Page 1

Y


this pageintentionally teft blank


?ft{aiteryZt

T00ts0ndftrlATtnlAts 0f theTrude By Byron G. Swearey Director, Chicago School of W atchmaking

r952 C H I C A G OS C H O O TO F W A T C I { M A K I N G Chicugo, lllinois


lllDtx c

A ..... t0 Alcohol Cup. 5 Alcohol Lamp Alcohol Torch. ....,....33 American Movement Identification. ...... 34 Anvil (or Bench Block) ..... 9 .... ?9 Arbor Chuck. I Assembly Blocks Assembly Tweez,ers....,...' 3 Attachment, Friction ...,.,22 Jeweling I Auxiliary Bench ......'. 4 Awl..

Chuck Holder, Tail Stock '. 3l C h u c k , T h r e e J a w . . . . . . . . . . " "3 l .., 29 Chuck, Wheel. Chuck, Screw, with C e m e n t B r a s s e s , . . . . . . . . .2 8 . ' ., I Z C leaning Solutions Cleaning Machines, All Type s. .... 6 Clock OiI .. , Cloth, Polishing TZ Cloth, Selvyt. Coiling Pliers, lvlainspring o LZ Compass, Magnetic... 4 Coping $aw. Cord, Bracelet Crocus Paper Cross Hole Punches.........l8 z9 Crown Chucks.. 37 Crystals, Ordering. Crystal Cement 6 Crystal Forrner 6 Crystal Material t0 C*p, Alcohol. 25 Cup, Boiling. 9 Cup,()i1.. C u t t e r s , B a l a n c e S c r e w . ' . . z4

z? Hammer, Brass.,".. Hand Broaching De vice...". t z L e v e l e r S e t . . . . . 24 Hairspring Hair springs, Orderin8....', 40 z4 Hair spring " Pix" H a i r s p r i n g T w e e z e r s . . . . . . . z4 I Hand Remover 9 Hard Watch Brush H o l d e r , B a l a n c e S c r e w . . . . , ?,3 Holder, Chuck, Taii Stock. 3 t za Holder, Rearner..,.' Hollow Mouth Taper ......... l8 Punches.....

I

j

B Balance Complete, .,,... 39 How to Order. Balance llole Jewels, ,...... 39 How to Order Balance Screw Cutters .,... 7'4 Balance Screw Holder "...., 23 Balance Staff , Ordering "... 39 Bands, Ordering,...........'. 38 I Bench, Auxiliary 9 Bench Block (or Anvil) ".... 5 Bench Keys 6 Bench Knife Z Bench Larnps Z Bench Plate ....... 25 Bench Vise I Bench, Watchmaker's ,.,..31 Bezel Chrrck Blades, Jeweler's Saw,..... 33 I Blocks, Assembly............ Block, Bench I Blower 9 ......... 25 Bottle, Boiling .", 3? Boxwood Slip. 7 Bracel.et Cord. ,.. ZZ Brass Hammer..... ...... l0 Brass Wire ,..,.,lZ Broaches, Large ,......22 Broaches, Pivot Broaching, Hand Device.... lZ Brushes ,9, l0 .,.. Zq Buff Chuck... ,..,.,.33 Buffs, Emery.... ......32 Burnisher, Pivot

c Calipers, Truing..,. Can, lv{aterial Cannon Pinion, Ordering... Cannon Pinion Too1.. Cap Jewels, Ordering"...,.. Carboloy Graver Set ...".... C arborundum \ffheels ....... Wheels Carborundum

H

23 I

35 14 39 2,7

29

....... 30 with Arbor... Case Openers, A1l Types.' Z C e m e n t B r a s s e s . . . .- . , , , . . . , . Z g 7 Cement, Crystal. Centering Punches........,., 1? I Chair, Posture I Chest, Tool Ghucks, All Typâ‚Źs ....... 28-31 .... Z9 Chuck, Arbor .... 3l Chuck, Bezel ..... Zq Chuck, Buff . ....... 2,9 Chucks, Crown..

1

D Demagnetizer Dial Brush.., Sial Refinish, Ordering ...,

tz t0 38

E 33 Emery Buffs End Cutting Pliers.....,..... T .t Eyeglass (see Loupe)

Incabloc and Shock-Re sist Jewels, Ordering....'.... Incabloc Rol1er Punches ... 'l[f Identification atches of and Movements ,..,.. 34, .,,. Index, Lathe Inserter, Oil, ....

35 ?'7 t0

J ........ 10 Jars, Glass.,... Jewel Oauge, Roller.......,. l4 Jewel Pushers..... ,9, Z0 Je'r'el $etter, Roller ........, 14 Jeweling Attachment, Friction. ....,, ?2 I6 Jeweling Tool s, Friction... Jewel.s, Incabloc, How to Order. ...... 37 Jewels, Roller ........, l5 Jewels, Shock*Resist, How to Order. ,..,..37 36 JeweIs, Train, Ordering..'

K

fI 3l I t3 15 30

Face Flate File , Flat. Files, Needle f ile, Screw F{ead.. Filing Fixture Flat Faced Hollow Punches...,. . . . . 1 8 , 2A Flat Faced Hollow Stumps. l o Flat Faced Straight Hole t9 StumP. Flat Faced Solid Punches., l 8 Flat Faced Sslid Stump..... 1 9 Flat Faced Tapered I9 Hollow Stump. I Flat File Flat Plier s,. ,, 3 6 Former, Crystal Friction Jeweling 22 Attachment.... Friction Jeweling Too1s..., 1 6

^

$t Gauge, Roller Jewel Gauge, Ligne Gauge, Millimeter .. Glass Jars..... Gravers...,. Graver Set, Carboloy ....... Graver Sharpener,....

37 l8

t4 6 6 l0 3Z 3Z 3Z

5 6

Keys, Bench Knife, Bench.

t .. "L" Tool Rest. Lamp, Alcohol Lamp, Bench .,. ', Lathe Motor ,. '.. Lathe Mount Lathe, Things to Look for .....' in $electing ... Lathe, rvliatchmaker's ....,.. Leveler Set, Hairspring.... Ligne Gauge Loupe, Single. Loupe, Double Loupe, Spectacle .... Luminous Paint Kit.........,

30 5 Z ZB ZB 27 26 2'4 6 4 4 4 l3

M Machines, Cleaning....,..... I I Mainsprings, Ordering ,14, 4A B Mainspring Coiling Pliers. Winder for Mainspring B Bracelet 1#atches,,...... Winde r lor Mainspring 8 Pocket Watches. 7 Cans Material


IHDTX t[

N .,., i3

Needle Files.

s

P

6 Material, Crystal lviaterial, How to Order (see Ordering) .34- 40 Material Tray ,.4..i..., 3 I Micrometer,. 6 Mitlimeter Cauge .*,.t,r.."e8 Motor, Lathe lvlount, Lathe .... Z8 Movement ldentification V4 -35

o Oil, Clock..,.. 6 Oil Cup. 9 ..... l0 Oil Inserter. .. lZ Oil, Watch....." Oilers, Watch .. I0 Oilstone, Cornbination..,.., 32 Oilstone Powder, ...... l2 ?, Openers, Case Ordering Material ......, 34*40 Ealance Complete 34,35, 39 Balance Hole Jev/eIs..,, 39 Balance $taff s. ".. 34, 35 , 39 Bands, Watch. ...,. 38 Cannon Pinion, Swiss... 35 Cap Jewels.,.. .....,39 Crystals.....,.,. .,.. 37 Dial Refinish, .".."" 38 ...,."...40 Hairsprings Incabloc Jewels. ... 37 ..,.." 40 Mainsprings,. Regulatcr., Swiss ......... 35 ..".,..,39 Roller .,.,,...38 $crews ....36 Set Bridge S h o c k - R e s i s t J e w e L s . , . , .3 7 Spring Bars Stems...," .....36 Train Jewels ....... 36 Train Wheels 34,38 Overcoiling Tweezers ..,.,. t >

It a Paint, Luminous... Pallet Warmer Paper, Crocus Paper, Watch. Paraffin Wax. Parallel Jaw Pliers ......".. Paste, Po1ishing...., Pegwood Pins, Stud Pin, Tapâ‚Źr.,. Fin Vise.. Pinion, Cannon. Pithwood Pivot Broaches ,.... Fivot Burnisher.,,., Pivot Polish*r Fivot Rounder, " Pixi Hairspring .., Plate, Bench.. Plate, Face Plate, Screw, Pliers, Snd Cutting

r3 z5 'l

2

5 1

l3 l4 2.* I5 1^ l.*

r3 z3 3?, 30 l5 24

z

JI

33 4

Pliers, Flat. P1iers, Mainspring Coiling Pliers, Parallel Jaw Peiising Tool Polisher, Pivot r.r.,.*r Polishing Cloth Folishir:g Paste. Posture Chair Powde r, Oilstone " Prepo" Torch. F u n c h e s , A l l T y p e s , . , . . . 1S , Pusher, Jewel. Pusher, Friction Jewel..,..

5 8

) z3 30 7. I

LA 33 20 9 z8

R Reamer, fcr F-riction Jeweling Reamer Holder Regulaterr, Orclering $wiss type. Hand Remover, Remover, Roller .........15, Remctrer, Staff. ,..,15, Rest, $lide Roller Driving Punches .,,, Roller Jeryel Cauge Raller Jewel Setter. R.oller Jewels Roller Remover ', '.,.,...15, R$lier Rernoving Stumps... Round Farced Hollnw ,.,..17, Punches ,... Round Faced Solid ..., I S, Funches.,,.. Rounder, Fivot"

zo ")n ov

35 I

z2 zz 30 i8 L4 l4 t)

z? tq 2n Z,A 15

Staking $et, Beginner's,.,., Z0 $taking Set, Watchmaker's Zl ....,r..... l7 StakingTool ..,, l8 $tar Pgnch... ...,,.35 $terns, Ordering. Stocil . . "" , . . . l Stud Fins . r . r . . . r . . . . . .l 4 S t u m p s ,A l l T y p e s . . . . . . . L 9 , Z 0 Swiss Movement Identif ication . .. .,., 35 ? I

Tags, l#'atch L5 Tail $tock, Lathe z7 Tail $tock Chuck Holder... 3 l Taper Fin., z4 Things to Laok For in 27 Selecting a Lathe", T h r e e J a w C h u c k . , . . , . . r . , r , r? l L4 Timing Washers.... l4 Tool, Cannon Pinion. 1 Tool Chest z3 Tool, Poising 30 Tool Rest, "L" type t? Tool, 6taking 'f,orch, Alcohol, 33 Torch, "Frepo" 33 ?rain Jewels, Ordering,.,. 36 2"7 T-Rest J Tray, Material z3 Truing Calipers.., 'lweezer$, Assemhly. 3 z4 Hairspring ,,..r....r z5 Overcoiling .. .i.,x.r.r... 4 Soldering.

s $ample Parts, Need for .".,.,. 35 in 0rdering,. ,36- 4A SampIe Orders.... Saw Blades.,., ."".......33 4 Saw, Coping ......33 Saw, Jeweler's... Screw Chuck. ,.,. e8 $erew Crrtter*, Balance ".., 24 3 Screwdrivers, ...., t 5 $crew Head File, Screrv Holder, Balance ...., Z3 Screw Knocking Punches.., i8 ...,.. 33 Screw Plate ...,. 38 $crews, Ordering Selvyt Cloth. ..... 17, 5et Bridge, Ordering.."..... 35 .., 14 $ette r , Jewel Sharpener, Craver ,.,. 32 5 h e 1 1 e r c$, h r e d d e d , . . . . . . , . , . . l 4 .., 14 $hellac, $tick. 7 $pring Bars Spring Bars, Ordering.".,.. 38 5 Sleeve Wrench Slide Re st . -... ., 30 $lip, Beixwood ",. 3Z Soft Watch Frush. ..,.. l0 4 Soldering Tweeners,..-...,. $olutions, Cleaning .,"....,.. I a Soluticins, Rinsing . ., .. i 2 Spectacle Loupe 4 Staff Remover,..., .L5, Zz Staking Frame ....,.... l7 $taking Punches,.,.,, ....17, tg

U Undercgtters .

.., 7"3

v ,,.,, Z5 .....,... 15

Vise, Bench. Vise, Pin

vlf Warmer, PaLlet. ...,.,, Washers, Timing ...,.. Watch Bands, Ordering..,.. Watch Brushes.,,.. .9, Watch Movements, How to Identify....,. ".34, Watchmaker's Bench, Watchmaker'g Lathe Watchrnaker' s Staking Sets Watch Paper. tffatch Tags W ax, Paraffin Wheels, Carborundum .,.... Wheels, Carborundum, with Arbor.,. Whee1 Chuck. Wir:der" Mainspring, for Bracelet Watches .,. Winder, lvlainspring, for Focket Watches.,.,.. Wire, Brass Wrapping Watches or Material for Shipment.. Wrench, Sleeve ...,.,..

Z5 l4 3$ 10

35 z6 zl 3 l5 n , 79

30 29 I I

r0 35 5


TORTWORD Th is t ex t was p re p a re d w i th tw o th o u g h ts i n mi nd: O ne, t o g i v e y o u i n b ri e f fo rm an understanding of the cornrnon tools used in w a tch mak ing, par t i c u l a rl y t h o s e u s e d wi th Lessons in Master Watchmaking. $econd, to assist you in the oftimes dif f icult task of L a c k o f k n o w l e d g e a b out o rd e ri n g m at er ials . p ro p e r t ools and r ig h t w a y s to o rd e r rn a te ri a l s ca n b e s er ious s t um b l i n g b l o c k s fo r n e w c o m ers to watch repair, I hope this text will remo ve t hes e bar r ie rs to l e a rn i n g a n d e n a bl e yo u to c onc ent r at ey o u r fu l l a tte n ti o n o n maste ry o f wat c h r epa i r i ts e l f. Th e s e pages m a y c o rn e a s a re v e l a ti o n to th o se who hav e t h e i m p re s s i o n th a t th e o nl y tools needed for watch repair are a loupe, and a pair of pliers. screwdrivers, Watch repair is precision work and demands preci si o n t ools . S k il l a n d k n o w l e d g e a l o n e a re n o t e nough, es pec i a l l y i f y o u i n te n d to w ork fo r p r of it . In the olddays, watchmakers made mo-qt of theirtools. Some stilldo. There is less need to do so now, since most tools are generally available at moderate prices. Indeed, dollarwise watchmakers realize it is better to spend th e i r t im e t oday i n p ro fi ta b l e w a tc h re p a i r th a n at ar duous an d u n n e c e s s a ry to o l m a k i n g. Mo re o v er , it is p o s s i b l e to b u y a fi rs t ra te se to f t ools f or a ve ry mo d e s t s u m i f y o u b uy wi se l y. Y ou s houl d l o c l k u p o n to o l s a s a n investment rather than an expense, because th e y will r epay t he i r i n i ti a l c o s t E ra n y ti m e s over in their long years of service. The tools de sc ribed herein include the basictools rnost likely to be acquired as well a s so rne ot her s y o u s h o u l d k n o w a b o u t. Not every tool can be cove red in the limited space, Th o se des c r ibed s h o u l d b e c o n s j .d e re d o n l y as representative. No attempt has been made to compare the merits of. one manufacturer's i te m a gains t anot h e r' s . Al l th a t i s i n te n d ed is to give you an understanding of what a tool sh o u l d do. K nowin g th i s , y o u c a n m o re a bl y j u d g e the adv ant age s c l a i rn e d fo r a n y p a rti c u* lar make.

a greater vari ety of w ork, but he must do it fast and economi cal l y i f he expects to m ake a profi t. N ext, consi der how often you w i l l u se a tool . If youare goi ng to have frequent use f or it, and can do better work with it than wi.thout i t, you probabl y shoul d b* y i t. B y l i m it ing your first purchas e s to the tools you will habitually use, you avoid tying up money in special purpose or limited-use tools. These w i l l corre l ater w hen you see the nee d f or more speed or more convenience. A thi rd consi derati on i s w hat you can afford, It i s sound advi ce to buythe best tools, i f you can. Thi s rnay not be possi bl e i n your si tuati on. S tudents, e speci al l y, must of t en economize. If this is true of you, you should have a good understandi ng of w hat tool s ar e used for. You can then more readily decide where you can hold off buying a tool, or can use a less expensive one, and where it would be a fal se economy to buy a cheap tool . For i nstance, i t i s no parti cul ar di sadvantage t o use aninexpensive set of screw drivers while learning. Youcanbuy a better set later at no great cost. But it would be folly to buy a cheap truing caliper or similar tool where accuracy demands a precision tool of high quality. As afurtherhelpfor those who must econornize while iearning, this text suggests some substi tutes for certai n tool s, enabl i ng you t o postpone thei r purchase unti l you can af f or d them, These substitutes make u$e of other tools you are likely to have or other methods for doing the work. Such make shift s are usual l y adequate for trai ni ng, but should be repl aced w i th the genui ne arti cl e the f ir st chance you have, In any event, don't force any tool beyond the l i mi ts for w hi ch i t was i ntended.

Even so, the task of selecting tools is not easy. Manufacturer's catalogs present a te mp ti ng but b e w i l d e ri n g a rra y . The ever-present question is "Which tools should I b u y f ir s t ? ' A f e w s u g g e s ti o n s m a y h el p determine the answer.

V fh e n i t c o m e s t o o r d e r i n g m a t e r i a l s r 1 r o u shoul d fi nd these pages of consi derabl e help. Typi cal methods for orderi ng and the type of i nformati on requi red are i ncl uded to g uide you i n getti ng the exact materi al you want . Vague orders are a great expense, both for you and your suppl y house. They can m ean extra correspondence, time lost and dissatisfi.ed customers. If you realize this, you will understand the i mportance of thi s trai ning and the val ue of thi s secti on of the text,

First, consider your airn in watchmaking. Hobby? Or career? Obviously the needs for both are not the same, The professional ordinarily requires more tools than the amateur. This is not only because he handles

It ordinarily takes some years of practical experi ence to acqui re the i nformati on th at is presented so compactly here. I hope, therefore, that you will use these pages to advan* tage in speeding yCIur progress.

B. c. s.


TOOLS AND MATERIALS WATCHMAKER,S

OF THE TRADE

BENCH

Watchmaker,s

ches are orwo'd' rhev b e nin dirrer;fffiilrfrT#; as mahogSny, oak "l*u and *"trr..t. The

bench *rd *o*f-rtrnents in con_ which

tains small d""w*r:

ptac*rrtJJootsand mater-

fir:T"n*aker.l1

zz inc,,:J :il",}I;tl-# ;:i:: 3Binchu,l'iiatn AUXILIARY

BENCH

The beginner can improvise i

face such.i"

drawing.#:;ll"?r";:: der to rai.se tr,e "-i"l;; i;;s;;",. ;: ,:lf'e **r*iliary to 42 inches, it is advisable iJ-.*"L* * which can be sut-ln bench an

readily removed and.

ordinary table and be "tor.J-*i-*r, not in use.

TOOL CH"EST - This portable cabinet rng tools and rnateriar* is convenient for hordif J"""i.rr* bench is not available' It J*-usures a60ut 2a long by 9 inche" *ii" by I a i*"Lus high. inches STOOL A srnall stool is the most comrnon seat used by the forrn of *"t"i*aker. lt-}rould justed to be ad _ 'erght.^*ti.rr arro*, ;;; *o"kman to " rest his arms on the U-"nJ,-"t'iir. same time sr,orrau"s

[.H:t

S.:

back: ril

atrowshim

- as the beich supports

b"sil;;; "":; i :."H.; h."T t:fl^ IJ#"T;: ;. " the arm s :*::"1-tiring

FOSTURE CHAIR Posture chair illustrated is, b-ecoming *"3: .;}::;:-j-, amons watchmrke.J as _a *ur"o*f

-*Jiry"s t*il,:oTilf making ;;;;;;"1"" shops use ;:J,;:

thi"" ?ypl'Ji"uq,rip*"rrt, not only for watchrnakers, bw'f"" .'^p**o*1,*'o to do their sit down yg"k. i; be readity adjusted fit the individ;;i; to ";; "-;"n;irement s,

a',::"

i,


TOOLS AND MATERIALS

2 BENCH

LAMPS

The watchmaker's Good light is important. placed as near to natural light bench should be p o s s i b l e . N o r t h l i g h t i s as the most ideal. It nece is usually ssary to supplement the natural light and there are many light with artificial type s of lamps for this purpose. A common gooseneck lamp with a round or oval reflector using about a 60 watt bulb is ideal. Anothe r lamp which has been typ. is the fluorescent power corrected for watchmaker s and is gen* e r ally coole r . BENCH

PLATE

An auxiliary working surface of some sort A surface of white material is recommended, of hard enamel is not recommended. The beginner can use a piece of Bristol board or any white paper wtrich will lie flat. CASE OPENERS A - Case openers are used to pry open the front and back of snap typ* cases- They come in many shapes and styles. They can be made from a piece of flat steel which has a curved edge and ground to a dulI knife edge. It should be hardened and tempered. The beginner can use the blade of a srnall knife. B - A rubber suction griptype of casâ‚Ź opener can be used to remove the back and bezel on screw type case s of pocket size. The beginner may substitute a piece of rubbe r such as a small piece of inner tube. d - A waterproof case opener is usually a type of wrench used to remove $crew-back waterproof case s. There are many type s of backs, requiring a variety of wrenche s. The illustrated opener has reversible tips, which will open most types of screw backs.

DOUBLE

POLISHING

CLOTH

This type of polishing cloth is comprised of an outer cloth, which keeps the hands clean when polishing metal, and an inner clothwhich has been impregnated with rouge. It can be used to brighten all type s of gold and silve r jewelry, including the family silverware.

Of. THE TRADE


TOOLS AND MATERIALS OI. THE TRADE

3

SCREWDRIVERS The blades of watchmaker's screwdrivers are made of hardened and tempered steel. The head of the screwdriver remains stationary against the fingcr which is placed upon it, while the stem and blade revolves freely when in use. Screwdriver s are made in a variety of blade widths to fit the wide variety of scr ew head diameters. It is necessary to select a screwdriver of a width slightly smalle r than the screw head so as not to damage the screw hea.d or the plate. The smaller sc rewdriver s , used to remove jewel screws, range in size from .60 mm to .85 mm.

ASSEMBLY

TWEEZERS

There are rnarry types of watchmaker's tweezers" The assembly twe ezer is a general purpose twee zeT vsed for assembly work and handling watch mate rial. The typu illustrated. is an excellent twe e?.er for gene ral work but there are nnany other different styles and shapes of points.

MATERIAL

TRAY

AND

COVER

Most rnaterial trays are divided into sections in which to place the parts of a watch as it is disassembled. For example, trainwheels in one section, balance and e s c a pe m e nt in another, and so on. Most trays are covered in order to keepthe parts free of dust and rnoist* ure. The beginner n'ray use a clean porcelain dish, such as a saucer with an inverted glass.

WATCH

I)APER

Watch paper is used when handling parts of watches or watchmovernents, It is rnade from high grade, tarni sh- proof tis sue and usually comes in sizes about Z-I/4 x Z-I/4 and 4-I14 x 4- t /4 inche s. The tis sue is placed between the finger s and the movement or parts when handling-. The beginner can substi{ute a good grade of tissue which has been cut to eithJr of the d.imensions given. watch paper is also used to wrap parts of watches and materials when sending samples to the supply house.

mlr *itsttr *-HERCU

LE Ewfr

WATCH PAPER I C00 Shcct {r( x 414

Non-Tarnishable rtl

t5

H..rcrl.'r tlhh"t cild

(,uiattt.\'.|

tr(.r'?(J

$"H

*rr<h rlr.rr (;,rJ! lir.ur

nalr

tr -

h

t!'n,lrrstlhrhla

crp{..lrirt

ll.r

fr,,nr

{rrllr

lnJ wetrhmr}*r.

rhe

linl'hrl nrlru. art,

W3


4 LOUI)E

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OR EYEGLASS

For the person who is not required to wear glasses a single eyeloupe is recommended for all general purposes. It can be held in place by using a head wire. The loupe shauld be approximately a 3 inch fccus, This is comparable to a magnification of 3.3 times. DOUBLE

LOUPE

A two lens loupe used for clo se work and more magnification. The outer lens can be removed, thus reverting to a single loupe, Double loupes are available in many different power$ and focus. The ideal double loupe for .general work should magnify approximately 7 -l/Ztimes, SPECTACLE

LOUPE

For the person who must wear glasses to correct vision, this type of spectacle loupe is preferred. It is quickly attached and detached. A 3 inch focus is recommended for general bench work. For those wearing bone rim glasses, a loupe sirnilar to this is made to fit the f rame . A loupe holder may al so be u sed to attach the regular loupe to the glass frarne. AWL An ordinary awl is extremely handy around the watchmaker's bench, It can be used for punching hole s in Leathe r , opening cla s ps on bands and marking outlines in plastic etc. Ary sharp pointed instrument may be substituted. SOLDERING

TWEEZERS

These tweezers are used to hold materials when heating, hardening and soldering. Some tweezers have a clamp as an added feature. COPING

SAVT

A small inexpensive coping saw is useful for cutting wood and plastic. It can be obtained at rno st hardware store s, END CUT?ING

PLIERS

An end cutting plier of the type illustrated i s anothe r of the c omm on type of watchm ake r ' s pliers. It is made to cut soft steel, brass, nickel, and othe r materials.

OF THE TRADE


TOOLS AND MATERIALS

KEYS

BENCH

These usually come in sets of three with double end and are used for winding and setting watche s after rerrloval frorn the case. They are seldom applicable to watche s of Swi s s manufacture, which use a different type of winding The beginner can and setting arrangement. readily make a set of bench keys from steel rod. Afte r the pie c e s have be en shape d to the proper size squares they should be hardened and tempered to a blue color. They can then be mounted in handles of metal or wood. The following dimensions are the most cCImmon:

Length of square .6 mm 5.5 mm 4,5 mm 4,5 mm 3.3 mm 3,3 mm SLEEVE

Thickness 1.5 1.3 l.l I.0 .8 .6

of square mm mm mm mm mm mm

WRENCH

Sleeve wrenche s have 3, 6 or l0 prong s . Theprongs are of varied shapes and sLzes and are used to remove or adjust sleeves, generally in pclcket watch cases. FLAT

PLIERS

Flat pl i e r s have a variety of uses to the and jeweler. A flat plier of good watchmaker quality, approximateLy 4-L/Z inches long, is ordinarily used. The beginner may use any typ. of plie r by taking pr e c aution not to m ar the surface of the parts being worked on. FARALLEL

JAW PLIERS

Used to hold small objects more securely, frorn the conventional flat no se They differ pliers in that the jaws remain parallelwhether open or closed. ALCOHOL

LAMP

to the one A small alcohol lamp similar piece of equipment for shown is a necessary bench. The fuel for these the watchmaker's lamps is usually obtainable in a drug or paint store and is a denatured alcohol suitable for burning.

OF THE TRADE

5


TOOLS ANI} MATERIALS OF. THE TRADM

6 BENCH KNITE

A snlall sharp k n i f e u s e d t r : s h a r p e n p e g w o o d , A t y s m a l l pocket kni{e will suffiee as a substitute. LIGNE GAUGE A small ligne gauge Ls usually obtainable from your supp)"y hcuse. It is handy to rneas* ure the diameter of movements to determine the size; hawever, it is nst generally as accurgauge. ate as the millimeter MILLIMETER

GAUGE

The gauge iLlustrated is a fommon type of millimeter gauge with a vernier for subdividinto tenths, It is used far ing the millimeters rneasuring the length and outside diameter depth in millimeters. MM is the abbreviation for millimeter. Later a de scription will be given of the micrometer, which ffreasure s to a n e/ o n e - h u n d r e d t h o f a m i l l i m e t e r . CLOCK OIL Clock oil, while principall"y used for ciling pi.vot$ on a clock, is used by the watchmaker to oil rnainspring s and the winding and s etting parts of the watch. It should be kept correred" at all times and in a dark place. It should be removed from the bottle several drops at a time and placed in an oil cup. This as $ure,s of having clean, fre sh ail at the watchmaker aLl time s, Do nat add f re sh oil ta th* oil cup without f ir st di s po s ing of any r e m aining old oil. CRYSTAL

T'ORMNR

For the beginner, any half round object of glass or metal and about 4 inches across will serve. A smaller size is de sirable for small crystals. The crystal is shaped over the former and should be farmed high enough to let the hands of the watch rotate without rubbing. CRYSTAL

MATERIAL

material for rnaking and forming Ctystal fancy shape watch crystals is usually of plas tic, the most commonof wtrich is known by the It can be farmed trade name PLEXIGLASS. and polished with a minimum of effort.


TOOLS AND MATERIALS FOLISHING

7

OF' THE TRADE

PASTE

A good silver polishing paste can be used to polish the edge s of a crystal after the rough edge s have be en smoothed with c ro cus pape r . This polish can also be used to polish silver ware and jewelry.

POLISHING PAgTE

CROCUS PAPER This is an abrasive material which is glued to smooth paper. It is used to remove scratches from metals and plastic. The student may use it to smooth the edge of non-breakabl"e watch cty stal s, CRYSTAL

CEMENT

C"ystal cement generally comes in tubes. These tubes are made with a needle cap which allows the cem.ent to flow f reely. Replacing the cap will keep the cement clean and liquid. It is used primarily as a sealer between the bezel and the crystal to keep dust from entering and not to hold the crystal in place. BRACELET

CORD

Replacement cord s for ladie s watch bands diameters. corre in different The principal color is black. The old cord is used as a guide when replacing the cord. After the new cord has been cut to length, the ends should be dipped in hot wax. PARAFFIN

BRACELET WATCH CORD ONYX ELACK r 5 vos r srze.O7O

WAX

A small piece of paraffin wax is ideal for tipping the ends of the cord bands used on ladie s' watche s. The wax can be heated in a small material can. MATERIAL

CAN

Small metal container s of varying shape s are known in the trade as mate rial cans. They are usually furnished by the supply houses to hold watch material in mailing. SPRING BARS A small assortment of. spring bars should be kept handy at all times. They come in assorted lengths in either regular or thin diameters.

@

52 - FEXALE

G

60 - DoUoLESrfolrloEr

@

'O - DOI'TLâ&#x201A;Ź FtAIGf


TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE

8 MAINSPRING

WINDER

for

Pocket Watches

winder is an indispensable The mainspring tool used to insertlhe mainspring in the barrel' The winder illustrated" has six loading barrels, the smallest being 8.8 mm, and is graduated up to 16.0 mm. lt co*es withtwo sizes of winding arbor. This winder is used on pocket size watche s.

MAINSPRING

VIINDER

fOT BTACCICt WAIChCS

This set of 8 mainspring winder s for brace let watches ranges in size from 5 mrn to l0 mm' They are a neie s sity for the watchmaker who *oris on small watche s. There is no practical substitute for a mainspring winder'

MAINSPRiNC

COILINC

PLIERS

These pliers, with a specially designed end, are used to ad iu s t the inner coil of a mainSlight alterations can spring to fit the arbor. Ue made with a pair of heavy twe ez,ers if care is used not to snap off the end.

MICROMETER is gradThe illustrated metric micrometer i s a must T h i s a m i l l i m e t e r . uated tnl/L00 of prof e sional s as as well the itern for the beginner are a watch parts of all working Practically gauged in hundredths of a rnillimeter'

ASSEMBLY

BLOCKS

The as sembly block is a cylinder used to hold the movement while working on it. The illustrated set is of plastic and ranges in size from 7 -314 ligne s to 18 sise.

HAND

REMOVER

This tool is designed to remo\re the hands to the dial' $ome of a watchwithoutdamage of u se two small screw w a t c h m a k e r s the oldtime protecting the while hand s pry up the driver s to paper. watch or dial with either celluloid


TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE T'LAT

FILE

An ordinary file is in orde r around the bench. Asa general rule, watchmaker's watchmakers have a variety of small files, but the reference here is to a flat file from six to ten inches long and with a medium cut, BENCH BLOCK OR ANVIL This steel block has various size hole s and slots to support different parts of. the watch on which work is being done. BLOWER Used to blow off particles of lint or for drying certain parts of the watch, such as the balance and pallet fclrk. Not an essential itern for the beginner, but a rnust for the professional. The beginner may substitute a small rubber syringe which can be purchased in a drug store. JEWEL

I

PUSHER

This tool is used to push out jewel settlngs such as a cap and balance jewel in setting. The tool has several size pushers to match different size setting s. The beginne r rnay use pegwood c ut to the r equir ed size ,

orl, cup Watchmakers use a small covered receptacle to hold oil. Only a little oil should be kept in the cup at a time and the cup should be cleaned frequently. The watchmaker should have at least three oil cups: I for clock oil I for regular watch oil I for bracelet watch oil The beginner may be able to obtain small glass salt cups for this purpo$e. HARD WATCH

BRUSH

This brush is used in the hand method of cleaning watches to scrub plates and other parts. It is made of materials that will not set up a chemical reaction in the solutions, which might c au se co r ro sion,

'm


IO

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF' THE TRADE

SOTT WATCH

BRUSH

Used to remove any particles of dust or lint that may settle on the parts of the movement after cleaning. This brush should not be used a f t e r t h e m o v e r : r ' r e n th a s b e e n a s s e r n b l e d d u e t o the pre sence of r:il and the pos sibility of smear ing it. WATCH

OILERS

U sed to oil the parts of the watch. They are usually made of steel or nickel ground to a dia* mond - shaped tip. They ar e available in a variety of sizes, the srnallest being used to oil tho se part s requiring the smalle st amount of oil, and so on. The beginner rzray make his own oilers frorn needles. The illustration shows the shape of the tip. OiL INSERTER This tool is used to i"nduce oil through the balance hole jewel onto the cap jewel. The be * ginner may make one by reducing a fine piece of steel such as a needle to a very fine point, approximateLy 5/L00 mm. DIAL

BRUSH

Used to brush off the dial after the movement has been as sembled as well as to remove any dust or lint before casing the movement. ALCOHOL

CUI)

U sed by the watchmaker as a container for alcohol, bertzirte, naptha, and so forth. These are solutions used in cleaning. The alcohol cup is usually fitted with a ground glass top, which retards evaporation. The beginner may use any small glass jar, GLASS JARS These pint jars hold cleaning solutions, The beginner may use mason jars or any other good substitute so long as there is riot a rubber seal on the jar. Cleaning solutions will cause rubber to dissolve and contaminate the solution" BRASS WIRE Used to string parts for hand cleaning. used in latte work.

Also

H

M


TOOLS AND MATERIALS

CLEANING

OJ. THE TRADE

tt

MACHINES

Cleaning rnachines are a modern, time * saving de They are generally vice used to clean watch parts. properly used, have a n d , w h e n found in the best shops; department. repair inc reased the profit s of the introduced, When first there \rrere sonne claims that the watch need not be taken apart for cleaning. This brought quick condemnation frorn expert watchmakers and, for a while, the machine was not accepted in the trade . Nonetheless, as with everything that has me rit, it was gradually adopted by watchmaker s and found it produced who began to use it properly It remains a fact, however, that excellent results. workman any machine in the hands of an indifferent will not pr oduc e the be st r e s ult s .

are many good machine s on the market. There in that the watch must be csmThey are all similar pletely disassembled, the parts placed in abasket which is attached to the machine, run through a ser* ie s of cleaning and rinsing solutions, and then dried. dryer. electric Sorne machines have a built*in operationin the amount of automatic They differ in which the basket Some have automatic reversing f rorn one solution to anether, m$ve s automatically and will clean as many as three watche s at a time . The choice of a machine and solutions will depend on the needs of the individual.

Figure A is a gene ral all* purpo se cleaning mawith a revolving base. It chine electrically-driven, illustrates the four* section wire basket in place. This for the is gerl^erally recommended typ* of machine average watchmaker. tr'igure B is a heavy' duty machine, used in producIt will clean three separate movernents at tion work. one time . It also feature s a basket for clocks. Figure C is a fully automatic watch cleaning machine. After the basket has been placed in the machine take s the it automaticall!' and the rnachine started, solutions and parts through the cleaning and rinsing drye r .


l2

TOOLS AND MATERIALS CIF THE TRADE

1MATCH OIL A fine grade animal CIr fish oil is used to lubricate the moving parts of a watch. POWDER

OILSTONE

This abrasive powder is used in finishing 'W metal. It is mixed with oil into a paste, hen applied to a grinding slip, it may be used to grind pivots or other steel surfaces. SELVYT

CLOTH

This type of cloth is used by watchmakers and jewele r s in handling watche s and jewelry to keep it free from finger marks. It is a lintfree, washable cloth. CLEANING

AND RINSING SOLUTIONS

prepared There are many commercially cleaning and rinsing solutions in use. They are alike in this respect: they remove the old oil, slsan and brighten the parts, and dry with* out le aving any s edirn ent . Many watchm ake r s prepare their own solutions, using formulas that have been found to give satisfactory re* sult s . DEMAGNETI

ZER,

This is an electrical device used to remove magnetism from a watch movement. lt is a desirable piece of equipment, for there is no other convenient method of dernagnetlziog. COMPASS A small magnetic compass is used to detect magnetism in a watch. LARGE

BROACHES

These are tapered cutting tools designed to enlarge hole s. They are Llsually made up in assortments of different siz.es, They are used in fitting hands to movements and similar jobs. HAND

BROACHINC

DEVICE

This vise-like device is used to hold hands while they are being broached.

i-@ NOAM 6oLv$lrl

tao r

IYOAM ztP o.tf Ng rrr,rr

!l1t\l!

a*taat,ff

ftt aox

rr4ortr,

nnt

ri,\


TOOLS AND MATERIALS

NEEDLE

,--w

li_,

FILES

t3

Or. THE TRADE

* [QUAr[|'t|G fit[3

The se are small, f ine - cutting file s that come in a variety of shapes. They are used on many jobs requiring fine work, such as fitting and shaping of regulator Pins.

a -ROUND ;rttt l

ilt ii tii: -ltAtf

RourD ilt;s

r. *$ouAntnu3

The first five files illustrated are the ones meist commonly used by the watchmaker,

r -THrtr 'ouAnr rnts

t

@ -:NT:rtilO

rl$t

PEGWOOD These are round sticks of Dogwood used for cleaning purposes. They are usually obtained from France. Pegwood comes in three sizes: srnall, medium and large. The last is usually called " clock pegwood" because its main use is for clock work. The medium size is more The smallcommonly used by the watchmaker. w atche s. f o r b r a c e l e t t i n y e st size is handy Pegwood can be sharpened to a point like a pencil-. It is used in cleaning to reach hard-tog"t-at places, such as pinion leaves- It can ilso be wet with naptha and us ed to peg out pivot or jewel holes. Cut to size, it can serve the beginner as a jewel P*sher. PITHWOOD A soft, sap-f ree wood f rom the center of The watchmaker finds Elder tree branches. rrrany uses for it. The sponge-like nature of the wood allows delicate parts to be pushed into it withoutdamage. One use, therefore,is to clean oil from pivots before inspection" Another is to hold wheels, pinions and staffs while they are being mea sured or examined. Fine pointed tools, watch hands, and so forth can also be stuck into pithwood tor safekeepirg. LUMINOUS

PAINT

KIT

A compound which may be used to refinish luminous hands. The mixture has a wax base It is applied to the and comes in a paste form. a p p l i c a t o r , which has been hands with a metal i n t o the pan of paint. The warmed and dipped heat causes a small arnount of paint to stick to and melts the paint enough to the applicator If the flow it onto the hand while still warm. with a result is uneven, it rnay be trimmed knife blade.

I -ctosslt{o i|rts

t *KNtiE Hu3

{tarding)


l4 CANNON

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OT THA TRADE PINION

TOOL

Used to tighten a cannon pinion. There are other rnethods used to close or fit a cannon pinion but the cannon pinion tool is considered the most practical and safe st method.

ROLLER

JEWEL

SETTER

Used to hold and conduct heat to the roller table in order to set or make adjustments to the roller jewel

ROLLER

JEWEL

GAUGE

A feeler gauge used to measure the pallet fork slot to determine the proper size of roller jewel.

TIMING

WASHERS

GEI{UINE AUHf,S

These are small brass washers used in poising balance wheels and timing of watche s. They come in as sortm ents, and are segregated in sizes and weights to fit the different sizes of watche s. The weight i s de signated by a li st ing of the approximate amount of time it will alter a watch, such as I minute , Z minute s, etc. This listing refers to a pair of washers placed on opposite screws near the neutral point on the balance wheel rim.

COT{PLHT

TTMING WASHERS

F o r A m er i c a n a n d Swirs llatches

Fronc 3r,/r Usrr

[- tt:] t': rl

4 ).'t

49

4u1

5C

5 irr

:i1 qt

e

53 54 55

6ti 7 o

I L

I ?. I

5S 5g 60

This jewels,

SHELLAC

shellac

is used in cementing

roller

STICK SHELLAC Used with the lathe in cementing jewel setting s, staff s , etc. This cement may also be used for setting roller jewels if you have no shredded shellac.

I ?

Lll

63 a4

\t

o

B5

r0 16 l8 r8

I 2 I 2

b?.

5b O I

6fJ

As sorted

SHREDDED

tai} t'/D a2 6l 62 l2

o1

STUD PINS S m a l l t a p e r e d b r a s s pins used in studding hairsprings, M.y also be used in repiacing regulator pins etc.

lo l8 Siro

Sizct

3/

.1 ",4

48

ASSONTMENA l{o, 5

STUD PINS

1


l5

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OT" THE TRADE TACS

WATCH

fus

Tags are used by a watchmaker to identify These tags a custorrler'swatch during repair. filf in the y o u w i l l i n w h i c h c a s e p l a i n , may be n a r n e, date , a s i n f o r m a t i o n , s u c h de sired e l a b o r a t e tags inf o r t h , M o r e charge, and so for explanation of clude a ttg numbe r , spac e work performed, and the like. Tags are ex* cellent for the beginner to use in record"ing repairs made in his practice work.

ff* *â&#x201A;Ź

JEWELS

ROLLER 'When

doing repair work it is de sirable to have an assortment of roller jewels in a complete range of size s, including both short and long jewels to fit both single and double roll'tD-r'-shape jewels are the most ers. The They are gauged in I I lA0 commonly used. mm. REMOVER

ROLLER

ITUr4f

'A6gTTTt

ERACCITf

IH HOLOTR

This tool is used to remove roller tables and is de signed for use with a bench block or staking tool. See page ZZ. STAFF

REMOVER

?his tool is de signed for use with the staking tool and is used tor removal of riveted balance staffs. See page 22. FIVOT

ROUNDER

This small tool is fitted with a sapphire end which is placed ove r the bent pivot. Revolving the rounder between the fingers force s the pivot back to its original position. It also remove s burr s and poli she s the pivot. PIN VISE A small hand vise is used to hold small o b j e c t s , s u c h a s a s t e m , B ee d l e , a n d s i m i l a r item s. SCREIT HEAD

FILE

A very fine-cutting, knife-edge file used to slot in the head of a cut the screw driver screw. It is also used to shape regulator pins and the like.

|v,it

v


TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE

t6

JEWELING

FRICTION

TOOLS

This tool is used to ream ' pre ss in and jewels. lf the rnake adjustments to friction jewel to be replaced is a friction jewel, Iou need only press out the cracked or otherwise the size of the hole darnaged jewel, determine d a m a g e d )' press in a fricn o t (if thJ hoie is and pivot diameter tion jewel of the proper endshake . If' for proPer hole sLve and adjust ream it s h o u l d the hole has been damaged, }'ou in t h e n p r e ss a n d with the next size reamer j e w e l . the proper size In replacing other types of jewels with friction jewels, a more thorough knowledge of jewels and jewel setting s is needed. This adcan be found in Les sons ditional information in Master Watchmaking 12, l3 and 14BASIC SET The basic set witl usually consist of the following: tr'riction jeweling t o o l ( w i t h m i c r o m e t e r ad ju stm ent to control depth) Reamer holder Reamers ( lZ to I 5) Pu she r ho lde r Pushers (tZ) Anvils (5) COMPLETE

SET

The complete set will usually include in addition to the basic Parts: Concave Pusher s Pump pushe r s Hole reducing Punche s pallet Set of tools for setting friction arbors. DELUXE

SET

The deluxe s et wilt u sually include in ad dition to the parts listed above: stone (f o r r ef ac ing pu she r s) G rinding Holder for jewel settings Face plate with additional clamPs Set of centering Points Set of pushers and anvils for setting hands. Handle with set of chucks Tool {or straightening Pivots Fivot gauge Uprighting pumP tool


TOOLS AND MATERIALS OT' THE ?RADE

r7

THE STAKING TOOL The staking tool is a tool of many uses, such as, removing and replacing a balance staff, closing pivot holes, removing or replacing pinions, replacing hands, replacing a hairspring, etc. With a few exceptions the following information will apply to all staking too1s. The staking tool consists of the following parts: the staking frame, punches in various shapes and sizes, and stumps in various shape s and s i z e s .

A-r' STAKING

T'RAME

The punch guide A is alignedwith the die plate B so ttrat the Funches will always be perpendicular to the die p1ate. The die plate may be turned so that any hole may be aligned with the punch. Turning the knurled wheel at C will lock the die plate in any de sired position. The hole s in the die plate are gauged and centered and give you the right spread of sizes frorn small to large.

B-.-+

STAKINC

PUNCHES

Practically all work on the staking tool will require that the proper hole in the die plate be alignecl with the punch. The centering punch serve s this purpose"

STAKiNG T'RAME CENTERINC PUNCH Fir st determine the hole in the die plate to be used. Then insert the centering punch through the punch guide into the hole in the die plate and lock the die plate in position before removing the punch.

ROUND F'ACED HOLLOW PUNCH It s most common use is in staking balance staff s. Afte r the die plate has been centered, the staff with wheel in place is placed in the die plate, and a round faced hollaw punch af a size just slightly larger than the collet seat is used to spread the rivet on the staff.


IE

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OT THE TRADE

3'LAT T'ACSD HOLLO1M PUNCH Used for finishing the riveting of balance staffs, After using a round. faced hollow punch to spread the rivet, a flat faced hollow punch of the same size hole is used to finish off the top of the rivet. This punch has many other uses, such as pressing the hairspring collet on the staff , hands on watches, and the like.

ROUND T'ACEN $OLID

PUNCH

Generally used for closing pivot holes etc. The proper size of punch to use is deter mined by the sise cf the oil cup and should fit as shown in illustration A. Ttre bottom supported of the piate shsuld be properly with a stump or inverted punch and if there is a recess as shown in illustration B, the stump should be of a size which will fit the recess. This punch has a variety of other use s such as closing the hole in a minute hand, closing the hole on a single roller, and so forth.

Bfu@

F.LAT T'ACED SOLID PUNCH Generally

used as an inve rted stump.

HOLLOW TAPER T\4OUTHPUNCH

ll.ffi

Used for closing holes, such as hour hand, and for closing collets, etc. Use care in selecting the proper size <lf punch.

STAR PUNCH

I--T> L--*rr'

$ometimes known as the triangular point punch. It is used to close by raising sma1l burrs equidistant around the the hole in rollers edge of the hole.

CROSS HOLE PUNCHES U sed in removing and replacing Waltham f riction staff s. The se punche s arâ&#x201A;Ź de signed to fit over the pivot and re st on the cone rather than against a shoulder.

ROLLER DRIVING PUNCH

ilN,s

This punch was designed to replace single rollers. It is a flat face hollow punch with a slot cut in the edge to accomodate the roller jewel. Modern methods of replacing a roller do not require the use of this punch,


TOOLS AND MATERIALS

r9

OF' THE TRADE

SCREW KNOCKING PUNCH

lT*\_

tl'-r*

-.

"

This punch is designed to drive out a screw which has been broken off inthe plate. This is practical only if you have an ove rsize screw available and also a tap cf the proper size to cut new threads, as The more practical method of rethe old threads will be stripped. moving a broken screw is to use an acid solution which will dissolve the steel screw and leave the bras s or nickel threads intact.

INCABLOC ROLLER PUNCH rT*l-*-

tl

z-L*-.s

F'CI

This punch is designed for use in replacing an incabloc roller. ?he incabloc roller has a raised edge on the bottom, This punch fits within this edge and so minimizes the possibility of darnage to the rolle r,

STUMPS The manufacturers have done little to modernize their assortrlrent of stumps. In most staking sets may be found otumps no longer in common use, as more modern tools and methods have beea devised. Using the inverted style of tool, any of the punche s can be turned over and used as etumps, FLAT TACS SOLID STUMP This type of stump has a variety of uses. Most staking sets have several of these stumps in different sizes. They may be used any time a flat solid surface is desired.

rLAT

FACE HOLLOW STUMPS lvlost staking sets are equipped with these stumps in a variety of sises. They may be used to su.pport a plate when drilling, broaching , etc.

rLAT TACE TAPERED HOLLOW STUMPS Used to support the hub CIn a l,4raltham friction the staff is being rernoved.

typ.

balance

when

g.LAT F'ACE STRAICHT HOLE STUMP Used to support staked on.

a

'Waltham

friction

staff

while

the wheel

is being

ROLLER REMOVING STUMPS The se stumps More modern rollers.

were tools

roller de signed f,or use in removing have been devised to and methods

tables. remove


OF THE TRADE

TOOLS AND MATERIALS A PRACTICAL

STAKING SET for Beginners

This set consists of a small, solid base frame, ten punches, five stumps, plus a reafirer hotrder, reamer, and jewel prtsher for friction jeweling. The various piece s are all standard stze and may be used in othei staking sets. Additional punches, stumps or attachments, such as a rollei remover (iilustrated), can be added. FLAT

FACED

HOLLOW

PUNCHES

This type of punch is used to replace wheels on pinions, and to finish the riveting on balance staffs. It is a very versatile punch.

rrpv,I::"1',*i *^=rf-'= | i

ROUND TACED HOLLOW FUNCHES

@;T1 W}

Round faced hollow punche s a.re most cornrnonly over the countersinks on balance staffs and pinions.

used to rivet

ROUND FACED SOLID PUNCHES

---*r] L-*-_l_i

This type of punch is used for peening (flattening or metal) and for closing holes in plates or bushings"

REAMER HOLDER AND REAMER

spreading

-

holder and reamer are used in friction jeweling. The reamer Reamers for this holder They will fit all s t a n d a r d s t a k i n g f r a m e s . measurement) : in the following sizes (millimeter are available oq l .39 I.?9

$ill Ufifii$il ##u$ lln l[[ii] if : 11

il

I2 Fine Sleel Reqmor:

FRICTION

13

.8e

JEWEL

I .09 I.19

l.4g l59

1. 9 9 2.29

PUSHER

This pusher is made with end sizes as listed below, which enables the watchmaker replace and adjust friction to remove, jewels and bushings,or to remove and replace balance hole andcap jewels in settings. Pushers can be made from 3/16 inch (4.? mm) round steel stock, which shouid be hardened and tempered to a blue, These end measurements are in millimeters^

zz :3; UUUilHUHUHilUU 1 2p o r , .dn, r . apr ! . r r . .

.75

1.05

l:13 ):i3 I,60

2.65

STUMPS Stumps are useful when miiled or rece ssed surfaces are to be w o r k e d o n . T h e b a s e o f t h e f r a m e i s d r i l l e d to ac comodate the s t u m p s , a s w e l l a s o t h e r a t t a c h r n e n t s , s u c h a s a r o l l e r r e r r l o v er , which also can be used on the frame.


2l

TOOLS AND MATERIALS CIF THg TRADA WATCHMAKER'S

STAKINC SETS

staking set usually eontains from 80 to 120 punThe professional watchmaker's ches and 20 stumps. More punches allow a greater variety of sizes to be handled, Ahis is important to the watchrnaker who has to work on many different makes of watches. lfaviag the proper size punch readily available will speed up the work, For the beginner who intends to follow up watchmaking as a career, this investment The set illustrated here has lZ0 punches and 25 should be carefully considered. stumps and can be equipped with a friction jeweling attachment. The punches can As shown in the table below, it is also possible to etart be inverted as illustrated. with a smaller set and add other punchee as necessary or as you can affo rd them. A staking set will last a lifetime, if given average care.

$t aking tool s et s c an be pur chased in different combinatians, the mCIst common of. which are listed beloril/:

133 punches e5 stumps

lza

"

* 100

tl

>t g0

r'

60

ti

z0 e0 za

tz

,**

4g

rr

g

**

36

r'

6

**

z4

r'

4

* These sets come in boxes drilled for lZ0 punches and 30 stumps, add punches and stumps to these sets at any time.

t

tt

I tl

tt

|

Thug, you can

** These sets come in boxes drilled lor 60 puoches aad 15 stumps, enabliag you to add punches and stumps to these sets at any time, They are useful starter sets.


22

TRICTION

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

JEWELING

ATTACHMENT

Many manufacturer s of staking sets also make a fricti<ln jeweling attachment to fit the lt is more desirable to have a staking frame. separate f riction jeweling tool , but for tho se do * ing watch repair aE a hobby or side line, this attachment rrill take care of most needs. With the attachment are included reamers, reamer holder and pushers. This attachment may be permanently attaehed to the staking frame withwith normal use of the tootr. out interfering

ROLLER

REMOVER

This tool, used in the removal of single or double rollers, is designed for use with the The illustrated staking tool, tool has three adjustable stumps in different sires which allows the tool to be used to rernnve rollers in practically any size watch.

STAtr.F'REMOVER This tool, also de signed for use with the staking tool, is used in the removal af riveted balance staff s. The staff and wheel are placed on the die plate in a hole just large enough to ac commodate the lrub of the staff . U sing the screw adjustment on the staff remover, the arms of the wheel are pressed down firmly against the die plate, thus preventing the arms from bending when the staff is driven out. (A more desirable method than this of removing a balance staff , is to place it in a lathe and cut away the hub. This method minimizes the chance of damage to the wheel.)

BRASS HAMMER This brass hammer is use dwith the staking tool. A steel hammer should never be used as it will damage the punches, About 3 os. weight is the proper size hammer.

Or' THE TRAI}E


TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF' THE TRADE TRUING

CALIPER$

A tool in which to place a balance wheel to check for truth in round and flat and make the necessary adjustments. Two types of calipers are illustrated; one with a screw adjustrnent to open and close, and the other which works with hand pressure. Each tool has a moveable indicator and awrench to make adjustments of the arms of the balance.

POISING TOOL This tool is used in checking the poise of a balance wheel. The one shown has three legs. Two of these are adjustable so as to level on your working surface. The j"*s are of highly polished sapphire or ruby jewels. With general use and care, the se jaws will never need refini shing . The adjustable ja* s make it po s sible to use this tool for any size of balance. Poising tools also come equipped with highly pCIlished steel jaws and this type is equally serviceable if the jaws are kept highly polished,

BALANCE

SCREW HOLDER

This tclol is used to hold and remove a balance screw after it has been loosened with a Undercutting to remove weight screw driver. can be done after removing the screw from the holde r while timing washer s may be added without removing the screw from the holder.

PIVOT

BROACHES

These come usually in assortments of twelve and are available in size s to cor re spond with the smallest pivots. They are used to broach or clean pivot holes intrain bushings or plates.

UNDERCUTTERS Usedto remove weight from a balance screw by cutting from the under side of the screw head, A set ordinarily has the varietyof sizes necessary to undercut the different size balance screws,

$lw

23


24

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE

BALANCE

SCREW CUTTERS

This is a Swiss type balance screw cutter used to remove weight from the balance wheel. It cuts a cone in the head of the screw without taking the screw f rom the wheel. The prefer * red method is to undercut with the lathe or the undercutting tool; however, rnany Swis s manufacturers use this type of cone cutter.

HAIRSPRING

TWEEZERS

The se are fine - pointed twe ezer s used only Due to the drelicate points it is on hairsprings. not recommended that you use these tweezers for any other work. The tips are graded from very fine to coar$e. Each manufacturer has a different system for de signating the finene s s Usually the largest number will of the tips. de signate the fine st tip. The beginne r should start with a mediurn -fine tip and then add others as the need arises.

TAPER

PIN

A steel pin used in working on hairsprings. It is mainly used as a holding tool for the collet and hairspring. It is tapered to a size that will accomodate all sizes of collets. You may substitute a broach or other tapered steel rod.

HAIRSPRING

LEVELER

SET

This set of five tools is de signed to make adjustment s to the hair spring while i.n the watch. It has three sizes of hairspring leveler tools, one tool for centering and one tool to adjust the regulator pins. These tools are not necessary for the beginner.

I I

\n/J

z

\Jl-l-1

3

CX

4-4 5*4 .t".f*

HAIRSPRING

'PIX'

Black-For

ad.iusting beat*large collet.

[Jlue-For

adjusting: beat-small

r::z Green-For

This set of five tools is used in the manip* ulation The illustration of the hair spring. explains the use of each tool.

collet.

adjusting regulator pins.

Red*-For needling overcoil and hairspring coils, etc. Yellou'--For removing stud pins, curb pins, etc.


25

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE

OVERCOILING

TWEEZERS

The se twe ezer s are used to form the over coil of a hairspring over the body of the spring. show the different sizes of The illustrations IA/0 or L0/l are recommended curved tips. for general use. This tool is not essential for the beginner a$ the overcoil may be formed by using a pair of hair spring twe e;aet s and a tape r pin.

PALLET

WARMER

This tool is used to hold and apply heat to a pallet fork, The pallet stones are cernented into the fork with shellac. This cement will this melt when heat is applied. Therefore, becomes an essential tool whenever a pallet Heat stone has to be adjusted or replaced. should never be applied directly to the pallet fork, &s direct heat will draw the temper from The part of this tool the steel fork and arbor. which holds the pallet fork is split to allow each pallet to be heated separately.

BOILING

CUP AND BOTTLE

When ever it is found necessary to remove shellac from any part of a watch, such as the pallet fork, roll-er, etc. , the recommended method is to boil the part in alcohol. The illustrated bottle with hole cut in cap is used to contain the part and alcohol (fratf full will be sufficient). A small amount of water is placed in the boiling pan, the bottle placed in the pan and heat applied until the alcohol boils sufficiently to dissolve the shellac. A low flame, such as an alcohol lamp, should be used to rninimize the chance of igniting the alcohol fume s. Alcohol is highly inflammable.

BENCH

VISE

The bench vise has always been part of the watchmaker's equipment. It is used in the making or refinishing of tools and other small watch parts. The beginner wili find it nece s sary to make c ertain tool s which c annot be purchased, and so a bench vise should be a part of his equipment.

th|[fihAh r[\ La/tr

t0/2

Ia /r

ffi/0


26

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

OF' THE TRADE

THE WATCHMAKEN.'S LATI{E The watchmaker's

lathe is the most versatile

tool at his command..

with the

lathe and its attachments, all manner of work can be done, from delicate, precision fitting of part s to makiag a complete watch, if aeed be.

rt enable s the watchmaker

to handle repairs

And many jobs can be done

he might ordinarily

have to send out,

in minuies with a lathe that would take hours to do bv hand,

No simpler

or more effective

machine has yet been devised to do the multitude

of jobs that the Lathe can handle.

wheel cutting, jeweling, polishing, grinding pallet

jewels,

making balance staffs, opening wheels and jewel holes, uprighting,

tapping

screw holes, pivoting staffs -- these are but a fewof the tasks that can be doae efficiently on a lathe.

Even though it is possible today to buy practicaly

any watch, many of these will need alteration Iike changing the diameter

of the roller

to make a perfect

fit.

any part for Alterations

seat, the collet seat, or the wheel seat on a

balance staff can be done properly

only on a lathe.

vestment that is well worth while,

Even if used but a few minutes a day, it will re-

pay its purghase price will last a lifetime,

many times over.

properly

lt is considered a i'must"

As a result, the tathe is an in_

used and maintained,

tool for the professional.

the lathe


TOOLS AND MATERIALS

27

OT' THE ?RADE

THINGS TO LOOK FOR IN SELECTING A LATHE: choosing a lathe is largely a matter of personal choice and available budget, for today it is possible to find good lathes in almost everyprice alone should not be the deciding factor, as accessories finish, somewhat control the price,

and minor features,

guch as

There are more basic things to look for:

The lathe bed should be of firm construction casting.

range. However, price

and preferably formed from a single

?he head stock should be movable on the lathe bed, so the pulley can be

aligned with the pulley on the motor.

?he pulley

adjustrnent of 6peed and power desired.

should be a step pulley to permit

It should al.so turn lteely, bearings should

be fitted' and no end shake or side shake should be apparent.

It should be possible

to adjust the bearings. The spi.ndle should take standard size chucks and have a key way to assure each chuck fitting in the same position.

Both lathe and chucks should run perfec

A"n index should be affixed to the pulley. An index is a circular

y true,

plate with evenly

spaced holes iato which an index pin may be placed to lock the moving parts in any desired position. The lathe also sh.urd have a hinged or tip-over T-rest. The tailstock

is les s used than formerly

make most of his parts himsel{.

when the individual

watchmaker

had to

The beginner can postpone purchase ofa tailstock.

The pro{essionaL usually acquires one in time. There are many accessories that can be had for use with the lathe. described

in ihe foliowing

some are necessities.

A few are

pages, but these are by no means all that are available,

others are simply an added convenience on certain jobs and

can be considered special-purpose

tools in nature.

The type of work habitually done

as well as available funds will largely determine the worth of an accessory to the individual

watchmaker.

The beginner is advised to start with just the basic items

and add others only as a need is felt for them. Space here permits accessories, Goodrich's

for

but a hint on the selection and usefulness of the lathe and its

detailed information

authoritative

on its possibilities,

book on the subject:

we refer you to Ward

"The watchmaker's

Lathe l


28 LATHE

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

OF THE TRADE

MOTOR

In year s past the lathe was Fowered foot wheel. This may still be used by i n "a r e a s o f t h e w o r l d w h e r e t h e r e i s n o power available. The modern electric method is to use a small, electric, re versible motor, about 3./LA horsepower, equipped with a foot rheo stat to control It is best to sethe speed of the motor. lect a motor de signed for use with the lathe. The paint, enamel or chrome finish on the motor casing may somewhat control the price.

LATHE

MOUNT

A portable lathe mount on which the lathe and motor are fastened is recom mended for those who have no permanent working surface or who do not wish to mount the lathe and motor directly on the bench, \7

CHUCKS _ Chucks are gauged in tenths of a millimeter. Anumber 20 chuck istwenty-tenths (20/lO) of a millimeter. A No. ? chuck is seven-tenths (7/lO) mm., aad jo on. A beginner should have Nos. 16, 20, 32, and 40 chucks, plus a chuck for holding a cement brass. Other chucks may be added as the need arises. A chuck should be used only with metal stock of the same size, ao spreading or compressing the jaws of a chuck wil.l cause damage to the gripping surface and also cause the chuck to be off c ente r.

SCREW CHUCK WITH

CEMENT

BRASSES

The cement brass is used on the lathe as a working surface for small parts that cannot be held in an ordinary wire chuck. The part, such as a jewel setting, is ce* mented and spun true on the cement brass.


TOOLS AND MATERIALS OT THE TRADE

CRO\MN CHUCKS The se chucks ar e used to hold c rowns which have to be opened on the under side to fit over the pipe on the pendant of a case ' for c rowns for They are de signed primarily In lieu of this type pocket size watches. size s, the chuck, as well as for smaller a c e m e nt brass m a y b e c e m e n t e d t o crown a g r a v er. and the opening enlarged with

WHEEL

CHUCK

This chuck is used to hold a train wheel in the lathe when poli shing pivot s , a n d so The chuck will hold more than one forth. size wheel. This ctruck grips the ends of the teeth and so care should be taken to use the proper size chuck and not apply too much pre ssure or the teeth will be damaged. This chuck need be used only when too little of the pinion extend s past the wheel to be gripped Another method of set with a wire chuck. ting up this wheel would be to cement it to a cement brass.

CARBORUNDUM

WHEELS

Small carborundum wheel s can be mountsmall chuck for grinding ed on an arbor When using the se wheels on the steel work. lathe, take care to keep particles of carborClean the lathe undum f rom the bearings. carefully after using carborundum.

ARBOR

CHUCK

This chuck has a solid body and can be used to carry circular saws, wheel cutters, and the srnaller size carborundum wheels.

BU FF

CF{UCK

This solid body chuck has a tapered screw on which to mount polishing buff s. Buffing jobs and the should, be confined to small same care should be taken of the lathe as when carborundum is used.

29

ffi@@


30

}.ILING

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE

T'IXTURE

replace s the re st CIn your This fixture T -rest. It is used when filing across work held in the lathe; as when filing the square on a stem.

CARBORUNDUM

WHEEL

TTITH ARBOR

This type wheel ccme s in several shape e and grade s. It can be had in hard Arkansas stone andAloxite for grinding watch crystals. Howeve r, as mer:tioned before, it is not advisable to use grinding wheels to exce s s in your lathe.

PIVOT

POLISHER

This attachrnent is mounted on the lathe and is used to hold pivots while they are being straightened, burni shed, ground, or polished. it is adjustable to fit all balance staffs. The pivot to be worked on extends all the way through the end bearing plate.

I{L'' TOOL REST This tool rest is used with the face plateIts design will allow close adjustment to the plate.

SLIDE

RSST

This lathe attachment is of little u.se to the average watchmaker of today. It has various use s for the watchmaker who specializes in making watch parts. It is also used by model makers,


TOOLS AND MATERIALS

TAIL

STOCK CHUCK HOLDER

T h i s d e v i c e i s u s e d t o hold r egular wir e This is desirable chucks in the tail stock. when drilling so as to hold t h e d r i l l i n d i r e c t line with the work.

THREE

3l

OF THE TRADE

JAW

Fffir]ffi*=

CHUCK

This chuck is used for heavier kinds of work. The jaws are adjustable and rever sible. This chuck can be used for holding clock barrels and work by model maker s.

BEZEL

CHUCK

This is a special chuck used primarily for holding bezels, either bv the inner or outer edge,

F.ACE

PLATE

This lathe attachment is used to mount watch parts, such as plates, for uprighting a pivot hole. The ja*s are adjustabie, which allows free movement of the plate to any desired center.

tl

6


TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE

32 GRAVERS

The tools used for cutting on the lathe are They come in many known as gravers. shapes and sizes. The gravers most com* rnonly used are the #+ or #6 square. It is essential that gravers be kept sharp. GRAVER

nfif,ftftfr

SHARPENER

Gravers may be sharpened by hand, but it experience t o get the takes considerable An easier and rnore convenient right result. method is to use a graver sharpener, which holds the graver in a fixed position during the sharpening pro c e s s . The tool m ay al so be used to shape the tip on a new graver or rnay Engravers to reshape a broken tip, likewise use this tool, OILSTONE For a combination sharpening gravers, oilstone with coarse and fine sides is rec* Kerosene or light machine oil commended. should be used on the stone at all times. CARBOLOY

GRAVNR

SET

This carboloy steel graver set is used on hardened or tempered steel, &s when cutting out balance staffs from the balance wheel. When the graver s need sharpening, they must b* g round. on a special diamond *impr egnated wheel. A setusually includes blades, handle, lap wheel, and compound. BOXWOOD SLIP This slip is a hard, almost grainless wood used to polish pivots. Polishing compound, such as diamantine ar rouge, is applied to Full explanation of the use of the the slip. be found in L e s son 3 I , boxwood slip will 'W atchmaking. Maste r PIVOT

BURNISHER

This tool is used to burnish a pivot, râ&#x201A;ŹIt is a very hard move burr s and so forth, No a slightly rough surface. steel with u s ed grinding or polishing compound is ever on this tool. When used as illustrated and described in Lesson 31, Master Watchmaking, it will compre$s, harden and close the pore s in steel, thus giving it a smooth, hard and poli shed surf ac e .

flil


33

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE

JE\IELER'S

SA\M FRAME

A saw frame de signed to hold saw blades that are used to cut metal.

JEVTELER'S SAVT BLADES For use in jewele r' s saw f rame. They ar e made of narrow, tempered, flexible steel wire into which teeth have been cut. The teeth in a jeweler's saw should point toward the handle of the saw frame. The sizes are 5*4*3-Z-L-

t / 0 - z / a - s / a - + / a - s / a - 6 / o- T/ 0 - s / 0 . T h e m o s t

useful

EMERY

size to the watchrnaker

is No. 2.

BUFF'S

The se are small strips of wood covered with abrasive cloth orpaper. They are graded from coarse to fine grit I Z,I , 0 Z/A, Z/0, 4/A. They are used to polish steel surfaces by starting with the coarse buff and working to the fine ones.

ALCOHOL

TORCH

A11 watchmakers will at some time need to harden and temper a piece of steel. The beginner will find it advisable to practice hardening and tempering steel to make pivots, etc. A small torch will usually supply enough heat to harden properly. The beginner may use any gas flame that will give sufficient heat. ..PREPO''

TORCH

This torch is ideal for use by the watchmaker or jeweler. It will produce a minirnum h e a t o f 2 ? , A Ad e g r e e s F . I t i s e q u i p p e d w i t h a "throw-away" type of container which holds a liquid gas under high pre s sure. Ordinarily the container should last a minimum of four hours of continuous use. The empty container is easily removed and replaced with a new one,

SCREVT PLATE A threaded die plate with graduated hole size s used in threading screws or making taps.

2/o

2/O


34

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF THE TRADE ORDERING MATERIAL It is possible to get nearly any part for alrnost any watch now being manuf actur -

ed as well. as for many obsolete watches. watch are known as genuine parts, which have proven satisfactory

watch

parts made by the maker

of ttre

but other companies make replacement

in general.

parts

However, it is best to use genuine parts

wheaever they are avaj.lable because they usually require less alteration. Parts such as balance staffs, stems,crowns, mainsprings, roller jewels, friction jewels, friction bushings, and the like, may be purchased in assortments or singly. The advantage in having assortments need it. tomer

is that you will have the part needed when you

You'll have no delay in completing faster

service.

the repair job and can give your cus-

The cost per part in assortments is usually less than the

single part price, so there is some saving of money as well as time. You may make up your own assortments by ordering in l/4 ot l/Z d.ozenlots as the need arises. Before and model'

ordering

a part for a watch, you must identify the watch by make, size,

To order

manufacturer's

a part for an American

watch, it is advisable to include the

name, size, number of jewels, and serial. and/or movement number,

which is stamped on the bridge of the watch.

some late model American

watches

have a rnodel or grade number stamped on the bridge. lnclude this number arso. 'When ordering staffs or wheels, list the pivot diameter size. In ordering jewels, list the hole size of the jewel or the diameter

of the pivot on which the jewel is to

fit. The identification dial means little

of a Swiss watch is a little

in e stablishing

more involved.

the manufacturer

The name on the

of a Swiss-made

movement.

Bulova watches are usually identified by a model or caliber number stamped on the bridge, such as ?ap,6arn,6ak,

and so on.

This is the only identification aeeded.

Gruen watches usually have a model or caliber number and which can be seen between the barrel wheel.

If no identification

and train

stamped on the pillar

bridges

plate

or under the balance

can be made on this side of the movement,

remove

the


TOOLS AND MATERIALS

dial.

35

OT' THE TRADE

You may then find a model or caliber

number

such as As 926 or ETA ?35.

This listing will ideatify the maker and the model number. You may fiad only a symbol to identify all well-known you still

the maker.

Most rnaterial

catalogs list

symbols and manuracturers who use them. If you find only a syrnbol,

must identify

you can do this by

the watch by model or caliber number.

means of the setting partsi that is, the set bridge, set lever and clutch lever. facturers

make their models with setting parts sligh

Material

catalogs show these setting parts

according to their

list their

identifying

comparison

model number.

watch at hand with these listings not familiar

close

y different

in size and shape. size and shape and

of the setting parts in the

should enable you to identify the watch.

with this method of identification,

Manu-

a few minutes'

If you are

study of a material

catalog will make it clear to you. Occasionally, you may have eome trouble proper

listing.

If you are :rot able to positively

seld it to your material carefully

identilying

a movement

identify

jobber for identi{ication.

due to im-

a movement,

you should

Be sure, however, to wrap it

so it will not be damaged in transit.

Besides the identification, sample for comparison.

it is well to include the part you want replaced as a

Always package sample parts in a rnaterial

can or similar

container to insure safe arrival. Il/hen ordering

a balance staff for a Swiss watch, you should designate the type

of balance jewels; regulator,

that is,

regular, Incabloc or Shock-resist.

you should indicate

When ordering is available,

the type of hairspring;

a cannon pinion, you should furnish

that is,

When ordering a flat

or overcoil.

the exact length, if no sample

as canu:on pinions for some Swis s watches come in as many as nine

diffe rent lengths. The following

pages will

guide you further

always include all the information little

trouble

in ordering

specific

parts,

If you

showrr in the samples, you should experience

in getting exactly what you want.


36

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

When ordering material should be f urni shed:

OT'THE

TRADE

f,ar a watch, the following information

Make; Size: Model or Crade {if known}: Serial Numbe r (eme rican only) : Nurnbe r of jewel s: De scription of part {Include {"actary number,

SAMPLE

SAMPLE

ORDER

(e*erican)

ORDER

($wiss)

if known) :


37

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OT- THE TRADE CRYSTALS Your material jobber Ctystal jobs can be sent out to be fitted. handle this for you. Be sure to indicate the type of crystal desired.

INCABLOC

AND

SHOCK-RESIST

will

JE\ITELS

Replacement part s may be purcha sed f rorn your jobbe r. Y ou may also obtain assortments. When ordering parts, always include a sample. I N C AB r o c

{'r,-",ft t=*7\::

PPERAND TOWER CAP EWEI HOLDERSPRING

f{o. lO0l

@

@

UPPERCAP JEWEL .25 M/M Thick No' lOO4

UPPERBALANCF CA.PJTVTITASSEMELY lOtS*2.65 tOJl-2.40 lOl2*3.00 IOlg-3.1O

Mr}{ Diq. A,'rr\ Dia. M,,M Dio. M./lrtDiq.

M M Dio, ln:M Dio. M.AtDio.

I

LOWERCAP JEWEI. HOTDER SPRING No, lOO2

TOWERCAP JEWEL .16M/M Thick

UPPERAND LOWER BALANCE JEwEtIN SETTING -Holo Ho, No, No. No.

Xo. lOOll

COMPTETE UPPER A55EM8LY

No. lol l-2.75 l{o. tOt2*2.95 ilo, lOl3*3.10

?lo. l|o, Xo. No.

LOWERCAP JEWET HOTDER SPRING

No. IOQO

,

LOWER COMPIETE ASSEMSLY

1006 .08 I OOI -Holo .09 IOOE 4di .to -floh .l I l(X)9

1{o, I OO3

SCREWFOR LOWER ASSEMBLY No. lOtO

COMPLEIEIOWER ASSEMBTY l{o. lOl!

t{o. lOl4

ASSEMBIY LOCK

LOWER COMPLETE ASSEMSTY Xo. IOl6

SHOCK-RsrsT

UPPERAND TOWERBALANCE JEWELWITH COI! No. lO62-Dio. t.60*Holc .{)9 UPPâ&#x201A;¬RAND LOWERBAT,ANCE 1.60-holc , ro No, l06t-Dio. JEWEIASSEMBIY l{o. lO6f*Dio. 1.60--Holc- i l LOWEREALANCECAP JEWELASSEMELY ilo. lOta -2.10 /'l. M Dio. N6, lOSt-2.45 ln M Dio.

Ho, No. Ho. No. l{o. No.

lo65*0io. lo66-Dio. lo67-Dro. lo6t-9io. lO69-Dic, lOTHic.2,

1.80*Hola .l)9 l.8G-Holc . r 0 1,O0-Hdc . t l 2,1O*-tlolc .l)9 ?.10-Holq . t 0 lO*tlob.

Ha. No, llo. No. Hc. ilo.

lOll6-Dio. lOllT-Oio. lOSl*Dio. lOt9-Dio. lO6O-Dio. lO6l*Dio.

1.9O-Holo.09 l.9O-Hdc.10 1.90-Hdo ,l I 2.lO-Holc .09 2.10*Hdc .l0 2.lS*flolo .l l

REGUIATOR No. lOZl


38

TOOLS AND MATERIALS OF' THE TRADE

TRAIN

WHEELS

In addition to identifying the watch, when orderi"ng train wheels, you should furnish the pivot size and indicate if the pivots are square shoulder or conical. Always enclo se sample .

scREws When ordering plate screws, jewel screws and the like, indicate if the screw should be regular or ove r size. Darn aged threads in the plates may sometimes be corrected by replacing with an over size screw. It is helpful to buy assortments of screws from which you can usually select the one you need. DIAL

REFINISH

Dial refinishing is usually sent out to a specialist in jobber will handle this for you. that line. Your material On the material envelope you should give the nameyou want printed on the dial and the finish of dial and figures. If you want the dial refinished as it was originally, indicate "As Is". T f .a c h a n g e i s d e s i r e d , i n d i c a t e t h e c h a n g e .

SPRING

BARS AND

BAND$

Spring bars come in assortments of sLzes and styles or may be purchased individually. It is good practice to keep an assortment on hand for necessary replacements. It is also good to have on hand a few leather bands for mens' watches as well as replacement cord for ladies' watches. jobber can inform you on available assortYour material ments of these items.


TOOL$ ANI) MATERiALS

s9

OT THE TRADE

'When a balance staft, give the pivot size. NOT$: srdering If both pivots are broken, send the upper and lower jewels so that a prope r staff can be fitted. Alway s enclo se sample staff (removed from the wheel) for comparissll. $wiss BALAI{CE

staffs are ordered HOLE

in the same manner.

JETTELS AND CAP JEWELS

In many American Furnish the hole size of the jewel. watches, the cock {balance bridge) jewel setting is of a different size, so yoll should mention whether cock or foot jewel i s needed. Enclo se sam ple . Upper and lower cap jewel settings in b<.rth Arnerican and Swiss movements are usually different in size. Also, either friction-fit Swiss balance hole jewels are usually They should be replaced with or burnished in the plate. friction jewels.

ROLLER In addition to identifying the movement, dicate if the roller is single , combination, cabloc or Shock-resist.

BALANCE

you should two - piece,

inIn-

COMPLETE

and hair This include s a balance wheel, staff , roller spring which has been colleted, vibrated and fitted to the In ordering - trh efou should identify the movement and wheel. is flat or breguet (overhairspring designate whether coil).


40

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

OF THE TRADE

HAIRSPRINGS New hair spring s can be sent out to a specialist to be vibrated and fitted to the wheel and bridge. Your material jobber will handle this for you. \ffhen CIrdering a new hairspring for either an American or Swiss watch, }rorr should identify the watch and include the following parts: ?. Balance wheel with staff and roller. It must be true in the round and flat and in poise. Pivot s must not be bent or broken. b. The collet and stud. c. Balance bridge with regulator. Balance and cap jewels should be clean and in place on the bridge. W'rap and package all parts carefully to prevent damage. NOTE: A hair spring fitted in this manner may some further adjustment when fitted to the watch.

need


B ench i s rrrade of kiln - dried c abinet hard waod and laminat ed plywood., All wo rk i s tenon and mortise joints, all in accordance rvith the m o st app r oved c abinetrn ake r s ' m eth*d s . The drawers are tenon and groove with bot* telm s of lrls* stron$,noise absorbing"DuRoN:' The side s of the drawe r s extend 3 n' beyond the back, Metal runners are usâ&#x201A;Źd as slides, ex*ept where construction prevents their use. Ilepressed frcnt aets as pu11s. S-inishes: Ebony B1ack, Oak, Mahogand Walnut. Highly lacquered and any rnoisture resistant. Dimensions

'i x ZA" x 38" high to working

The BOLEY LATHfi " CIne o f t h e a l l t i m e This fine, Gerrnan*rnade lathe i s mechanically of. all parte is guaranteed.

surface.

great names in precision lathes. accurate and accurate alignrnent

GENUIHEEOLTY

TATHE No.800

A ten chuck combination is furnished with each Boley Lat}le. The combination consists of 6 assorted wire chucks, Z wheel chucks, I tape r chuck with male and female tape r s , and I friction chuck with I assorted cement brasses. C o m p l e t e with Complete w i t h wood w o o d chuck c h u c k box. box.


Length of Bed...l2"

Disfonce,Cenier toBed...2"

S-ing...4"

CHROME PTATED

Hardenedand GroundSTEELBEARINGSIndividuallyLapped IO CHUCI( COI'|BINATIONAND MICROMETER SCREIYTAIL FEED No. ii9412. MOSELEY LATHE cornpiete rvith Microrneter Tail F eed and tip-over "T" Re6t, including taper chuck with c.enter., screw chuck, six r/a" cement brasses, I wire chucks, belting and chuck box with hinged cover and block for ehucks. No. 39640. PEERLESS LATHE u.ith tip-over "T" R-est and 10 chuck eombination . , . 8 wire chucks, 1 tiper chuck with taper, 1 acrew chuck with _6.yoinch cement br.asses. Cornplete with chuct box and leather belting.

LATHE TED Made of cast Meehanite, the finest close grained cast iron made, cast-only by lieensed foundries under rigid-laboratory contrnl. sea, soned to eliminate strain in the n'retal and prevent any distortion. Aft-er seasoning_,the bed is machined to sh-ape and giound on alr surfaces to a micro finish, insuring perfeet alignment-of headstock and tailstock. The- bed_is then pol-ished and given B coats of plating;. copper, lickel and then chiomium, insuring perfect prr:tection for long Eerviee"

HEADSTOCKA}ID TAILSTOCI(

MAIH OR IIVE SPIilDtES Highest grade tool steel, nrachined and hardened same as bearings, ground on all gurtaces to a ZEBO TOLUBANCE. Spindle then lapped into bearings to a mirror finish . . . no possibility of side shake or end shake. Inside angles of spindle that support the chuck and the drarv-in-spindle are then ground and polished while the spindle is running in the headstock IN ITS OWN BEARINGS. A lock nut is provided to take up any end shake in the live spindle, if that ever becomes neeessary. Experience has proved that under ordinary conditions, and if the lathe is not taken apart, no adjustments are necessary for at least 25 years.

COT{EPULLEY Molded Bakelite on heavy ffanged metal hub. Pulley is balanced perfectly to elirninate vibration. I'langed end of hub is drilled u'ith 60 holes for indexing.

TAILSTOCKSPINDLE Highest grade tool steel hardened and ground, fitted after tailstock bearings are honed. Honing and lapping of bearings produees the velve-ty smoothness of operation, And t'ith the proteCtive coating of oil, the spindle actually floats.

T.REST

caet.Meehanit-e, same quality as lathe bed. Nlachined. seasorred, polished and plated same as lathe bed. Hand scraped so they rvill fiti No shoe_required_forfitting. Made of oil hardened tool steel, hardel!g-dalq prlished and locked securely by positive locking lever that the bed at any position and remain in perfect alignment. will hold "T" secure at any height within its range.

SPINDTEEEARIHCS Ifighe-et g-rqde _tool steel . not bronae (See note below). Machined and hardened_h-62 plus Rockwell, tiren ground on all surfaces to a zERo TOLERANOE. Then fiftad to tfre tathe headst;k for lapping to the spindle, u'hich is of double cone construciion for ac'curacy and strength.

PEERTESS AND MOSELEYLATHES have been in constant manufacture for tl9 years and have always had hardened and ground steel bearings ind spindles. And the. mahers have never resorted to bronze or comioeition bearingr which can tre fitted without grinding or lapping'beeause of their softnass.


;nu

With Chuck Holding Tailstock

No. 39616 I O C H U C K C O M B I N A T I O N C O N S I S T So F 8 WIRE CHUCKS, I TAPER CHUCK, WITH TAPER, I SCREWCHUCK, WITH 51X r 14" CEMENT BRASSES. COMPLETE WITH CHUCKBOX. . . N o . 396r6

rqwry

Pre-loaded Ball Bearings are sealed in oil for life. No oiling necessary. Their scientific design eliminates side or end shake in spindle, There is no need to obtain special attachments as all WW Style Chucks and attachments are interchangeble on this lathe.

CONE BTARING IATHTS

Both nrodels are identical except for' the spindle bearing*. In the model B they are of bronze, rvirile in the nrodel H they are made of haldened steel, ground and lappecl to fit the spindle.

'NODELB Bronre Beorings

MODETH

Standartl accessories supnlieci ll'ith either lathe are tip-over "T"-rest, 2 tapel chueks with halcl eenters,2 brass cement chucks, 1,(" diamete.r, 1" brass " rliarreter. cement chtrck -,14

Hard Sieel Seorings

MOTOSTAT No. 3I -145 Gcavrnlcrl lovcrlng lwltth

9yncmlccilly Satonod Armoturt

Doubb Shofl Erlrnrlon lar Drlll Chucl, Arbor Chucl, Orlndlng Hhrelr, ttc, Durl lrool lron:o tecrlngr Smooth and Oulet Pe rformonco ond Loag lllr

Nrol. Compocf. Well Gonrfructed HeovyDuty Rheortot

Voriqble Speed, Revereibla, Fool Control Rheoslof l/rc H P. reversible motor. Six-speeel r'lteostat for 110120 volt A.C.-D.C. Full speed 6,000B.P.M. undel load. 3step cone pulley, extended shaft on opposite end, cord anrl plug. Comples-seelcomposition bronze sleeve bear* ings rcquire oiling only about six times a year. Height 6", base B" x 3".

No. 3 9920

Take s the place sf a countershaft

and gives you more power at low speed. Heavy face plates etc. can be turned slowly for the most accurate work, yet the motor will have its full power and will not stall.

LATHE MOUNT

No. lZ58

tM,r' lfir1 l/I2 H.p. reversible nrotor providcs leliable power. I)ynamically balancedarmature assures smooth. quiet operation. Foot control rheostat graduallv stens up sneed to 13.000R.P.M. r'r,ithorrt ioad*6,000 R.P.M. under full load.

No. I360. .BlackFinish N o . I 3 6 0 , 4 "C h r o m e F i n i s h

\ \

',%l ..rr1

â&#x201A;Źl

Portable lathe rnount for mounting watchmakers lathe and motor.


,WATCH.CRAFT

TRI.DUTY OUTFIT

Finest, lUlost Complete Tool of lt's Kind r r r

Built and Priced to Lead in Quality and Value! Tesfed ond Approved by leoding Horologisls A supet'iorquality chrome plated staking tool. Instead of moving die tr:latewhich has to be set each time it is used, it has an extra large accuratesolid die plate fastenedsecurelyto a six and one-half pound base-a solid foundation for riveting work ancljust the proper'height. The die,plate is extra large with four times the riveting area of any other staking tool. Has two rorvs of holes and four slots clesignedto take care of all speciaianclregular rvork. A speciairadial arm mounted on a heavy solid steel baseswings to any position and can be quickly eentered and locked over any hole. It is provided with friction sleeve guide for punches,also extrdi guicleto aciommodatedrill,sand friction jerveling reamers and punches. Punches are reversible and can be inverted in the baseand usedas stumps, which makes possitile a very,wide range of work. Each one is individualll, turned out by hand, hand finished,Iappedand polished on the face to a mirror finish. The Wateh-Craft Tri-Duty tool is equipped completely for Friction Jeweling; all reambrs,-punches, stumps, efu,, are supplied. The tool has an aecurate micrometer adjustment so that the jewel can be set at just the proper depth in plate or setting for proper end shake. The drilling attachment e\rery watchmaker will ppp_reciate. Pivot drilling, holes in plates, removing bro,ken serews, attaching dials, etc., can be done with more accuracy and preeisionthan in a lathe. Twenty;four finest qualiiy Magic pivot drills are supplieclwith this outfit.

Outfi] frclsdeg:

l. $takingIooI A

The Greatest ADVANCEMENT in the History of STAKING TOOLS!

A

I

I

il U0mp|Crc

Outfits ln 1!

133 Itunches

pun"n1,o*;ii:Hirnrcfted inFr.arnc. and Used as Stumps.

Friction ,- r Gomdete Jewdling Equipment 12 Reamer:s 12 Pushers 7 Friction Jeweling Sturnps Reamer Holder*Pusher Holder*Micrometer Depthing Adjustment * Built-in Direct Preesure Lever

llrill Press $. Preeision 24 Magic Pivot Drills

2 Drill Holders No. 42694 Watch-Craf t Tri-Qulr Precision Staking Spling Wire Belting, Pulleys and Full tool, Friction Jerveling tool and Drill Press, combined Equipnrent for Operating With Pou'er as one eonvenient compac-t-un1t.Includes 1BBpunches, fronr l,athe ?5 -Special Stumps, 24 High-Grade Magic pivot Drilli and complete set of reamers, pushers and sbumps for Friction Jeweling, all in a heavy solid walnut cabBUIIT snd PRICEDTO LEAD THE ineL A combination outfit that is beyond a doubt the finest precision WORLD lN QUALITY oild VALUEa watchnraking tool of its kind ever built.

I


MOSELEY STAKING TOOL With Attachment, Also a Friction feweling Tool OF

CT LY

TOUGHEST

ATLOY

HARDENEP

NY YEARS

OF

TO

STEET gIVE

sERYICE

Die plute is ensily locked into position u,ith the knur'led screu' shou.n on illustration. After centering the die plate with the centering pnnch, included as standard equipment, you simply tq'ist the screlr.to lock the die piate securely in the right positiotr for' .stuking. The clicrlrlate is made of the toughest alloy steel lino\r,n to science and comectly hardened to give many years rrf servicc. I{very die plate is sulface ground for accuracy and drilled lry hand of) supel'-sensitive drill presses. The die plate has 2(i hclcs rvhich nreans the right size hole for any modern l'atch f ronr snrallest to largest. I-Iolesare properly gauged and centpled and give ;,'outhe right spread of sizes fronr ,srnallto large.

STAKINS TOOI PUNCHES

PUNCH AND STUMP COMBINATIONS \ o . 4 2 ? 1 7 - M o s e l e y$ t : r k i n g T o o l , c o n s i s t i n g o f 1 2 0 punehes, 25 stunrps and fitted r.vith friction jerr'erling attachment complete, ) t i o .{ 2 ? l & * M o s e l e y S t a k i n g T o o l , c o n s i s t i n g of. 100 punches,25 stumps and fitted rvith friction jerveling attachmenteomplete. Itio.'12?15-Moseley Staking Tool, consisting of 8O punches, 20 sturnps and fitted with friction jeu'eling attachment complete. No.42714-Mosrlel' Staking Tool u,ith l?0 punche.sand 95 sturnps. r*o. C2?ll--Moseley Staking Tool rvith 100 punches and 25 stumps. No, 42712*bloseley Staking Tool rvith 80 punches and Z0 stumps. Itio.,12?I8-Friction Jeweling Att:rchnrent only. for abovc tools, consistint{ of: ATTAClHMltNT......-.12Reanrers l2 htshers.......,....""..1 Reamer Holder........-..","..1 Cone Miller

All purrcht,^s suppliedu'ith lllOSELEY Staking Tools are correctly gauged :rnd gr:lduated . . . you are assured of the right punch in thu right c:orrrbinations, Punchtls al:e uniformly cut from steel rod b1' our Su-iss Type Autornatic Screrv Machines. Then they gio through ir series of hand oper:ltions rvhich insure exactness and trrlecision. . . including lapping and polishing punch faees to a rrrirrerrlinish. Hole punches are drilled dead center, an operation that u'ill nr.rtvary from one punch to the next. With Moseley, as u'itlr our other staking tools, :rny punch found defective in workrrr:rnshiprrill be replaced free of eharge, However, the best of pun<:hescan be broken occasionally . , so be surr to use the right sizr"punches for all u'olk. And always use a brass hammer. for staking so you will not flntten thr: he:adof the punch, as I'or.l might rvith a steel harnmer.

ALt PUNCHES NUMBE.RED Al[ punches supplied with Moseley are nurnbered for quick idrrn, tification. For instarnce, if a punch number 822, a ruund faeerl hole punch, is used to spread the shoulder of the balance staff, the companion punch for riveting the same staff is number A22, n ffat faced puneh, found in the same relative position on the opposite side of the case. This systern, found only in WATCHCRAFT and MOSELSY Staking Tools, eliminates tedious sezrrching for the right punch each time.

_ STURDYCONSTR,UCTION ACCURACY The Moselcy Staking ?ool is completely chromium plated, giving tht: tool an attractive appearanee, the first thing you look for in your staking tool. It is designed so punches can be reversed, inserted in frame and used as stumps. The frame is cast in one piece, giving you a rrrgged, sturdy tool that will stand up under continuous usag:e. This is very important, since a sfaking tool is a long time investment. You want it to last - . , stund' construction is as important as accuracy. And both are emphasized in the Moseley Staking Tool. The frame is relieved so punches can be easily inserted and removed . . . so any watch parts driven out through die plate drop clear of frame. The punch guide is equipped with a friction sleeve which holds punches in any position. A1l Moseley Staking Tools are drilled for 120 punches and 30 stumps. Thus you can add punchee and stumps to the smaller sets at :rny tirne.


ITTLE GIAilT STAKING

TOOL

A High Quality Tool At Low Gost The Little Giant Staking Tool is like the famed lVloseleyin general appea$nee and construction. It has the same frame and die plate, but hlrs a lou'er cost . . . baked enamel . . . gunmetal finish. The tooi cornes in a snurller rvood case with one insert . . . holding a :naximum of 60 punches and 15 stumps. It has the same punches as the l\{oseley, but a stnaller nunrber of punches. The economies in thjs tool are confined to quantity, not quality. The Uttle Giant colnes in 4 different combinations of punches and stumps, with each insett drilled to hold a maximum of 60 punches and 15 stumps. You can add punches and stumps to the sntiilicr scts at any timer.

LITTLEGIANT STAKINGTOOL PUNCHES Little Giant Staking Tool punches are nratle flom carefully selected high g::ade steel . . . the sane as for Moseley zrnd trVatch-Cr:rft punches. Yor.r are always assured of getting the right punches in the right comtrinrrtion legardless of the sct you buy. Punches are unifor,mly and correctl-r,' hardened on a special nraehine . . . there is :ro guessu'ork :,rbouthorv h:rrd they should be. That rneans they t'iil give you satisf:ictory scrvice for lnany yeilrs if thel' are propelly used. Faces of punches are lapped and polished to a smooth finish . . . not sand biasted ol acid finished. Rrnches at'e nutnbered for quick seleetion of the right punch. And thel" are. irrserted at an angle in the plastic holder so you can see,the right puncir rvithout stletching or standing. Puncires can be rever.secl,inserted in fra,rne and used as stumps. The frame is czrst in one piece, gir.ing you all tho aclvantages of a solicl piece of nretal. Frarne is lelieved so punches can kre easilf insertecl and retrroved . . so any watch parts driven out thr.ough the riie plate drcp cle:rr of frame. The punch guidc has a friction sleeve rvhich holds punches in :ln1' position.

THE LITTLEGIANT IS THE IDEAL STAKINGTOOL FOR YOU WHOSEWORK DOESNOT NEQUIRETHE MORE COMPLETE WATCH.CRAFTOR TSOSELY 4 COMBINATIONS O F P U N C H E SA N D S T U M P S Nnmber' 42720 4272r 42722 42i2:t

Punches 60 48 36 24

HEAYYDIEPLATE Sturnps 1s -: 6 6 4

The heavv die plate i,s easily locked into position rvith the knurled seren' shou'n on illnstr:ation. It is made of the toughest alloy steel known to scicncc and correetly hardened to give many )'eals of senrice. The die plate is also surfr,ce ground to exactly the right flatness and depth for accuracy. It has ?6 holes which gives you the right size hole for any n"rodernwatch frorn srnallest to largest. The holes are properly centered and gauged to give you the right spread of sizes fi'om small to large.


ttvltf sTAKtlro T00r some years ig$, the Since its introduction Levin staking tool has been univer sally recognized, for its high quality. The frame is rnade of Meehanite with a stainless steel column. The arm contains a simple on and off friction device which cannot get out of The. die plate is made of the finest order. tool steel 5/16" thick and lapped to a polish. may be inverted Funches so they can be used as stumps. The inclined block i.n the ca$e contains 1 20 hole s for punche s, allowing room for additions to the regular set, The same box is used with both sets.

100 punches, 20 stumpe, l0 sub punches and punch pick-up..or.or.r..,..,......C4t.

No. STIM

80 punches, 2A stumps, 10 sub punches and p u n c h p i c k * u p , . r . , . . . , r . . . , * . . . . . C a tN . o. ABBE

T00t 80LtYsTfrlfiilG ( Imported

)

Punche s can be The Superior staking tool. a u x i l i a r y inverted when base is u$ed. Frame is easily remeived from auxiliary base when desired. Extra die plate fits on auxiliary base for use as a bench block.

Contains I 14 punches and 14 stumps. Fut up complete in finely finished, sturdy wood box. No. 805 Without Attachment. Ns. 810 Attachment.

Jewelling

lMith Jewelling


l(&D THE INVERTO"DELIIXE"J{O. I8R Corfdnlrg:

.,.

100 rpcclelly ralaclad pntchet fcr

nodnrn

wclehar *llnpe

. .. 20 rafccicd ,.,

coarpltl. Altachucnt

Jeweling

Frlclla; ilcludlng

Gru atd toldtr,

18 mcar.

? lub puncher

snd hcldtr.

$ qrtdualed

lcce hollor

rtunps

.. . lwo lor , . . **o

bolarcc lorgc

rlaf

cnd rnlll

cdlr*labla

lct

râ&#x201A;Źnovori watches

rcller rctncycr

tlunlpr ..,

luo

rele cennon phloa

clos"

ilg p*nches and slunrp* ...

l0 rrrb puaebes rld driviag slf lcrcur sorl

holder fcr snd similor

ll0. t+3-018ft .

K&D NEW llrlVtRTO STAKIHGTOOL NO. I83 conlaining: .. . 100 lpecially selecled puncher {sr modern walcher. , , .2A selecled rfump:, ... fws adiustableroller remcverslumpr. ... l0 sub punches and holder for driving out screwsand similar work.

Prsvirion has been made on ihe netv 188 frame fo facifitafe the addirion of K & D Friclion Jeweling Atlachrnent. lt is not necesrary lo send ihese new models io ihe factory lo have this worfr done.

l{o. t}3-0| 88 .


K&D JUNIOR ft\tVfRrO STAKING TOOL NO. 600 $ER-IE$ Thir tool has all the features of ihe regular lnverto, but is lighterand hasa s m a l l e rd i e p l a te . No.

Punchcs

Sfumps

600 601 602 tt6l0

60 80 f00 t?0

20 20 20 20

ff is furnirhsd in t88 lnverlo Box.

NEW IIR'' SERIES Furnirhed with Complete Friction Jeweling Altachmenfq 2 BalanceStaS Removers,2 Adiusiable Roller RemoverStumpr, ? relr Cannon Pinion Closing Punchesand Stumps,and De Luxe Box as shownwith l8R De Luxeon Page l. No.

Punches

60rR 602R 6t0R

80 f002a f2020

Stumps

20

Y i h e na r d e r i n g , s p e c i f y o b o v e f a c t o r y n u m b e r s p r e c e d e d b y 4 3 , Exanple: #0At Sta&ing Tool becones lYo. $-6A7.

K&D FRICTIONJEWETINGATTACHMENTS """1;:i-i:';-11""""i;:1;'' .i.ry.$, r.1,; .;::;:...:.J ..,':.,

ilo. tl3-5{0R FRICTfONJEWELINGATTACHMENT.Lever typ" Friction JewelingAttachmentwilh micromelerslop for the new l8B frame as illuslratedunder l8B Staking Tool.Can be earilyfitted by the watchmaler.

ilo. $3-0l8X COMBINATIONSET.Thiscombinalionconverlryour K & D StakingTool fo FriclionJewelingand consisfrof: . . . large Deluxebox

llo. JEWELINEATTACHMENT. [3-5*O FRICTION Lever . . . 540 or 540R Friclion Jeweling Aitachmcnt type Friction Jewefing Attachment wifh a micromeler stop that reads to l/100 m.m. Can be fitted to alf K & D framer ercept the cmaller iypes such as 58 and F04, and

. . . 3?28ret of lg Reamers . . .321 ret 7 rub punchesand holder

ihe new l8B frame . , . .324 rel of 6 hollow siumps Full directionr for a{*achingare included wiih the lool, bul we sirongly recommendsending in your frame io have thir done.

ve fil 540 atlochmenlslo your old lrome


f-ER meant

I-OW'W EqLrnqffn@L

U

I L & R

Master

Watch Cleaning Machine

Trimmer, more efficient, with all controls on new front panel. The most popular watch cleaning machine eve r m ade will now, mo re than eve r, le ad the field. Powered by L & R's owrr motor.

Wotch CleoningMochine Th e f ines t budget -p ri c e dM o c h i n e o n M o rk e t!

Heavy

Duty

Watch

Cleaning

Machine

A true production unit now rnade even better with the new clock basket double the capacity of. former basket. Ingenious clips permit one hand attaching and remclving. Fits all Heavy Duty - new or old. Shafts

Qu ality S oti sfocl i onOependobi l i ty*

Compore! l. Powerful, precirion-buill Overheod Motor 2.3 Sguore Jor 3. Drying Chomber

4. Sprod Control 5. tully Guoronfecd

and the some superi arw orftm onr hip ol other ZENITH W atch C l eoni ng * l ochi ner!


IITTLE GIAT{T

WATCH CLEANING MACHINE Featuringthe ReversingOperation

The Little Giant is the choice of rvatchnrakers who demand effieieney, satisfactory performance and eeonom]' . , , the best machine in its field.

INDEXTURNTASLEKEEPSWORI( ALWAYS IN FRONT BALL BEARINSMOTOR Wound for both foru'lrd :rnd revct'se opcration.

FINGER.TIPLOCKING DEVICE Designed to lock the motor at atty position nn the colutrtn, It affords the utmost convenience,for there are no knobs to turn ol ,screwsto tighten. Simply release pressule of your fitrgers on the locking deviee and it locks automatically.

PUSH BUTTONREYERSINg To make the basket turn in revelsr-rto its normal operation, you sirnply press a button" The reverse operation will give a greatel florv of solution over and through the basket, insuring perfecl. cleaning of all parts.

@ STAII.ILESS STEEL8ASKET

ffi

s9uAREJARS Rest on an open turnt:rble rvhich is e;tsily cleaned. The jals trtr held rigidly so there is no ratbling rvhile the rnachine is operating. They are extra high to permit the lorver half for solution and the upper half for throwoff.

BAKETITEJAR COVERS

]iade of stainle.ss steel or constructed to the various franre. Thus the solution thicknes.s of nresh straight

ffi @

METAT SHIETDEDHEATINS UNIT

^,-.

I{ade of fine grade Bakelite, they arc durable and ardd to the sppearance of your machint'. Mlchine has chromiunr :rnd black rvrinkle finish.

trl M

st

Eti--

E

h I i l I D

6r--!

r ^'E-. t --

J

No.36lf9

Monel nretal. the busket i: sections fit together in on, passes through onll' on,to the patts to be clr':rnr:d.

Ia

.\n exposed heating coil will oxidize and weal out rnuch sooner than this, which is covered. Ttre purposc of this shield is trvofold, being also designed to givr: uniform heat to the watch parts.


s Et T z F Rt c Tt 0 r {

$et consistingof:

JErftLtt{0 T00L$

F r i c t i o n J e w e li n g I i t a k e l 5 R e a m e r sw i t h H o l d e r l2 flat Jewel Pushers l 2 P u m sP u s h e r s | | C oncaveJerel P usher s 5 Stunps

$et consistingof: F r i c t i o n J e w e il n g $ t a k e 1 5 R e a m e r sw i t h H o ld er , 2 F l a t , , l e w e lP u s h e r s 5 li tumps I setMicrometrical A n vi l , P u s h e r and Bushnut. I Ieatherette, feltI i ned Case, lfo. 28-U20., , Set

lsetl-licrometrical A n v il , P u s h e r and Eushnut. t l H o le CI o s i n g P u n c h e s $et x3 of Pallet Arbor $ e t t i n g T o o lo . I I eatherette, fel tI ined Case. lo. 28-026- (as illustrated)

I I{GTOOL SEITZ FRICTI OII JET'EL C o m p l e t es e t c o n s i s t i n g o f : ... AlI .,, Set ,..Set ,..S€t ,.,Set .,.$et ... $et .,.$et

parts in $et l{o. 28-026 X o . 2 8 - l 0 | . l { a n dS e t t i n g T o o ls l{o. 28*103. FacePlates x 3 llo. 28-105. tlolder for Brats Settings l { o . 2 8 - 1 0 6 , C h u c kh o l d e r w i t h 3 C h u c k s l{o. 28-109. Self centering Points x 12 l{o, 28- | 13. 0rinding Stone l l o , 2 8 - l l l + . P i v o t $ t r a i q h t e f li n g T o o l

l l o . 2 8 - G 1 5 .t a s i I l u s t r a t e d ) . . . . . , . $ e t

JEWELS At{DCAP.fEtEL$. l|o. 792 . SEtTZ BAtAltCE,PTATE 2 J ewels in e a c h b o ttl e , to ta l I0 0 B al ance, 196 Plate and 30 Cap Jewels in *ood cabinet.

PUTEAll0 CAPJETELS. llo. 7l l. $EITZBALAXCE, 1 Jewel ea. of. 67 Balance, 138 Plate a n d 3 e a . o f 15 Cap Jewels in wood cabinet.

llo. 721. SEI TZ CEIITER JEilEL$. 1 € r r . o f I 0 0 nurnbers in wood cabinet.

llo. 73| . $EITZ BALAIICE JEHELS.1 e a . o f 1 0 8 numbers in wood cabinet.

Chicago School Of watchmaking course Tools & materials of the trade  
Chicago School Of watchmaking course Tools & materials of the trade  
Advertisement