received final consent to proceed with major dredging works scheduled to begin later this year, which will widen and deepen Tauranga Harbour shipping channels to accommodate larger vessels. At present the port can cater to 5000TEU (20 foot equivalent containers) and after the dredging will be able to handle 8000TEU. “It will allow our exporters a more economical way to get goods to market and will also result in cost savings for importers as well.” Cairns says additional benefits of transhipment and hub ports include environmental impact with significant reductions in carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide emissions predicted. “Figures from a New Zealand Shippers’ Council analysis suggest a 31% reduction will be possible by shipping on larger more fuel efficient ships.”

• Growth expectations - page 8

All smiles: Port of Tauranga chief executive, Mark Cairns, left, Prime Minister John Key, and Port chairman, John Parker, at the opening of the port’s new container terminal facilities this year.

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Business North / September 2013

SHIPPING » Port of Tauranga

The Port of Tauranga has purchased six new straddle carriers to transport containers to and from the cranes as part of the expansion of the port’s container facilities.

Better Together Our Promise, Your Satisfaction

• Pacific International Lines (PIL) celebrates its long-standing partnership with Port of Tauranga Limited. • Since PIL's launch of service in New Zealand, direct call into Tauranga is an integral part of PIL's service to our customers. • PIL vessels bearing the 'Kota' prefix can be seen twice weekly in the port moving blue PIL containers around the Bay of Plenty region. • PIL offers the fastest transit time via the hub ports of Port Klang and Singapore into North Asia, South East Asia and has a direct link into Taiwan, Philippines and China. • To better serve the Tauranga market, McKay Shipping Ltd, as a PIL Agent, has an office situated in Nikau Crescent Mount Maunganui. • PIL, together with Port of Tauranga Limited, strives to build strong and long-lasting relationship with Tauranga market.

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SHIPPING » Port of Tauranga

Business North / September 2013

Port’s rapid growth set to continue Karen Phelps Officially established in 1873 Port of Tauranga is now New Zealand’s largest port. It operates wharves at Sulphur Point and Mount Maunganui in Tauranga, as well as MetroPort, a rail-linked inland port in South Auckland. Today the scope of the port’s operations is extensive and includes provision of wharf facilities, land for storage and transit of cargo, berthage, cranes, tug and pilotage services, leasing of land and buildings, container terminal ownership as well as providing a rail link to Auckland through MetroPort. The Port’s Tauranga Container Terminal opened for business in 1998 and complements the bulk cargo operations. Port of Tauranga operates on both sides of Tauranga Harbour with the Port’s Container Terminal situated on 76 hectares of land at Sulphur Point, and the bulk wharves at Mount Maunganui situated on just over 115 hectares. Port of Tauranga had 36% compounding growth last year in container volumes compared with world shipping trade figures of 5-6%. The port’s chief executive Mark Cairns says that this year the Port is also anticipating double digit growth figures. “We have a good cargo facility complemented by our own rail and inland port in South Auckland. “We are one of the few ports in New Zealand to be a net acquirer of land, which means we have a significant land bank to cater to future growth. “We’ve tried to plan for 30-50 years out rather than taking a short term view. “Our ability to cater for larger ships will not only benefit the Bay of Plenty, but also the broader national economy. “These investments are vital to ensure New Zealand’s exporters can remain competitive globally.

In demand: Port of Tauranga had 36% compounding growth last year in container volumes. “Port of Tauranga will continue to invest to ensure we lead New Zealand’s port infrastructure developments into the future.” The Port of Tauranga Group includes: Tapper Transport Limited - New Zealand’s largest wharf cartage company and operator of a container freight station adjacent to MetroPort Auckland and includes Priority Logistics

Quality Marshalling (Mount Maunganui) Limited - New Zealand’s second largest log marshalling and scaling company, with operations based at Mount Maunganui, Northport, Murupara, Rotorua, Kaingaroa, Napier and Auckland. Northport Limited - a joint venture with Northland Port Corporation, operating a deep water commercial port at Marsden Point.

FULLY DEDICATED SHIPPING SERVICE BETWEEN NEW ZEALAND TO AND FROM FIJI AND NEW ZEALAND TO AUSTRALIA.

• Tauranga to Suva and Lautoka every 21 days • Auckland to Suva and Lautoka • Fortnightly Auckland / Tauranga / Napier to Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. • Multi- purpose vessels specialising in dry / reefer containers, break bulk and project cargoes. • Neptune Pacific Line is proud of its reliable schedule and ex cellent delivery record of cargo reaching its destination as advertised. • Owners of 3 ships serving the South Pacific. Australia

Neptune Pacific Agency Australia Pty Ltd ACN 128 149 280 Level 12, 45-47 York Street Sydney NSW 2000 PO Box 3813 Sydney NSW 2001 Australia Phone +61 2 9235 2999 Fax +61 2 9235 2912

New Zealand

Neptune Pacific Agency Australia Pty Ltd New Zealand Branch Level 12, AFFCO House 12-26 Swanson Street, Auckland 1010 PO Box 3291 Shortland Street. Auckland 1140 New Zealand Phone +649 302 5360 Fax +649 302 5361

Fiji

NPT Agency Level 3, Ra Marama House, 91 Gordon Street, Suva PO Box 36 Suva Fiji Phone +679 3304 528 Fax +679 330 0057 / 331 6360

www.neptunepacificline.com

MetroPack Limited - a container packing and unpacking facility based in Auckland. MetroBox Auckland Limited - a container cleaning, repair and storage facility at MetroPort, operated in a joint venture with KiwiRail. Cubic Transport Services Limited (37.5% ownership) - specialists in moving freight within New Zealand.


Business North / September 2013 SHIPPING » Port of Tauranga DEVELOPMENT » - Golden Sands

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Tauranga eyes hook-up with Timaru’s Primeport Port of Tauranga hopes to extend its reach into the South Island with the announcement of plans to acquire a 50 percent shareholding in South Canterbury’s PrimePort. Under the plan - which remains subject to local community consultation - Port of Tauranga will become a joint venture partner in Timaru-based PrimePort with Timaru District Holdings Ltd (TDHL) Other elements of the transaction mean that the current minority owner, Port Industry Holdings Ltd (PIHL), will sell all shares, and Port of Tauranga will buy the container terminal assets, including the cranes and forklifts. Port of Tauranga will operate the port’s container terminal under a long term lease arrangement. TDHL, which is owned by the Timaru District Council, will be the 100% owner of the port’s investment property. It will continue to be the joint partner in the operation of the port and derive secure income through this investment. The amount paid by Port of Tauranga for the 50% stake in PrimePort and the container assets will be $21.6 million. PrimePort will still manage and operate all aspects of the port, including breakbulk such as logs, fertiliser, fuel and all marine services. The only exception is the container terminal, which will be leased and operated by Port of Tauranga. PrimePort said the deal combines the capability of Port of Tauranga, New Zealand’s largest and most efficient port, with PrimePort’s strategic position and huge commercial potential in the South Island. It has the capacity to open exciting new doors to exporters, in South Canterbury and beyond and to create a paradigm shift in the way freight is moved in New Zealand. PrimePort chairman Roger Gower says the venture creates the opportunity to deliver huge

benefits to the community and transform trading opportunities for the South Canterbury region. The agreement, will have far-reaching positive economic and social impacts for the region, Gower says. “This is a first step in a pathway for all central South Island exporters to connect directly with a far greater range of shipping services offered by Tauranga, enhanced by the frequency and personalised service of a local port. “It is a win-win-win proposal that will deliver a huge boost to the business sector and wider community,” Gower says. “It opens possibilities for more jobs, increased trading volumes and significant growth for our port and partners.” PrimePort chief executive Jeremy Boys said Port of Tauranga’s position as the country’s number one port hub for freight to international markets was an important part of the deal, and the alliance is entirely consistent with the strong recommendations by the NZ Shippers Council, made up of Fonterra and the country’s largest exporters. “The joint venture creates the opportunity for coastal shipping to allow a better, more reliable route to international markets,” he says. Boys says the new entity will aggressively pursue new business opportunities. “We believe we can attract substantial new business to PrimePort through the efficiencies and greater range of international services that this new venture provides.” “The port has faced many challenges over recent years but we always believed in the value that was here, value which has been recognised by this alliance,” Boys says. “It reflects not only Tauranga’s innovative approach to business but the long term vision by our shareholders, which we trust our community will respond to during the consultation phase.” Jock Freight International are agents for

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“It’s not the mountain we conquer, but ourselves” - Sir Edmund Hillary -

The Golden Sands development stretches along the coastline, just 900 metres from the beach front.

Golden Sands ticks the boxes Karen Phelps Golden Sands Papamoa Beach will become a new hub for the Tauranga region after the Tauranga Eastern Motorway Link opens in 2016, coupled with the Ports of Tauranga’s recent move to become a deep water port, say the developers. “We have already had interest from import/ export businesses looking at the possibility of relocating from Auckland to Tauranga,” says Golden Sands Papamoa Beach sales and marketing manager Mark Day. “They want to know if the land in the development is affordable to build on and if the housing is affordable for potential employees,” says Day. “Golden Sands Papamoa Beach ticks both boxes.” Developed by Bluehaven Management Limited, Golden Sands has been taking shape since 2001 and now 750 houses have been constructed and residents number around 2500. When fully developed the site will cater for over 7000 residents. Established in the mid 1990s, Bluehaven is one of the largest land developers in the Bay of Plenty region. The company is dedicated to best practice urban and suburban planning with a focus on addressing housing choice and attainability. The Golden Sands development stretches along the coastline and is located just 900 metres from the beachfront. It offers residential sites ranging from 350-700sqm. The Golden Sands Primary School, which opened two years ago, now has a roll of around 260 pupils. Golden Sands Kindergarten is also operational. Day says that Bluehaven Management is also currently in discussions to open a proposed new private primary school in Golden Sands. He says one of the main thrusts of the development has been sustainable community living. “Golden Sands has been planned as part of the Papamoa East Urban Growth Strategy, to be built around connecting neighbourhoods and a proposed 20ha cosmopolitan town centre. Walkability has been paramount.

Golden Sands Papamoa Beach 0800 727 2662

Sir Edmund Hillary was dynamic, but one of our most influential heroes described himself as “an ordinary chap, sufficiently motivated.”

www.goldensandspapamoa.co.nz

“In Golden Sands streets are connected and a sense of community is promoted through the shared public space. “It will be a self-supporting community with a strong sense of belonging and pride amongst its residents.” Sites can be purchased direct from the developer or Bluehaven have also partnered with a range of partner builders who have purchased sites in Golden Sands. Partner builders are Golden Homes, Venture Developments, Classic Builders, Platinum Homes, Dixon Homes, Urban Homes, Blue Group, NZ Design & Build and Souness Builders. “Their packages incorporate the best materials, fittings and fixtures that are available in modern residential building,” says Day. “With a good mix of builders involved in the subdivision, Golden Sands offers a diversity in product design and styles to fit the needs of today’s market.” The latest stage of Golden Sands opened in November last year and 58 of the 81 sites have already been sold. It is expected that commercial sites will be opened in 2016/17.

A quality coastal development. Golden Sands is a neighbourhood that has been taking shape since 2001. It has matured into a very friendly, walkable community with local shops, schools, play grounds and the beach within a short stroll of each other. Show homes are now opened for viewing in the new stage of Golden Sands. Sections from $147,000

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We think he probably would have also said something like this - keep looking ahead, have great people, keep positive and keep going; because that’s all you can do. Think of the possibilities.

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MANUFACTURING » McNaughton

10

Business North / September 2013

McNaughton celebrates milestone Karen Phelps McNaughton has been built on a reputation of innovation, trust and leadership, says company general manager Andrew Riley. “Celebrating 75 years is huge for us. We are a family business founded by the three fathers of the current McNaughton directors. It is the reputation the company has forged over these years that we are most proud of,” says Riley. The company was founded by brothers Max, Jack and Noel. Today it is operated by their sons Garry, Grant, Ross and Dennis who are continuing the family tradition of excellence in joinery. The management team boasts collective industry experience of over 150 years. Riley says it is the family’s values that have been a cornerstone of the 75 year success of McNaughton. “There is a strong sense of loyalty in this company from the directors to the employees. “Some staff have been working for the company for 30 years; the longest serving employee has clocked up 46 years. “Whether our products are made in timber or aluminium, McNaughton windows, doors and shutters are crafted by joiners with an average of 16 years’ experience and tested to comply with New Zealand standards,” says Riley. The company culture of loyalty also extends to customers, many of whom have been purchasing from the company for many years. “When a customer rings McNaughton they are able to speak to any one of the four directors who continue to work in the business,” says Riley.

McNaughton 09 620 9059 www.mcnaughton.co.nz

Over the years the company has taken a leadership role both within the company and the wider industry including spearheading many innovative changes. There is perhaps no greater example of this than the work of Garry McNaughton in bringing the New Zealand timber joinery industry together to create a manual of tested profiles proven to outperform the NZ 4211 standards. The standards are the result of a 2010 mandate by the Department of Building and Housing, which gave the timber window industry two years for its windows to comply with the NZS 4211 standard. Garry tested McNaughton’s existing windows and doors and with testing now complete McNaughton has lead the timber joinery industry and produced a range of windows and doors fully compliant to NZ4211. He is now involved in a programme tasked with testing windows and doors to ensure they meet the requirements of the New Zealand Building Code clause E2 for installation into buildings. Riley says as a result there will soon be a fully tested installation manual designed to create the appropriate resource for architects wishing to guarantee fully compliant windows are being installed. He says that employees are also encouraged to take leadership positions in the industry with David Cunningham (McNaughton project manager) recently being elected as the president of Auckland Master Joiners – a position many of the McNaughton directors have occupied over the years. The company manufactures timber joinery predominantly for the residential home market and products include timber windows, doors, shutters and louvres. It also manufactures a range of fire doors under the brand name FYADOR that are smoke stop, 15-minute, 30-minute and 60-minute rated.

Latest developments: Garry McNaughton, right, discusses the NZS 4211 standards with Andrew Riley, centre, and Dennis McNaughton. Riley says the company’s strength is in its strong tradition of craftsmanship enabling the production of one-off boutique designs as well as standardised products. McNaughton also holds an agency for Vistalite aluminium joinery and Alti, a product which offers timber joinery on the home interior and aluminium joinery on the exterior. Riley, who has recently been employed as general manager to take the company forward, says customer service will be a key part of this.

The company has recently invested in new computer software that McNaughton is currently rolling out to streamline processes and enhance the customer experience. “Every day our people strive to supply great customer service. “From a product point of view McNaughton will continue to evolve and lead the market,” says Riley. “Continual improvement is one of the outcomes of being a ‘yes’ company with engaged employees.”

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Business North / September 2013

BUILDING » Foster Construction

11

Accolades pour in for Claudelands Sue Russell Major Hamilton-based construction company, Foster Construction received Gold and Silver awards at the prestigious New Zealand Commercial Project Awards held in Auckland mid-May for construction of the Claudelands Event Centre in Hamilton. Foster’s commercial manager Leonard Gardiner says that while the accolades were a thrill to receive he was not surprised that the company’s effort and standards achieved with the construction was recognised by peers in the building industry. “We poured our heart and soul into the project and as the only Hamilton company to tender for the job we feel very proud of our efforts and for building this first-class facility for the community,” Gardiner says. The build was not without some unexpected and costly challenges along the way, and, given the project was delivered both on time and to budget, speaks volumes of the quality of workmanship Fosters Construction delivered. “We spent about $3 million more than budgeted in the ground because when digging got underway it was discovered that an historic stream went through the land,” says Gardiner. “We had to remove vast amounts of substandard soil before constructing reinforcement and huge piles to deal with the problem. “Still, with working with the sort of flexibility we’re used to we managed to save costs elsewhere and keep true to the budget Hamilton City Council had set.” Foster Construction is not new to major builds in the Waikato area. Other projects have included the Waikato Academy of Performing Arts at Waikato University, and The Verandah café, restaurant and function centre at Hamilton Lake. The Claudelands arena has a capacity to seat 5000 but its clever design, by Hamilton Architects Chow-Hill, means that the large area can also easily be made smaller to accommodate smaller groups. “The whole design is incredibly flexible and while aspects of the project challenged our skills I can say that our team stepped up to the task,” says Gardiner. “Some of the technical services imbued in the

The new Claudelands Event Centre in Hamilton has been recognised in the NZ Commercial Project Awards. building, including mechanical, electrical and fire technologies are second-to-none. “The air-conditioning alone cost $5.5 million to complete.” The sequencing of such a large project was a vital part of the success of its management, according to Gardiner. Every month the key stake-holders got together to review where the build was at and to make necessary modifications in planning to keep the project ticking over. “A company the size of ours has the ability to

draw on more staff as needed and over the years we’ve built up incredibly valuable relationships with other contractors. “On projects of this size and scale those relationships are essential to achieve the end result we expected.” The construction of Claudelands was also a first

Photo - Stephen Cox

for developing green star building standards for a facility of this size. Features include recycling of water and waste, use of the soil on site to create bunds, and the environmentally friendly choice of materials used substantially throughout.

• Foodcourt renovation a winner - page 12

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BUILDING » Foster Construction

Business North / September 2013

Foodcourt renovation a winner Sue Russell A great deal of careful thought and sequencing went into Foster Construction’s renovation of Hamilton’s Centre Place Foodcourt and Dining Lane, the results of which were acknowledged with a Gold Award in the retail category at this year’s NZ Commercial Project Awards. Not only did the alterations have to work around existing permanent structures, but, impressively, the project took place with the minimum of disruption to retailers who continued to trade through most of the building phase. “The Buchan Group from Auckland did a marvellous job at the design, opening up a tired and somewhat enclosed space into a bright appealing area for diners,”’ says Foster’s commercial manager Leonard Gardiner. “Our challenge was that the construction had to come second to the needs of the operators and the public,” he says. Key to the success of the entire build was the high level of communication between the project’s engineers, architect/designer, quantity surveyor and project manager. Gardiner recalls the demolition phase provided surprises and unexpected remedial work adding costs and pressures on timelines. However, he says, that savings were able to be achieved in other places bringing the project in on time - ready for the 2011 Rugby World Cup - and to budget.

The substantial renovation of the Centre Place Foodcourt has created a stunning new dining area in Hamilton. The company was especially praised for the impeccable level of health and safety initiatives it developed and followed, aimed at keeping everyone safe. “We had a very dynamic situation to deal with, between our responsibilities to keep our own workers safe, ensuring the safety of the retailers we were working around and the public. Regular tool box talks were critical in achieving this,” Gardiner says.

He describes the dining lane as “absolutely fantastic”, with its north facing aspect, bright warm and welcoming. Foster Construction is a company very loyal to Hamilton and the Waikato and to demonstrate this, its preference is to use local contractors as much as possible. And for the outstanding standard of work achieved on the food court renovation Fosters has been rewarded with more work from Centre Place

owners, Kiwi Property Holdings Ltd, who has contracted the company to undertake more major refurbishments through the entire building.

Foster Construction 07 849 3849 www.fosters.co.nz

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BUILDING » Foster Construction

Business North / September 2013

13

Foster Construction’s renovation of Hamilton’s Centre Place Foodcourt and Dining Lane, won a Gold Award in the retail category at this year’s NZ Commercial Project Awards.

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BUILDING » D Stevens Ltd / Brownmore Construction

14

Business North / September 2013

Concrete specialist does it all Karen Phelps

The new St John Ambulance Gisborne headquarters - a winner.

St John Centre delivers in style Karen Phelps It’s been a challenging project but D Stevens Ltd has completed the new St John Ambulance Gisborne headquarters before schedule and under budget – two factors which also helped secure the project a gold award in the Registered Master Builders House of the Year 2013 competition in the commercial section. The project also took out the national award in the category. D Stevens managing director Peter Stevens says the time frame was tight making it even more remarkable that the company managed to finish before schedule. Undertaken in 2011 the project, designed by Gisborne firm Pacific Modern Architecture, was completed in just eight months. “Because the St John team had had to move to a leased building we simply couldn’t have gone over time as they had a fixed lease,” explains Stevens. A key reason for the project was the fact that the building no longer met modern building codes. The original single-storey training centre was demolished and rebuilt. D Stevens had to excavate 1.2 metres below road level to ensure foundations met modern earthquake standards. This presented challenges as, despite commencing in summer, bad weather meant the crew had to deal with water run-off from the road as well as working close to the water table. Water had to be pumped out as the foundations were poured simultaneously. D Stevens also constructed two-storey garaging that was added onto a renovated part of the initial structure. The whole building was thermally insulated with double glazing and insulation products resulting in passive heating and ventilation. D Stevens offered a turn-key service down to car parking, fencing and landscaping. St John Ambulance was actually fund raising for the project as it was getting completed.

D Stevens Ltd 06 867 5700 www.dstevens.co.nz

This meant that D Stevens had to keep tight control of progressing and expenses, ensuring excellent lines of communication between contractor, architects and clients. D Stevens Ltd was started by Derek Stevens more than 50 years ago. The company is now managed by his son Peter. A long-standing member of the Gisborne Registered Master Builders Peter is proud of his company’s commitment to the building industry and the tradition started by his father. With a staff of 30, D Stevens offers a complete service and the team can take the client right through the process starting with architectural design and finishing with the interior decoration and landscaping. The company offers free advice, information, measure and quote on new buildings and alterations from all of its firms departments which include carpentry, wooden joinery and Rylock aluminium.

Dennis Hall Decorators 2013 Ltd

Concrete may seem pretty ordinary stuff to most of us - but not to Rex Podmore. His life has been dedicated to concrete and he says it can be used to achieve a range of looks – something people often don’t realise. “Concrete doesn’t just have to be grey. “While standard plain concrete can look very natural and is cost-effective a colour can be added to match or complement the property to give an impressive finish. “Concrete mixes are also available where round smooth decorative pebbles are used. These pebbles are then exposed by washing off the top layer of cement,” he says. Podmore began working with concrete straight from leaving school and has subsequently gained experience in the industry in New Zealand and Australia. He started his business Brownmore Construction Limited in 2003. Based at Waihi Beach in the Bay of Plenty, Brownmore Construction is now a highly regarded concrete specialist company. Podmore’s considerable expertise in the medium has seen him develop close working relationships with local builders as well as farmers, home owners, companies, organisations and councils. Brownmore Construction takes on all types of concrete work including colour, finish, sealing, layout, drainage, location of underground services, calculations of dig out, base course and Council permits if required. Projects include residential jobs from excavation to finished floor, standard or RibRaft foundations, driveways, paths and patios.

It also does industrial floors, tilt panels, car parks and forecourts as well as rural projects including feed pads, silage bins/bunkers, fertiliser bins, races and cow sheds. Brownmore works in the Coromandel, Hamilton, Tauranga and Te Puke. The company has been involved with various projects in the Waihi Beach area including the Whangamata Coastguard building and car park, Waihi Beach Coastguard new boat parking area and subdivisions at Waihi Beach and Waihi. It has just finished a complex project for Newmont Waihi Gold which involved working 300 metres below the surface of the earth to complete a concrete workshop floor. The company is also now completing the concrete yard and floors on New Zealand’s largest goat rotary at Gordonton, near Hamilton. The project is being undertaken for main contractor WD Davenport and Co. Brownmore Construction employs seven full time staff and the company owns its own plant as well as hiring necessary equipment depending on the contract. Rex’s wife Jennifer completes the company book work and helps ensure everything runs smoothly. The company is a member of the New Zealand Master Concrete Placers Association and is a Licensed Foundation Practitioner.

Brownmore Construction 07 863 5785 www.brownmoreconstruction.co.nz

The beauty of concrete - more than meets the eye.

CONCRETE CONTRACTOR

Quality Painters & Decorators Contact Salvie Rickard PO Box 841/16 Tapaea St, Gisborne 4010 Ph 06 867 3118 Fax 06 867 3168 Mobile 0274 449 366 Email dhdecorators2013@xtra.co.nz

Proud to be associated with St John Ambulance Centre

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Business North / September 2013

BUILDING » Hawkins Construction

15

ASB Theatre gets new lease of life Karen Phelps From a design and construction perspective Auckland’s ASB Theatre in the Aotea Centre has always been a venue fraught with challenges. Originally designed and constructed in the late 1980s at the time the Aotea Centre project was dogged by procurement, construction and public controversy issues during its fast tracked delivery. The combination of these factors saw the project eventually well over budget and late on completion. A feasibility study was done in 2006 for the theatre refurbishment project - which was completed last year. Designed by Archoffice, the refurbishment was carried out by Hawkins Construction. Hawkins project manager, Alun Larsen, says one of the biggest challenges was the need to work the building programme around prearranged bookings for shows. “Work streams had to run in parallel and in stage one this included working on the walls, ceiling and floor at the same time. “Contractors had to work for 24 hour period for half of the project to meet the tight time frames.” Access was another key challenge with all materials having to be loaded in through the truck dock to the rear of the building. “To get materials to the workface they had to be brought across the stage meaning that the whole stage had to be supported to take the extra loading that was to be placed on it and also covered in a protective layer of plywood. “One of the key considerations during the build was the ability to keep the rest of the facility operational. “To this end we looked at different construction and demolition methodologies to reduce both sound and vibration through the structure,” says Larsen. Stage one of the project involved construction of the new stalls area, wall panelling, lighting as well as part of the acoustic requirements and building services. The concrete and steel floor was replaced to give better sight lines for the audience, to ensure it complied with disabled access requirements and allowed the air conditioning to be separated from the seats when it had previously been integrated. This gave the venue more flexibility as seats could then be removed if required to create a larger space. Hawkins had to complete the stall floor at the same time as installing the new acoustic reflectors in the ceiling where each panel weighed up to 12 tonnes. This necessitated a complex scaffolding system which allowed for installation above and construction below, plus a lift operated with four electric winches hung from a supporting structure at the top of the fly tower to lift the panels into place.

New look: the auditorium’s new decor features a combination of Danish birch ply and red New Zealand wool seating. Stage two of the refurbishment involved installing the smoke extractor and HVAC requirements in a new plant room located on the top of the building. The circle floor and seating were also replaced with a new plenum and new wood panelling installed in this area with new entrances to the entire venue. Archoffice director Brendan Rawson says that there were a number of aspects of the project that required architectural thinking and engineering design outside the square both in the design stages and during construction. “The project could not be completed in a single construction sequence and there were only a couple of very small windows of opportunity to carry out the work on site.

“Due to the high interdependence between the various work streams the challenge was to divide the scope of work between the two stages so that the work could be completed on time to meet the next show booking and that the theatre was left in the most presentable format for the period between the stages,” says Rawson. Rawson says that decor was also a challenging aspect of the project requiring a new twist on the traditional theatre look. Danish birch ply was the material of choice which accentuated the red New Zealand wool seating selected. Due to acoustic considerations parquet flooring was installed throughout the stalls and circle floors to replace the existing carpet. Despite the many challenges along the way

One of the key considerations during the build was the ability to keep the rest of the facility operational.” the project was completed on time and on budget, something Rawson takes great pride in. “The Aotea Centre and ASB Theatre has been returned to where it should be and is now realising its full potential as a premier theatre in New Zealand.”

Hawkins Construction 09 918 8100 www.hawkinsconstruction.co.nz

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BUILDING » Legacy Construction

Business North / September 2013

New Countdown meets its targets Karen Phelps Legacy Construction specialises in undertaking challenging projects. A recent example of the company’s work was the new Countdown at Browns Bay, Auckland. The refurbishment of the Countdown was the latest in a series of stores that Legacy Construction has worked on over the years for Progressive Enterprises Limited. “These projects can be challenging because the bulk of the job often has to be completed after hours,” says Legacy Construction director Shane Hartner. “We also have the general public and constraints such as noise control to take into consideration. “At the end of the day the store needs to remain fully operational and we do everything we can to ensure this by liaising with and updating our client on a frequent basis,” Hartner says. The Browns Bay store was completely refurbished to bring it up to modern standards including relocating departments within the store, remodelling the back of house and entrance along with reclad work on the store exterior. In order to keep the store fully functional parts of the store were sectioned off and worked on in isolation. “This obviously requires extensive planning and project management. “We work closely with the Progressive Enterprises project manager to ensure key dates are met and things progress smoothly as planned,” says Hartner. He says these types of projects are often complicated by the fact that there can be unknown factors. For example in the Browns Bay project there were issues with the existing structure and a large amount of variations. To overcome this the team had to reprogram and move around the staging as well as work with the Progressive Enterprises project manager to get the project back on track This involved Legacy Construction staff having to work several different shifts to get the work completed, one reason why Hartner chooses to employ his own staff.

New look: the Browns Bay Countdown supermarket was completely refurbished to bring it up to modern standards.

“This is a factor that sets us apart in the construction industry today and one that is of significant benefit to our clients as it assures them that the team we appoint to work on their project is a cohesive group with a strong track record.” Hartner, who started Legacy Construction in

2001, says that he has placed a big emphasis on developing a family culture within the business. He currently employs around 80 staff. “We have a lot of very experienced staff including fathers and sons working for the company.

“We believe in bringing apprentices through and have about 10 training with us currently.” Hartner say that another key to the company’s ongoing success has been on focusing on the client rather than the type of work the company will do.

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Business North / September 2013 “We essentially like to work with our clients to meet their requirements rather than placing restrictions and just telling them these are the services we offer. “This has led us to undertake a wide variety of types of work which has served us well during the recession. “We will do everything we possibly can for our clients from the smallest job to the biggest.” This flexible attitude has seen Legacy Construction undertake a range of projects including residential, commercial, retail and education including new builds, maintenance, recladding and refurbishment. Examples of past projects completed by Legacy Construction include the reclad of Hampton Court historic building in central Auckland, a project which included hanging scaffolding off a storey of the building. The company also refurbished Fountain Lane North shopping complex in Botany Town Centre and is currently working on Fountain Lane South enclosing the courtyard and transforming it into a mall area. Another stand-out feature of the company’s service, says Hartner, is the commitment to taking ownership of each project. “At Legacy we work to the highest standards and take personal pride in delivering a job well done. “The Browns Bay Countdown is yet another example of this. “It demonstrates how flexible we can be and that we have the skill and experience to make things happen no matter how challenging the job.”

BUILDING » Legacy Construction

17

The renovation included relocating departments within the store, remodelling the back of house and entrance along with recladding the exterior.

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18

BUILDING » Horvath Homes

Business North / September 2013

The Best Homes initiative is aimed at creating healthier, more energy-efficient and dynamically sustainable houses.

Bringing the ‘Best Home’ to the Bay Sue Russell Despite the last four years being pretty tough, Adam Horvath, owner of Hawkes Bay building and property development company Horvath Homes says there are plenty of positives on the horizon. Along with his Canadian-born wife Leanne, a qualified horticulturalist and interior designer, Horvath has recently been involved in an exciting ‘first’ in the New Zealand residential building industry, the development of the Best Home concept. The not-for-profit initiative is a collaboration with the Hastings District Council. Horvath says he could see the potential for healthier, energy-efficient and dynamically sustainable houses to be built for a minimal additional cost.

“I’ve been in the industry for 31 years now and have built thousands of houses so the opportunity to build the first Best Home, showcasing everything that can be achieved in sustainable, healthy housing has been a great experience and a real thrill,” Horvath says. The four-bedroom, two-bathroom 187sqm Best Home demonstration house in Havelock North was officially opened last December. Hastings Mayor, Lawrence Yule described the Best Home project as the “best example seen of private enterprise and the public sector working together”. Horvath says that the goal in building the demonstration house was to attain a minimum six stars on the Homestar rating scale, while spending no more than 5% more than it would take to build a standard non-sustainable home. “As it turns out we achieved a seven-star rating

... it is a tremendous house which has exceeded all the goals we set in its design and build. The outcome speaks for itself.”

while the average home built in New Zealand is three to four stars,” he says. “The cost is very competitive for a home of this standard and location.” Among the many stand-out features incorporated are neighbour friendly landscaping, an orientation towards the sun to maximum solar energy gain, the recycling of storm water, rainwater collection as well as a raised vegetable planter, fruit trees and a composting bin.

Response from the hundreds of visitors who have been through the home has been overwhelmingly positive. “With my hand on my heart I can say we’ve had 100% positive market feed back from visitors to the home,” says Horvath. “I’m heartened but not surprised by this as it is a tremendous house which has exceeded all the goals we set in its design and build. The outcome speaks for itself.”

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Business North / September 2013

BUILDING » Horvath Homes

The four-bedroom, two-bathroom Best Home demonstration house in Havelock North was officially opened last December. The home is jam-packed with features designed to maximise its energy-efficiency. Heating is provided by an efficient low emission wood burner as well as a temperature controlled heat transfer system. Fittings used promote water efficiency while a combination of solar and wetback heating promises to deliver hot water at minimal cost. Demand for sustainably rich homes has been increasing for some years, but it wasn’t until Horvath and his team got together with the Hastings District Council to work in partnership creating a not-for-profit housing initiative that a comprehensive design, consent and building framework arose. “The Council guarantees to process the building permit stages in five working days for houses using the Best Home system as long as all the information they require has been put together correctly.

“This means a huge saving in building time and reflects Council’s commitment to the principles of sustainable housing.” Horvath’s enthusiasm for the initiative is matched only by how proud he is of the programme and the tools it has created to help home-owners to get the best “bang for their buck” when building their home. “This co-operative approach involving council, building research company’s and our company is full of promise for the future. I’m proud to have been part of pioneering it.”

Horvath Homes 06 844 4638 www.horvathhomes.co.nz

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ARCHITECTURE » Bossley Architects

Business North / September 2013

A unique approach to architecture Karen Phelps Bossley Architects aims to design buildings that are appropriate to both location and client. “This means we don’t have a set design style. Our strength is being able to listen to the client then deliver what they want,” says company director Pete Bossley. Bossley has run the practice since 1996 after previously being a director of Jasmax. Since that time Bossley Architects has completed a wide variety of architectural projects spanning arts and culture, commercial and retail, residential, education, public buildings, urban design, interior and even furniture design. One notable project was Bossley’s role as codesigner of Te Papa in Wellington while at Jasmax.

“Our express purpose is in providing intense input into a deliberately limited number of projects,” says Bossley. “We believe that innovative yet practical design is essential for the production of good buildings and that the best buildings spring from an open and enthusiastic collaboration between architect, client and consultants. “Every project we see as a unique journey with the client and it is always very influenced by them, the site and the general location,” says Bossley. He says the aim is for each project to have a strong idea as its backbone, driving the overall design. Location is always a key consideration. A case in point was a home in the Bay of Islands which was broken into smaller elements spread over the site.

The idea was of a holiday encampment, which reflected the location of the home on a hill overlooking the sea. “These smaller elements reinforced the poetry of the landscape,” says Bossley. “They accentuated the contours of the land and brought out memories of childhood holidays.” Another prominent project designed by Bossley Architects was the Peter Blake extension of the Voyager New Zealand Maritime Museum in

Auckland. The extension was designed to house NZL32, the yacht which first won the America’s Cup for New Zealand. The extension floats over the sea and large planes of polycarbonate cladding are used combined with colour, transparency and reflectivity to suggest the constantly shifting conditions in which yachts exist as well as reflecting the natural environment, says Bossley. He says it is a good example of not only how

Every project we see as a unique journey with the client and it is always very influenced by them, the site and the general location.”

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Business North / September 2013

the company designs to the physical but also the commercial environment. “The building was designed to announce to the public that something special was going on. “The turnover of the museum rose very sharply after this new extension opened as it was a space that really drew people inside.” Bossley Architects is a member of the New Zealand Institute of Architects and has won many awards over the years. Bossley is a fellow of the institute and received the prestigious Gold Medal in 2012, awarded each year to recognise a lifetime of achievement. Bossley is also on the advisory panel for the Auckland Unitary Plan and the Auckland Design Manual.

ARCHITECTURE » Bossley Architects

Despite his success Bossley says he has no aspirations to grow his practice, instead preferring to take on a limited number of distinctive projects that he feels he can add value to. “We’re responsive to the people we’re working for and we like to explore new design options. “We think design is crucial – it’s much more than just keeping the rain out. Design is critical to the way people live their lives.”

Bossley Architects 09 361 2201 www.bossleyarchitects.co.nz

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ARCHITECTURE » APR Architects / Millennium Architecture

Business North / September 2013

Solving the design puzzle Sue Russell Roger Willard has led Rotorua-based APR Architects since establishing the company 23 years ago. Originally from England, Willard has diplomas in Architecture and Town Planning from Brookes University, Oxford, England and has worked extensively in the United Kingdom Middle East and Africa before moving to New Zealand. Describing himself as a “puzzle solver” he remembers as a youngster loving the experience of visiting construction sites, the smell of new materials and the excitement of seeing a building slowly growing out of the ground. “It wasn’t until I started studying at Brookes that I found I was good at design work and problem solving and really got excited about architecture. “Puzzle-solving and three dimensional visualisation are core aspects of architecture and I would say that most good architects excel at this,” Willard explains. He describes it as the ‘Eureka Moment’ when all the elements have come together, creating something unique – the enthralling and challenging part of architecture. The Ihenga Building for Maori Studies at Waiariki Institute of Technology is a recent example of this. It is a project Willard is very proud of. The brief asked for a building that reflected, in its design and materials, a strong Maori story and its multi-cultural purpose, with an ability to co-exist with the adjacent campus marae. “We created a strong, stunning and contemporary building with an emphasis on the virtues of wood and a commitment to sustainability. “The project took us two years and we are very proud of the end result,” he says. APR Architects has grown steadily since inception and is currently exceptionally busy, due partly to a steady stream of ACC and MOH accessible housing conversions throughout the upper North Island. Willard says this work has filled the gap left when commercial projects dried up during the recession.

The practices currently employ a multinational staff of 17 architects and technicians with team including members from the UK, Italy, Germany, the US, Brazil, Australia, and as well, of course, from New Zealand. This blend gives the practices a very broad cultural base and a wide range of experiences to call upon and it gives APR a strong position to take on substantial, leading-edge projects. APR Architects has offices in Whangarei and Hamilton, with their head office in Rotorua along with permanent representatives in Gisborne and Auckland. Workload can fluctuate; in recent times the company has had as many as 100 active projects on its books. Depending on where the work is and the complexity of the project, staff from the branches pull their expertise and resources together and share the workload. Willard spends a large proportion of his time managing the practice and overseeing the projects but he is also very connected to design work, especially when the solutions are not so simple. APR is a New Zealand Institute of Architects ‘practice’. It follows the NZIA Codes of Practices, uses approved NZIA documentation and quality assurance procedures. Staff regularly undertake professional development and the company also has Independently Qualified Persons who meet the standards for IQP registration. “We are fortunate to have a dedicated and highly professional team with a mixture of skills and a wide range of international experiences. “All this means we are well placed to give excellent service to our growing client base,” says Willard.

APR Architects 07 349 8333 www.apr.co.nz

Millennium Architecture has an impressive design portfolio.

A reputation for quality Sue Russell Rotorua-based Millennium Architecture was formed in 2002 by Jason and Megan Douglas and over the last decade has forged itself an enviable reputation for building stylish home and commercial buildings all over the region. Though Jason Douglas admits he reacted to a downfall in the market perhaps a little late, when he had to let some staff go in 2009, the firm has work booked up for the next two or three months, something he says is a result of the company’s reputation getting out by word of mouth. “Rotorua is a difficult market and I’m seeing building going back to more traditional designs, with shrinking budgets, but our clients come to us based on our reputation and this is very gratifying,” he says. The challenges that come from doing renovations are something he finds professionally very stimulating and he understands just how attached to a property people become.

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“Most people who come to me with a renovation in mind give me a list of their problems and leave it up to me to solve them. I’ve also learnt to be a bit of a marriage counsellor as well when often the couple each have a different set of priorities.” Douglas believes that if a decision is made to stay and adapt a property then the concept of overcapitalisation needs to be looked at from a different set of criteria. “If you are going to stay in the property, particularly for years to come then you get the value of the investment back in living in it.” Currently the company has four designs for Urbo Homes on the books, a relationship that began in 2006 when Urbo Homes approached Douglas to design houses for the building company on a more regular basis. “We have enjoyed a great working relationship with Urbo. Their business is part of our core work. “We also designed a 270sqm home being built in Pauanui and have just priced a new home in Whakatane, so there’s plenty on.” Douglas says he is always looking for further opportunities but is careful to weigh each one up on its merits. For him it is about preserving the company’s reputation and making sure his existing clients are completely satisfied. “Our workload is manageable and I’m not prepared to sacrifice the standard of service to my clients by taking on more and more work. “To each of my clients, their project is the most important one and we recognise this. It’s very easy to over-promise and under-deliver.” Both Megan and Jason have lived all their lives in Rotorua and operate the business from their home office 10 minutes from the CBD. Their team includes a qualified draftsman who has been with the firm for the past three years. “I remember it wasn’t easy to let go of some of my staff in 2009, so while the work is going along well, I’m cautious about not over-extending. Our building company clients are solid performers with strong reputations in the industry so our situation is looking optimistic for the future,” Douglas says.

Millennium Architecture 07 362 8775

0800 32 00 32 www.dawson.co.nz brokers@dawson.co.nz

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ARCHITECTURE » Haydn Sawyer Architects

Business North / September 2013

23

Monitoring of leaky homes essential Sue Russell There is nothing like a bit of fire in your belly on an issue you’re passionate about to give you the drive to speak out about it, even though your point of view may run counter to mainstream thinking. Such is the case with architect Haydn Sawyer, founder of Haydn Sawyer Architects based in Murray Bay on Auckland’s North Shore, when it comes to the vexed and complex issues surrounding management of the leaky homes crisis. Sawyer is angry about the unwieldy, costly, complex and often soul-destroying processes home-owners find themselves trapped in once their homes are deemed to have weather-tight issues. “We’ve become really interested in helping owners of leaky homes deal with the implications associated with ownership of these buildings. “It has been accepted that buildings have always leaked to some degree but the present environment has become very reactionary,” Sawyer says. He is most concerned about the governing bodies and professionals connected with the issue who have adopted, as he says “a belts and braces” approach, leaving the public under the illusion that if all the rules and compliance procedures are adopted then all will be well. “Most people in the construction industry know this is not true and what is needed instead is the ability to allow the monitoring of building performance on-going.” MDU permanent probes, developed by Step Up Group, are, as far as Sawyer knows, the only tool currently available to offer this monitoring capability. Inserted into skirting board and through into the bottom plate, the probes look like a small button to the eye once fitted. The probes measure moisture and provide a source of data objectively showing change in moisture content over time.

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Haydn Sawyer Architects has designed many stunning homes in Auckland. These probes will often allow for repair work to be carried out to best suit the owners’ situation. While it is accepted that the best solution is a total reclad, Sawyer says in some cases partial repairs may be more appropriate.

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He says this technology, along with recent legislative determinations, opens up this option. “As I see it the probes offer a three pronged benefit; an impartial preliminary assessment tool, an instrument to monitor remedial works and an on-going record of the building’s well-being,” says Sawyer. “The value of buildings that include this technology will potentially increase as it can demonstrate that problems identified in the past have been resolved and then monitored. It is an objective assessment device, unencumbered by option, conjecture and emotion. Sawyer says he cannot understand why the probe technology hasn’t been grabbed by builders, architects, councils and government agencies connected with the issue. He uses the analogy of buying a car, no matter how expensive, without a temperature gauge installed. “That is something that would never happen because to know a car’s temperature is vital

information, understood to be so by motorists and car designers alike. Even Lamborghinis have temperature dials, so why isn’t the monitoring of the moisture in a house seen the same way?” Over the past decade Haydn Sawyer Architects has managed the fit-out of four medical imaging facilities for Ascot Radiology including most recently the Millennium Institute of Sport and Health. Designing for the health sector has become a speciality of the company, involving high levels of interface between all parties involved. Last year the practise also completed a $4 million community centre in Albany for The Salvation Army.

Haydn Sawyer Architects 09 478 2018 www.hsarchitects.co.nz

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ARCHITECTURE » Carla Jacobi Architects

Business North / September 2013

Housing shortage driving demand Karen Phelps In the past year demand has increased for architectural design due to the desperate need in Auckland for housing, says Carla Jacobi from Carla Jacobi Architects. “There’s definitely a shortage of quality building in Auckland; we’re a growing city. There are a lot of older places that need upgrading at some point. I think people have been putting things off but they can’t put things off any longer,” she says. Jacobi started her practice in 2001 after commencing her architecture career in 1988 and working for a number of practices in Auckland. Her business has grown exponentially and she now employs a draftsperson and an office administrator. Jacobi has mainly focused on new homes and residential alterations due to demand but she also takes on a variety of architectural projects including commercial. She says her business has grown built on reputation. “The work I do is high quality and technically sound. If things go smoothly you get a good name and that’s exactly what’s happened,” she says. Jacobi personally checks every detail ensuring high levels of quality control at all times. She offers a variety of architectural services including a free initial site consultation to explore possibilities with the client. The next step is the preparation of a quotation and then the design phase, which is all rendered with 3D software. A cost estimate is obtained from a quantity surveyor and then Jacobi proceeds with more detailed drawings, building consents and construction. She also prefers if possible to be involved in a contract administrator role to ensure the project progresses smoothly. “It definitely helps to ensure a quality product if I am there regularly on site to see what’s happening,” she says. Currently under construction is an early childcare centre in Epsom, which has involved an alteration and addition to an existing building. Situated in a residential 1 zone Jacobi has had to ensure that the changes are in keeping with the original building which was built circa 1915. She says she has achieved this by taking key details from the original design and replicating these with a modern twist in the new addition and alteration. Also underway is a home in Ponsonby, another older building which is being altered with a modern extension. The home has also been upgraded with aluminium window joinery, double glazing and insulation.

Carla Jacobi Architects Auckland 09 479 3120

Carla Jacobi Architects has focused mainly on designing new homes and residential alterations. An example of a commercial project Jacobi has completed was a contemporary refurbishment of an existing warehouse / electrical wholesale and office space in Glenfield for Scott Electrical. The building is situated among many commercial and industrial buildings and the new building was built within time and budget restraints. Located in Campbells Bay, Auckland, Jacobi’s own office is a good example of her innovative design skills. The sustainable office unit has been built from pine timber with cedar cladding and includes double glazing using thermally broken aluminium joinery. Jacobi is a member of the New Zealand Institute of Architects and is a registered architect with a bachelor degree in architecture. She also has a New Zealand Certificate in Architectural Drafting. Jacobi says she is happy to take on small to large projects from a new wardrobe system to a commercial building. “As a highly competent practice with extensive knowledge of New Zealand construction methods we pride ourselves on producing quality buildings that are fit for purpose.”

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ARCHITECTURE » Koia Architects

Business North / September 2013

25

Code needed for healthier homes Sue Russell The idea to ‘star-rate’ buildings based on energy use and maintenance costs above building code minimums would deliver significant advantages through the industry and to home owners, says Tony Koia, principal of Koia Architects, based in Auckland and Queenstown. “It would focus the industry on best value instead of low cost. “A building code that focuses on minimum standards - as our current system does - actually produces expensive homes when you consider the whole of life cost of the building,” says Koia. He says the idea is gathering support from fellow members of the New Zealand Institute of Architects. “Creating a code that allows for voluntary, higher performance standards, using a simple star system which rates the building’s components performance, would reduce the cost of better value solutions. Koia says the motor vehicle industry is a “great analogy” for what he is proposing. “When a consumer looks to purchase a $6000 car, they can instantly view a star rating for its performance, fuel efficiency, emissions levels and other key elements. “This helps the consumer evaluate if spending a little more up front on a hybrid car, is actually better value to them. “Why would we not expect the same when we purchase a $600,000 house? “This information should be available on the Project Information Memorandum, PIM, when you purchase a home and be evaluated at Building Consent stage.” Koia recently floated these ideas at an Affordable Housing Conference in Wellington, put on by Prefab NZ Ltd where affordability and quality were the hot topics. “We know the impact of poor housing standards trickles through to a wide raft of social issues.

Koia Architects is keen to see the development of healthier, more energy-efficient homes. “Running costs on houses can be significant and take food off tables. “We have the ability to significantly reduce these costs and create healthier homes. Improving the standards for the whole industry will improve the outcome and costs for all.” Koia says he first fell in love with building design as a teenager when he travelled with his family for

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two-and-a-half years through Europe. It exposed him to centuries of architecture and led him to five years of study at Auckland University’s School of Architecture in the 1980’s. While undertaking his degree he took a year off and travelled through the United States, plotting his travel by linking visits to see projects of architectural significance. “I visited a huge range of architecture and focussed on some key themes, such as how the buildings relate to the ground, the three-dimensional form and what were the common elements that made a building successful, no matter what period it was designed in. “Most inspiring were the designs of the earliest Modernist architects; Marcel Brauer, Mies van der Rohe, Eliel Saarinen, Frank Lloyd-Wright along with others like Louis Sullivan and Frank Gehry, Louis Kahn etc.” The Queenstown office opened in 2004, allowing project coverage throughout New Zealand. Koia

describes Queenstown as a special place, second to none in terms of inspiring great architecture. “We lived in Arrowtown for two years and our children, now aged 16 and 10, loved that time in their lives. “We get back as often as we can and enjoy the opportunities that both locations offer. “We live in a beautiful part of the world and our challenge as architects is not to detract from it,” he says. “New Zealand architecture is admired around the world because of its integrity, naturalness, realness and unpretentiousness. “Professionally, it’s an exciting time to be working in the industry.”

Koia Architects 09 373 2244 www.koia.co.nz


26

ARCHITECTURE » Sean Harris Architect/Proarch Architects

Business North / September 2013

Proarch chalks up 25th anniversary Karen Phelps

Sean Harris is interested in sustainable and alternative building methods.

Personal service guaranteed I am the person that

Karen Phelps Heavy demand being placed on engineers due to the earthquakes in Christchurch and Wellington has seen Taupo-based firm Sean Harris Architect being called upon to provide expertise to local engineering firms. This, coupled with a general seismic upgrading of commercial and some residential properties which has come about due to the earthquake, has seen the demand for architectural skills increase recently after a quiet few years due to the economy. “Councils are undertaking an Initial Evaluation Procedure on commercial buildings in their region to determine if they are earthquake prone or not,” says company director Sean Harris. “Owners then may be required to undertake a more detailed seismic assessment if deemed necessary. Engineers are flat out dealing with these assessments,” he says. Brick construction buildings over two storeys built pre-1960s are particularly at risk and Harris says whether a building is deemed earthquake prone or not can affect tenancy rates and also insurance premiums. If earthquake strengthening is deemed necessary then the building needs to be retrofitted with appropriate measures. This is where Harris can add his considerable expertise project managing on site as well as taking care of any necessary building consents and fire code reports required. A Registered Architect with the New Zealand Institute of Architects, Harris started his practice in 2003 after completing a Masters in Architecture with emphasis on sustainability and the built environment. He says his aim is to provide good design to achieve the best solution, in the best way for his clients, their budget and the environment. The practice is able to provide full service to projects large and small including concept design, feasibility and building surveys, 3D presentation, developed design, detailed documentation of consent and tendering and project administration and site observation. As a sole practitioner Harris feels he can offer a very personal service. “I am the person that meets with the client and does the drawings. I know their job inside out

meets with the client and does the drawings.” so when they have questions I am readily able to assist,” he says. A particular area of interest for Harris is in sustainable and alternative building methods. One project he is working on at present is a home utilising low cost local materials – pumice and clay to be used as the wall in-fill material. The method being used hails from Germany and dates back 500 years. Using timber framing with the infill in between Harris says the result is a very well insulated, sustainable and breathable wall. The wall will then be plastered to provide a modern finish. The background of his practice is mainly residential additions and alterations, new homes, education and community along with sustainable eco projects and retail. The region serviced is primarily the North Island - Harris provided his expertise on Auckland’s Millennium Sports Institute project - with some overseas work. Harris has been a past chairman and is the current treasurer of the Waikato/Bay of Plenty branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA). He was recently honoured for his service by being made a fellow of the NZIA. A beach home in Whangamata he designed based on the concept of a shell on the beach has just won a gold medal in the 2013 Waikato Registered Master Builders House of the Year competition. “My goal is to complete the circle from design, documentation and contract and site administration. “Emphasis is on personal service with a sustainable philosophy to allow the best outcome for my clients and the future.”

Proarch Architects Limited has just celebrated its 25th anniversary. The company was started by Roy Price and Fraser Vickers. Price was the sole director of the company for much of nearly 20 years until it was recently taken over by Mike Swann, Shane Lewer and Amanda Coats. Swann, a registered architect who has been with the company for 17 years, says it will be business as usual for the company’s clients despite the changes at the directorship level. “We really pride ourselves on our performance as a team and the focus now, as always, is on delivering to our customers’ expectations,” says Swann. Based in Palmerston North, Proarch has a satellite office in Masterton and completes work predominantly in the lower North Island. All of the firm’s directors have been working in the company for a long time. Lewer, a senior architect technician, has clocked up 24 years, while Coats, a registered architect, 16 years.

It means we can give them better advice because we see the project as a whole not just the architectural aspects.”

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Not surprisingly they offer considerable experience in all facets of architectural services and project management and provide a comprehensive service to clients. Coats brings expertise in Resource Management Act matters and land use management, presenting evidence at council hearings and environment court. Swann says it is not only the company directors that have considerable experience, but also the entire team of 17 staff in total including six registered architects. This, he says, has been a key factor in the success and longevity of the company. Proarch undertakes project management, architectural design and master planning. The latter involves resource consent planning and large development planning, which may include factors such as how a business might evolve over time and the needs it might have as reflected in its workspace or how to best utilise a site. Proarch typically likes to undertake the project management of assignments from site procurement and planning to perhaps the due diligence on an existing building. Swann says this gives the company a much

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ARCHITECTURE » Proarch Architects

Business North / September 2013 better understanding of the entire implications of a project from design to construction. “It also means our clients can simply have one point of contact for all their needs. “It means we can give them better advice because we see the project as a whole not just the architectural aspects,” he says Proarch undertakes literally all types of building projects but its core business is derived from the commercial and educational sectors. Projects have included the boarding facility and new dining hall and Speirs Performing Arts Centre at Palmerston North Boys High School and a series of classrooms at Whakarongo School. Proarch also completed the Foodstuffs distribution centre in Palmerston North and the Youth Space project for Palmerston North City Council. Proarch has just completed a refrigerated storage facility for Murphy Properties Ltd. The company is a member of the New Zealand Green Building Council and the New Zealand Institute of Architects and has won a number of prestigious awards for its work over the years including the Palmerston North Boys High School dining room, the Youth Space, Palmerston North Airport and Pukaha Mount Bruce Wildlife Centre. “Our goal now is to grow our business and bring value to our clients as we look forward to providing the next 25 years of service to the region.”

Proarch Architects 06 356 9549 www.proarch.co.nz

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28

ARCHITECTURE » Saunders Architects

Business North / September 2013

Packages aim to make good design affordable Karen Phelps Saunders Architects is aiming to make good design affordable with the release of a new range of design concept packages. The packages, which are one-off designs individually put together for each client, include a design consultation, plan, concept, 3D views and costings for a home. “We are aiming to show people that they can actually have an individual architect designed home for around the same price as they might pay for a set design from a group home building company,” says Saunders Architect director Neville Saunders. “We are changing our whole architectural process and essentially taking the risk so people can see what they are going to be getting before fully committing to the design. “By using our new system people can see what they are getting without having to invest a lot of money. “The packages, which start in price at around one thousand dollars, are designed to be affordable to ensure everyone has access to an architect designed home.” It’s a brand new concept for the industry and one which Saunders has put a lot of thought into. The concept has already been trialled in the market to good response. From the design concept clients can then choose to proceed with full working drawings and by teaming up with other selected industry professionals Saunders Architects can take clients through the whole build from consents to the finished home. The build is fixed-price, giving customers peace of mind and total control over their budget. He says an individually designed home brings many advantages long-term: the home will stand out commanding higher resale value and the design will maximise space giving most value for money, enhanced comfort and usability for the homeowner.

Sustainable design features and products can also be incorporated. “For example we orientate and position the windows perfectly for the specific site to maximise light, views and sunshine in the home,” says Saunders. “We take into account how the light will enter the home and how the sun will move around the house during the day. “These kinds of details are not often thought of by a person wanting a new home but are vital to their on-going comfort,” he says. Based in New Plymouth, Saunders Architects is an award winning firm, including taking out prestigious New Zealand Institute of Architects Western Awards in 2012 in the awards residential section. The awards are given based on the quality of the design reaching a certain high standard. In 2012 only two entrants in this section were deemed award-worthy. Saunders Architects has also just released a Standard and Executive home plan range based on their past successful designs. The Standard plans range in size from 90-125 square metres and the Executive plans range from 200-300 square metres. “People have the perception that architects are expensive” says Saunders. “But we are seeking to alter this perception by offering these packages and home plan ranges so that people can afford a unique architecturally designed home that will stand out from the crowd at a great price. “If you can afford a beautiful individually designed house for the same price as going to a group housing company why wouldn’t you? “It’s a win-win situation.”

Saunders Architects 06 759 7430 www.saundersarchitects.co.nz

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Business North / September 2013

ARCHITECTURE » Logan Architects

29

Building background brings benefits Karen Phelps Logan Architects Ltd is distinctive in that director Logan Reilly is a registered architect and has also worked in the past as a builder. “From working on building sites myself I know what will work and what won’t when it comes time to construct. “This means that everything we design at Logan Architects is not only extremely buildable but intelligent and creative,” says Reilly. In fact it was this key point of difference he felt he could offer the marketplace that prompted him to start the company in 1995. “I felt that I could add value to people’s projects in different and better ways than what was currently available.” Based in Muriwai, Auckland, Logan Architects offers a full range of architectural services from project feasibility studies and pre-purchase design consultation through to finished drawings, consents and tendering. The company has worked on historic buildings to contemporary homes. Reilly encourages his staff to regularly get out on building sites: “If they can’t visualise the materials or don’t know the weight of a piece of timber or steel for example how can they put it in a design and know it will work on site?” One example of the benefit this hands on practical building knowledge brings was in a commercial project the company has just designed. Logan Architects was able to reduce the steel requirements for the project by one fifth. “The result was a building that was commercially viable, giving the client an excellent return on investment and tenants a favourable lease rate. “Working closely with clients to review costs and ensure that projects are commercially viable is essential, especially in today’s market,” says Reilly. He says the strength of his practice is listening closely to clients then delivering what they want combined with offering them excellent design solutions. “We approach projects as a team from sub consultants to contractors on site so all involved have a good rapport and feel a part of the project. “This ability to work with people is vital because of the complexity of regulations today. Everyone must be on the same page.” To ensure this all projects are managed personally by Reilly, who has travelled extensively and gained invaluable experience while working in architectural practices overseas in Brisbane, London and Frankfurt. Logan Architects has now successfully

Logan Architects offers a full range of services from feasibility studies and design consultation through to finished drawings, consents and tendering. completed many successful residential, commercial, health, community and retail projects. Logan Architects is presently working on the North Piha Surf Club and despite the tight limitations of the site will deliver a design that maximises the building by smart utilisation of space. The company is also working on a new building for Hamilton Orthodontics and has just completed an office fit-out for Juralco and Autex.

A member of the New Zealand Institute of Architects, Logan Architects works throughout New Zealand. “Our practice is committed to producing outstanding architectural solutions. We achieve this through an intimate knowledge of the art and science of architecture and constantly evolving our design and technical solutions. By listening carefully to our client’s

requirements, asking questions and exploring design options we can ensure we always deliver the best result. The fact we are a smaller boutique practice means that clients only deal with me. I have very loyal staff, some of whom have been with the company ten years. “This means our clients enjoy an extremely personal individual service.”

Logan Architects Phone www.loganarchitects.co.nz

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30

ARCHITECTURE » Jensen Chambers Young

Business North / September 2013

New look a winner for Silverdale supermarket

The Silverdale Pak ‘n Save has utilised feature ceilings, tiling, colouring and lighting to ensure each area of the store is unique.

Jensen Chambers Young 09 374 5914

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Design is evolutionary especially when it comes to big supermarket brands such as Pak ‘n Save. So when Auckland based architecture firm Jensen Chambers Young Ltd took on the new Silverdale Pak ‘n Save project although certain design themes had to be adhered to, the site and location also affected the eventual design. The store, situated at 20 Hibiscus Coast Highway, at the intersection with East Coast Road, was constructed on a greenfields wedge-shaped site with contoured land that pitched steeply down from State Highway 17 to Weiti River. This meant the project involved a great deal of engineering to create the 330 car park and building platform for the 6540sqm store. An added complication was consideration for natural flora and fauna on the site, parts of which were zoned as public open spaces. This meant the native skink population on site had to be strictly monitored during the build process to ensure the animals were not disturbed. Due to the zoning, the building had to go through an extensive resource consent process and urban design assessment. One result of this was that the distinctive bright yellow colour had to be toned down slightly to fit in with the natural landscape. Director of Jensen Chambers Young Ltd, Steven Jensen says that the resulting building, which won a silver award in the retail category of the 2013 New Zealand Commercial Projects Awards run by Registered Master Builders, is a good example of the company’s focus on achieving good economical design. It also reflected design elements of an award winning Foodstuffs supermarket the company had worked on previously – the Te Rapa New World. This project won a New Zealand Interiors Retail Association design award and was the first time a supermarket had featured in the awards.

The design included a ‘shop within a shop’ concept where individual areas of the supermarket were made visually distinctive through colour, materials and innovative signage. The Silverdale Pak ‘n Save utilised some of these same design concepts – for example feature ceilings, tiling, colouring and lighting to ensure each area of the store was unique. “Each ‘shop’ within the store, for example the deli, is evocative in terms of its colour, theme and identification,” explains Jensen. Jensen Chambers Young was started by Jensen, Richard Chambers and Eddie Young in 1995. Since its inception the company has grown and accumulated considerable experience in all facets of the architectural profession through a range of completed projects. It offers a full range of architectural services including advice to assist with property or land purchasing options, leasing of commercial or retail tenancy space, development consultation, full design service, production of documents for tender pricing and construction, tender management and appointment of a main contractor and construction management and observation. The sectors the company works in include retail, commercial, hospitality and residential. The company is well versed in Green Star, a comprehensive, national, voluntary environmental rating scheme that evaluates the environmental attributes of New Zealand’s buildings. Jensen Chambers Young Ltd has designed number of Green Star rated buildings including a five star Green Star rated office development currently under construction for Mansons TCLM in Newmarket, Auckland.

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LOGISTICS » ACA International New Zealand

Business North / September 2013

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Personal service with global reach Karen Phelps It’s a small company that offers a personal service but with global reach. ACA International New Zealand distinguishes itself in the market by offering clients a very individual service but with the backing of a network of offices worldwide, says company general manager Wayne Crabb. ACA International is an international logistics and supply chain management specialist providing totally managed international transport and warehousing solutions tailored to meet customers’ needs. The company has strategically positioned offices in key cities and is supported by an extensive agency network of over 100 offices throughout more than 40 countries across the globe. Based at Mangere, Auckland, ACA International New Zealand is 100% privately owned and all the company shareholders work in the business. The company entered the New Zealand market in 2005. Since that time it has established itself as a company with its finger on the pulse of its daily business giving the ability to make quick decisions for customers, says Crabb. “Because all the company shareholders actively work in the business we can cater to the local market and find more efficient ways to run the supply chain including business-to-business interfacing,” he says. He says that the company is always aiming to stay ahead of trends and customers’ needs. The company’s 3PL warehousing solution is an example of this, where the company stores,

picks and packs product on the customers’ behalf. “This means that when one of their clients places an order we can pick it, pack it and send it direct to the client for our customer. “Once a container has been unpacked, optional bar-coded and put into storage our customer can have access to their own inventory information via our 24-hour ACA web page security access. “They can create their own ‘pick and pack lists’ and receive consignment delivery notes through access to ACA’s computer system. “All ‘in and out’ transactions will electronically balance the storage inventory in anticipation of their periodical external stock takes. “Added this to the fact that they only pay for the warehouse space actually used, the savings alone can eliminate the need for their own warehouse.’ Crabb says that customers receive maximum benefit when ACA International New Zealand takes care of both their international purchasing and 3PL warehousing. “This means we are their one port of call and can adequately monitor and advise our client of their stock levels assisting them in ordering based on lead times. It also gives one point of contact in the event that anything goes wrong. “There is no passing the buck because the buck stops with us.”

ACA International NZ offers an international freight service and state-of-the-art 3PL warehousing.

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32

ENGINEERING » Baty Thomas Engineering

Business North / September 2013

Diverse range of services on offer Karen Phelps Baty Thomas Engineering (2002) Limited prides itself on offering a diverse range of services to its clients, says company owner Brian Thomas. The company was purchased in 2002 by Thomas, who has worked in engineering for 27 years. Originally from Whangarei, Thomas moved to Dargaville over 30 years ago. Thomas started off Baty Thomas Engineering (2002) Limited with three staff members and in a short time has built the company up to its present size of six staff - one fitter turner, three fitter welders and two apprentice. Based in Dargaville, the company predominantly works locally offering general engineering services including welding, machining and mechanical engineering. The company offers dairy shed design, build and project management services and Baty Thomas Engineering has the local agency for Waikato Milking Systems, Herdflow and Reporoa High Lift Gates. The company also sells Lowara pumps and Global Pump Solutions products. These products and more can be viewed at the company showroom, where customers can also purchase bearings, milking system parts, wheels and stainless steel bolts. Another area of work is aluminium boat construction and Baty Thomas Engineering has a dedicated aluminium and stainless steel department in its workshop to fabricate the range of powercat boats that Thomas has designed called West Coast Catz. Being rurally based has led the client to develop its comprehensive range of services, says Thomas. Baty Thomas Engineering can care of plant and cow shed maintenance for local companies and farmers. The company also completes structural steel work for a range of industries. It offers steel and aluminium sales. Clients include logging companies, farmers, local manufacturers, car dealers and construction companies and the projects completed by the company have been just as far ranging. Baty Thomas Engineering completed the new bulkhead for the Dargaville Swimming Pool.

Baty Thomas Engineering recently completed the new bulkhead for the Dargaville Swimming Pool. The bulkhead is a mobile start platform for swimmers to leap from in competition swimming. Baty Thoms Engineering also completed the structural steel for an extension to Otamatea School and the new Fosters and Westpac buildings in Dargaville. The company regularly manufactures ute decks for local Toyota, Ford, Holden, UtesNissan and Mitsubishi dealers. According to Thomas business has been good. The company head office and workshop was

extended in 2006 to cope with the growth, which Thomas puts down to one thing: service. “We stick to time frames and go out of our way to cater to customers’ needs. For example if someone walks in off the street with an urgent job we’ll do our best to accommodate them.” Customers can use a Farmlands card to make purchases at Baty Thomas Engineering. They can also join the Smart Trade programme where they get points for purchases.

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CONTRACTING » Falcon Electrical

Business North / September 2013

33

Quality, diversity lead to success I see more and more

Sue Russell Leading Hawkes Bay electrical engineering specialists Falcon Electrical are a company going from strength to strength, and according to business development manager, Brad Mason, this is entirely due to the quality of people the company employs. “We have 46 staff and they are the biggest asset this company has; that and our longevity in the business means we have been able to adjust our approach to take on a large cross-section of business opportunities,” says Mason. The company, based in Onekawa in Napier, comprises several divisions; from electrical servicing and maintenance to switchboard design, fabrication and installation, security and DATA solutions, system integration and much more. With the skill-base its employees carry the company can see any electrical project through from scratch, a trait Mason describes as providing a total electrical ‘turn-key’ solution. “We have highly skilled, highly regarded technicians working for us. “As an example, when it comes to the security projects we’ve taken on, we compete with some major, nationally branded companies; to do this we have to be very good at what we do.” FALCON are involved in a large number of significant electrical engineering projects in the Hawkes Bay region, including forestry, manufacturing, food, beverage and water/waste water projects. As recognised Rockwell Automation System Integrators, Falcon is regularly engaged by clients to provide dedicated automation solutions, including process control, wireless monitoring and instrumentation services. Mason says about 80% of work is return business, which speaks volumes in terms of the consistently high standards it delivers. In a business where word of mouth is pivotal to success he is confident the company’s future is secure. Looking to the future Managing Director Richard Phillips’ commitment to renewable energy is focussing on expanding the work of its Renewable Energy division. Mason describes it as ‘taking existing technologies and bringing them together in ways to meet new environments by engineering solutions.”

people interested in taking personal ownership of their energy supply.” The company engineers off-grid installations in places where mains power doesn’t reach and with the sort of sophisticated solar photoelectric energy technologies in existence today Mason is not surprised that more and more people are turning to this endlessly renewable form of energy supply. “While uptake has been slow, in the last twelve months we have remained true to our goal and really focussed on our Renewable Energy division. “After all, we’re in a part of the country which enjoys significant sun and I personally think that solar is the way of the future. I see more and more people interested in taking personal ownership of their energy supply,” he says. While the reputation FALCON has developed over nearly 40 years has given it a prominent position in the electrical engineering industry Mason is quick to point out there is no way the company intends to rest on its laurels. “As we grow we’re constantly refining the way we approach business. Richard is leading by example in terms of the direction he has taken the company over the last few years,” Mason explains. Before joining Falcon Electrical Mason worked for some of Australasia’s largest electrical engineering product manufacturers and suppliers and in the two years Mason has been with the company he has come to value first-hand its intrinsic strengths. “I’m proud to work with such highly skilled engineers and for a company offering substantial advantages over rank and file electrical contracting businesses.”

Falcon Electrical 06 843 1646 www.falconltd.co.nz

Falcon Electrical has several divisions from electrical servicing and maintenance to switchboard design, fabrication and installation, security and DATA solutions, and system integration.

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34

SCAFFOLDING Âť Layher New Zealand

Business North / September 2013

Poor quality imports risking safety Jo Bailey The safety of construction workers could be at risk from poor quality, imported scaffolding material, says Scott Bergstrom, managing director of Layher Ltd NZ and member of the Australia/ New Zealand Standards Scaffolding Working Group. “The unprecedented level of building activity in New Zealand combined with tighter monitoring of health and safety regulations by government has significantly increased the demand for scaffolding material in the construction sector,� says Bergstrom. “This heightens the risk of inferior imported product entering the market, putting construction companies, their staff and potentially the public, at serious risk.� With no specific approval processes required for importers of scaffolding products into New Zealand, Bergstrom says it is vital that scaffolding and construction companies do their own research into the origin of any scaffolding products they purchase or rent. “They run a great risk if they assume that because a product looks similar to a well-proven quality brand, that it must be safe and will perform the same way. “The truth is that a lot of the scaffold manufacturers are simply trying to copy these products, and do not invest in good quality raw materials, highly automated manufacturing processes and the rigorous testing and robust quality assurance practices we undertake at Layher.� Bergstrom says scaffold users should check where the scaffold is made, how it is manufactured, and if it comes with valid quality certificates and approvals, and reliable technical data verifying

Layher is a leading supplier of safe, cost-effective high quality modular scaffolding.

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SCAFFOLDING » Layher New Zealand

Business North / September 2013 its capabilities. All parts should be embossed or stamped with the manufacturer’s name and production batch details to ensure they are identifiable and traceable. “We invest heavily in these sorts of practices because they are mandatory for good quality control and safety. “Unfortunately this is not something that is followed or complied with across the board.” Poor manufacturing practices can lead to fitting inaccuracies, poor welds and poor galvanising, which all pose major safety risks. “At worst these product flaws can result in the failure or even collapse of the scaffolding. The scary thing is that consumers are relatively unaware these sort of dangers exist.” He says the “evolving architecture” and often inclement weather in the New Zealand market means that scaffolding is being subjected to greater stress than ever before. “I suspect most of the cheap, imported products wouldn’t have been tested for these conditions at all.” Companies are also taking a “huge risk” if they mix prefabricated scaffolding systems from different manufacturers, he says. “Mixing systems can potentially lessen the strength, stability, stiffness or suitability of the scaffold. It can also invalidate existing product liability insurance protection and supplier warranties, putting the company at financial risk.” He says even ISO 9001 quality management system certification is no guarantee of a high quality product. “Some critics argue that ISO systems merely gauge whether processes are being followed, in other words they don’t necessarily ensure the product quality. I agree as there are no grades of competence with ISO systems and no guarantee the institute issuing the ISO 9001 certificate is even accredited in some countries.” Bergstrom is based in Layher NZ’s head office in Wellington, from which the company services the entire New Zealand market.

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Layher systems are manufactured to strict German Building Approval Systems. The 68-year-old German brand is manufactured to strict German Building Approval Standards and is regarded globally as a leading supplier of safe, cost effective modular scaffolding solutions of consistently high quality to the construction, mining, infrastructural, petrochemical and event industries. “Our broad customer base in New Zealand invests in Layher products not only because they

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visit www.estockinventory.com Remote Access Technology also provide the internal management system for Layher New Zealand and Australia.

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Providing a wide range of services to Wellington • Fixed Steel Scaffolding • Swinging Stages • Mobile Aluminium Scaffolds • Event Scaffolds (concerts/stages) • Temporary Free Spanning Roofs

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Shrink Wrap and Temporary Roofs are suited for: North Shore Scaffolding specialises in Shrink • Recladding Wrap and Temporary Roofing. Designed as • Roof retiling temporary and weather tight, it allows you to work • Leaky home restoration in any weather on your building. No matter what • Large renovation of houses stage your build is at. • House restorations from fire Temporary Roofing and Shrink Wrap allows you to finish on time and on budget. North Shore Scaffolding can meet all your requirements in Scaffolding. Call now to find out what we can do for you

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want to take all reasonable steps to ensure safe scaffolds but because they demand efficiency, precision engineering, reliable technical data, consistent supply and product liability protection,” says Bergstrom. He says that the problem with poor quality imports flooding the market is not unique to New Zealand and has become a “hot topic” in the industry world-wide.

“It is not a subject that has been discussed widely in New Zealand yet. “However it is critical the message gets out there to ensure scaffold safety. “The flow of poor quality scaffolding products into the country should be prohibited, as once it is in the market, it becomes much harder to identify.”

• New product - page 36


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SCAFFOLDING » Layher New Zealand

Business North / September 2013

New lightweight system “exciting step forward” Jo Bailey Layher’s new modular Allround Lightweight scaffolding system is a lighter, safer product that is faster and more economical to build and transport than conventional scaffolding systems, says Scott Bergstrom, managing director of Layher New Zealand. “The new system is an exciting step forward for Layher, which has been able to significantly reduce the weight of the product without giving up anything in terms of strength. “We are looking forward to introducing the Allround Lightweight system into the New Zealand market within the next three months.” Bergstrom expects the efficient, innovative system to be a hit with Layher’s customer base that is primarily scaffolding companies, with a smaller number of construction firms. “When people make an investment in scaffolding it’s not just about the cost up front,” he says. “Around 80 percent of scaffolding companies’ costs are employing people to erect, dismantle and transport the scaffolding over a period of many years. Any gains in efficiency will ultimately result in greater savings for users.” This is where the new Allround Lightweight system offers “huge advantages”, he says. “With the lighter components, assembly is around 10 percent faster, and transport is 12 percent more efficient. Vertical clearance height has improved by up to 10cm with changes to our bridging ledgers. This makes working on the scaffold more comfortable and faster.” The structural strength and load-bearing capacity of the system has also been enhanced, and with physical strain on scaffolders reduced, the product offers even better on-site safety. Allround Lightweight is also fully compatible with existing Layher components. Bergstrom says the Allround Lightweight system was the “highlight” of around 30 new innovations Layher displayed at Bauma, the world’s largest trade fair for construction equipment and machinery that took place in Munich in April.

Layher NZ 04 568 2588 www.layher.co.nz

“We place priority on continued innovation, quality and safety,” he says. Layher is the world’s largest producer of modular scaffolding systems for a range of industries including construction, infrastructural, mining, petro-chemical and events. Its hot-dip galvanised and aluminium scaffold components are manufactured in state-of-the-art production facilities in Germany, where the familyowned company was founded almost 70 years ago. Layher’s extensive product range includes scaffolding, falsework, stairs, temporary roofs, cladding, containment, staging, grandstands and mobile tower solutions; with safety features such as lock-in decks, no-trip hazards, advance guardrails, childproof guardrails for public access stairs and site, stretcher and evacuation stairs. “Given New Zealand’s variable climate the weather protection solutions we offer, such as Layher’s keder roof and containment products have almost become an industry on their own,” says Bergstrom. The company set up its New Zealand headquarters and warehouse in Wellington 14 years ago and for some years has been the largest supplier of scaffolding in this country. Bergstrom says the market here continues to grow at a rapid rate. “Building activity is at a level I’ve never seen before. “The earthquakes in Christchurch and now Wellington are obviously a part of the equation, but the shortage of housing across New Zealand, leaky building works, and new legislation around health and safety on residential building sites has led to a lot of new activity in the scaffolding market.” Bergstrom says the company’s technical and design expertise is often called on by clients to help them make full use of the Layher systems. “We invest heavily in supporting Layher users with extensive local stock holdings, technical data, engineering, training and design advice – helping our customers to deliver reliable and economical solutions every time.” Layher has recently provided scaffolding solutions to clients working on several challenging sites including the Te Mihi Geothermal Power Station development; demolition of the Grand Chancellor Hotel in Christchurch; a Taranaki offshore oil rig; the Waterview tunnel project as well as numerous leaky buildings in Auckland. The company also recently completed a design

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Layher is the world’s largest producer of modular scaffolding systems for a range of industries including construction, infrastructural, mining, petro-chemical and events. for earthquake propping of a Wellington car park building following the July earthquakes. “Our success is based on our customers’ success which is why we believe in forming close

collaboration and genuine lasting partnerships with our clients as we strive to provide them with the most innovative and cost effective scaffolding solutions on the market.”

Mainfreight Air and Ocean Wellington are proud to support Layher Ltd

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‘Consistent quality and safety every time’ For All Your Scaffolding Needs • Commercial • Residential • Industrial • Roof Edge Protection • Containment • Mobiles • Propping • Event • Access Rob Marffy Managing Director 021 509036

Garry Rothwell Operations Director 021 452467

Proud to be Supporting Layher Ltd 804 Hastings Street North, Hastings Email: bayscaffolding@xtra.co.nz www.bay scaffolding.co.nz

SARNZ members work to the Best Practise Guidelines in Saffolding, using product that meets internationally recognised standards, using trained staff and adhering to the highest health and safety practices. SARNZ supports Layher as a supplier of high quality scaffolding that meets the industry Best Practice Guidelines. PO Box 31067, Lower Hutt 5040, P: 04 589 8081 E: info@bsc.org.nz W: www.sarnz.org.nz


Business North / September 2013

SCAFFOLDING » Orange Scaffold

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Proud to stand out from the crowd Sue Russell When Gavin Houghton, co-owner of Orange Scaffold in Takapuna, was thinking on a name to give the company back in the mid 1990’s, he decided to go with a colour theme approach. “I always liked the orange and silver combination and wanted to incorporate it somehow so orange became the name and I think it’s worked well,” says Houghton, who came into the industry after 20 years as a builder and a stint as a fitness trainer. A former boss had started a scaffolding business in Taupo and at the same time a mutual friend was looking for a business to invest some funds in. As a result Houghton explains they jumped in boots and all and purchased $200,000 worth of scaffolding to get started. “I worked harder in those first 18 months than I have ever done in my life, so much so that my body started falling apart. “It was a steep learning curve but I understood the basics of geometry so could figure out scaffolding design without too much trouble.” Now, some 8 years later the company has never been busier – “stressfully busy” as he puts it. He works all over Auckland and says there is plenty of work to be had keeping his team of 13 busy. The company only uses top German-designed Layher Scaffolding systems, which Houghton says has been pivotal in it’s success. “It’s an incredibly well thought-out product and its performance comes through especially with really tough jobs because it is so brilliantly engineered. “It is highly flexible and adaptable to any brief, easy and quick to assemble.” Among the raft of jobs Houghton is most proud of, is a dynamic mobile hanging scaffolding structure his company designed and erected on a bridge near Albany, north of Auckland three years ago; one of those ‘light-bulb’ moments when thinking outside the square created a unique and brilliant solution to what could have been a much bigger scaffolding job. Out of the success of the company Houghton has chosen to take up a personal philanthropic bent, providing funding to several charities. It is something he’s very proud of and believes is an important gesture when considering use of surplus funds. “I support various initiatives through Tear Fund. A current focus is on saving children from child trafficking.

Orange Scaffold is determined to help raise the bar in the New Zealand scaffolding industry. “Another is an organisation called TROAZ who take medical and building supplies into North Korea. As far as I’m concerned if you’re going to make a profit the temptation is always to not give, but I think it’s incredibly important that something is given out, whatever the amount.” Industry training and the quality of scaffolder that emerges through it are issues important to Houghton. “I think the current training option, the only one available for ticketing, is a waste of time because

I don’t think it’s hard enough. It attracts mainly the bottom echelon of workers and I think the solution lies in raising the bar.” He hopes this sentiment will be taken up by SARNZ ‘Scaffolding and Rigging New Zealand’ the umbrella organisation professional scaffolding firms belong to. He would even like to put some of his own energy into coming up with a better training model. Houghton is trying to access through ACC statistics for work-place accidents involving scaffolding, so, as he says “at least we can get our heads around what the real situation is.”

Meanwhile, there is plenty of work coming in and while Houghton is more desk-bound these days, he’s confident his reputation and that of his product will help make that continue well into the future.

Orange Scaffold 09 486 3845 www.orangescaffold.co.nz

It’s an incredibly well thought-out product and its Insuring contracting businesses for over 30 years, Penberthy Insurance Limited are proud to be Orange Scaffolds first choice Insurance broker.

performance comes through especially with really tough jobs because it is so brilliantly engineered.”

www.penberthy.co.nz p: 09 488 1175 f: 489 4904

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MANUFACTURING » PPS Industries

Business North / September 2013

Innovative firm an industry leader Sue Russell PPS Industries success and growth in a competitive and demanding market can be attributed to a few crucial factors, according to company general manager, John Davidson. Davidson has been with the company for over 20 years, a longevity he shares with several other staff and this is one of the reasons, he says the company has developed into the market leader it is today. “We have been very very lucky with our staff. We have some who have been with the company for well over 20 years and even though in the last 8 – 10 years we have seen a lot of the younger ones go to Australia the average term of our staff is about 10 ½ years. This is a real strength,” Davidson says. That and the company’s strategic decision to diversify over the years from its core business servicing the electroplating industry when the company founded back in 1974 has meant that PPS Industries has been in a good position to cope with the evolutions the company has embraced. “In the early days there was something like 119 electroplating businesses, now there are only 20. “While we still support the electroplating industry we’ve diversified to embrace servicing the general engineering industry and this side has really grown over the years.” PPS Industries Ltd manufactures a range of chemicals and products for the metal finishing industry. It also imports and distributes abrasive products, polishing buffs, compounds, chemicals, welding consumables, power tools and finishing products. In 1997 PPS Industries moved from its scattered situation, spread over five buildings in Auckland to a new purpose-built factory in Hugo Johnston Drive, Penrose. Davidson says the move into one base, where the company’s specialities, like their chemistry facilities and testing labs, could all work side-byside was a turning point for the company, setting it up to grow from strength-to-strength ever since. As general manager, Davidson says he most enjoys getting his head around new products and “up-skilling” his sales team of 14 about them. “We have really strong relationships with our suppliers overseas. We source our products only from world industry leaders in their area and our reputation stands on the quality of product and service we provide.” As for the stainless steel fabrication industry Davidson ranks his company as New Zealand’s No. 1 supplier. To maintain this position requires vigilance and an interest in the constant stream of new products emerging on the market. He makes annual trips overseas to Europe and the States meeting suppliers, seeing and talking about their new materials and products. “When you are up there as an industry leader somebody is always biting at your heels to take your position.

PPS Industries Ltd manufactures a range of chemicals and products for the metal finishing industry. “A key strength we have is in the amount of stock we carry. A lot of companies just don’t carry anywhere near our stock because they don’t have the financial capacity to do so. “We’ve probably got, at any one time, about $3.5 million of stock at arm’s-length.” Davidson says a real threat to the industry is the proliferation of companies supplying cheap products without the depth of science behind them. Companies that don’t have the overheads his company does; working on slim margins. “I think it’s got worse in the last three or four years. “It’s become ridiculous and it is not uncommon for customers to return to us, having tried these cheaper substandard products,” says Davidson.

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PPS Industries 09 579 1001 www.pps-industries.com

Proudly supporting PPS Industries

www.bosch.co.nz PPS Industries is now based in a new purpose-built factory in Auckland.


Business North / September 2013

CONTRACTING » Harker Underground

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Sewer upgrade a challenging job Karen Phelps The upgrade to the TS30 northern trunk sewer has been a project with unexpected challenges but one which aptly demonstrates what can be overcome when client and contractor work together, says Harker Underground Construction general manager Leigh Bishop. The upgrade project for Watercare has necessitated a mix of construction methods including small open trench sections, horizontal directional drilling, microtunnelling plus some hand tunnelling. The upgrade of two kilometres of wastewater drainage system which runs alongside part of Auckland’s Albany Highway presented many challenges which were not predicted at the onset of the project, says Bishop. Complicated ground conditions were discovered partway through the project including pockets of extremely hard and soft terrain as well as problematic unstable running ground below the water table. “These things were not picked up in the initial geotechnical survey as the investigation only took samples at certain points. Because these pockets were localised they were easy to miss,” says Bishop. The project had to be altered drastically including changing alignments and depth to avoid pockets of problematic terrain where possible as well as purchasing a brand new Akkerman tunnel boring machine capable of dealing with the variable ground conditions. The hand dug component of the project was also increased. Coupled with the fact the project was located on a busy road, near a school and a number of intersections Harker Underground Construction had its work cut out. Harker staff have undertaken and successfully completed the longest curved hand dig pipejack ever attempted in New Zealand – 240 metres in length. The two-year project is still underway and so far Harker Underground Construction has completed one kilometre of open cut trenching and 700m of trenchless.

The project has involved a mix of construction methods including small open trench sections, horizontal directional drilling, and microtunnelling. Harker Underground Construction is presently undertaking preparatory work to launch the Akkerman tunnel boring machine to complete the final stage of the project, which has the problematic pockets of running ground.

Harker Underground Construction has so far completed 1km of open cut trenching.

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“We are not sure how large the pockets are at this stage and the design has been modified in terms of alignment to aim for better ground,” says Bishop. Harker Underground Construction has had up to 40 staff dedicated to the project at any one time. Bishop says a highlight has been both the cooperation of client and key stakeholders including the general public. “We’ve been able to work very constructively with Watercare to come up with alternative solutions to meet the challenges we’ve had to face. “We’ve often had to rely on the assistance of the public, such as being allowed to use the water supply from a local church for our lunch room. The public has certainly been very supportive.” Bishop says the project, earmaked for completion later this year, is indicative of the company’s innovation, problem solving skills and ability to adapt quickly to challenging circumstances.

“It has certainly been a challenging project for all involved but Harker Underground Construction and Watercare have developed a great working relationship. “We’ve been able to identify solutions and take the project forward. “It’s about establishing good communication, trust and being transparent about challenges and solutions so that the client can make an informed decision. “It’s a good example of how client and contractor can work together to get a good result,” says Bishop.

Harker Underground Construction 09 295 2570 www.harker.co.nz

Services include: • Municipal, commercial and private sector arboriculture • Land and section clearing • Landscape planting • Large tree transplanting • Power line clearing • Grounds maintenance • Arboricultural and Ecological consultancy Treescape is also a bulk producer of landscaping mulch.

Pleased To Be Associated With Harker Underground Construction

Phone 0800 TREEWORK (873 396) www.treescape.co.nz


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STORAGE » Royal Wolf

Business North / September 2013

Royal Wolf opens new service centre Karen Phelps New Zealand’s leader in storage and shipping containers, Royal Wolf, announces the opening of its purpose-built retail site and storage facility in Auckland’s East Tamaki – an Australasian first that becomes the new hub for the company’s national supply line. The 2.6 hectare site in Ormiston Rd is one of the first of its kind in Australasia, delivering a full retail experience around a working site, allowing customers to view and compare products in a safe and inviting environment. The new facility is fronted by a retail showroom custom-built using a variety of Royal Wolf containers. There is a yard of more than 800 containers for hire or purchase and three fully enclosed state-of-the-art workshops for refurbishing, respraying and custom builds. As part of its customer offering, the front of the site provides onsite storage and cold store facilities. Paul Creighton, Royal Wolf New Zealand executive general manager, says the new facility signals the next phase in growth for the company, expanding on its already robust offering in the retail sector. “The opening of this facility is the result of a lot of time and planning and is the beginning of a particularly exciting time for the company as it cements a new focus on several key growth markets,” says Creighton. “The site will not only increase capacity for new stock but also provides us with a hub for our growing retail trade which is both customer friendly and showcases the very best of our product.” The centre point of this customer hub is a two-storey showroom and offices from which Royal Wolf will base its national operations. The structure is custom-built using both 20ft and 40ft Royal Wolf shipping containers and takes pride of place at the entrance to the East Tamaki facility. It provides a safe and comfortable area for customers to come and speak to the experts from Royal Wolf, as well as a visual overview of the entire operation. A major point of difference for the East Tamaki site is the inclusion of three fully enclosed workshops which will house Royal Wolf’s refurbishing, re-spraying and custom-build operations.

Royal Wolf’s new East Tamaki facility is fronted by an innovative retail showroom custom-built using a variety of containers.

The structures allow all custom-builds and refurbishments to take place entirely onsite and away from the operational areas of the storage yard. As the buildings are fully enclosed, work will not be affected by inclement weather or other external factors. “Our new East Tamaki site is a hugely exciting proposition for both staff and customers. “Not only will it improve our operational efficiency and safety, but our customers will experience a real change in the way they are able to engage with us,” says Creighton.

Established in 1995, Royal Wolf is New Zealand’s market leader in providing container solutions. The Australasian company currently operates out of eight locations nationwide and employs more than 300 people across Australasia.

Royal Wolf New Zealand 0800 266 824 www.royalwolf.co.nz

Not only will it improve our operational efficiency and safety, but our customers will experience a real change in the way they are able to engage with us.”

New product? Our readers want to know!

CONTACT US TODAY ON 03 983 5514

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Business North - September 2013  

Business people are always interested in what other business people are up to – and that's the sort of information you'll find in Business N...

Business North - September 2013  

Business people are always interested in what other business people are up to – and that's the sort of information you'll find in Business N...