Page 1

i think IAN ALAN WATCHORN project architect


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PORTFOLIO 2008 - 2016

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CONTENT CV CURRICULUM VITAE PROFESIONAL PROJECTS 1

JOURNAL SQUARED

2

673 5th AVENUE

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WIEN MUSEUM NEU

4

BAUHAUS MUSEUM DESSAU

Composition of the Square

Bamboo Curtain

Defining the void as public space Exhibiting a school as a continuum of time

5 TRANSBAY

Exhibiting a school as a continuum of time

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2701 SOUTH BAYSHORE DRIVE

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SOUTH BEACH ACE

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THE PLAZA AT SANTA MONICA

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STUDENT CENTER & LIBRARY K.U.

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Maximizing views and porosity Contributing public space

Unfolding a programmable roof landscape A new town center


10

SOLHEIMSVIKEN HOTEL

11

EX - CASA 400

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H & M GUEST HOUSE

13

STATION OLDENZAAL

14

STOCKHOLM CEMETERY

Waterfront engagement

Mixed residential beacon BIG BROTHER_little brother

Day and night renderings at Oldenzaal Station Nature[al] reflection

ACADEMIC PROJECTS 1 LABYRINTH

A journey to our own center

2

UPGRADE: CONTINUITY & CHANGE

Reconnecting Clonmel with its Industrial Heritage

ACADEMIC WORKSHOPS 1 AVANZADA

Design_Build workshop on the Spanish coastline, Cadiz

2

FROM SUBURB TO CITY

3

MEGALOPOLI[TIC]S

4

LOCALISING NETWORKS

Counter suburbanisation - ETH Zurich The Berlage Institute - Reineir de Graaf The Berlage Institute - Alejandro Zaero-Polo

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BIOGRAPHY Ian Watchorn is a Project Architect at Hollwich Kushner Architects (HWKN) in New York. He is currently working on projects of multiple scales ranging from a 70 story residential tower in New Jersey currently under construction to a retail flagship store based in New York. Having previously worked in The Netherlands and Norway as well as his native Ireland, Ian moved to the US +4 years ago to practice at OMA. Here Ian thoughtfully formed his design sensibility and was over time a core member of design teams that won numerous competitions including a luxury residential tower development in Coconut Grove, Miami; a mixed use development in Santa Monica, California; OMA’s tallest tower to be built in San Francisco as well as first prize in the Miami Beach Convention Center masterplan. Ian has since spent the past number of years leading various successful competitions and commissions including that for a three level Retail Flagship Store on 5th Avenue as well as museum competitions in both Germany and Austria. PERSONAL INFO Ian Alan Watchorn Nationality: Irish Date of Birth: 16/03/1987 CONTACT 145 South 4th Street, Apt. 32, Brooklyn, NY 11211, US +1 917 754 4581 watchorn.ian@gmail.com ACADEMIC ETH Zurich | Zurich, CH International Summer Academy | 2012 From Suburb to City The Berlage Institute Rotterdam | Rotterdam, NL Masterclass Program | 2012 “MEGALOPOLI[TIC]S” led by Reineir de Graaf The Berlage Institute Rotterdam | Rotterdam, NL Masterclass Program | 2012 “Localizing Networks” led by Alejandro Zaera-Polo Waterford Institute of Technology | Waterford, IE Master of Architecture | 2011 Dissertation: ‘Wanderings into Architecture...the Nomad’ Waterford Institute of Technology | Waterford, IE Bachelor of Science in Architecture | 2008

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Ian Watchorn CV EXPERIENCE

Hollwich Kushner HWKN | New York, US

Project Architect | April 2016- Present Retail Flagship Store | 4500sqf | SD/DD | New York, US | Architect | 2016 Micro Housing | n/a | DD/CD/CA | New York, US | Architect | 2016 Journal Squared | 2,300,000sqf | CD/CA | New Jersey, US | BIM Architect | 2016

Studio Link-Arc | New York, US

Project Architect | Sept 2014 - Apr 2016 5th Ave Retail Flagship | 7,200sqf | SD/DD | New York, US | Pr. Architect | 2016 DaChong School | 41,000m2 | SD/DD | Shenzhen, CN | Architect | 2015 One Mima Rooftop | 3,500sqf | SD | New York, US | Project Architect | 2015 Wien Museum Neu | 11,500m2 | SD/DD | Vienna, AT | Project Architect | 2015 Bauhaus Museum | 3,500m2 | SD/DD | Dessau, DE | Project Architect | 2015 CRLand Archive Library | 9,000m2 | DD/CD | Shenzhen, CN | Architect | 2014

OMA | New York, US

Junior Architect | Jan 2013 - Dec 2013, May 2014 - Sept 2014 Transbay Tower | 56 Floors | DD | San Francisco, US | Jr. Architect | 2014 George Lucas Museum | 360,000sqf | SD/DD | Chicago, US | Jr. Architect | 2014 2701 South Bayshore Drive | 600,000sqf | SD/DD | Miami, US | Jr. Architect | 2013 South Beach Ace (MBCC) | 52 acre | SD/DD | Miami, US | Jr. Architect | 2013 The Plaza at Santa Monica | 420,000sqf | SD/DD | CA, US | Jr. Architect | 2013

Grafton Architects | Dublin, IE

Junior Architect | Jan 2014 - Apr 2014 Student Center and Library KU | 11,500m2 | DD | London, UK | Jr Architect | 2014

OG Arkitekter | Bergen, NO

Civil Architect | Mar 2012 - Oct 2012 Solheimsviken Hotel | 300 Room | SD | Bergen, NO | BIM Coordinator| 2012 Kameleon Kronstad | 3,000m2 | SD/DD | Bergen, NO | Project Architect | 2012

VMX Architects | Amsterdam, NL

Intern Architect | Sept 2011 - Mar 2012 Station Oldenzaal | 1000m2 | SD/DD | Oldenzaal, NL | Intern Architect | 2012 Ex-Casa 400 | 30,870m2 | SD/DD | Amsterdam, NL | Intern Architect | 2011 H & M Guest House | 60m2 | SD/DD | Amsterdam, NL | Intern Architect | 2011 SELECTED AWARDS Competition 1st Prize | DaChong School | Shenzhen, CN | 2015 Competition 1st Prize | 2701 South Bayshore Drive | Miami, US | 2013 Competition 1st Prize | South Beach Ace (MBCC) | Miami, US | 2013 Competition 1st Prize | The Plaza at Santa Monica | California, US | 2013

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PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS

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JOURNAL SQUARED HWKN NEW JERSEY, NJ, US.

100% Construction Document Submission of phase 2 of Journal Squared consisting of the tallest of the three towers. Collaboration with all major and minor consultants. Documentation produced using BIM software Revit. Summer 2016 Role: Delivery of 100% CD for Phase 2 using Revit as BIM tool. Phase 1 Partial CA

Journal Squared, a collaboration between Handel Architects and HWKN (Hollwich Kushner), is a 2.3 million SF residential highrise development that will be the linchpin of the redevelopment of Journal Square with views to downtown New York. Designed for Kushner Real Estate Development (KRE), above a base of retail and podium parking, three residential towers will rise – the tallest at 70 stories – and include 1,840 residential units. Phase 2 involves the second of three towers. Phase 2 is 697,000SF and includes 701 apartments.

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1

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Design team on the roof of Journal Squared Tower 1 fully topped out.

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673 FIFTH AVENUE Studio Link-Arc NEW YORK, NY, US.

Design commission for 3 floors of prime retail space on the most high profile retail street in the world, 5th Avenue. Winter 2016 Role: Project Architect

The design of this retail flagship scheme for a major chinese retailer is inspired by the concept of a bamboo forest. This allows a unified architecture that connects all three floors and allows flexible retail space. The project site (673 5th Avenue) exists in a very unique location at the intersection of commerce and culture as 5th Avenue meets 53rd Street. Adjacent to both major cultural institutions such as MOMA (53rd Street) and High-End 5th Avenue Retail Flagship Store brought us to view the design as a hybrid of retail and chinese cultural institution that could capitalise on its striking location. The scheme features a program of art, housewares and ceramics as retail components and galleries and a chinese tea house as cultural component.

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2

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Contextual Analysis

Commercial Axis

Cultural Axis

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52nd St.

57th St.

51st St.

56th St.

50th St.

49th St.

55th St.

5th Ave.

58th St.

5th Ave.

53rd St.

54th St.

Photographic Analysis of Corner Retail Fcades on 5th Avenue

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Unifying the Floors

EXISTING CONDITIONS

SCREEN

EXISTING FACADE

Bamboo Screen Insertion

Typical 5th Avenue Retail

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Unify the Floors to Create Value


Axonometric Corner View

53rd Street Elevation

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Floorplans

display counter entrance

elevator

lobby

storage

office

cash register

display table existing staircase

corridor

service entrance

display wall display window

53rd street

1st Floor

display table

elevator cash register

fifth avenue corridor existing staircase

movable display table storage/office movable display table

53rd street

2nd Floor

exit stair (existing)

elevator fifth avenue

corridor

tea house/event space existing staircase serving area

53rd street

3rd Floor

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pantry


1st Floor

2nd Floor

3rd Floor

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Long Section, Display, and Programatic Studies

Existing Building

Teahouse/Flexible Event Space

Building Section

retail display wall (interior)

retail display (exterior) demountable display wall (interior)

Street and Interior Product Display

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housewares

housewares

accessories

accessories

jewelry

accessories

ceramics

paintings

accessories

ceramics

paintings

facade demountable display wall (facing street)

art gallery 1

art gallery 2

wood screen

Retail Program Layout Options on Level 2

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WIEN MUSEUM NEU Studio Link-Arc Vienna,AT.

Competition submission for the extension and redesign of the Wien Museum, Vienna, Austria. Key to the task was the integration of the building within the previously unresolved Karlplatz and Karlskirche adjacency. Spring 2015 Role: Project Architect/Competition Lead

In 1909 Otto Wagner necessitated that planners must deal with three questions which he listed in order of importance: - The Karlplatz question - The Karlskirche question - The question of the Museum Building Today more than 100 years later the decision to maintain the museum in its current location on Karlplatz presents an opportunity to revisit the as yet unresolved questions raised by Wagner. It is our view that the ultimate success of the museum will rely on establishing an appropriate context on an urban level which thus far has evaded Karlplatz. Our approach embodies two modes of thinking; a classical appropriation of hierarchy, axial symmetry, and proportion on the one hand and a contemporary articulation of space, boundary and structural capabilities on the other. In effect we position ourselves between the desire for a formal urban gesture between park, church, and museum, and the design of a contemporary piece of museum architecture which invites excitement, wonder, and intrigue from the visitor.

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3

+23.4

+22.0

LEGEND Museum Approach Bike Logistics Axis

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The Karlplatz Question: A Park for the People

The Glacis - A series of interconnected green spaces As a result of the historical evolution of Vienna the Glacis emerged as a continuous green belt occupied by a dense network of cultural buildings. Karlplatz therefore is one of the city’s most important public spaces surrounded by more museums and cultural institutions than any other. The ideal of the Glacis however as a continuous green belt is instead realized in Karlplatz as a vast gray surface with sporadic pockets of greenery that have little or no relationship to the cultural context.

Hard surfaces are replaced by a green lawn

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Furthermore the present condition of Karlplatz is one that is disorientating and presents a visual barrier from within. Instead we envisage a place that brings the people of Vienna together with its cultural institutions; a highly programmable green space for art, education, and culture; a common ground for all. We imagine a unique space that is at once a church forecourt, a museum plaza, a university lawn, a transport connector, and a people’s park.

Project existing cultural buildings onto the park

Subtract a network of paths that connecting buildings


The Karlskirche Question: A Central Presence

Emphasize Karlskirche as the central axis in the design

Mirror the geometry to create desired zoning envelope

As one of the most celebrated buildings in Vienna, Karlskirche has endured an unsatisfactory relationship within its immediate context for over a century. From the outset our goal is to make Karlskirche the central presence of the design providing an as yet unrealised forecourt upon its central axis. Rather than merely a ground surface treatment however this is achieved spatially.

Continue to emphasise this axis on masterplan

Our approach is to mirror the massing, including heights and geometry, of both the Technical University and neighboring block upon the central axis of Karlskirche to create a theoretical zoning envelope within which to design the Wien Museum NEU and Winterthur building. This has the ultimate effect of establishing a proportional symmetry centered upon Karlskirche to at last allow the church a desired presence onto Karlplatz.

Site Plan

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The Question of the Museum Building: Defining the Void

1 . Self defined zoning envelope

2. Required exhibition massing

We systematically sought to address the questions of both Karlplatz and Karlskirche before addressing the question of the museum. By this process of deduction we arrived with a theoretical zoning envelope within which to design. Within this framework our design seeks to free the ground plane as an extension to the park by lifting the main exhibition gallery 15 meters above the ground to define the upper extents of the envelope and create a generous and exciting entrance into the new museum. We place a continuous row of columns around the perimeter of the volume serving the dual purpose of both structurally supporting the elevated mass but more importantly architecturally defining the void as a contained volume and completing the desired relationship between the park, church, and museum. The front façade of the original Wien museum has an uninterrupted view to the park through a field of columns. The integrity of the original protected Haerdtl-

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3. Lift to define zoning extents

Bau building is maintained and indeed reasserted by removing the recent addition of the atrium roof to expose the building in its original manner. The partial permitting of light into the permanent gallery along with its overall significance result in its elevated positioning whilst the darkened temporary exhibition spaces occupy a flexible area beneath the plaza; each efficiently served through vertical connections to the lobby, office, and logistics areas. The positioning of the permanent exhibition galleries above the original Wien museum and entry plaza creates a truly special moment on Karlplatz inviting the visitor through a perimeter of columns and into a central void with views to the sky above. Here also rests the Vienna room suspended below the galleries and offering views to Karlplatz, Karlskirche, and the Wein Museum NEU; a unique perspective on both Vienna’s past and future.


4. Preserve entry plaza

5. Define void as contained space

6. Vienna Room below galleries

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6.2.3

2.2.4

6.2.1

8.7 8.6

5.7

2.2.1

2.2.3

5.6.3 5.6.1

1.6 6.5 5.6.2

5.6.4

8.4

9.1 5.5

6.6

6.7 6.2.4

5.4

B’

Ground L

Basement Level Plan (-7.00 m)

3.4

3.3

8.1

8.3 3.2 4.1 8.5

4.2

9.3

6.2.2

Level 1 Plan (+4.46 m)

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6.2.5

Level 2 Plan (+9.66 m)


Arrival

1.1 Foyer 1.3 Café 1.4 Shop 1.5 Ticketing

A

2.1 2.2 2.3

Exhibition

Permanent Exhibition Temporary Exhibition Childrens Museum

Education and Visitors Forum

1.3.1

1.3.2

Studio Event Space Lecture and Project Space A Lecture and Project Space B

3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

8.2

Vienna Room

Reading and Info Room Coffee Bar

4.1 4.2 1.1

8.5 1.2

5.1 5.2

B

Handling and Logistics

Delivery Packing and Control Room

Workshops, Storage and Collection

1.5

7.4 7.2 1.4.1

5.2

5.3

Workshops Material Storage Staff Room

6.1 6.2 6.4

7.1

Administration

Offices Project Offices Meeting Rooms Library Staff Rooms

8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5

7.3 5.1

Level Plan (+0.00 m)

Legend

A’

8.1 2.1

2.3

3.1

8.1

2.1

2.2.2

2.1 6.1

6.4 6.3

Level 3 Plan (+15.80 m)

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*


*


*


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East Elevation

North Elevation

West Elevation

West Elevation

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2.1

2.1

A

A’

2.2.4

2.2.1

2.2.1

Section A-A

3.1

8.1 8.5 8.4

4.1

3.2

8.3 B

2.1

2.2.2

1.1 5.6.4

1.6

B’

1.6

6.5

2.2.1

Section B-B

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BAUHAUS MUSEUM DESSAU Studio Link-Arc Dessau, DE.

Competition submission for the design of a new Bauhaus Museum in Dessau, Germany to house the Bauhaus Collection set to open on their 100 year aniversary. Spring 2015 Role: Project Architect/Competition Lead

In the past two decades the assumed need for ‘ultraflexible black box museum space’ has resulted in a disorientating and faceless museum volume that can be placed anywhere in the world with little or no relationship to context or program. The open floor plate and flexible space that curators have desired so much has become an Achilles heel of exhibition design and engaging museum experience: an empty vessel, empty of inspiration, empty of a truly unique experience for the visitor. Our proposal seeks to undermine this trend by readdressing the museum and exhibition paradigm as both an exhibition specific and place specific response to the program requirements. To answer the question of how to exhibit a school we look to the Bauhaus. To this day the Bauhaus remains the world’s most famous art and design school. The Bauhaus ethos permeated all design disciplines and society as a whole and its impact is identifiable all across the globe today. Indeed with advances in technology and communication the ethos of a collaborative, experimental, multi-disciplinary school applies to our world today more than ever. Gropius’s assertion of “Art and Technology – A New Unity” and that “Architecture should be a mirror of life and time” are still today cornerstones of our professional education. Our proposal therefore seeks to design a museum experience that is unique to all these criteria by designing a space that is both a mirror of life and time and a true reflection of the Bauhaus ethos translated into today’s possibilities. In the Bauhaus ideology of merging functionality with aesthetics we focus on the function of our proposal and through our design process allow that to reveal the form.

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4

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PARK

CITY

BAUHAUS

PARK

On a larger scale we imagine our building as a cultural core within the city. Rather than the isolated static object we described previously we imagine the building PARK as a meeting place, a place for social interaction, one that allows for the flux of daily life within the city of CITY BAUHAUS Dessau-Roßlau. In this sense we preserve existing links from city to park and integrate the building within the fabric.

Soft vs Hard Edge

The overarching concept is a sensitive and sympathetic approach to the context; a building of two dichotomies; a hard edge to the east that addresses the fabric of the city and a soft edge to the west that addresses the park. The resulting form is a linear building in which the main spine of the volume reasserts the urban street edge that existed on Kavalierstraße before the bombing of Dessau. This has the intent of again reframing the view north along Kavalierstraße to St. John’s Church. Elsewhere the buildings form then shifts and moves through the site to open designated views, avoid existing monuments, and orientate the visitor. On the western edge addressing the park the building is woven into the landscape. Branches of program reach into the park to integrate with the landscape and extend the park by inviting both the park and the public to occupy its green roof.

Branched Form

The overall form is both a building and a connecting device; encouraging people to flow within through and around a new cultural core that connects city and park; citizen and visitor; and Bauhaus to all.

Applied Green Roof

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BAUHAUS

Extended Park

CITY


1

6.e

7.a 6.a 6.c 6.b

7.b

7.b

6.f 7.c

6.g

Outdoor Spaces Open Spaces 6.a 6.b 6.c 7.a 7.b 7.c 7.d

Accessibility 6.d 6.e 6.f 6.g

Open Space Foyer Open Space Museum Ed. Cafeteria Terrace Entrance Plaza Underpass w/ Shop Access Public Lawn Public Roof Terrace

Parking (3 x Bus, 2 x Taxi) Bike Parking Parking Spaces (50) Open Space Logistics

Circulation

Museum Approach Museum Circulation Local Residents Car Logistics

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1.i

Museum Education

1.j,k

5.n

5.m

1.f

Visitors Service

1.b Visitors Entrance and Foyer 1.c Inquiry Area 1.d Ticketing 1.f Shop 1.h Group Access 1.i Wardrobe / Lockers 1.j Restrooms 1.l 1.n

7.b

2.f

Museum Education

Workshop Space Event Space

Exhibition

Collection Presentation 2.a 2.b 2.c 2.d 2.e 2.f 2.g

Topos “Prolog” Topos “Inventor” Topos “Factory” Topos “Warehouse” Topos “Museum” Topos “School” Topos “Clubhouse”

2.e

Cafe 4.a

Restaurant 80 m 2.d

Logistics

5.a Objects Delivery Hall 5.b Janitor 5.c Distribution Warehouse 5.d Logistics, Control, Packing 5.e Interim Storage 5.f Material Storage 5.j Janitors Workshop 5.m Staff Room 5.p Building Services

6.a 6.b 6.c 7.a 7.b 7.c 7.d

Outdoor Spaces

Open Space Foyer Open Space Museum Ed. Cafeteria Terrace Entrance Plaza Underpass w/ Shop Access Public Lawn Public Roof Terrace

Level -1 (-5.50)

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1.g


6.e

7.a 1.a

1.n

1.l

6.a

1.b 1.c

6.c 1.a

1.d

1.m 6.b

1.e 4.b

1.h

1.f

4.a

7.b 2.f

2.g

2.a

7.c

5.n

2.b

2.c

1.j* 5.h 5.e

6.g

5.b

5.d

5.a 5.k

5.j

5.i

5.g

5.c 5.l

5.m

5.f

Level 1 (+0.00)

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1.n

7.d

2.h

7.d

Museum Education 1.n

Event Space

Exhibition

Temporary Exhibition 2.h Exhibition Space

Administration / Office Spaces

3.a Administration / Communication 3.b Office Exhibiton / Collection 3.c Office Museum Education 3.d Office Directors’ / Conference 3.e Kitchenette 3.f Restrooms 3.h Office for Commuters

Level 2 (+5.50)

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7.d

3.d 3.a

3.c 3.h

3.f

3.e 3.b 3.g

3.i

Level 3 (+12.00)

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INQUIRY AREA

TICKET CHECK

ENTRANCE

WORKSHOP

EVENT

PRESENTATION OF THE BAUHAUS COLLECTION

DELIVERY

FOYER

RESTAURANT

TICK. CONTROL TICKET CHECK

ENTRANCE

DISTRI. SHOP

OFFICES

STORAGE

TEMPORARY EXHIBITION

Security museum Area

Program Relationships As stated previously we reject the open plan black box in favor of an experience specific to the exhibition collection. Just as time is a linear phenomenon so too the experience of discovering the Bauhaus through time is arranged as a linear experience. The exhibition route itself is therefore a didactic framework for the discovery of Bauhaus themes. The linear route has the result of engaging the visitor more directly with the collection due to the compressed width and is ultimately expressed as a continuous loop. Just as the topoi represent continuity of the Bauhaus ideology and teachings so too is the exhibition route continuous. Collection and museum are integrated into an organized whole.

The route begins with a progression of foyer, ticketing, and shop before sequentially guiding the visitor through the 7 topoi including; Prologue, Inventor Space, Factory, Department Store, Museum, School, and Clubhouse before culminating in the Café. At this point the path is connected as a loop and can be retraced or alternatively the visitor may access the temporary exhibition. In contrast to this the temporary exhibition occupies a large space above the entry and permanent exhibition allowing it to be autonomous in its own right or to connect with the permanent exhibition in various configurations for larger exhibits.

TEMPORARY EXHIBITION

OFFICES

INVENTOR

DELIVERY

FACTORY

PROLOG

WAREHOUSE

DISTRI. FOYER BAUHAUS COLLECTION LOOP

CONTROL

LOGISTIC MUSEUM

STORAGE EVENT WORKSHOP

Organisation: The Loop

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CLUBHOUSE

SCHOOL


Grand Hall of Temporary Exhibition Space

Gallery Combinations CULTURAL HUB EVENT AND EDUCATION

INDEPENDENT ORGANIZATION AND SCHEDULE

MUSEUM

Small, Medium, Large Building Operability

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East Elevation 1:500 3.e

2.h

2.a

5.n

1.f

Section A-A

1:500

West Elevation 1:500

1.n 2.d

2.f

2.f

Section B-B

1:500

South Elevation 1:500

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2.e

2.d


3.d 2.h

1.b

Museum Education

Visitors Service 1.b Visitors Entrance and Foyer 1.c Inquiry Area 1.d Ticketing 1.f Shop 1.h Group Access 1.i Wardrobe / Lockers 1.j Restrooms Museum Education 1.l Workshop Space 1.n Event Space

Exhibition

2.a 2.b 2.c 2.d 2.e 2.f 2.g

Topos “Prolog” Topos “Inventor” Topos “Factory” Topos “Warehouse” Topos “Museum” Topos “School” Topos “Clubhouse”

Administration / Office Spaces

3.a Administration / Communication 3.b Office Exhibiton / Collection 3.c Office Museum Education 3.d Office Directors’ / Conference 3.e Kitchenette 3.f Restrooms 3.h Office for Commuters

North Elevation 1:500

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TRANSBAY BLOCK 8 OMA San Francisco, California, US

Residential Tower for Related Companies currently under construction in San Francisco. September 2014 Role: Core member of design development team including highrise documentation production in Revit.

Block 8 begins with an urban gesture to the neighborhood and a desire to open the site to the public. Introducing a mid-block passage between Folsom and Clementina activates the interior open space and creates a paseo for both Block 8 residents and neighbors alike. The paseo lends a sense of discovery, respite and community just steps away from the vehicular traffic of First, Fremont and Folsom. The Folsom Street side of Block 8 is filled with retail shops and residential lobbies creating active edges as well as porosity around and through the site. The porosity is further enhanced with the paseo. At the podium level, the buildings flanking either side of the paseo gently slope back to enable more light and air and invite Block 8 residents and any neighbors to wander into the open space. The open space, or urban living room, is surrounded by retail shops, a resident community room serving the affordable housing population and residential lobbies. These diverse program elements will create a blend of users to activate the space day and night. Pedestrians can pick up a bite to eat, read a book, meet friends, or take a shortcut to pick up their twowheelers at the bike kitchen. The urban living room may transform into an outdoor cinema under the twinkling Tivoli lights. The paseo might be filled with pop up market stalls to host a farmer’s market or the Clementina pocket park might host a block party.

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5

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CI

TY

Context

Y BA N

Carving The mid-block passage carves through the site and simultaneously tapering the tower and reorienting the residences within toward the more prominent views of both the city and the San Francisco Bay.

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Zoning to Design Form

550’

550’

550’

350’

316’

316’

139’

139’

81’

85’

81’ 50’

50’

65’

64’ 85’

Development Controls

64’ 82’

Symetrical Tapers

50’

South Facing Terraces

82’

Program

The tower is shaped to orient views within the units toward the Bay and the City. The south side steps back from Folsom in three steps, creating south-facing terraces that are shared by the residents.

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Tower Amenities

Pool at Shared Amenity Level

Amenity Terrace and Lounge at Level 33

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HEALTH

SERVICE

SERVICE

Amenity Terraces and Program DINING

DINING

RESIDENT

FITNESS

YOGA

LOUNGE

LOUNGE

POOL

Fitness & Lounge

North & South

DO

SUN DECK

Terraces

W

ER

O

NT O

LOUNGE DECK

POOL DECK

D

W

EM B

A

R

C

A

N

YOGA

POOL SUN DECK

Sun Exposure

A

POOL DECK

M

SO

HEALTH

WATER

YOGA / MASSAGE

YOGA

DINING

DINING

GYM

LOUNGE

LOCKERS

LOUNGE DECK

SUN DECK

BA YB

RI

LOUNGE LOUNGE DECK

POOL

E

SUN DECK

Views

At Level 15 fitness and lounge amenities are strategically located adjacent to open and covered exterior spaces, mixing indoor and outdoor living.

DINING

DINING

POOL DECK

DG

KITCHEN

Access

KITCHEN YOGA

WC

YOGA / MASSAGE

BOH

OUTDOOR DINING

GYM DINING

LOUNGE LOCKER LOCKER

HOT TUB

POOL POOL DECK

LOUNGE DECK SUN DECK

N

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Unit Interior

Unit Matrix

’ P

3413

P

3807

P

3807

P

3413

/ ’

12907

11236

13508

AHD RENTALS

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LIVING

DINING

The tower’s crenelated north facade shifts to create ledges at every 6th floor, extending the green rooftop amenities at the tower’s base onto a series of smaller landscaped gardens. These crenelations are spaced at 12 feet, creating subtle divisions between dining and living rooms in common areas and providing corner views for bedrooms.

BEDROOM

Crenelation at Units

*


Building Floor Plans

MR 1BD

MR 1BD

MR STD

MR 1BD

YOGA KITCHEN

MASSAGE MR STUDIO

MR STUDIO

MR STUDIO MR 1BD

MR STUDIO

MR STUDIO

MR 1BD

DINNING

LOCKER

LOUNGE

MR STUDIO MR STUDIO

MR 1BD

MR 1BD

Levels 8-12 (Levels 13-14 similar)

MR 1BD/1.5BA

CARDIO

MR STUDIO

POOL

POOL DECK

Level 15

2BD/2BA

MR 2BD/2BA

2BD/2BA

MR 1BD/1BA

MR 2BD/2.5BA

MR 1BD/1BA MR 2BD/2BA

MR 1BD/1BA

1BD/1BA

2BD/2BA

1BD/1BA

BOH

LIBRARY

LOUNGE

MR 1BD/1BA MR 1BD/1.5BA

MR 2BD/1BA

MR 2BD/2BA

Levels 27-31 (Level 32 similar)

2BD/2BA

KITCHEN DINNING

Level 33

2BD/2.5BA 3BD/3BA PENTH.

2BD/2BA

2BD/2BA

PENTH. 2BD/2.5BA

3BD/3BA

2BD/2BA

Levels 45-52 (Level 53 similar)

*

Levels 54-56


MR 1BD

MR STD

MR 1BD/1.5BA

MR 1BD MR 2BD

MR 1BD MR 1BD

MR 1BD

MR 1BD

MR 1BD

MR 2BD

MR 1BD

MR 1BD/1.5BA

MR 1BD

MR 1BD/1.5BA

MR 1BD MR 1BD

MR STD

MR STD

MR 1BD

Levels 16-20

2BD/2BA

MR 1BD

MR 1BD

MR 2BD

MR 1BD

MR 1BD

MR 1BD/1.5BA

Levels 21-26

1BD/1BA

1BD/1BA

1BD/1BA 2BD/2BA

2BD/2BA 1BD/1BA

1BD/1BA

1BD/1BA 1BD/1BA

2BD/2BA 1BD/1BA

1BD/1BA

2BD/2BA

1BD/1BA 1BD/1BA

LevelS 35-37 (Level 34 similar)

1BD/1BA 1BD/1BA

LevelS 38-42 (Levels 43-44 similar)

N

*


MECHANICAL

AMENITY

AMENITY

RETAIL

LOBBY

RETAIL

Section - Fremont Street

*


Building Elevation - Clementina Street

*


2701 SOUTH BAYSHORE DRIVE OMA Coconut Grove, Miami, Florida, US.

First place competition winning submission to design over 600,000sf of luxury residential apartments on a waterfront site in Coconut Grove, Miami, Florida. Summer 2013 - Present Role: Core member of design team from competition stage through to subsequent commission. Model leader throughout.

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6

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Coconut Grove —

Context

A distinct community within The site acts Miami’s as a connection point, connecting the community of Coconut Grove to the north with new patchwork of neighborhoods, civic park to the south. We intend to allow the site to facilitate this connection and provide an opportunity Coconut offers alternative to by urban The site posseses greatGrove potential and difficulties; the an to provide a lifestyle complimented last developable site in a string of large scale condos, convenience and natural beauty. offices and hotel buildings along the main waterfront metropolitan downtown. A new typology thoroughfare Bayshore Drive. Coconut Grove has a history of homes surrounded and connected with the natural-landscape around and of living has emerged in the Grove Two realms of culture and community exist in Coconut so rather than create an impenetrable parking plinth Grove; one attached to Biscayne Bay and the other to like the neighboring developments we intend to allow one deeply connected with the local the village of the Grove. Currently, the undeveloped the buildings rise from the tropical vegitation beneath. site is the only break in an otherwise impenetrable allows us to invite the newly established sculpture community yet offeringThis the intimacy of a wall of towers that separate the cultural community park onto the site bridging South Bayshore Drive and of Coconut Grove with a series of key assets to the connecting the community to the park and the water. private retreat. South. A distinct community within Miami’s patchwork of neighborhoods, Coconut Grove offers an alternative to metropolitan downtown.

SHORECREST BELLE MEADE LEMON CITY

BAYSIDE

MORNINGSIDE LIBERTY CITY

BUENA VISTA

BAY POINT

DESIGN DISTRICT

ALLAPATTAH

GRAPELAND HEIGHTS

FLAGAMI

WEST FLAGLER

CORAL GATE

WYNWOOD

CIVIC CENTER

LITTLE HAVANA

RIVERSIDE

EDGEWATER

MIAMI

MIAMI BEACH

OMNI

DOWNTOWN PORT MIAMI

THE ROADS BRICKELL THE ROADS

SILVER BLUFF

VIRGINIA KEY

COCONUT GROVE

4

KEY BISCAYNE

Coconut Grove to the south of Downtown Miami offers a retreat from the city.

*


Context —

The site sits in close proximity to many of Coconut Grove’s main attractions.

SW 27 Ave

Mayfair

SITE

Sculpture Park Miami City Hall

Grand Ave

Cocowalk e

or

h ys

Playhouse

Dr

Ba

Commodore Plaza

Peacock Park

Coconut Grove Sailing Club

Barnacle State Park

8

The site sits in close proximity to many of Coconut Grove’s main attractions.

COMMUNITY

PARK A wall is created between the waterfront park and the Coconut Grove community.

*


Concept

De-Coupling

*


Strategy Instead of creating 2 large towers, which have been the typical response on the waterfront and compromise unit layouts and views through the site, we propose a series of 6 identical towers; based on the ideal unit layout. Slender enough that they afford maximum porosity at ground, whilst placed to achieve maximum

views for each apartment.

1. Porosity enhanced

2. Views Maximized

3. Lot Coverage minimized

4. 100% 3-sided units

The key driver for apartment sales in the area is ocean views and so the towers are placed with each apartment having an uninterupted orthagonal view to the water as seen in diagram 2.

*


Model 1’=1/50� highlighting the relationship of the towers to the park.

*


*


Vertical Living

... a vertical village.

*


Collective Individuality A new typology of living has emerged in the Grove; one deeply connected with the local community yet offering the intimacy of a private retreat. A lifestyle equal parts collective community and individual retreats define the way of living in Coconut Grove. Sized to accommodate 1-2 residences per floor the slender towers form a collective stack of individual homes.

180˚ VIEWS

UNIT B

UNIT A

180˚ VIEWS

> The skyscraper as producer of infinate virgin sites.

UNIT A

360˚ VIEWS

2 Unit Tower Floor Plan

1 Unit Tower Floor Plan

*


Unit Layouts CITY VIEWS

BEDROOMS

The units are planned to take maximum advantage of views towards the ocean from the public space.

LIVING TERRACE

OCEAN VIEWS

MASTER SUITE

MASTER SUITE

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

KITCHEN

DINING

KITCHEN

LIVING

LIVING

2/2 BEDROOM - 2112 sq ft/ 2112 sq ft

*

DINING

0

5’

10’

20’


MASTER SUITE

MASTER SUITE

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

KITCHEN

BEDROOM

DINING/LIVING

KITCHEN

LIVING

DINING

2/3 BEDROOM - 1,955 sq ft/ 2,278 sq ft

BEDROOM MASTER SUITE

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

LIVING BREAKFAST ROOM

KITCHEN

4 BEDROOM - 4405 sq ft

DINING

0

5’

10’

20’

*


*


*


Plinth Axonometric

Plinth Roof level - unnocupiable reflecting pools and gardens compliment the lower apartment units and provide privacy from activity below.

Mezzanine Level - A continuous path is created connecting all the towers and public program. The Bank stands as an autonomous building, differentiated from the surrounding residential plinth.

Ground Level - The individual plinths are lifted to allow visual and physical access throughout the extents of the site.

Basement 1 & 2 - Accessible from the two ends of the site a full level and one half level of parking is located below grade.

*


Pool

Level 2 (EL +37’-0” - 43’-6”)

Roof Garden Reflecting Pool Cultural Center

Reflecting Pool Bank Office

Mezzanine Level (EL + 24’-0” - 30’-6”)

e Av il

rta ge Ti Cultural Center

Residential Amenities

Cafe

Mechanical

ry

Ma

Bank Office & Parking

St

Ground Level (EL +12’-0”-18’-6” )

Residential Dropoff and Lobby

e

S

r

D

s

ay

B

r ho

Terra Office

Basement Level 1 (EL +12’-0”) Valet Parking Bank Parking

Basement Level 2 (EL +3’-0”)

Residential Parking

Terra Parking

*


Sculpture Garden adjacent to the water acts as a ‘front garden’ to the towers.

View of main living space in 4 bedroom unit. The unit allows for occupation of an entire floor

*


Gardens and landscaping bleed into the site to create a continuity from site to water.

*


Night view of towers from Biscane Bay.

Long Section highlighting plinth and tower relationship.

*


Interior view of front balcony and ocean views.

View from within bedroom.

*


Coconut Grove 2.0

Unit views over the Biscane Bay

Interior spaces merge seamlessly with exterior terraces

*


The revised scheme combined 6 towers into 3 for efficency

*


SOUTH BEACH ACE

OMA Miami Beach Convention Center, Miami, Florida, US. Competition wiining masterplan of Miami Beach Convention Center worth $1,200,000,000 Spring/Summer 2013 Role: Member of Model and Presentation Team

Sitting on 52 acres within the vibrant and unique community that is Miami Beach, an outdated convention center acts as an urban blockade – inactive when conventions are not in town, disruptive to adjoining neighborhoods and inhibiting connections to Lincoln Road and surrounding communities. Our master plan resolves each of these issues through a series of intelligent yet simple moves: — We conceptually rotate the convention center, reorienting the site to allow for east-west neighborhood connectivity and a southerly orientation for both convention center and hotel guests. — We concentrate the density at the center of the site and make the revamped convention center and its meeting and ballroom space contiguous with the hotel – a feature that meeting planners love. — We reimagine the area’s existing assets: the Jackie Gleason Theater, the Carl Fisher Clubhouse, City Hall, the 17th Street Garage and 17th Street itself are all maintained and transformed to better engage their surroundings while keeping the character of Miami Beach. — We fill the rest of the site with public amenities and programmed uses appropriate to activate the space 7 days a week, 365 days a year. In short, our plan upgrades the convention center into a best-in-class facility and weaves the entire convention center site into the fabric of Miami Beach.

*


7

*


*


*


Massing

Hotel Convention Center Fisher Fields

Jackie Gleason Theater Residential City Hall Commercial

*

Culture Residential Parking


Aerial View of Convention Center context

Diagramatic massing of intervention areas

*


*


*


Connection to the Outside

23R

D S T

PA

RK

AV EN UE

The climate and lush tropical environment of Miami Beach are currently underutilized assets of the current convention center. Our plan opens the building to its surroundings with views, accessible terraces and operable facades that allow users and visitors to remain connected to the city around them. The new Hall C is unencumbered by loading or concourse areas on its west side, allowing it to open both visually and physically to the Botanical Gardens and the new park areas to its south. A glass façade with sliding operable hangar doors allows light to spill in and also exhibitions to spill out. The doors can also be blacked out to create a more conventional exhibition hall for groups who prefer that.

RE

ET

BAYSHORE

CO

LL

IN

S

CA

NA

BASS MUSEUM

L

COLLINS PARK

DE

BL

VD

HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL

BOTANICAL GARDENS

EAST CONCOURSE

DA

WEST CONCOURSE

CH UB

BOUTIQUE HALL 1 9TH ST

EXTERIOR FUNCTIONS

1 9 T H ST R EET

1 8TH ST

CON VE NT I ON C EN TER D RI VE

1 8 T H SR EET

Diagram of connectivity PARKING

CITY HALL

View of Hall C extending to Botanical Gardens

JACKIE GLEASON THEATER

1 7TH ST

17TH STREET PARKING GARAGE

68’

LINCOLN ROAD

BOTANICAL GARDENS

*

20’ 20’

BOARD RM.

ADMIN.

CORRIDOR

RESTAURANT

94’

CONNECTOR LOBBY

ATRIUM CONCOURSE

MEETING

LOBBY

100’

Existing

VESTIBULE

WA SH I NG TO N A V E

M E RI D IA N A V E

1 7 T H ST

REST ROOM

KITCHEN

BOH ELEC.

BOTANICAL GARDENS

32’

TERRACE

PRE-FUNCTION

CONVENTION HALL CONVENTION HALL

54’

STORAGE

85’

Future

TERRACE

18’


BALLROOM

CONVENTION HALL

View of Hall C interior

*


Connective Facilities: 2 Ballrooms

Above Hall C, two large ballrooms provide a unique set a potential configurations and uses. At Level 4 a 60,000 sf ballroom can house large banquets and other events. To the south of the ballroom, a set of meeting rooms provides breakout space directly adjacent. Above these meeting rooms, an easily divisible 40,000 sf ballroom provides an important new asset for the MBCC. This 40,000 sf ballroom can be used

either on its own, in conjunction with the meeting rooms below, or most importantly, as a general assembly space used in conjunction with the main ballroom for banquet dining. These facilities have the impact of connecting the hotel and the convention center so that accessibility is attainable form both. This will make sure that the convention center site has maximum use throughout the day.

40,000 sf ballroom

Ballroom to Ballroom Access

Access from F1 60,000 sf ballroom

*


*


Civic and Cultural Belt including City Hall, Eately Food Hall, a new Museum and the renovated J

View of hotel resting on top of existing Convention Center

*


Jackie Gleason Theatre.

Modelling technique using hatch patterns to define landscape

*


Synergy within the Convention Center

*


Typically, convention centers sprawl outward, not only imposing on the city around them, but also dispersing the functions within. The elongated travel distances that result impede operations and complicate the experience of the convention center visitor. The layered program of the new MBCC not only allows the

building to be compact, it also creates a new juxtaposition and proximity between its different components. Meeting rooms, ballrooms and the Hotel are close to one another. Their arrangement around the central concourse and the hotel atrium creates visual links between them as well as the plaza to the south.

*


*


*


View of approach moving from city through teh proposed cultural band.

Main convention center hall entrance

*


Aerial from above showing curved hotel bar resting on top of convention center.

Large hall doors opening to the lanscape beyond connecting inside and out

*


Model Lift off Sequence

Completed Model

Surface Roof Removal

Upper Concourse Removal

Convention Center Halls Roof

*


Hotel Removal

Structure Removal

Lower Concourse Removal

*


THE PLAZA AT SANTA MONICA OMA Santa Monica, Los Angeles, California, US.

Competition winning Mixed Use development worth $330,000,00 Spring/Summer 20113 Role: Member of design team and leader of model making

*


8

*


Context

Context of Santa Monica

Roof as programmable landscape

Existing open spaces in Santa Monica. The project aims to provide a new typology of space

*


Concept

Building program stacked vertically.

Unfolded building program creating adjacent roof space and programmatic hinges between

*


*


*


Plans

Ground Floor Plan - Market, Retail and Cultural Program

Second Floor Plan - Office Space

*


Fifth Floor Plan - Flexible Office Space. Also adaptable to Residential

Eight Floor Plan - Hotel Lobby with Rooms

*


Programmable open spaces highlighted with open market on ground floor.

View of cascading terraces from above.

*


First floor terrace with green lawn, bandstand, and cafe spillout.

The rotating hinges unfold to create cantilevered bars resting on one another.

*


North West View

North Facade

*


West Facade

South East View

*


*


*


Student Center & Library K.U. Grafton Architects Kingston, Surrey, London, UK

First Place competition winning project for New Town House Building for Kingston University January 2014 Role: Design Development Phase and use of Revit as BIM software

Penryhn means promontory and so we thought about this building as a man made promontory, assuming a key presence on Penryhn Road. Promontory also suggests visibility, pushing beyond boundaries, a ‘headland’ reaching into unknown waters or territory. This reflects the progressive educational vision of this university. In the brief, the term ‘Learning Landscape’ is used. We

*

found this term very interesting since we believe that our role as architects is to make new places, new pieces of landscape, new pieces of geography. The form of the building is therefore a new piece of urban landscape, rising and falling in it’s contour. Rising to make vantage points overlooking Kingston, Penryhn Road and the main campus. Falling to respect neighbors, to respect rights of light.


9

The model highlights the use of a very directional building with solids articlated with the grain of the ribbed slabs which allow for voids to move freely throught teh building in teh alternate direction. The section shows the use of voids shifting vertically throughout the building and provide a ver social building with open plan work and study spaces. The goal is the welcome the community into the building in the manner of its siting and permeability at ground and uper levels.

< Concept model of Structure Below: Section through main entrance and circulation space

*


The form in plan sidesteps mature trees, recedes to form permeable edges, shade from sun and rain, to form permeable thresholds setting the stage for public life. The roof profile is ‘sculpted’ to form voids, courtyards, clerestory windows, lanterns of light. The line of the new building projects beyond the existing building line and forms a public undercroft space on three edges. Three new public spaces are formed at ground floor level. The ‘prow’ space to the north, the long finger space to the south, and the east- west connection between Penryhn Road and Grove Crescent. Bicycle parking is located adjacent to the ‘prow space’ within a secure area with lightweight canopy integrated with the trees and the landscaping.

Typical Floor Plan

*

Concept sketch section


View from existing adjacent building > View looking down onto foyer

View of Auditorium highlighting wide spans

*


Solheimsviken Hotel

OG Arkitekter (In collaboration with Metropolitan Workshop, London: GB) Bergen, NO A new hotel and conference center for Bergen on a former shipbuilding site. Summer 2012 Role: Draftsman through design development with extensive use of Revit.

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10

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The new Hotell will be a landmark building and with the new Arenum Building together, form a waterfront focus for the Solheimsviken area, the wider Bergen community and its visitors.

through the shape and form of the buildings, and also how they raise the profile of Solheimsviken whilst also maximising the potential of the new street and with active uses at street level.

The approach is to maximise the natural qualities of the site; the views of the surrounding mountains and over the fjord; together with the benefits of its urban context, the proximity to public transport and the linking of, and enlivening of the public spaces. This is

The architectural design of the buildings also draws on the ship-building and industrial heritage of the site, using forms and materials appropriate to the scale and importance of these two new buildings and their historical setting.

Exploded diagram showing inners of hotel and arenum

*


View of hotel and arenum from above

*


*


*


Setting

Canal surrounding Hotel

The Hotell will be sited on a new ‘island’ overlooking Puddefjorden and with views to the surrounding mountains. The introduction of a canal surrounding the Hotell brings the water further into the site, whilst also creating and re-inforcing public access to the water’s edge. It will enable boats and other water users, to be brought in to the centre of this project. This is reinforced with a series of boardwalks, terraces and a pool to step people right down to the water’s edge. The routes around the Hotell also strengthen public access to the site and the use of Solheimsviken square.

Harbour pool allows people to enter water

Spaces Accessible roof garden terraces

The two inter-locking atria formed by the ‘knotted’ shape, create the central focus for the interior spaces. On entering the Hotell the first atrium is a dramatic high space with the hotel rooms surrounding it over six storeys. One side of this atria has an open end framing the view down the fjord with bridges crossing it at higher levels.

Atrium spaces allow natural light and vent.

*

The first atrium also forms the reception, lobby and bar space. This leads on to the second central space which is a wider atrium with the lounge and restaurant.


Water pools as public amenity

Architectural Form The Hotell is formed in a knott shape with each of the Hotell wings directing views to the surrounding mountains of Fløyen, Ullriken, Lovstaken and down Puddefjorden. This ‘knotted’ shape creates two central atria about which the rooms are arranged and this gives rise to the Hotell’s unique form. This will be clearly identifiable and create a new landmark for Solheimsviken. It is important that the Hotell’s detailed design and materials match this unique quality and this is proposed to be articulated through set-backs, balconies and terraces, together with different façade treatments.

Jetty hotel suites floating on water

Interactive display beacon

Increasing the valuable water edges

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8

7

6

J

1a

6 V0 000 4

M

M

x

I

V06

x 50 h:0 11 B

1150 x 4000 Bh:840

50 h:0 6 V0 00101 B 4

6

V0 000 x4 50 h:0 11 B

Lobby-lounge 986.7 m²

6 V0

0 00 x4 50 h:0 6 11 B H V0 4000 x 50 h:0 6 V0 00101 B x4 50 h:0 11 B

Vindfang 18.4 m²

L

Kanal

1b

G

Bagasjerom 26.8 m² Gastrobar 213.8 m²

K F

Gang 4.5 m²

Kontor 10.6 m²

Kontornisje for resepsj. (Nedsenket himl.)

Gard. 10.3 m²

2b

/ eg g sv an ing ng mn nalin Rø rso pe

Atrium over

8

sing mn . rø nale for rso e Bro g/p ve

Gang 10.2 m² Resepsj.

3b

Trap 18.6 m² Teknisk (Server-Rom) 17.8 m²

Lager 10.9 m²

x D:2

V03

400 B:1

Avfall 20.3 m²

00

Lager 9.8 m²

0

800 x 4000 Bh:0

Service-gang 4.6 m²

7

Kanal

400 B:1 x D:2 00 0 0 40 B:1 x 400 D:2

Uteplass

Service-gang 6.8 m²

400 B:1

4b

x D:2

J

00 0

t nsi

VIP

Lager/disp. 7.0 m²

Tra

Varemottak 53.3 m² Lager 5.2 m²

Tra t nsi

I 0 x :0 80 Bh

3 V0 000 4

Mulig skille mellom restaurant og vrimle.

Sirkulasjon 7.6 m²

WC - kvinner 24.2 m²

E

Lastesone

WC - menn 13.1 m²

V03

00 x 40 800 Bh:0

HK-WC 4.6 m²

Bro over kanal

V03

800 x 4000 Bh:0

V03

E

D

800 x 4000 Bh:0

Restaurant resepsj.

D

Kjøkken 317.2 m²

C

Buffét

Mulighet til å åpne fasaden

C

Kanal

Mulig glassvegg?

B

B

Trap 22.5 m²

Mulig glassvegg?

Terrasse 40.2 m²

A

A

N

Bro over kanal

Kanal

1a

2a

3a

Kanal

4a

5

6

First floor plan of hotel in design development phase showing main entrance to north

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8

7

6

J

1a

Balkong 9.0 m²

M

M H-rom 23.4 m²

V01

800 x 2400 Bh:0

V01

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

800 x 2400 Bh:0

I

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

H

H-rom 17.3 m²

L

V01

800 x 2400 Bh:0

V01

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

G

800 x 2400 Bh:0

H-rom 17.3 m²

1b

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

Deck Overlooking Harbour

H-rom 17.3 m²

F

K

V01

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

800 x 2400 Bh:0

H-rom 17.3 m²

2b

Atrium

8 H-rom 28.8 m²

V01

800 x 240 0 Bh:0

Bad/WC 3.0 m²

3b

Trapp 18.5 m²

Lager 4.6 m²

7

1 V0 400 2

H-rom 17.0 m²

Possible Sky Bar

x 0 h:0 80 B

1 V0 400 2

400 B:1

Bad/WC 3.6 m² x D:2

0 x :0 80 Bh

00 0

400 B:1 x D:2 00 0 0 40 B:1 x 400 D:2

400 B:1

4b

x D:2

J

00 0

1 V0 400 2 0 x :0 80 Bh

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

0 x :0 80 Bh

Lager 7.6 m²

x 0 h:0 B

1 V0 400 2

1 V0 400 2

G H-rom 17.8 m²

1 V0 400 2

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

800 x 240 0 V0 Bh:08 1 00 x Bh 240 :0 0

D

C

H-rom 17.3 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

H-rom 17.3 m²

H-rom 17.3 m²

V01

1150 x 2400 Bh:0

H-rom 17.3 m²

1150 x 2400 Bh:0

V01

H-rom 17.3 m²

H-rom 17.3 m²

V01

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

800 x 2400 Bh:0

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

V01

H-rom 17.3 m²

800 x 2400 Bh:0

H-rom 17.7 m²

H-rom 17.3 m²

800 x 2400 Bh:0

V04

1150 x 2400 Bh:0

H-rom 17.3 m²

1150 x 2400 Bh:0

V04

x

F800 Bh:0

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

E

1150 x 2400 Bh:0

V04

00 24 0 x :0 80 Bh

Lager 3.0 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

V04

1 V0

V01

V04

1150 x 2400 Bh:0

Bad/WC 4.1 m²

0 x :0 80 Bh

H-rom 17.3 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

800 x 2400 Bh:0

V01

800 x 2400 Bh:0

0 x :0 80 Bh

Lager 3.0 m²

V04

1 V0 400 2

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

H-rom 26.5 m²

B

H

H-rom 17.3 m² Bad/WC 4.1 m²

C

0 x :0 80 Bh

H-rom 17.3 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m² H-rom 26.5 m²

D

I

H-rom 17.3 m² Bad/WC 3.6 m²

H-rom 17.3 m²

1 V0 400 2 80

H-rom 17.3 m²

Lager 6.6 m² Teknisk 7.6 m²

1 V0 400 2

E

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

Lager 7.0 m²

B

V01

800 x 2400 Bh:0

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

V01

Trap 21.1 m²

800 x 2400 Bh:0

Trapp

1150 x 2400 Bh:0

V04

H-rom 17.3 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

Bad/WC 3.6 m²

H-rom 23.3 m²

H-rom 23.3 m²

A Balkong 9.0 m²

A

Balkong 9.0 m²

N

1a

2a

3a

4a

5

6

Sixth floor plan showing access onto roof deck overlooking fjord

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EX - CASA 400 VMX Architects Amstel, Amsterdam, NL

The use of an existing linear building shell dated from 1962 to provide accommodation for 330 studnts accompanied by a new tower incorporating 130 starter homes Winter 2011 Role: Member of design team and sole creator of all models shown

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Ex - Casa 400 represents the project which I was most involved with at VMX Architects being solely responsible for the model that is photographed. The brief to be exectuted demanded a program of 330 student residences accompanied by over 100 starter homes for first time buyers on a site that was formerly occupied by the Casa hotel; a large linear block built in 1962. The project is located in an area undergoing urban regeneration where the new urban plan gave another dimension to the scheme.

The decision was made in a sustainable manner to maintain the shell of the existing Casa block and contain the embodied energy within the project. The existing Casa block was then incorporated into the new scheme providing the accomodation needed for the student residences. Alongside this a new tower and plinth is proposed alongside the Gooiseweg which operates as a major gateway into Amsterdam. A green axis outlined by the urban plan intersects the Casa block to form a new gate into the project.

Plan showing immediate context with proposed organization of urban blocks and green axis

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Eye level view from the opposite side of Gooiseweg

Birds eye view from above showing intersection of green axis and existing Casa block

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Cross section and plan of proposal highlighting the scale of old and new

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Typical layout of student accomodation in Casa block

Typical layout of starter homes in tower

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A green belt of dense trees will provide a sound barrier from the main road.

View of green axis intersecting the Ex-Casa linear block

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View upon leaving the city along the Gooiseweg

Detail model of tower module showing facade appartment layout

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View upon leaving the city along the Gooiseweg

Completed facade composition

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Renovated Ex - Casa alongside new tower

270 degree corner view realised

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H & M Guest House VMX Architects Amstelveen, Amsterdam, NL

A house in the garden architecturally functioning as a little brother to a previously realised VMX home Winter 2011 Role: Leading designer working closely with director and sole creator of all material presented This small scale project asked for the design of a guest house in the garden to compliment a previously desinged VMX home. My role was to manage the process from start to finish and take full responsibility of each aspect from design to working drawings to a model that would best engage the clients in the process. The project is located in Amstelelveen on the edge of Amsterdam Bos. As such the main dwelling seeks to demonstrate how the desire to live amongst nature can be expressed through architecture. The main dwelling thus incorporates a large open plan living space on the ground floor which is contrasted by a dense grouping of rooms and spaces upstairs. This concept was originally born from the space perception we experience in a forest; a flow of space allowing movement on the forest floor in contrast to the thick foliage that creates a dense roof above. Architecturally the guest house can be read as a sibling to the main dwelling a sort fo â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;little brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; relationship.

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Plan view of Guest House highlighting the public/private relationhip with the main dwelling.

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Scale: 1_200

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The footprint of the guest house seeks to both initiate best use of the space that the building is allowed to occupy in the regulations plan and crate a clear understanding of public and private zones relative to the main dwelling. In this way the building is concieved as an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shape which allows the bedroom to aquire all the benefits of living within the garden whilst also orientated away from the main house for privacy. In contrast to this the main space in the guest house has a direct relationship with the main living space of its older brother. Diagramitically the guest house aquires a similar contained space in the garden as the main dwelling contains internally. An inverted typology of the main dwelling. The clients asked for a response that would allow guests to aquire a sense of private space when they stayed but also that the space would function as an extension to the living space of the main house when not in use by guests; a retreat for the families three teenage children. The main space in the guest house contains a library and media space whilst maintaining a direct visual with the garden and in turn the living space of the main dwelling. This space is also served by a small kitchenette and bathroom which is worked around a previously existing car port/garage. Furthermore the guest house has the ability to physically open to the garden like its older brother by sliding back the large glazed doors. This allows the intermediate garden to take on an entirely different association with both.

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Station Oldenzaal VMX Architects Oldenzaal, NL

Day and Night renderings of an intervention at Oldenzaal train station Spring 2012 Role: Sole creator of the following visualizations

The following are a series of visualisations created for an intervention to a train station in Oldenzaal in the south of The Netherlands designed by VMX architects. I was responsible for producing the shown images for use in presenting the final design proposal. The images sought to highlight the orange steel tube and its subsequent lighting at night as a means to orientate the user and to bring the various workings of a train station into a single element such as; bus terminals, bicycle storage and the main station.

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Night time view highlighting the LED lighting system and the transformation of the the steel tubing

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g into signage

Completed integreated wayfinding signage

Completed Project

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Cemetery at Jarvafaltet, Stockholm DHB Architects Stockholm, SE

An international competition entry for a woodland cemetery Winter 2009 Role: Member of two person competition design team and creator of model and hand drawings presented

This project was undertaken as part of a three man team at DHB Architects for an international competition regarding the design of a new cemetry at Jarvafaltet, Stockholm. The project setting is an area called Jarvafaltet to the north of Stockholm which rests between several multiethnic communities on a large forested green space which incorporates a large hill. The brief for the project was thus to create a non demoninational cemetery that would provide a focused place for mourning and add a layer of permanence to an ever changing community. The space was to provide a recreational as well as a spiritual function; one where people could come and play outdoor sports whilst also being in contact with those who are grieving. The design of a cemetery must naturally develop over an elongated time frame and so this proposal seeks to begin by setting four nuclei amongst the groves of trees which radial grave patterns emerge. These nuclei, at the center of which is locted a columbarium, are then interconnected by forest trails around a central church. The church sits on the highest point of the hill above each of the nuclei which will develop over time to become ocupied. In particular the scheme seeks to touch the lanscape very gently setting the graveyards in the naturally formed groves of wooded areas.

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Aerial of site with design collage

Model showing network of paths accross the site

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Progression of plots over phase 1

Progression of plots over phase 2

Sketches of ceremonial route

Progression of plots over phase 3

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Plan of ceremonial space showing reflection pool and path leading to burial grounds and collumbarium

Long section through major elements of the scheme

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ACADEMIC PROJECTS

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LABYRINTH

Waterford Institute of Technology Undefined location Pillars of Society: A Journey to our own center Autumn 2010 Role: Sole designer and creator of all material presented

What defines a culture is a set of ideas and values that a particular group of people have in common. These ideas then produce behaviour; people do things as a result of the way they think. Everyone is a product of their own particular environment. We do not genetically inherit our traits and lifestyles from our parents or anyone else rather we learn them from our surroundings and what we are both aware and unaware of. Culture cannot give birth to itself, it only exists through people. It is easy (and daily common) for people to believe that their culture is superior to the next. Everyone is taught and led to believe, through their environments, that the culture they associate with represents the correct way they should think and act throughout their daily lives. It is thus from this predisposition that we differentiate ourselves from others and become aware of the layers fo prejudism and discrimination that exist within and between differing cultures today. This was the motivation behind this project; a self generated brief to design a space to understand the fragile relationships that exist between differing cultures today with particular awareness of minority cultures. The project sought to use the concept of a labyrinth as a metaphor for the design. A labyrinth at its most basic level; is a metaphor for the journey to the center of your most deepest self and back out into the world with a broadened understanding of who you are. A labyrinth is a right brain task, it involves intuition, creativity and imagery. There are no dead ends, it is not a logical or rational left brain task. The same path takes you into the labyrinth and back out again. Thus with a labyrinth you trust that the path will lead you to where yo need to be. The only decision is to enter or not.

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A Journey to our own center Visually one is met by tall slender columns that are each an abstract representation of an undefined culture. This is the only thing that needs to be explained of the space to the viewer, the rest is to be experienced. The external number of columns stand strong and regimented and create the misconception of order and harmony within the space. To many people, this is their perception; that all cultures exist in harmony. All the columns are the same height which represents that every culture is equal and none can be considered lesser than the next. The columns are also made of the same material which is rusted core ten steel and are each filled with differing amounts of concrete so that when one uses an instrument to strike them they would each reverberate a different frequency of sound; symbolizing diversity.

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Moving into the space the columns gradually begin to lean. The viewer becomes aware of this obscurity and delineation. This has the underlying sense that many cultures are being suppressed and broken down. That beneath the surface if one begins to explore there is vulnerability. They represent that it is not always easy to understand another culture, when we are immersed into a different culture we sometimes feel lost and disorientated. Unlike the rows of columns on the outside of the space which everyone can understand; here there is a feeling of obscurity. This is the sense of unknown. The user is drawn to the center no matter where they enter from. This is a journey to a deeper understanding of oneself. The skewed columns are evidence of suppression, discrimination and racism that people of many cultures face.


Externally the space gives the appearance of order and harmony

Within the visitor becomes aware of the delineation, here lies a space for contemplation

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Appearance of order and harmony from outside the space

Study highlighting the importance of shaddow over light

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Realisation of obscurity and delineation from within

It is through shaddow that the columns can interact and communicate with one another

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In the center the space opens up for reflection. People can gather their thoughts on their own understanding of the space; what it means to them personally. The space asks them look inside their deepest self and question their own awareness of cultures and discrimination. Do they associate with one of the columns around the perimeter or one closer to the center? Only an individual can answer this, their emotions are subjective; the space is subjective. In this way no column represents any particular culture; to a person from a culture of limited numbers they may feel that that the strong tall column is a metaphor for them, just as somebody of a seemingly stable culture can associate with a skewed column or space. The images reflect that shadow is more important than light and it is through this that the columns or cultures interact with one another. When light enters as a dimension the cultures communicate with one another. This is a labyrinth that can be entered from all sides; one moves through the space from whichever direction they enter and just as in a labyrinth there are no wrong turns, you are on the same journey no matter where you come from. The journey back out into the world is one with a heightened understanding of oneself.

> The scale conveys the dominance of the culture over the individual

< Plans, sections and elevations of the space

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UPGRADE: CONTINUITY & CHANGE Waterford Institute of Technology: Clonmel, Tipperary, IE

Reconnecting the town of Clonmel with its INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE Grain Milling Museum and Experience Center Spring 2010 Awarded distinction at EAAE international competition for students in architecture Host: “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urbanism, Bucharest, RO Role: Sole designer and creator of all material presented

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The closing page of Charles Kickham’s novel Knocknagow contain the rueful passage; “I remember when I could hardly get through the streets wud loads of corn; and now theres nothing doing there. The mills nearly all idle, an’ the stores an’ half the shops shut up. Twas well Phil Morris used to say ‘twas the corn that made the town uv Clonmel’.”

Historically the town of Clonmel has developed upon the important resource of the River Suir as a means of water, power and transport for the surrounding agricultural hinterland. During the towns peak in the late 1900’s Clonmel, and in particular Suir Island, was inhabited by one of the largest collection of grain mills in the region. Today as a post industrial town in decline the island is on the periphery of Clonmel town and is not incorporated into the townscape as the important node it was throughout history. The project aims to reassert the presence that Suir Island had on Clonmel town and once more allow the town to look towards the river and to the island both as part of their past and importantly their future, thus the CHANGE will allow for CONTINUITY of PLACE. The Industrial Heritage Museum on Willow Island will act as a learning and experience centre to the heritage of the town and in particular to the process of grain milling. It includes a large gallery space for permanent exhibitions of the grain mills such as mill wheels and mill stones as well as a flexible space for temporary exhibits of a varied genre that would provide an ever changing environment. The learning centre also includes an auditorium space that can locally be used by the community of Clonmel. This is located in the existing seventeenth century Suir Island House along with temporary exhibition and office space. This creates a relationship between the old and the new where both volumes function as a whole, affirming the sites history and empowering the place. The building aims to be a machine that takes reference from its predecessors on the island and continues the process of grain miling that the public can engage with. The museum itself has a very strong relationship with the landscape as it sits directly on a mill race using the water as a source of power and invites the outdoor environment to occupy a space inside the building envelope in the form of a mill race that runs directly through the museum. In effect this aims to blur the division of the outdoor and indoor environment. In this sense the thresholds between land and water, community and heritage, and internal and external are addressed.

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The Site The site is located on Suir Island which gets its name from being the largest Island located on the river Suir. To the north of Suir Island is the town of Clonmel and to the south the landscape reaches back to the Comeragh mountains, in this sense the river and in turn the Island acts as a threshold between the urban fabric of Clonmel and the rural backdrop of the Comeragh mountains. As stated, the island itself has an important historical relationship with industry and in particular grain milling during the 18th and 19th centuries. The site was utilised for the power that could be generated from the surrounding water as well as using the river as a means of transportation. Today the island is a shadow of its busy past and is for the most part abandoned. The most noticeable aspects of the site include the remnants of the industrial mills and the series of manmade interventions that made these mills function including weirs and both headraces and tailraces which intersect the site from west to east. At present the island is linked to Clonmel via a bridge located on the north of Suir Island built in the 14th century and is then connected to the opposite side of the river by another bridge to the rural fabric. The shell of Suir Island house is still present on Willow Island amongst a variety of overgrown vegetation.

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Below: Aerial photograph showing the island in context of Clonmel town and how the river has become a barrier to the urban fabric. Right: A map of Suir Island from 1874 during the height of the grain milling operations. The map shows the town thriving with an industry that gave Clonmel its identity.

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Context Drawings

Context plan of Suir Island with the dense Urban fabric of Clonmel town to the north

Cross section of Suir Island and its relationship with Clonmel town

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Parti Diagram and Basic Floor Plans Situated in a natural environment that has undergone the process of becoming an industrial site and then an abandoned return to nature the key architectural concept was to create strong links with the natural environment from within the building. This is achieved by placing the building directly on a millrace and allowing the water to enter the building and power a an operational millwheel as its predecessors on the site would have. In this way a sustainable energy source is harnessed as a means to inform visitors of the grain milling process.

Ground floor plan showing circulation and the movement of water through the site

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Second floor plan

First floor plan

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Plan demonstrates the series of voids between floors and the intersecting waterway

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The fabric of the building also makes strong reference to continuity and change through upgrade as the materials used are an abstraction from the grain stores that were once located on the site. The external walls are constructed of cast in-situ concrete wich is an interpretation of the solidity and permanence of stone construction which the mills originally used. Internally the volume created is then inhabited by a structure of timer floors and supports which are again an abstraction of the former present mill interior.

The linear nature of the scheme allows one volume to rest in the water whilst directing views up a

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and downstream

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Isometric Section and Elevations

The high level of transparency achieved by the organisation of solid and void allow the visitor to become aware of the process that is taking place before entering the building. The isometric section shows the building resting upon the millrace and provides a sense of scale to the operational millwheel. The wheel will thus allow the millstones to grind the flour and reveal the age old process of milling once again to the visitor. Reconnecting the people of Clonmel with their heritage. The product of this process will then be used within the bakery cafe to allow the complete process of making bread to be contained within one sustainable entity. A self sustaining machine.

> Isometric section

East elevation

West elevation

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South elevation

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Main entrance to the museum allows a visual to the working millwheel

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South facade allows access through the bakery cafe to gardens behind

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;If architecture is to play a leading role in the creation of a sustainable culture, it must inspire communities to connect more profoundly with the natural world.â&#x20AC;? Source: www.aiatopten.org In seeking for a sustainable solution this project attempts to embody the relationship between man and nature. Most importantly the building acts as a self sustainable entity which can use the resources of nature to create harnessed energy. When provided with the raw material of grain the building bakery program further has the ability to complete the process of making this substrate into the a core food type; bread. The design seeks to continuously place the user in a position where he/she is in contact with the natural environment. The location of this site exemplifies mans desire for a symbiotic relationship with nature in the form of the network of millraces that are evident cutting through the island. In this way the building is a constant reference to people and place; Upgrade through continuity and change.

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Glazing between both volumes reveals working milwheel inside

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ACADEMIC WORKSHOPS

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AVANZADA

EASA International Student Workshop Cadiz, ES _a constructive workshop concerned with the reinterpretation of the Spanish for typology and the traditional boatmaking craft Summer 2011 Role: Member of 15 person design-build team

Design and build workshop Photos and documentation courtesy of Avanzada Workshop Team This temporary exhibition pavilion was built as part of the student event EASA (European Assembly of Students of Architecture) in Cadiz, Spain, during a two week period in late July 2011 by a team of 29 students of which I was an active participant. The EASA is a non-profit body organized by students/graduates for students/graduates. Each year, the assembly is hosted in a different European country. Thus, in summer 2011, EASA was hosted in Cadiz, Spain. The concept for the 35 sqm pavilion was inspired by the maritime history of Cadiz, and in particular, the Galleon sailing vessel. Most people enjoying a stroll trough Cadiz harbor would not be aware of the historical significance of the area: first that it was used as a launching pad for the Spanish colonization of the Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; and second that the type of ship needed for the task was built on the very ground that they are walking on.

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Our team saw the opportunity to highlight the history of the site, and created a temporary exhibition pavilion whose design was partly inspired by the material palette of the Galleon. Rope, always a material relegated to servant duties, is allowed to relax and becomes a skin, expanding and contracting to reveal the artwork inside. The impressive carpentry of a Galleon hull is realized in the Pavilion through the use of exaggerated timber structural member sizes, along with fully revealed joinery. The inversion of apparent mass between rope and wood, from the typology to the Pavilion offers a welcome change to normative realizations of boat-inspired architectural concepts.

> Relationship between Galleon Ship and materiology of pavillion

Exploded axonometric of structural system

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Investigating the craft of rope weaving

The pavillion during construction

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The pavilion was to host exhibitions by young artists who would display their work in turn during the course of the Pavilionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifetime. The artwork would respond to the maritime theme and in so doing would create a strong conceptual relationship between container and contained. The morphology of the project is based on a folded and stretched container, a reference to the activities of the modern shipyard. Key axis and lines of sight determine the angles of the arms of the Pavilion, along with the use of shade as a device to make the public places around it more enjoyable.

Entrance to the pavillion

Steel bars are attatched to ceiling and floor plates to weave the rope

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Plan of the inhabited pavillion including immediate context

Exploded axonometric of structural system

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The finished structure allows for varying degrees of transparency and enclosure

The changing density of the rope weave allows for varied spaces within

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Exaggeradted timber structure member sizes reminisce ith the galleon sailing vessel

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From Suburb To City International Summer Academy ETH Zurich Zurich, CH

Participant of two week postgraduate Summer Academy investigating new and existing city typologies to counter the process of suburbanisation that continually advances into the landscape. August 2012 Overview of work undertaken as part of group

Creating a city; preserving the landscape This two week academy, open to graduate students of architecture, urbanism and related disciplines postulated a change from the Swiss urban precident of a predominantly suburban city fabric towards one of densifiation. The academy took the form of a series of studios, evening lectures and critique over a two week period to build on the work of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Krokodilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; group; using an area north of Zurich known as the Glattal region as a test bed for future city making. The Glattal region is a collection of seperate communities/towns which in its combined totality registers 150,000 residents and 120,000 workers. The area as yet has not registered as a city rather it is a collection of low density suburban townscapes that are reaching further into the landscape and in doing so merging the boundaries of one another. The result of this passive development is a vast area of low density development that sprawls across the landscape and creates little in terms of urban intensity. The theme of the academy was explored through a series of workshops tutored by invited international architects, urban designers and landscape architects.

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The Small Walled City Fortify: strengthen/protect. The small walled city can be regarded as the single urban typology in direct contrast to that which we see evolving across the globe today. The process of suburbanisation which defines our modern cities is one that is marked by the constant uncontrolled growth of our urban fringes. Containment therefore becomes our thesis. We assume 100% city and 100% landscape, rejecting the grey matter that we associate with suburban living today.

Aigus Mortes; FR

Neuf-Brisach; FR

Milan; IT

Amsterdam; NL

Lower right: St Blaise; patron Saint of Dubrovnik holds the city as an object removed from its context(948ca)

Zurich itself as a city contained by limits

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Urban Edge vs Urban Fringe

Intervention area: Uster - one of the communes that forms the Glattal as a subcity to Zurich Far left: Amsterdam; a city that grew from within a predefined limit Left: New Amsterdam; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;contained within a containerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Located on Manhattan Island the emergence of New York was a contained settlement from the beginning. Far lower left: The sttlement of New Amsterdam gives rise to a planned city with clearly defined edges and boundaries that were present reardless of Manhattan being an island.

Planning the city - Designing the Edge

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Lower left: The area that was first contained on Manhattan Island gives rise to New York and is clearly visible as the area which achieves the highest density first. The model of planning the urban fabric and allowing the city to fill the voids is present in both Amsterdam as a model and New York. The image highlights the purpose and design of the city edge.


Thesis: To create density we must design limits to our cities growth

Contemporary Cedric Prices diagram metaphorical diagram of the evolution of the city. The diagram on the right represents a thesis that consolidates the fringes and redefines them as edges

Monocentric city

Inverted model

Can our cities become smaller and more intelligent thus preserving the landscape?

At present the city is surrounded by a weak fringe that year by year encroaches further into the exhaustable landscape. To create more sustainable cities that rely less on the car as means of transport and instead on efficient transport and communication systems we need to make the city smaller and more intelligent. The point of contact between city and landscape is dominated by the presence of the city. We need to shift the weight so that the landscape takes on a new presence in relation to its counterpart. We can then begin to consolidate the city as it becomes more intelligent and sustainable directly altering the balance of city and landscape.

Present

Equalize

The edge must be a space of purpose as precident shows, or furthermore, when imbued with meaning and identity it must become a place.

Consolidate

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Localising the Thesis - Uster Building on existing infrastructure the scheme embraces the current. It looks to contain the various administrative regions of the canton of Zurich. Each maintaining their

individual identities to become a network of interconnected competing cities which are allowed to grow and evolve within defined terrotories. In this proposal we use Uster as a testbed for this reconfiguration.

1. The fringes of Uster are contained - The territory for the city is defined

2. The boundary is not seen as a line but as a space a public interface between city and landscape

3. The scale of the new city with a maximum diameter of 4 kilometer allows the city to function without cars with underground parking at existing transport nodes.

4. The ban on cars entering the city allows for a pedestrianised city with bicycles becoming the main mode of longer distance transport

5. The city is circumnavigated by a light rail network that connects the perimeter. The most attractive real estate in the city is inverted from the center to edge.

6. The city cannot grow beyond its limits and so begins to densify from the outside in over time. The result is that of 100% sustainable city, 100% landscape.

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Graphical collage of new urban typology circumnavigated by public transport

Street in Uster before with expansive road network occupied by cars and after with large stretches of disused road available for development and densification of a pedestrian city.

Designing the edge: Further study to design the interface between city and landscape as a public space. These diagrams represent possible typologies of such a space.

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MEGALAPOLI[TIC]S Master Class at Berlage Institute led by Reineir de Graaf supported by Laura Baird and Tanner Merkeley Rotterdam, NL

External participant of a one week theoretical Master Class speculating future political structures of the Magacity. April 2012 Overview of work undertaken as part of group

This Master Class was attended at The Berlage Institute Rotterdam as part of the postgraduate masters programme which I attended as an external participant. The focus of the workshop was the subject of the megacity and its past, present and future political structure in relation to their governing nations; thus the pun on the title MEGALAPOLI[TIC]S. The masterclass was led by Reineir de Graaf, partner of OMA and director of AMO (think tank of OMA) and supported by collegues Laura Baird and Tanner Merkeley.

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In 1950, New York and London were the only cities with more that 8 million inhabitants. Currently there are 26 cities of over 8 million people; by 2020 there will be 37. Some of these cities now surpass entire nations in terms of population and GDP: the population of Mexico City is bigger than that of Australia; the GDP of Sao Paulo larger than that os Sweeden. The Masterclass posed the question as to what ultimate political consequences should be drawn from


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the demographic, economic and cultural momentum that the megacity has gained. If the current rate of urbanisation continues, the world could be 75% urban by 2050 and close to 100% before 2100. Antiquity - The world as an archipelago of citystates could aquire unexpected relevance: challenging both the existing concept of the city, as well as that of the nation. The study was undertaken as groupwork where seven seperate areas of study were assigned to individualgroups to present findings.

These groups included; Antiquity - The City State Model Public Works and Privatisations Competing Professions and Planning Policy instead of Planning Urbanism and Marketing Academia and the Megacity The future of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Urbanism and Marketing During this study we made investigations into the subject of Urbanism and Marketing; posing the question as to what extent have the disciplines merged. If urban plans were historically produced to cater for an actual demographic necessity today they are designed speculatively to attract the very population they are planning for. This marked shift has thus huge consequences for the discipline of urbanism.

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Graphics highlighting the city as a brand to be marketed to potential consumers

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The ‘I amsterdam’ brand was investigated locally as a case study. This brand highlights the city and its name to market to consumers from a scale as small as gift accessories that sell the city as a logo to attracting large scale multinational companies and people to invest in Amsterdam. The venture proposes to market Amsterdam as a ’business city’, a ‘residential city’ and a ‘city of knowledge’ (see graph upper right) to achieve these developments. Behind the venture lies a network of commercial enterprises who support and benefit from its success; in turn creating a straight jacket to manipulate the cities natural process of evolving and redefining itself.

Detroit offers an example of a heavily branded city in decline with a decaying urban fabric

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Localizing Networks:

Physical Terminals for Web 2.0 Engines

Master Class at Berlage Institute led by Alejandro Zaero-Polo supported by Maider Llaguno Munixta Rotterdam, NL

External participant of a one week practical Master Class researching potential relationships between physical constructs and the growing virtual phenomenon. April 2012 Overview of work undertaken as part of group

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Virtual worlds should not be seen as an alternative to the real world or a substitute, but as an extra dimension which allows us a new freedom of movement in the natural worldâ&#x20AC;? 1. Pearce, M (1996) p.76, Architects in Cyberspace, Academy Press

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This Master Class was attended at The Berlage Institute Rotterdam; a postgradute laboratory for research in architecture and urbanism. The Master Class was organised as part of the postgraduate masters programme which I attended as an external participant. The workshop sought for both theoretical and design based outcomes.

Digital Democracy; Re-imagining pathways to political participation Throughout history architecture has been shaped by the means with which society communicates. In ancient times the Greek Agora facilitated communication by providing people with a forum to debate, discuss, and share information. With the advent of the book a new building typology emerged, that of the library. Today the continuing advancements of ICT(Information and Communication Technology) have led to a new era of communication, one that engages society across virtual networks which exist in parallel to our physical world. This new form of communication has thus opened an avenue for architectural research and speculation which has yet to be fully explored.

The phenomenon of social networking and web 2.0 applications have transitioned the user from one limitedas a passive viewer of content created for them(consumers) to becoming active creators of user generated content(prosumers). The locality of communication on web applications has thus progressed from that on a global scale to one that is now equally local. This workshop then posed the question as to what potential avenues architecture and the built environemt might assume from such a local phenomena. The workshop was organised as groupwork that formed around speculations as to how the built environment could engage with certain online phenomena. I proposed and chose to explore the potential of new pathways to political participation proposing a situation where the parliament as we know it is replaced by a horizontal decision making process which is accessed on a virtual network.

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Today there are over 118,000,000 blogs being tracked in use since their emergence in 1990’s. These are visited by over 60,000,000 American adults each day. The result has created a political empowerment for the ordinary citizen including those in emerging democracies whose voices are otherwise unheard. In 2006 Time magazine famously proclaimed the person of the year to be, simply, ‘You’ in recognition of the ordinary citizen turned producer – “For seizing the reins of the global media, for funding and framing the new digital democracy” and placed a reflective cover on the issue. This realisation has allowed for a new scale of access to collective intelligence platforms most notably including ‘Wikipedia’. This creates a system where through active participation information is shared collectively over a network to come to an acurate consensus. As such this is the basis for a new form of extreme democracy to emerge. A system of organising the views of the masses to denounce the hierarichal ‘top down’ political system in favour of a horizontal system of collective decision making can emerge.

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Individual views and opinions are entered into the grid which forms an infinate network of intelligence which then impacts directly on the city where the effects are realised. As emotional beings this project imagines that people need a certain physicality and tangibiity to trust in an otherwise intangible system. Thus, this proposal seeks to realise a space which people can identify with. The space is designed as an undulating surface that moves in direct response to the data being entered into the network so that people have a physical awareness of the virtual political activity of the citizens.

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Notes

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Portfolio  

Portfolio of Work 2008-2016

Portfolio  

Portfolio of Work 2008-2016

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