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Bret and Amy Baier

the 2018

Social List Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Who on the Washington Social Scene EXCLUSIVE: President and Mrs. Trump

The Ultimate Holiday Gift Guide Books for Everyone on Your List

&

Inside the Vice Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Residence with Second Lady Karen Pence

pa rt paies! rt pa ie rt S! ie s!

join the Cabinet at an A-list dinner at the Embassy of Kuwait


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EDITOR'SLETTER 

FEATURES

LIFESTYLES

THESOCIALLIST .......................................

FASHIONEDITORIALPajama Party .............. TRENDREPORTChina Patterns ...................... HOLIDAYGIFTGUIDE ............................... WINTERREADINGROUNDUP ................. ARTSPOTLIGHTPakan Penn ......................... MEDICALINNOVATORDr. Shireen Atabaki ....

FYIDC INSIDER'SGUIDE ........................................  INNOVATORSShop or Not............................. THEDISHUmaya ...........................................  PERFORMINGARTSTenor Andrea Bocelli ......  WHO'SNEXT Pianist and Composer Sam Post ............................ 

Parties! Parties! Parties! .........................................

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY

HOMELIFE INSIDEHOMESThe Vice President's Residence..... BOOKTALKCharles Denyer's "Number One Obervatory Circle" ................................................ 

REALESTATENEWS................................... OPENHOUSE .............................................  MYWASHINGTON Katherine Bradley ............. 

National Portrait Gallery Director Kim Sajet ...............  The American Portrait Gala ....................................

POLLYWOOD

AROUNDTOWN .........................................

EMBASSYROW ..........................................

JDRF Hope Gala ................................................ 

Kuwait-America Foundation Gala Dinner .............. 

OVERTHEMOON ...................................... 

Fight Night........................................................ 

Nobu Sake Ceremony ........................................... 

Thurgood Marshall Fund Gala.............................. 

Opening of the National Gallery's Vermeer Exhibition ... 

LBJ Liberty & Justice for All Award .......................

Knock Out Abuse................................................. 

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

DC Ed Fund......................................................

Screening of HBO's "The Newspaperman" .................

Tennis Shoes,Ties and After Five .............................. 

A Very Bipartisan Bash ........................................

White Hat Gala .................................................. 

The Meridian Ball ..............................................

INOVA Summit..................................................

Points of Light Tribute Awards ...............................

Book Parties ........................................................

INTERVIEWConductor Gianandrea Noseda .......

Harman Center for the Arts Gala .............................

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ON THE COVER: Bret and Amy Baier (Photo by Tony Powell) TOP FROM LEFT: Karen Pence (Photo by Tony Powell); Gianandrea Noseda (Photo by Tony Powell); Jack and Susanna Quinn (Photo by Tony Powell); First Edition Library Set ($500) juniperbooks.com; Ramen bowls from Umaya (Photo by Tony Powell)

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T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Nancy Reynolds Bagley EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Virginia Coyne SENIOREDITOR

Kevin Chaffee DEPUTYEDITOR

Erica Moody ASSOCIATEEDITOR

Catherine Trifiletti CONTRIBUTINGEDITOR

Roland Flamini COLUMNISTSANDCONTRIBUTINGWRITERS

Janet Donovan, Steve Houk,Vicky Moon, Stacey Grazier Pfarr and Donna Shor ART DIRECTOR

Matt Rippetoe PRINCIPALPHOTOGRAPHER

Tony Powell CONTRIBUTINGPHOTOGRAPHERS

Joy Asico,Tony Brown, Ben Droz, Alfredo Flores,Vithaya Phongsavan, Kyle Samperton, Erin Schaff and Jay Snap

PUBLISHER & CEO

Soroush Richard Shehabi SALESANDMARKETINGREPRESENTATIVE

John Arundel BOOKKEEPER

Michelle Frazer WEBTECHNOLOGIESDEVELOPMENT

Eddie Saleh,Triposs Mihail Iliev LEGAL

Mason Hammond Drake, Akerman, LLP EDITORIALINTERNS

Jocelin Diaz and Rachel Kalusin

FOUNDER

Vicki Bagley CREATIVE DIRECTOR EMERITUS (*)

J.C. Suarès CHAIRMAN, EXECUTIVE BOARD

Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased


EDITOR’S LETTER

‘TIS THE SEASON ...TO BE SOCIAL

FROMLEFTTORIGHT: Editor in Chief Nancy Bagley with Ivanka Trump at the Kuwait-America Foundation dinner; Publisher Soroush Shehabi with Jared Kushner, also at the dinner; Second Lady Karen Pence with Executive Editor Virginia Coyne and Principal Photographer Tony Powell at the Vice President’s residence.

resident Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump recently departed from their usual routine to attend a glamorous affair outside of the White House when they dined with Kuwaiti Ambassador Salem Al-Sabah and his wife Rima to support the Kuwait-America Foundation’s efforts to help U.N. Refugee Agency programs empowering women and girls. Washington Life was the only publication given access and we lead our Pollywood section with two full pages of exclusive coverage. Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen have hosted their fair share of social events as well, and Mrs. Pence kindly gave our executive editor, Virginia Coyne, a scoop on their official residence for this issue. She also let us in on former Vice President Joe Biden’s parting words about the house.You’ll learn even more about its history when you read Deputy Editor Erica Moody’s interview with Charles Denyer, author of “One Observatory Circle,” which combines neverbefore-seen photographs and previously unknown details about the historic house and its past residents. This year’s 23rd annual social list reflects additions to the Washington scene based on the change of administration in January.

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Yes, there are more than a few notably social individuals from the Trump Team who have been added to our 800-plus roster and we have spotted a number of them at events around town. Suffice it to say – we’re sure they’ll help to shake up the scene just as much as their predecessors did. That said, we do find it fascinating that both the Clintons and the Obamas still maintain residences in the nation’s capital — only the second time in history that three presidents have done so (the other being when Presidents Taft, Wilson and Harding lived here from 1921-1923). As the holiday season begins, we want to make sure you are fully equipped for happy chaos! Our gift guide should help you navigate selections for the pickiest people on your list. We are also firm believers that holiday shopping doesn’t have to be stressful and, after meeting Kate Myers and Kelly O’Malley, founders of the curated shopping service Shop or Not, we learned it could be as easy as a text message.You can read more about their business in this month’s innovators column. Flip ahead to our interviews with two Italian music celebrities whose work is sure to get you into the holiday spirit. We chatted

with tenor Andrea Bocelli in advance of his Dec. 10 performance at Capital One Arena to learn how he relaxes before a big concert. Contributing Editor Roland Flamini also spoke to conductor Gianandrea Noseda, who is bringing his signature style to the 86-yearold National Symphony Orchestra for the first time. On the party front, you will find ample coverage of WL-sponsored parties, including the Meridian Ball, Fight for Children’s Fight Night and the American Portrait Gala. Come February, look for photos from our blowout Young and the Guest List celebration and Cafe Milano’s giant 25th anniversary bash as well as the WL-sponsored Chorus Ball and the Washington Ballet’s Nutcracker Tea Party. Happy Holidays to you and yours!

Nancy R. Bagley Editor in Chief Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her at nbagley@washingtonlife.com

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P H OTOS BY TO N Y P OW E L L A N D

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FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington BY ERICA MOODY

GLOBALGOODS Select international gifts for those on your list at the sixth annual Winternational, where more than 30 embassies will be showcasing the unique wares of their country at this midday celebration. Dec. 6, 11 a.m to 2 p.m., FREE and open to the public, Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, itcdc.com/winternational.

JINGLE BALL

A CANDLELIGHT CHRISTMAS

CHORAL CONCERTS

See the Washington Chorus’s new director Christopher Bell in action at the group’s annual choral Christmas lineup, with events at the Kennedy Center and the Music Center at Strathmore. Featuring “brass, organ, sing-alongs, and the magnificent candlelight processional,” A Candlelight Christmas includes songs such as The Dream Isaiah Saw and The Hallelujah Chorus. Dec. 10, 15, 16, 21 and 22, tickets start at $18, thewashingtonchorus.org

HOLIDAY HITMAKERS

WASHINGTON WINTER SHOW

Today’s bestselling artists and a few up-and-comers will be performing at the festive annual Hot 99.5 Jingle Ball at Capital One Arena, part of the IHeartRadio annual Jingle Ball tour. See Fall Out Boy, Logic, Halsey, Charlie Puth, Liam Payne and other celebrity performers at the event to benefit the Ryan Seacrest Foundation. Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m., Capital One Arena, prices, ticketmaster.com.

The second oldest charitable antiques show in the U.S. (and the most exciting one in Washington) will start the new year at American University’s Katzen Arts Center, with dealers from across the country and internationally. This year’s “The Charm of Chinoiserie” theme will focus on Chinese influence on antiques. Honorary Chair Charlotte Moss will deliver the Friday lecture on “32 Years of Designing and How Travel Has Influenced It All.” Thursday’s preview night is the place to see and be seen. Jan. 11-14, washingtonwintershow.org

EXQUISITEANTIQUES

NATIONALS’ WINTERFEST

OFF-SEASON ANTICS

Bring the whole family to mingle with Washington’s baseball team for two days of activities. The Nationals will be on hand for photos with Santa, snow fort building, baseball themed activities and interactive events. Players will read aloud baseball-themed and winter stories and humor the kids with press conferences. December 16 and 17, Convention Center, $25 for children and $35 for adults when purchased in advance, nationals.com/Winterfest.

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WASHINGTON CAR SHOW

AUTOMOTIVE INNOVATION Billed as one of the nation’s top automotive shows, the annual Washington Auto Show will showcase more than 600 cars from over 35 manufacturers. VIP tours will be led by award-winning automotive writers and there will be a special exhibit area for live painting of “art” cars. Jan. 23-24, $12 admission, Walter E Washington Convention Center, washingtonautoshow.com.

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CO U RT E SY P H OTOS

WINTERNATIONAL


FYIDC | INNOVATORSANDDISRUPTORS

SHOPPING BY SMS “Shop Or Not” founders Kate Myers and Kelly O’Malley will have you texting “Yes” to uniquely curated gifts. BY ERICA MOODY

Kelly O’Malley and Kate Myers at their Logan Exchange headquarters

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ttention holiday shoppers: A new text-based service takes the stress out of finding thoughtful gifts.There’s no website to visit or app to download. Just send a message and Shop Or Not does the rest. Longtime friends Kate Myers and Kelly O’Malley relocated to the District from LA last year to launch their unique venture; they did the research to find the best food and coffee gifts in each state from up-and-coming independent makers (think organic fruit hot sauce from Colorado and bourbon cherries from South Carolina). Most items are under $20 with free shipping, so “it’s a great impulse buy,” Myers says. It’s free to sign up and easy to grasp. Shop Or Not sends out one text a week of a unique selection with short descriptions, photos and prices. Text back “Yes” to purchase, text your address, add your payment info in a secure pop-up page and then you’re all set for future purchases.Text “Gift” to send as a gift, and Shop Or Not will ensure it’s nicely wrapped and mailed in a timely manner. They also encourage conversation and feedback over text. “Repeat buying is super easy, you can seriously just text us an emoji and we’ll send you whatever it is that we’re selling that week,” O’Malley says. Remembering birthdays and anniversaries has never been easier. “Texting is such a good reminder tool,” Myers says. Give Shop Or Not the big dates in your life and the names of people you’ll need to buy for, and they’ll curate gifts specifically for that person and send reminders as the date approaches. Local vendors include Commonwealth Joe, Shrub District, Potomac

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Chocolate and ‘Chups Ketchup. For many vendors, “it’s super exciting to be texted out to thousands of people who have maybe never heard of them before,” O’Malley says. “We try so hard to only text the things that we really really love.”  Get started by texting HELLO to 347-482-0881. HOLIDAY HITS

‘SHOPORNOT’STOCKINGSTUFFERS Liddabit dark chocolate honeycomb “coal” candy from Brooklyn, N.Y. ($13) “Have Another” drink stirrers made in Charleston, S.C. ($14) Apple nutmeg cocktail mixer, handmade in D.C. from Shrub District ($10) Quin Candy rose lollipops made in Portland, Ore. ($8)

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FYIDC | THEDISH

UMAMI AT UMAYA A downtown izakaya showcasing Japanese comfort food. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I | P H OTO S BY TO N Y P OW E L L

E

at, drink, eat. Repeat.That’s the mantra at the crux of Penn Quarter’s Umaya, where diners are encouraged to imbibe, relax and stay awhile. Izakayas, or gastropubs, are fixtures in Japanese culture, frequented by an after-work set looking to unwind over drinks and snacks. Evelyn Chong, Umaya’s manager, hopes that the restaurant embodies the concept enough so that people will casually drop in and linger at their tables. “We don’t want to be stuffy,” she says, quickly adding: “We don’t turn tables.” Since its opening in January, Umaya’s laid-back sentiment has drawn a solid happy hour crowd and, because of its proximity to CityCenter and Chinatown, groups of tourists and lunch-goers as well. Chong says the extensive menu is meant to reflect this diversity of visitors. Chef Nick Hoang, who has had previous stints at Kushi Izakaya and Cafe Asia, helped shape the menu along with owner Charles Zhou to include specialty maki rolls and nigiri, donburi (“rice bowls”), ramen, robatayaki (Japanese street snacks) and a range of appetizers and small plates that run the gamut from basic edamame to whole lobster sashimi, which will likely be convulsing on the plate when it is served. “The goal is to keep our identity as a Japanese restaurant,” Chong says, “but not ostracize people.” Though the comprehensive menu is meant to suit everyone’s taste, freshness is the common thread that ties together traditional dishes with others that are less so. “You are supposed to taste what you are eating,” Chong says of Japanese fare, citing Umaya’s simply grilled robatayaki as a prime example. Skewers are scorched on an open robata grill using unobtrusive Japanese charcoal that allows the flavor of the meat itself to shine. Umaya also values presentation, stemming from the traditional Japanese motto “See first, smell then taste.” So, don’t be surprised to see gold flakes sprinkled on slices of sashimi. Whether it be a quick bite of robata or a full on omakase tasting with chef ’s selection of fresh fish, Chong says, “The ultimate goal is to make everyone happy.”

FROMTOP A bowl of Umaya’s pork ramen; Robatayaki offerings including chicken, pork belly, cod, shishito peppers, chef’s selection of sashimi and nigiri.

Umaya | 733 10th St NW | umayadc.com | 202-290-3443 WHAT TO ORDER: Miso sea bass ($9) and pork belly ($7) robatayaki Japanese A5 Wagyu beef sashimi (MP) Toro sashimi (MP)

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FYIDC | PERFORMINGARTSTORS

VOCAL MASTER

Andrea Boccelli heads to Washington to perform at Capital One Arena.

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rguably one of the world’s greatest tenors, Andrea Bocelli has received high praise from audiences across the world for his rapturous vocal talent. Celine Dion, who collaborated with Bocelli on “The Prayer,” said “If God had a singing voice, it would sound like Andrea Bocelli.” On Dec. 10, his tour makes a stop at Capital One Arena, where he will alternate between performing arias, duets and choruses by famous opera composers plus popular romanzas from “Cinema” and previous albums. With over 65 million albums sold and a cult following, Bocelli’s accomplishments grow by the day. A film based on his memoir “La Musica del Silenzio” (“The Music of Silence”) was released earlier this year. Directed by Michael Radford, it chronicles Bocelli’s

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early life in Tuscany, where he developed the glaucoma that left him completely blind by age 12, through his journey to becoming a worldfamous tenor. Of the cinematic experience, in which he makes a short cameo, Bocelli says working alongside actor Tony Sebastian for the role was completely surreal. “[Tony] has been able to get in my shoes very well,” he says “deepening the character and grasping nuances that have made him surprisingly credible.” Bocelli also has several musical projects in both the classical and pop arenas in the pipeline for 2018, as well as a slate of performances scheduled in the U.S. and Europe. Ahead of his Washington show this month we asked the Italian tenor how he prepares for his well-attended performances. “I prefer to stay on my own, trying to maintain the

maximum concentration,” he says, citing reading, writing and flute playing as sources of relaxation and inspiration before a big show. Bocelli counts his “musical heroes” as a combination of great Italian predecessors (Franco Corelli, Beniamino Gigli) and contemporaries such as Placido Domingo, José Carreras and Luciano Pavarotti. Like his heroes, Bocelli’s voice has the power to transcend emotion in a way that only music can accomplish. His performances, he says, revolve around the concept of beauty, and its ability to “touch souls, give passion” and move people.“Every time I get on stage I do hope to enter the heart of those listening to me.” December 10, 8 p.m.; Capital One Arena, Tickets start at $80

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P H OTO BY G I OVA N N I D E S A N D R E

BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I


FYIDC | WHO’SNEXT

CLASSIC MAN

Composer and pianist Sam Post is educating new generations about classical music.

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ou know your career’s on the rise when Yo-Yo Ma and Renée Fleming ask you to perform with them at the Kennedy Center. For lifelong Washingtonian Sam Post playing “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” at the Kennedy Center Arts Summit last year led to a composition project with the San Francisco Symphony. When he’s not traveling around the country to perform, the composer and pianist can be found at Washington’s Levine School of Music, educating students at the very school he attended growing up.

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“My teachers [at Levine] helped me step into new sounds, ideas and genres,” Post, 31, says, mentioning Irena Orlov and Carlos Rodriguez specifically. But they also instilled in him an appreciation of the greats, including Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. Educated at Yale and Northwestern, the cerebral composer has many thoughts about the status of classical music today, and how education can not only keep it alive, but see it thrive. “In the academic world, there’s a lot of pressure for people writing new music to

be ‘original’,” Post says. “But that’s overdone, in my opinion. There’s a lot of music being written today that’s crazy experimental and avant garde, but the problem is that people don’t really like that music. It’s become a burden on the industry.” Post, who has released three albums (one that is entirely Bach variations), doesn’t mind being considered “old-school.” “The idea that beautiful and compelling melodies and harmonies are dated is a very strange concept and I can’t sympathize with that point of view,” he says. “A lot of modern classical music aims to be radically different from music that came before it, but I like to let my ears and experiences be my guide, and as a result my music has a closer connection to my favorite composers, even as it combines different styles and goes in its own direction.” Most recently, Post found himself drawn to ragtime. His latest album “Dizzy Days” is his take on the turn-of-the-century musical style that “spawned a century of syncopated American music.” “I used to think that the best music had already been written, that it was all in the past, which I think is a common attitude for people raised to play/love the classics,” he says, adding that recent influences like his favorite living musician Gabriela Montero have led him to revise that stance. Last summer, Post founded a chamber group, Kassia Music Collective with Washington composer and violinist Bernard Vallandingham to continue his mission of making contemporary classical music accessible. “I want people to realize that music can be very intricate, complex and sophisticated, but at the same time very beautiful and at times very simple,” he explains. “The best music should catch your ear and catch your attention and you should like it the first time, but every time you listen it should get better and you should notice new things.”

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P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L

BY ERICA MOODY


POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPolitics﹐Hollywood﹐MediaandDiplomacy| The Meridian Ball and Fight Night

Rima Al-Sabah and First Lady Melania Trump at the KuwaitAmerica Foundation Dinner (Photo by Peter Papoulakos)

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POLLYWOOD | EMBASSYROW

Food for Thought and the Palate Trump’s chief of protocol – 75Years of Blair House - A week in Washington

NEW HAND AT PROTOCOL: with deportation when the Beirut The Senate Foreign Relagovernment suddenly changes the tions Committee confirmed laws. There was a documentary on Sean Lawler, President Trump’s the menu at the Italian Embassy nominee for the long-vacant as well. It was called “La Pizza: Il post of head of the State DepartCuore di Napoli” (“Pizza: the Heart ment’s chief of protocol, while he of Naples”) and was followed by was traveling with the president pizza tasting. The week-long event in Asia. The former master chief included discussions on reconcilpetty officer in the U.S. Navy had ing traditional farming and enviyet to be sworn in at print time, ronmental considerations, nutrition but in accompanying the presand defending Italian food brands ident he was not jumping the against the challenge of so-called gun. His current post is direc“Italian sounding” products. At the tor of visits, planning and dipHouse of Sweden, six 2017 Amerilomatic affairs at the National can Nobel Prize laureates spoke of Security Council, which gives their recent discoveries. Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young him a place in the presidential talked about the mechanisms of the traveling team. When he is chief body’s inner clock — fundamenof protocol, Lawler’s will be the tal to human health — and econfirst American hand a foreign omist Richard H. Thaler, widely leader shakes on arrival and known from his appearance in the the last upon departure. Before 2015 movie “The Big Short,” held jumping to the NSC he was Nobel Laureates biologist Michael W. Young (right) and chemist Joachim Frank at forth on economics and human director of Naval Support Facilthe Swedish Embassy dinner following a symposium by six of this year’s American behavior. ity Thurmond, better known as Nobel Prize winners. Camp David, the presidential retreat. “One of the things with protocol is CULTURE BLITZ: The scope and breadth of FOOTNOTE: Middle East Eye, a blog-site obviously to do no harm,” Lawler told the soft diplomacy was on display one week in focused on the region, reports that former November when the Czech embassy showed Saudi Arabian ambassador, Prince Bandar bin Senate committee at his hearing. documentaries from One World, the world’s Sultan is among those enjoying the hospitality BLAIR HOUSE: In November Secretary of biggest human rights festival held annually in of the Riyadh authorities in the gigantic, and State Rex Tillerson hosted a reception to mark Prague, the embassy of Italy celebrated the now heavily guarded Ritz Carlton Hotel. This the 75th anniversary of Blair House, the gov- history and quality of the country’s gastronomy, follows the recent purge of several princes and ernment’s guest house for visiting dignitaries and the Swedish embassy held a symposium of other leading Saudis in what was described as right across from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. American Nobel Prize laureates. Two of the an anti-corruption drive. Predictably, Middle Eleanor Roosevelt persuaded the govern- documentaries were doubtless meant to strike a East Eye’s report has been widely picked up ment to buy it for that purpose in 1942 after responsive chord. “Arms Ready,” a Czech pro- and is all over the net. Saudi Embassy spokesa surprise nocturnal meeting with Winston duction, dealt with the illegal firearms trade in person Fatimah Baeshen said the embassy Churchill wandering the White House corri- the Czech Republic, and what could be done “does not comment on individuals.” There is dors in his nightshirt. After that, distinguished about it. In “Lost in Lebanon,” a British produc- no official list of detainees. Bandar, who was foreign guests no longer wandered the White tion, hundreds of Syrian refugees in Lebanon dean of the diplomatic corps, was a fixture in House at night. find themselves illegal immigrants and faced Washington from 1983–2005.

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P H OTO CO U RT E SY O F T H E SW E D I S H E M BA S SY

BY ROLAND FLAMINI


POLLYWOOD

Steven Mnuchin and Louise Linton

Kuwaiti Amb. Salem Al-Sabah, Rima Al-Sabah, First Lady Melania Trump and President Donald Trump WL EXCLUSIVE

KUWAIT-AMERICA FOUNDATION GALA DINNER Kuwaiti Ambassador Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELLANDPETERPAPOULAKOS

Hillary Geary Ross, Wilbur Ross and Jamie McCourt

HONORINGTHEFIRSTLADYPresident Donald Trump joined First Lady Melania Trump at the Kuwait embassy residence for the Kuwait America Foundation gala dinner honoring the First Lady for her dedication to causes affecting women and children in the U.S. and abroad. The event raised over $1 million for UN Refugee Agency programs empowering women and girls and was hosted by Kuwait’s Ambassador Sheikh Salem Al-Sabah and his wife Sheikha Rima Al-Sabah, who is also a Goodwill Ambassador to UNHCR. In her speech, Melania Trump emphasized the importance of protecting children and said “the measure of any society’s humanity must be judged by how it treats the weakest and most vulnerable among them.” In attendance: Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Secretary of Treasury Steven Mnuchin, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao, U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley, Jared Kushner, Ivanka Trump, National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster, Chairman of Council of Economic Advisors Gary Cohn, UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi and Saudi Arabia’s Ambassador Prince Khaled bin Salman.

David Rubenstein and Rex Tillerson

Reed and Maggie Cordish

Elaine Chao and Susan Blumenthal

Abby Blunt, Robin Farias-Eisner, Rep. Debbie Dingell, Kelly Day and Alana Stewart

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Nikki and Michael Haley

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Dave McCormick, Nayla Moawwad and Dina Powell

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com Kellyanne and George Conway


Nancy and Lamar McKay

Rep. Darrell Issa, Antonio Guterres, Majida Mourad and Marty Obst

Katie McMaster, Nahla Reda, H.R. McMaster and Eygptian Amb.Yassar Reda Wayne Berman and Eli Miller

Gary and Lisa Cohn

Micaela Barbagallo, Vanessa Darroch and Moroccan Amb. Lalla Joumala Alaoui

Ivanka Trump, Filippo Grandi and Jared Kushner

Tony and Sandy Tamer with Debbie Bancroft

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com Jackie Duberstein and PatrickShanahan Jane Harman and Bob Dickey WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Ziad Ojakli and Mick Mulvaney

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Mary Peet, Sarah Huckabee Sanders and Bryan Sanders


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Larry and Carla Johnson (Photo by Kevin Koski)

Raul Fernandez and Ted Leonsis

WL SPONSORED

FIGHT NIGHT

Russ Ramsey

Washington Hilton | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Beverly Perry, Monsignor John Enzler and Kaya Henderson Omar Miller and Michael Wilbon

TOTALKNOCKOUT In its 28th year, Fight for Children’s annual Fight Night event has raised more than $60 million, including $4.3 million this year, to provide equitable education opportunities for at-risk children in the mid-Atlantic region. Besides its signature cigar smoking and boxing matches, this year’s event, chaired by Raul Fernandez, hosted Mixed Martial Arts for the first time ever. Blagoy Ivanov, a former heavyweight champion, and rising star featherweight Lance Palmer were among the Professional Fighting League competitors. The showdowns were streamed live online. Guests were also invited to participate in a silent auction featuring more than 100 lots that included sports memorabilia, local specialties and travel packages. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Brad Nierenberg, Chuck Ghoorah and Bob Ghafouri

Bret Baier, Rep. John Delaney and Mark Ein Jimmy Lynn, boxer Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini, Carlos Silva and Chris Tavlarides

Vinoda Basnayake, Zach Leonsis and Adrian Fenty 26

Roger A. Krone, Mark McGrath and Michael Powell (Photo by Kevin Koski)

Mayor Muriel Bowser and Scott Plank WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Alex Ceballos

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POLLYWOOD

Dr. N. Joyce Payne and Jussie Smollett

Gregory Jones and Johnny C. Taylor, Jr

WL SPONSORED

THURGOOD MARSHALL COLLEGE FUND 30TH ANNIVERSARY AWARDS GALA The Washington Marriott Wardman Park PHOTOSBYGETTYIMAGES

Jerronney Darrisaw, Capt. Deshauna Barber, Jamaal O. Bailey and Dr. Jamel Hodges Pamela Thomas and Roger Ferguson Jr.

Lisa Blunt Rochester, Harry Lee Williams and Rep. Mark Walker

Ashley Darby and Gizelle Bryant

Rabbi Jonah Dov Pesner

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Johnny C. Taylor Jr. and Bob Lanier

DELIVERINGDREAMS The Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) raised nearly $4.3 million dollars with a special $500,000 gift from United Airlines and a matching gift of $50,000 from TMCF Board Chairman Jim Clion at its 30th Anniversary Awards Gala. The proceeds directly benefit programs and scholarships for more than 300,000 students attending the fund’s 47 publicly-supported member-schools. Those honored included Roger W. Ferguson, president and CEO of TIAA; Richard S. Lincer, a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and Harry L. Williams, president of Delaware State University (who was also announced as the next leader of TMCF, taking office in 2018). “After this amazing gala, I am infinitely optimistic because I know the best is yet to come for our 47 member-schools,” said its current president and CEO, Johnny C. Taylor Jr., the evening’s surprise host. Strada Education Network sponsored special guest vocalist Glennis Grace who performed two selections to the sold-out crowd of more than 1,600 Historic Black College and University students, presidents and chancellors; members of Congress; and business, civic and education leaders.

Johnny Parham, Jr., Ann Cox Parham, Virgis Colbert, Racquel Oden and Noel Hankin

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Jim and Susan Clifton

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Ben Barnes and Barbie Allbritton

Rep. Steny Hoyer, Luci Baines Johnson and Rep. Gene Green Sen. Pat Leahy and David Rubenstein

Sen. Bob Casey, Lloyd Hand and Sen. Dick Durbin

WL SPONSORED

LBJ LIBERTY & JUSTICE FOR ALL AWARD National Archives Museum | PHOTOSBYDANIELSWARTZANDJOYASICO PATRIOTICPHILANTHROPIST Inside the grand rotunda of the National Archives, the LBJ Foundation presented its most prestigious LBJ Liberty & Justice for All Award to David M. Rubenstein, who has defined the essence of patriotic philanthropy, helping to preserve the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, Declaration of Independence and other national treasures of American history. President Johnson’s daughters, Lynda Johnson Robb and Luci Baines Johnson, bestowed the award. Lloyd Hand and Cappy McGarr chaired the bipartisan gala, saying, “David firmly believes in giving back to the country that has been so great to him.” Rubenstein’s generosity drew praise from Washington notables in attendance, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, Sens. Patrick Leahy and Ed Markey and Reps. Lamar Smith, Debbie Dingell and Joaquin Castro along with James Clyburn, a past recipient of the LBJ award, and former HUD Secretary Julián Castro. Proceeds benefit the LBJ Washington Center and its immersive graduate program.

Rep. Paul Tonko, Cokie Roberts and Lyndon Boozer

Rep. Carolyn Maloney and Lynda Bird Johnson Robb

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Smita Shah and Maarten de Jeu Rep. Jim Clyburn, John D. Raffaelli, Melissa Maxfield and Ron Kirk

Lucinda Robb and Cappy McGarr 30

Leon Harris and Dawn Lomax

Luke Frazier, Adrienne Arsht and Robert Pullen WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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POLLYWOOD | HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

TRUTHABOVEEVERYTHING HBO screens film about the life of famed Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee. B Y J A N E T D O N O VA N

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n the new Washington Post building on 13th & K streets, NW there’s a glass enclosed space called the Ben Bradlee Conference Room.There’s also a picture of of the famed Post executive editor on its exterior alongside one of his famous quotes:“The truth no matter how bad is never as dangerous as a lie in the long run.” At the screening of HBO’s film “The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradless,” his widow Sally Quinn said “The most important thing about this film is how important the truth is ... the lie that is the enemy of the people and not the journalists who expose it.” Slated for release on Dec. 4, the film centers around her late husband’s tenure at the Post from 1968 to 1991. During the presidency of Richard Nixon, Bradlee became a national figure when he challenged the federal government over the right to publish “The Pentagon Papers” and oversaw the paper’s investigative reporting on the Watergate scandal. “Ben hated lying,” Quinn continued, “It drove him crazy. And although he used to say, ‘We print lies every day because people lie to us,’ he also said that the truth will emerge.” Sally and Ben met after she applied for a position at the Post. She was so taken with him that after she didn’t get the job the first

time around, she came back and interviewed for a Style section job two years later. When he asked to see something she had written and she responded that she had no clips, he said ‘well nobody’s perfect ... you’re hired.’ “Newspaperman” premiered at the Newseum with a cadre of both former and current Post journalists relaying their “Bradlee tales” to an attentive audience, none more important than the then-cub reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein whose sleuth reporting helped take down a sitting president. We wondered how Bradlee took such a chance on these two given their youth, but it has been said that Ben always ran with his instincts. “He supported us. He was a shield,” said Woodward. “We thought we shouldn’t be on this story because we didn’t have enough experience,” added Bernstein. “Ben’s interest was in getting the story, and getting it right, and being fair, and respectful to the people we were covering, and that really is the legacy.” As to whether the two ever felt threatened, they said they did get paranoid a bit, but were more afraid of making mistakes. How concerned they were about the freedom of the press under the current administration? Both said that you can’t be a

citizen and not worry about that all the time, but also agreed that the press is basically in a sound position – strong and doing very good work. “Growing up Bradlee was different. It was wonderful. It was magical. It was very traditional,” said Quinn Bradlee who for the longest time wanted to do a film about his father before eventually offering it to HBO where CEO Richard Plepler picked it up. “None of this, would have been possible if it were not for the inspiration, vision, passion and the instinct of Quinn Bradlee,” Plepler said. After listening to Bradlee’s book recording, director John Maggio said that he “absolutely fell in love” with him as a character. Maggio was most surprised to learn about Bradlee’s intimate relationship with John F. Kennedy, which he describes as adding another dimension to his personality. “Democracy dies in darkness and nobody understood that more viscerally than Ben did,” Plepler concluded. “Anybody who’s great at anything has a little bit of an extra gene. Ben had two extra genes. He had an extra gene for journalism and he had an extra gene for life. What the filmmakers have captured here is how those two things can gel to create a remarkable life and a remarkable man.”

Sally Quinn and Carl Bernstein

“Killing Reagan” Director Rod Lurie and Novelist Kyra Davis Jack Norton and Jean Case Kristen Shaw and Michael Grady

Producer Teddy Kunhardt, Producer Peter Kunhardt, Director John Maggio, and Producer George Kunhardt

‘NEWSPAPERMAN’ SCREENING Newseum |PHOTOSCOURTESYOFRALPHALSWANGFORHBO

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, HBO Chairman and CEO Richard Plepler and Sen. Ed Markey

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Executive Producer Richard Cohen and Rep. Debbie Dingell

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Chris Ruddy, Margaret Carlson and Patricia Harrison WL EXCLUSIVE

A VERY BIPARTISAN BASH

Co-hosts Nancy Brinker, Vicki and Roger Sant and Buffy Cafritz

Hay-Adams Hotel | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL RISINGABOVETHEFRAY Washington may more polarized than it has been since the 2003 invasion of Iraq or the 1998-99 impeachment trial of Bill Clinton, which is exactly why longtime social force Buffy Cafritz wanted to gather guests from both sides of the aisle at a neutral spot — albeit one overlooking the White House — to politely put partisan squabbles aside at least for one night. Democrat philanthropists Roger and Vicki Sant joined former ambassador to Hungary and Susan G. Komen for the Cure founder Nancy Brinker and Newsmax Media CEO Chris Ruddy (both Republicans) to invite the 300 senators, congressmen, diplomats, media personalities and other assorted A-listers who mingled over cocktails, fancy hors d’oeuvres and a bounteous buffet throughout the night. “There was a coming together of many Repubicans and Democrats in the room so I thought the evening was successful,” Cafritz said, adding that “we still have a long way to go.”

Jim Lehrer, Jim Hoagland, Jane Stanton Hitchcock and Ann Jordan

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Former Sen. Mike Johnston Gen. Michael and Jeanine Hayden

Micaela Barbagallo, Italian Amb. Armando Varricchio and Barbara Maccaferri

Jordanian Amb. Dina Kawar WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Mayor Muriel Bowser and Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden

Conrad Cafritz and George Vradenburg

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Sen. Rob Portman and Rep. Debbie Dingell

New York Post columnist Cindy Adams

Sen. Susan Collins and Mary Mochary 33


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Afghan Amb. Hamdullah Mohib and Lael Mohib

Glenn and Suzanne Youngkin, Andy and Heather Florance, Tom and Sec. Ann Korologos, Jana Ryan, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and Gwen and Stuart Holliday Meredith Balenske, Lauren Culbertson and Rachel Wolbers

WL SPONSORED

THE MERIDIAN BALL Meridian International Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Dave and Jamie Dorros with Tracy and Adam Bernstein

DINNERDANCINGANDDISTINGUISHEDGUESTS The 49th annual Meridian Ball, the highly-anticipated see-and-beseen fall bash held to benefit Meridian International Center, was the organization’s largest yet. Over 800 guests, ranging from members of the Washington establishment to young journalists and entrepreneurs, all dressed in their black-tie finery, came to celebrate the center’s mission of promoting global leadership. Premium ticketholders attended one of 25 dinners hosted by ambassadors from around the globe (or dined at the White-Meyer House) before hitting the nacho bar, Tres Leches cake station or dance floor at the Latinthemed soirée. RARE SOCIAL SIGHTING: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and wife Janna Ryan, who served as Congressional co-chairs, greeted guests in the receiving line.

Rep. Mark Meadows and Debbie Meadows

Marsha Bonet and Rafael Farina

Virginia Boney, Caroline Harvin and Lindsay Walters 34

Didi and Walter Cutler

Anna VanMeter, Jeanhee Kim, Paul Wharton, Erika Gutierrez, Sarah Brutschy and Amanda Burger Urska Petrovcic and Juliana Fonseca WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Suzi and Jack Hanna Neil Bush, C. Boyden Gray and Points of Light CEO Natalye Paquin Arnold Schwarzenegger

POINTS OF LIGHT TRIBUTE AWARDS Embassy of France | PHOTOSNAKUMAYOALLISONO’BRIENMAXTAYLOR HONORINGSERVICE The Points of Light organization, inspired by former President George H. W. Bush, honored former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenneger, animal conservationists Jack and Suzi Hanna, NFL player Coty Sensabaugh and his wife Dominique Sensabaugh and former White House counsel C. Boyden Gray for their contributions to volunteering and service. More than 300 guests attended the awards dinner, during which President Bush’s son, Neil Bush, graciously stopped by every table to thank guests. On the red carpet, Schwarzenegger said President Bush inspired him to give back when he appointed him to the President’s Council on Physical Fitness. He called the elder Bush his personal “point of light.”

Dominique and Coty Sensabaugh VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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POLLYWOOD | PERFORMINGARTS

THE NSO PLAYS ITALIAN A conversation with conductor Gianandrea Noseda BY ROLAND FLAMINI PHOTOGRAPHS BY TONY POWELL

A

t the entrance of the Kennedy Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hall of Nations a larger-than-life poster of Gianandrea Noseda, the new music director of the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), confronts the visitor. The maestro stands, cold eyed and arms folded, as though waiting for an explanation why you are late for his master class. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a contradictory choice of image to portray this bright-eyed, soft voiced, man who

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conducts his conversation with graceful hand gestures. On the podium, the folded arms posture is even less typical of his whirlwind style of gesture and movement, leaping towards heaven and falling back on earth. Noseda is the first Italian conductor to lead the 86-year-old NSO, where his predecessors have been a Dutchman, a Russian, two Hungarians, two Americans and a German.

Now 52 and firmly established as a star in both the orchestra and operatic worlds, he has acquired a reputation for breathing fresh life into fixtures of the musical repertoire. In addition to his Washington appointment, he remains music director of the Turin Opera in Italy (the Teatro Regio di Torino) and guest conductor of both the Mariinsky Theatre in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and the Israeli

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Philharmonic in Tel Aviv. Noseda had previously been music director of the Manchester-based BBC Philharmonic Orchestra. He raised its level of artistry and recognition, and did the same for the Turin Opera, which had suffered from proximity to Milanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teatro alla Scala. Both achievements doubtless made him an attractive candidate to take over the NSO, described by Washington Post music critic Anne Midgette as â&#x20AC;&#x153;lackluster, and haunted by the curse of mediocrity.â&#x20AC;? Asked to name his biggest challenge in taking over the National Symphony Orchestra, as he sat in a small office in the Kennedy Center dressing room area, this was Nosedaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reply: â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I first met the NSO as a visiting conductor I found an orchestra with a huge, high potential to deliver. Their problem is to deliver continuously, every single concert, every single moment. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m aware, based on the last few weeks, that there is work to do, but it can be marvelous work. There are no weak links. The challenge is what? To ensure the NSO always gives an important interpretation of the music.â&#x20AC;?  WASHINGTON LIFE Five years, is that

the time frame you envision for your association with the orchestra? GIANANDREANOSEDA When I take on a post I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think in terms of two or three years and then away. You can start doing serious work in two or three years, but to do a thorough job you need more â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and to leave a legacy you need a little while longer. I think of constructing a reality â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and growth to create an important brand. WL What do you think the cumulative effect on the ensemble after having had resident conductors from five different musical traditions has been, and what do you think will be your impact? GN The impact of musical directors of several different musical traditions will have been to shape an orchestra capable of transforming its way of playing to suit the repertory [of each conductor]. This is a plus. Under Mstislav Rostropovich, they

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explored the vast Russian repertory, but also the different way that Russians approach playing it. Leonard Slatkin, being American, had his own way of approaching German music. I bring my characteristic approach: I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t avoid a distinctive way of phrasing. There is an Italian way of approaching the music. To conduct â&#x20AC;&#x153;An American in Parisâ&#x20AC;? you have to know how to swing, which is not the Italian way. For example [he sings a slow melody from the Gershwin piece], the risk in Italian hands is that it will become â&#x20AC;Ś operatic.

´,IRXQGDQ RUFKHVWUDZLWKD KXJHKLJKSRWHQWLDO WRGHOLYHU¾ WL What can Washington audiences

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three Cornered Hatâ&#x20AC;? is played, but not that often, the music is splendid. And Gershwin, who goes to Paris to study with Nadia Boulanger.We need to rethink our approach to programming, and how to arouse the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curiosity, and stimulate that curiosity by guaranteeing the highest quality. The publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reaction to an unknown piece will be: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know it,â&#x20AC;? but I know the orchestra will play it at the highest level. You conduct both operatic performances and orchestral concerts. Which do you prefer? GN: Both. They are different fields but I feel at home in both. Except that when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been conducting only opera for a stretch, I miss conducting concerts, and the other way around. I spent most of October with the Turin Opera, and began to feel the need to change to the concert podium. Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here at the NSO, and I know that by midDecember Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be thinking â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I need opera. I need opera.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; WL

expect by way of programming? You have revived Alfredo Casella, a half forgotten Italian early 20th century composer. Can we expect to hear some more of Casellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s many Italian contemporaries â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ildebrando Pizzetti, Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, and not just Italians â&#x20AC;&#x201C; how about William Walton, who is rarely heard, or Francis Poulenc? GN There are many Italian composers who deserve more attention. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve conducted various pieces by [Gian Francesco] Malipiero and Pizzetti, and last week in the NSOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first subscription concert we played Luigi Dallapiccola.

in 1993. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Italian, so I conducted my first opera in 1994 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rossiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cenerentolaâ&#x20AC;? [Cinderella] at Cosenza, Italy. Opera conducting entered my life in a strong way in 1997 when [Russian conductor Valery] Gergiev appointed me principal guest conductor of the Mariinsky. But even then, 60 percent of my conducting was still from the concert podium, not the opera orchestra pit. Today, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about 50/50.

WL What determines your program

WL When do you plan to take the NSO

WL Did you start as an orchestral concert

conductor or with opera? GN I conducted my first orchestral concert

choices?

on tour?

GN Before the choice of composers comes

GN Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on touring plans. To live

the idea of the story you want to communicate in the concert. For example, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the concept behind this seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first subscription concert? Ottorino Respighiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fontane di Romaâ&#x20AC;? [Fountains of Rome], â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ThreeCornered Hatâ&#x20AC;? by Manuel de Falla, Gershwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;American in Paris,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poemeâ&#x20AC;? by Ernest Chausson, add up to a hypothetical voyage through southern Europe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Italy, France, Spain.

up to our name as the National Symphony Orchestra weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking into arranging residence engagements in other parts of the United States. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also exploring the possibility of a Japanese tour and a European tour, and for these weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for sponsors. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also looking into methods of streaming, such as the live streaming Medici, both audio and video.

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T H E WA S H I N G TO N

L I F E

2 0 1 8

SOCIAL LIST

The 23rd annual record of notably social individuals from politics, diplomacy, business, philanthropy and the arts. PORTRAITS BY TONY POWELL

A Mr. and Mrs. JAMES ABDO (Mai) Mrs. JOHN WILLIAM ABEL-SMITH (Mimi) The Honorable and Mrs. TYLER ABELL (Bess) The Honorable DAVID C. ACHESON Mr. JOHN B. (JAY) ADAMS, JR. Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER ADDISON (Sylvia Ripley) Mr. and Mrs. JORGE ADELER (Graziela) Mr. and Mrs. DADI AKHAVAN (Farinaz) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN E. (CHIP) AKRIDGE, III (Sally) Mr. DAVID ALBERSWERTH and Ms. CARY RIDDER Her Excellency the Ambassador of Morocco PRINCESS LALLA JOUMALA ALAOUI and Mr. MUHAMMAD REZA NOURI ESFANDIARI The Honorable MADELEINE K. ALBRIGHT Mr. JAMES A. ALEFANTIS The Honorable and Mrs. LAMAR ALEXANDER (Honey) Justice and Mrs. SAMUEL ALITO, JR. (Martha-Ann) His Excellency the Ambassador of Bahrain ABDULLA BIN RASHED ALKHALIFA and Her Excellency Sheikha AISHA BINT JABER AL-KHALIFA Mrs. JOE L. ALLBRITTON (Barbara Jean/”Barby”) Mr. ROBERT L. ALLBRITTON and Dr. ELENA ALLBRITTON Her Excellency the Ambassador of Oman HUNAINA AL-MUGHAIRY and Mr. FUAD AL-HINAI His Excellency the Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates and Mrs. YOUSEF AL-OTAIBA (Abeer) His Excellency the Ambassador of Kuwait Sheikh SALEM ABDULLAH AL-SABAH and Sheikha RIMA AL-SABAH Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT ALTMAN (Lynda Carter) Mr. ANTONIO ALVES Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL ANSARI (Karen)

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Mrs. R. W. APPLE, JR. (Betsey) His Excellency the Ambassador of France GERARD ARAUD Mr. and Mrs. LOUIS M. ARONSON (Ami Becker) Ms. ADRIENNE ARSHT Mrs. ARTHUR W. ARUNDEL (Margaret) Mr. ANDREW ATHY, JR.

B

Mr. and Mrs. BRET BAIER (Amy) Mr. ROBERT BARNETT and Ms. RITA BRAVER Mr. MICHAEL BARONE Mr. and Mrs. ALEXANDER BARTH (Mary) Mrs. CHARLES L. BARTLETT (Martha) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN S. BEALE, JR. (Louise) Mr. JEREMY BEN-AMI and Ms. AILSA BIRAN Mr. and Mrs. MORTON BENDER (Grace) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT BENNETT (Ellen)

The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM J. BENNETT (Elayne) Mr. and Mrs. RAYMOND (RAY) BENTON (Nina) The Honorable and Mrs. ALAN BERMAN (Michele) Mr. MJ BERMAN The Honorable and Mrs. WAYNE L. BERMAN (Lea) Mr. and Mrs. ADAM K. BERNSTEIN (Tracy) The Honorable and Mrs. STUART A. BERNSTEIN (Wilma) Mr. MAX N. BERRY The Honorable and Mrs. ALBERT J. BEVERIDGE, III (Madzy) The Honorable and Mrs. JAMES H. BILLINGTON (Marjorie) Mrs. ROBERT O. BLAKE (Sylvia) The Honorable ANTONY J. (TONY) BLINKEN and the Honorable EVAN RYAN

JACK AND SUSANNA QUINN >>

He’s an attorney and former White House Counsel to President Bill Clinton. She’s founder of on-demand beauty app Veluxe. Their favorite charity is No Kid Hungry’s Share our Strength, which provides healthy meals to chidren in need. WASHINGTON LIFE: What is your favorite event venue? JACK QUINN: Without any doubt, my favorite venue is our home. We try hard to make sure that that is the venue where we entertain. It’s a warm environment and our friends are always entertaining and interesting – as are, of course, all of our children. Susanna is amazing at that, on top of her duties as Mom and CEO of Veluxe, she’s a talented and creative cook – and she never fails to make a dinner party fun, informative and satisfying. WL: What are common faux pas people make at social events? SUSANNA QUINN: Not engaging politely; looking past the person with whom you are speaking for someone else. We work on eye contact with our five-year-old. The same rules apply for adults. You may not remember every good conversation but it is hard to forget when someone is rude.

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| DECEMBER

2016

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“When I host a dinner party, I like the ‘one conversation’ at the dining table rule so that everyone is included and no one misses anything!” SUSANNAQUINN

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T H E WA S H I N G T O N L I F E 2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST

Ms. CAROL BLUE The Honorable and Mrs. ROY BLUNT (Abigail) Mrs. THOMAS HALE BOGGS (Barbara) Mrs. SAMUEL E. BOGLEY (Rose Marie) The Honorable AVIS T. BOHLEN and Mr. DAVID P. CALLEO The Honorable and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER S. (KIT) BOND (Linda) Countess PEDER BONDE (Clarissa) Mr. and Mrs. LYNDON BOOZER (Karen) The Mayor of Washington, D.C., MURIEL BOWSER Mr. and Mrs. BRUCE F. BRADLEY (Sharon) Mr. and Mrs. SCOTT BRICKMAN (Patrice) Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM (BILL) BRAWNER (Greta) Miss EDITH H. (BOBBIE) BREWSTER Justice and Mrs. STEPHEN G. BREYER (Joanna) Mr. and Mrs. BRUCE F. BRADLEY (Sharon) Mr. and Mrs. ARTURO E. BRILLEMBOURG (Hilda Ochoa Brillembourg) The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM E. BROCK, III (Sandra) Mr. and Mrs. KENNETH D. BRODY (Carolyn) Mr. and Mrs. RAYMOND C. BROPHY (Jeanette) The Honorable ANN BROWN and Mr. DONALD A. BROWN Mr. and Mrs. LEONARD H. BROWN, III (Diane Ray) Ms. MAGALEN OHRSTROM BRYANT Mrs. WILLIAM L. BRYANT (Aliki) The Honorable and Mrs. MARK BRZEZINSKI (Natalia) Mrs. ZBIGNIEW BRZEZINSKI (Emilie) Mrs. RUTH HALE BUCHANAN Mr. and Mrs. WILEY T. BUCHANAN, III (Janis) Mr. and Mrs. JOEL BUCHWALD (Tamara) The Right Reverend MARIAN EDGAR BUDDE, Episcopal Bishop of Washington, and Mr. PAUL BUDDE Ms. MAUREEN BUNYAN Mr. and Mrs. CHILDS FRICK BURDEN (Elaine) Mr. and Mrs. I. TOWNSEND BURDEN, III (Valerie) The Honorable RICHARD R. BURT Mr. and Mrs. DWIGHT BUSH (Antoinette/Tony) Mr. and Mrs. MARVIN P. BUSH (Margaret) Mr. and Mrs. WESLEY G. (WES) BUSH (Natalie) Mr. and Mrs. C. MICHAEL BUXTON (Charlotte)

C Mr. and Mrs. CALVIN CAFRITZ (Jane) Mr. and Mrs. CONRAD CAFRITZ (Ludmila) Mrs. PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ Mrs. WILLIAM N. CAFRITZ (Buffy) Mrs. CHARLES A. CAMALIER, JR. (Anne)

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Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES A. CAMALIER, III (Patricia) Mr. and Mrs. F. DAVIS CAMALIER (Lynda) Ms. LORI D. CAMALIER Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL CANTACUZENE (Elizabeth) Mrs. RODION CANTACUZENE (Melissa) Mr. L. MICHAEL CANTOR and Ms. JENNY SPRINGER The Honorable MORTIMER M. CAPLIN Mr. and Mrs. BERNARD J. CARL (Joan) Ms. MARGARET CARLSON The Honorable and Mrs. RICHARD W. CARLSON (Patricia) Mr. and Mrs. TUCKER CARLSON (Susan) The Honorable and Mrs. FRANK C. CARLUCCI (Marcia) Mrs. SUSAN CARMEL Mr. JAMES (JAY) CARNEY and Ms. CLAIRE SHIPMAN Mrs. JORGE E. CARNICERO (Jacqueline) Mr. and Mrs. JORGE J. CARNICERO (Rima) Mrs. SUSAN CARMEL Mr. and Mrs. STEPHANE CARNOT (Brooke) Mrs. CONSTANCE CARTER Mr. and Mrs. PAUL CARTER (Rose) Mr. TOM CARVER and Ms. KATTY KAY Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN M. (STEVE) CASE (Jean) Mrs. EUGENE B. CASEY (Betty) Mr. and Mrs. HENRY C. CASHEN, II (Diana) Mr. and Mrs. ENRICO CECCHI (Andrea) Mr. and Mrs. G. JOHN CECCHI (Kristin) Mr. and Mrs. GIUSEPPE CECCHI (Mercedes) Mr. KEVIN ST. CLAIR CHAFFEE Mrs. DAVID CHALLINOR (Joan) The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN E. CHAPOTON (Sally)

The Honorable and Mrs. O. DONALDSON CHAPOTON (Mary Jo) Mrs. KEVIN P. CHARLES (Ellen MacNeille Charles) Ms. JULIE CHASE The Honorable RICHARD B. CHENEY and the Honorable LYNNE B. CHENEY The Honorable and Mrs. MICHAEL CHERTOFF (Meryl) Mr. and Mrs. R. J. CICERO (Catherine Conover) Mrs. BRICE MCADOO CLAGETT (Diana) Mr. SNOWDEN CLARKE Mr. STEVE CLEMONS and Mr. ANDREW OROS The Honorable and Mrs. RAYMOND C. CLEVENGER, III (Leslie) The Honorable WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON and the Honorable HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON Mr. and Mrs. JOHN COCHRAN (Barbara) The Honorable and Mrs. THAD COCHRAN (Kay) Mr. and Mrs. ANDREW COCKBURN (Leslie) Mr. and Mrs. C. SHELBY COFFEY, III (Mary Lee) Mr. and Mrs. NEIL D. COHEN (Marcy) The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM S. COHEN (Janet Langhart) Mr. CARL COLBY Mr. and Mrs. ELBRIDGE COLBY (Susana) Mr. and Mrs. JONATHAN E. COLBY (Susan) Mrs. WILLIAM T. COLEMAN (Lovida) Mr. CHARLES N. (CHUCK) CONCONI and Ms. JANELLE JONES Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL M. (MIKE) CONNORS (Julia) Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE T. CONWAY, III (Kellyanne)

BITSEYFOLGER The philanthropist and renowned hostess has supported innummerable causes over the years, including the National Archives Foundation, the National Symphony Orchestra, Arena Stage and the White House Historical Association. WASHINGTON LIFE: You moved to Washington when your father, Neil McElroy, served as President Eisenhower’s defense secretary. How has entertaining changed here since then? BITSEY FOLGER: It was much more formal in my father’s time — from one’s attire to the general tenor of the evening. For instance, as soon as the meal was concluded, the men removed themselves to a separate room for coffee and cigars and women went to powder their noses, have a cup of coffee and smoke cigarettes, which were always on offer in silver receptacles placed discreetly on tables along with the ashtrays. My how times have changed! Gossip was the name of the game for the women and the men solved the problems of the day. All was over by 10:30 or 11 o’clock.

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“A perfect host is careful to make sure guests are comfortable at all times.” BITSEYFOLGER


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The Honorable ESTHER COOPERSMITH Mr. DAVID CORN and Ms. WELMOED LAANSTRA Dr. and Mrs. MILTON CORN (Gilan Tocco) Mr. and Mrs. WARREN J. COX (Claire) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT H. CRAFT, JR. (Margaret) Ms. FRANCESCA CRAIG Dr. and Mrs. WILLIAM H. CROCKER (Jean) Miss CAROLINE CROFT Ms. LAVINIA CURRIER The Honorable and Mrs. WALTER L. (WALT) CUTLER (Didi) Mr. and Mrs. JAMES M. CUTTS (June)

Ms. ELIZABETH DREW The Honorable and Mrs. KENNETH M. DUBERSTEIN (Jacqueline) Mrs. RICHARD N. DUBIN (Elizabeth) Mrs. ROBERT W. DUEMLING (Louisa) The Honorable JOSEPH D. (JOE) DUFFEY Mr. LAMMOT du PONT Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM H. (MIKE) du PONT (Rein) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT DUVALL(Luciana Pedraza) Mr. and Mrs. ALBERT J. DWOSKIN (Claire)

D

Mr. and Mrs. MARK D. EIN (Sally) Ms. SUSAN EISENHOWER Mr. JAMES P. ELDER, JR. Mr. PETER ELLEFSON and Ms. DEBORAH F. RUTTER Mrs. ANNE LIVINGSTON EMMET Mrs. RICHARD ENGLAND, SR. (Lois) The Reverend Monsignor JOHN J. ENZLER Mr. XAVIER F. EQUIHUA Mr. and Mrs. RICARDO ERNST (Isabel) Dr. and Mrs. AHMAD R. ESFANDIARY (Judy) Mrs. MELVYN J. ESTRIN (Suellen) Mrs. BENJAMIN C. EVANS, JR. (Jan) Ms. PAGE EVANS Mrs. ROWLAND EVANS, JR. (Katherine)

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM J. (BILL) DABBIERE (Ashley) Ms. COLLEEN DALY Mr. and Mrs. LEO A. DALY, III (Grega) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN M. DAMGARD, II (Britty Bardes) Miss REBECCA P. DARLINGTON The Honorable and Mrs. THOMAS A. DASCHLE (Linda Hall) Mrs. STUART C. DAVIDSON (Sally) Mr. JOHN L. (JACK) DAVIES and Ms. KAY KENDALL Mr. and Mrs. R. LESLIE DEAK (Moshira) Mr. and Mrs. ELI WHITNEY DEBEVOISE, II (Heidi) Mrs. ARNAUD DE BORCHGRAVE (Alexandra) Mr. DAVID A. DECKELBAUM Mr. and Mrs. JOHN J. (JACK) DEGIOIA (Theresa) The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN DELANEY (April) Mr. and Mrs. DONALD DELL (Carole) Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES J. DIBONA (Evelyn) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN DICKERSON (Ann) Mrs. C. WYATT DICKERSON (Tandy) The Honorable JOHN D. DINGELL and the Honorable DEBBIE DINGELL Ms. GLORIA STORY DITTUS Mr. BARRY DIXON The Honorable PAULA J. DOBRIANSKY The Honorable and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER J. DODD (Jacki Clegg) The Honorable ROBERT J. (BOB) DOLE and the Honorable ELIZABETH DOLE Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER J. DONATELLI (Karen) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN DONOVAN (Linda Semans) Mr. and Mrs. GUY O. DOVE, III (Valerie) Miss AMANDA DOWNES Mrs. CHRISTINE DOWNEY Her Excellency the Ambassador of Monaco MAGUY MACCARIO DOYLE

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E

F Mrs. RICHARD M. FAIRBANKS, III (Shannon) Mr. and Mrs. A. HUDA FAROUKI (Samia) Mrs. NORMAN FARQUHAR (Elinor) Mr. and Mrs. HOSSEIN FATEH (Dalia) Mrs. MICHELLE CROSS FENTY

Mr. and Mrs. RAUL J. FERNANDEZ (Jean-Marie) Mrs. GEORGE M. FERRIS, JR. (Nancy) Ms. KAREN FINNEY The Honorable JULIE FINLEY Mr. and Mrs. FRANK FIORINA (Carly) Mr. JOHN D. FIRESTONE Mrs. HAMILTON FISH, JR. (Mary Ann) Mr. and Mrs. ROLAND A. FLAMINI (Diane) Mr. ALAN FLEISCHMANN and Ms. DAFNA TAPIERO Ms. DORETTE FLEISCHMANN Mr. and Mrs. LEE M. FOLGER (Juliet) Mrs. NANCY MCELROY (BITSEY) FOLGER Mr. and Mrs. NEIL C. FOLGER (Izette) Mr. and Mrs. JAMES C. FREE (Ann) The Honorable and Mrs. RODNEY P. FRELINGHUYSEN (Virginia) Mr. and Mrs. ALFRED FRIENDLY, JR. (Marie Louise/”Pie”) Mr. DAVID FRUM and Ms. DANIELLE CRITTENDEN The Honorable and Mrs. CRAIG L. FULLER (Karen)

G Mr. JAMES E. GALE and Ms. LISA B. BARRY Mr. and Mrs. DOUGLAS GANSLER (Laura) Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM B. GARRISON, JR. (Mary) Dr. and Mrs. MATTHEW B. GAVIN (Holidae Hayes) Reverend WILLIAM GEORGE, S.J. Ms. ANN GERACIMOS Mr. and Mrs. BERNARD S. GEWIRZ (Sarah) Mr. and Mrs. CARL S. GEWIRZ (Nancy) Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL K. GEWIRZ (Cleo) Mr. and Mrs. STEVEN B. GEWIRZ (Katrina)

BRETANDAMYBAIER He’s FOX News Channel’s chief political anchor and anchor of “Special Report with Bret Baier.” Together they are steadfast supporters of Children’s National Health System, where they have given and helped raise millions, and where their son has been treated for a heart condition. WASHINGTON LIFE: What are your favorite Washington events? AMY BAIER: Our favorite event of the year is the Children’s Ball. This year will be Bret’s 10th year as emcee and I have chaired the Ball four times. We are passionate about children’s health after our son Paul’s journey battling congenital heart disease. BRET BAIER: Besides emceeing the Children’s Ball every year - and taking part in Gridiron skits - my favorite social events in Washington are intimate dinners where Democrats, Republicans, ambassadors and business leaders come together, share a meal, share stories and form relationships. That’s the Washington of old that actually still happens.

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“Our social life is mostly purpose driven - for Bret’s work or for charity.” AMYBAIER


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The Honorable and Mrs. JOSEPH B. GILDENHORN (Alma) The Honorable and Mrs. DOUGLAS H. GINSBURG (Deecy) Justice RUTH BADER GINSBURG Ms. SUSAN GINSBURG Mr. BRENT GLASS and Ms. CATHRYN KELLER The Honorable and Mrs. DANIEL R. GLICKMAN (Rhoda) Mr. and Mrs. DONALD GLICKMAN (Mia) Ms. JULEANNA GLOVER Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN GOLDBERG (Diana) Ms. KATE GOODALL The Honorable and Mrs. BARTON J. (BART) GORDON (Leslie) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN C. GORE (Antonia/Toni) Mrs. MARY ELIZABETH (TIPPER) GORE Judge and Mrs. WALTER GORMAN (Sarah) Mr. and Mrs. KINGDON GOULD, III (Kristin) Mr. DONALD E. GRAHAM and Ms. AMANDA BENNETT The Honorable C. BOYDEN GRAY Mr. and Mrs. JOHN D. GRAY (Melissa Phipps) Mr. GEORGE GRAYSON Mrs. HERMEN GREENBERG (Monica) The Honorable ALAN GREENSPAN and Ms. ANDREA MITCHELL Mr. and Mrs. G. LAUDER GREENWAY, II (Abigail Adams) Ms. NELSE L. (KUBIE) GREENWAY Mr. and Mrs. ANDERSON GRENNAN (Mae Haney) Mr. and Mrs. ROLF GRAAGE (France) Ms. ANNIE GROER Mrs. RUTH NOBLE GROOM Mr. KEN GROSSINGER and Ms. MICHELINE KLAGSBRUN Mr. and Mrs. EDWIN S. GROSVENOR (Deborah) Mr. and Mrs. GILBERT M. GROSVENOR (Mary Helen) Miss SARA A. GROSVENOR Mrs. CHARLES GUGGENHEIM (Marion) The Honorable and Mrs. CARLOS M. GUTIERREZ (Edi)

H Ms. TAMMY HADDAD Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT M. HAFT (Mary) Mr. and Mrs. GREGORY HALL (Wendy Adeler) The Honorable and Mrs. LLOYD N. HAND (Ann) Mr. and Mrs. FRANKLIN L. HANEY, SR. (Emmy) Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD HANLON (Pamela) Mr. THOMAS HARDHART and Ms. VIRGINIA SHORE The Honorable JANE HARMAN Mr. MATTHEW T. HASTINGS

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Mr. TODD HATHAWAY and Ms. NORA MACCOBY HATHAWAY Ms. CARLA D. HAYDEN, Librarian of Congress Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN A. HAYES (Theo) Mr. and Mrs. WEBB COOK HAYES, IV (Sara) Mr. and Mrs. S. ROSS HECHINGER (Susan) Mr. ROBERT E. HEGGESTAD Mr. and Mrs. J. RODERICK HELLER, III (Kay) Mrs. RICHARD M. HELMS (Cynthia) Ms. HELEN LEE HENDERSON Mr. and Mrs. JOHN HENDRICKS (Maureen) Mr. C. WOLCOTT HENRY Mr. JOHN HENRY and Ms. ANN CRITTENDEN Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL HERRALD (Susan) Mrs. ANITA G. HERRICK Mrs. CHRISTIAN A. HERTER, JR. (Catherine) Mr. JULIO E. HEURTEMATTE, JR. Mr. ROBIN HILL and Mrs. MARCIA MCGHEE CARTER The Honorable CARLA HILLS Ms. IRENE HIRANO Mr. ROBERT G. HISAOKA Mr. JIM HOAGLAND and Ms. JANE STANTON HITCHCOCK Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTIAN C. HOHENLOHE (Nora) The Honorable ERIC H. HOLDER, JR. and Dr. SHARON MALONE Mrs. WALLACE F. HOLLADAY (Wilhelmina) Mr. and Mrs. WALLACE F. HOLLADAY, JR. (Winton) The Honorable and Mrs. STUART W. HOLLIDAY (Gwen) The Honorable and Mrs. SVEN ERIK HOLMES (Lois Romano)

The Honorable and Mrs. LINWOOD HOLTON (Virginia/”Jinks”) Mr. and Mrs. H. CARTER HOOD (Amanda Smith) Mr. and Mrs. OUTERBRIDGE HORSEY (Georgina) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN K. HOSKINSON (Ana) Mr. and Mrs. ARTHUR A. HOUGHTON, III (Peggy) Mrs. EDMOND N. HOWAR (Margaret) Mrs. RAYMOND J. HOWAR (Pamela) Miss JANET A. HOWARD Mr. and Mrs. HORACE HOWELLS (Ivy) The Honorable STENY H. HOYER Mr. and Mrs. JOHN E. HUNNICUTT (Catherine) Mr. AL HUNT and Ms. JUDY WOODRUFF The Honorable BONNIE MCELVEEN HUNTER and Mr. BYNUM M. HUNTER

I Mr. and Mrs. DAVID IGNATIUS (Eve) The Honorable and Mrs. PAUL R. IGNATIUS (Nancy) Mr. and Mrs. JEAN-LOUIS IMHOFF (Michele) The Honorable and Mrs. MARTIN INDYK (Gahl) Mr. JOHN PETERS IRELAN Ms. MAXINE ISAACS Mr. and Mrs. WALTER ISAACSON (Cathy) Mr. and Mrs. C. OLIVER ISELIN, III (Swannie) Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER ISHAM (Jennifer) Mrs. EUGENE ISTOMIN (Marta)

J Mrs. AARON G. JACKSON (Alexine) Mr. HUGH NEWELL JACOBSEN

PATRICKSTEELANDLEESATTERFIELD Steel was named CEO of Politico in 2017. Satterfield has held several high-level government positions including Deputy Chief of Protocol at the State Department. She is currently vice president and CEO of Meridian International Center. Their favorite cause is Sasha Bruce Youthwork, the only youth-specific homeless shelter in the District. WASHINGTON LIFE: What are your favorite holiday traditions? LEE SATTERFIELD: One of our favorites is New Year’s Eve at home with our kids and family friends. We cook a big dinner and ring in the New Year playing charades and drinking plenty of champagne. The following day we walk it off through Battery Kemble Park and along the old trolley tracks with neighborhood friends and dogs in tow. WL: What is the best party that you attended in the past year? LS: That’s easy. The 49th Annual Meridian Ball. It has become the place where Washington society, diplomats, business and government leaders leave their differences at the door and come together to celebrate global leadership and diplomacy.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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“Washington is still an amazing community with a sense of purpose.” LEESATTERFIELD

Mack and Donna McLarty photographed at their residence


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Mr. and Mrs. SIMON T. JACOBSEN (Ruth) Mr. and Mrs. ERNEST D. (ERNIE) JARVIS (Debbie) Mr. JOHN JEPPSON, III and Ms. WENDY BENCHEY Mr. and Mrs. FREEBORN GARRETSON JEWETT, JR. (Joan) Mr. and Mrs. JAMES A. JOHNSON (Heather) Admiral (U.S.N. Ret’d.) and Mrs. JAY L. JOHNSON (Sydney/Nini) Mr. ROBERT (ROBIN) JOHNSON Mr. and Mrs. EVAN JONES (Cindy) Mr. and Mrs. VERNON E. JORDAN (Ann) Mrs. J. HOWARD JOYNT, III (Carol)

K Mr. MICHAEL KAHN and Mr. CHARLES MITCHEM Mr. MICHAEL KAISER and Mr. JOHN ROBERTS Her Excellency the Ambassador of Jordan DINA KAWAR Mrs. ALAN I. KAY (Dianne) Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES KEHLER (Marni) Justice and Mrs. ANTHONY M. KENNEDY (Mary) Mrs. EDWARD M. KENNEDY (Victoria Reggie) Mr. JOSEPH KEUSCH and Ms. JAN NEUHARTH Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM J. KILBERG (Bobbie) Mr. and Mrs. MARK KIMSEY (Sarah) Mr. and Mrs. KNIGHT A. KIPLINGER (Ann) Mr. JAY KLUG and Ms. JAMIE HECHINGER Mr. and Mrs. STEVEN KNAPP (Diane) Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER KOCH (Susan) Mr. and Mrs. EDWARD KOCH (Doro Bush) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT KOGOD (Arlene) The Honorable TOM C. KOROLOGOS and the Honorable ANN DORE MCLAUGHLIN KOROLOGOS Mr. THOMAS KRAHENBUHL and Ms. DOROTHY M. KOSINSKI Mr. and Mrs. RAJ KUMAR (Maria Teresa) Dr. SACHIKO KUNO Mr. JARED C. KUSHNER and Ms. IVANKA TRUMP

L The Director of the International Monetary Fund Mrs. CHRISTINE LAGARDE The Honorable and Mrs. JAMES C. LANGDON, JR. (Sandy) Mr. and Mrs. CHISWELL DABNEY LANGHORNE, JR. (Barbara) Mr. and Mrs. ANTHONY LANIER (Isabelle) Mr. and Mrs. CLIMIS G. LASCARIS (Carol) Mr. W. DAVID LAWSON, IV

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The Honorable and Mrs. PAUL LAXALT (Carol) The Honorable and Mrs. PATRICK LEAHY (Marcelle) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT E. LEE, IV (Carew) Mr. and Mrs. DANIEL H. LEEDS (Sunita) Dr. and Mrs. LASALLE D. LEFFALL, JR. (Ruthie) Mr. LASALLE D. (DONNEY) LEFFALL, III Mr. and Mrs. JAMES LEHRER (Kate) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT LEHRMAN (Aimee) Mr. JAMES H. LEMON, JR. The Honorable and Mrs. THEODORE J. (TED) LEONSIS (Lynn) Mr. and Mrs. DANI LEVINAS (Mirella) Mr. DAVID C. LEVY and Ms. CAROLE L. FELD Mr. and Mrs. H. FINLAY LEWIS (Willee) Mr. THOMAS L. LILJENQUIST Mr. THOMAS L. LLOYD and Ms. ANNA CRISTINA (RICKIE) NICETA Mr. and Mrs. JAN M. LODAL (Elizabeth) Mr. and Mrs. SCOTT ALAN LOGAN (Lydia) Mrs. CHARLES PILLSBURY LORD (Gay) Mr. and Mrs. WINSTON BAO LORD (Stephanie) His Excellency the Ambassador of Denmark LARS GERT LOSE and Ms. ULLA RØNBERG Ms. ANNE MARIE LYNCH

M The Honorable JOHN D. MACOMBER Mr. and Mrs. VICTOR MADDUX (Michelle)) Mr. and Mrs. RAY MAHMOOD (Shaista) Mrs. CHRISTOPHER J. MAKINS (Wendy) The Honorable and Mrs. FREDERIC V. MALEK (Marlene) Mr. and Mrs. FREDERIC W. MALEK (Britlan) Ms. ANN WALKER MARCHANT The Honorable EDWARD J. MARKEY and Dr. SUSAN J. BLUMENTHAL Mr. and Mrs. DAVID S. MARRIOTT (Carrie)

Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD E. MARRIOTT (Nancy) Mr. and Mrs. J. WILLARD MARRIOTT, JR. (Donna Rae) Ms. JACQUELINE BADGER MARS Mrs. VIRGINIA CRETELLA MARS Mr. and Mrs ALEX MARSHALL (Amanda) The Honorable CAPRICIA P. MARSHALL and Dr. ROBERT MARSHALL Mr. and Mrs. JOHN J. MASON (JoAnn) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN MURDOCH MATHESON (Susan) Mrs. BONNIE BUCHANAN MATHESON Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES T. MATHESON (Julie) Mr. MALCOLM MATHESON, III Mr. CHARLES B. MATHIAS Mr. and Mrs. EDWARD J. MATHIAS (Dale) The Honorable DORIS MATSUI Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER MATTHEWS (Kathleen) Mr. ERNEST N. MAY, JR. The Honorable TIMOTHY J. MCBRIDE and The Honorable ANITA MCBRIDE Senator and Mrs. JOHN MCCAIN (Cindy) Mrs. JOHN S. MCCAIN, JR. (Roberta) His Eminence Cardinal THEODORE E. MCCARRICK The Honorable MITCH MCCONNELLand the Honorable ELAINE LAN CHAO, Secretary of Transportation Ms. DOROTHY MCGHEE The Honorable and Mrs. THOMAS F. (MACK) MCLARTY, III (Donna) Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM F. MCSWEENY (Dorothy) Mr. DAVID L. MERCER Mr. THEODORE A. MILES and Dr. CARLOTTA (BUFFY) MILES Dr. and Mrs. WENDELL G. MILES (Ann) Mr. and Mrs. JAMES P. MILLS, JR. (Deborah)

SNOWDENCLARKE Clarke is a third-generation Virginia horseman and head trainer at Orange Hill Farm in Middleburg, Va. WASHINGTON LIFE: How does life in the Virginia Hunt Country differ from other horsey places such as Saratoga Springs, N.Y. and Wellington, Fla.? SNOWDEN CLARKE: It is an equine-based community that attracts top-of-the-top world champion riders and horse breeders and the same families have been involved for generations.We also have more traditions and a lot more events, including Upperville and Warrenton horse shows, the Virginia Gold Cup and the Middleburg Spring Races. Most of them go back to the 1800s. We are very proud of our National Sporting Museum, the most complete horse information center in the country, and are very involved in outdoor- and conservation-oriented activities, including land easement and wetlands programs to preserve this wonderful heritage for future generations.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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“I love the annual Christmas parade in Middleburg on the first Saturday of December.” SNOWDENCLARKE

Robert Higdon photographed at an interior design client’s residence


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Mrs. CONSTANCE (CONNIE) MILSTEIN The Honorable and Mrs. NORMAN MINETTA (Danealia/Deni) The Honorable and Mrs. GEORGE J. MITCHELL (Heather) The Honorable and Mrs. STEVEN T. MNUCHIN (Louise Linton) The Honorable MARY V. MOCHARY The Honorable and Mrs. ANTHONY J. (TOBY) MOFFETT, JR. (Myra) His Excellency the Ambassador of Afghanistan and Mrs. HAMDULLAH MOHIB (Lael) Mr. and Mrs. JARL MOHN (Pamela) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT J. MONAHAN, JR. (Laurie) Mr. and Mrs. C. BRAXTON MONCURE (Deborah) Dr. ROBERT MONTGOMERY and Ms. DENYCE GRAVES Mr. and Mrs. MARK MOORE (Brenda) The Honorable CONSTANCE A. (CONNIE) MORELLA and Mr. DAVID MORELLA Mrs. WENDY BURDEN MORGAN Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT (ROB) MOSBACHER, JR. (Carolina Barco) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT MOSES (Patricia Kluge) Mr. ERIC L. MOTLEY Mr. ROGER H. MUDD Mrs. PAT MUNROE (Mary) Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER MURRAY (Carlotta) Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS J. MURRAY (Evelyn)

N Mr. and Mrs. VALI R. NASR (Darya) The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN D. NEGROPONTE (Diane Villiers) Mr. and Mrs. BRAD NIERENBERG (Callie) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT C. NELSON (Julia) Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM V. NEWLIN (Louisa) The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM T. NEWMAN, JR. (Sheila Johnson) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT C. NICHOLAS, III (Lynn) Dr. and Mrs. THOMAS P. NIGRA (Jane) The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM A. (BILL) NITZE (Ann) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT H. (BOB) NIXON (Sarah) Her Majesty Queen NOOR Mr. FRANCO NUSCHESE Mr. and Mrs. LAWRENCE C. NUSSDORF (Melanie)

O The Honorable and Mrs. BARACK OBAMA (Michelle) Ms. DIANA (DEEDY) OGDEN and Ms. MARGO L. CARPER

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Mr. and Mrs. CLARKE OHRSTROM (Molly) Mrs. GEORGE L. OHRSTROM, JR. (Jacqueline) Mrs. RICARD R. OHRSTROM (Allen) Her Excellency the Ambassador of Sweden KARIN OLOFSDOTTER and Mr. MARTIN BENGTSSON Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER OLSEN (Michelle) Ms. MAUREEN ORTH Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE P. O’SULLIVAN (Nancy Howar)

P Her Imperial Majesty FARAH PAHLAVI His Imperial Highness Prince REZA PAHLAVI and Her Imperial Highness Princess YASMINE PAHLAVI Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM CUSHING PALEY (Alison) His Excellency the Ambassador of Peru and Mrs. CARLOS PARJA (Consuelo) The Honorable and Mrs. CHARLES S. PASHAYAN (Sheila) Mr. and Mrs. SAM PATTEN (Laura) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN C. PATY, III (Alma) Mr. and Mrs. MALCOLM E. (MIKE) PEABODY (Pamela) Mr. and Mrs. PAYSON R. PEABODY (Karin) Mr. and Mrs. HAVEN N. B. PELL (Mina) The Honorable NANCY PELOSI and Mr. PAUL PELOSI Mr. MARK PENN and Ms. NANCY JACOBSON Mrs. CHARLES H. PERCY (Loraine) Mr. LUCIAN PERKINS and Ms. SARAH TANGUY

Mr. and Mrs. DAVID PERLIN (Skye Raiser) Mr. JOSEPH G. PERPICH and Ms. CATHY SULZBERGER Mrs. LORI PETERS LAUTHIER Mr. and Mrs. MILTON V. PETERSON (Carolyn) Ms. LAUREN PETERSON Dr. and Mrs. MICHAEL J. PETITE (Jeannette) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN E. PFLIEGER (Donna) The Honorable THOMAS R. PICKERING Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL P. PILLSBURY (Susan) Mr. and Mrs. PHILIP W. PILLSBURY, JR. (Nina) Mr. and Mrs. WALTER H. PINCUS (Ann) Mrs. SALLY ENGELHARD PINGREE The Honorable CHELLIE PINGREE and Mr. DONALD SUSSMAN Mr. BILL PLANTE and Ms. ROBIN SMITH Mr. and Mrs. JOHN D. PODESTA (Mary) Mr. ANTHONY T. (TONY) PODESTA Mr. and Mrs. JOHN J. POHANKA (Lynn) Mr. and Mrs. CURTIS POLK (Amanda) Mrs. ABE POLLIN (Irene) Mr. and Mrs. HERMAN PORTEN (Regina) The Honorable and Mrs. COLIN L. POWELL (Alma) The Honorable DINA HABIB POWELL and Mr. RICHARD C. POWELL Mr. and Mrs. EARL A. (RUSTY) POWELL, III (Nancy) Lady PREVIN (Heather) Miss JUDY LYNN PRINCE Mr. and Mrs. FREDERICK H. PRINCE (Diana)

ANDREAHAILEYANDDAVIDWILLIAMSON A rare actively political bipartisan couple in the nation’s capital [Andrea, a Democrat, worked for Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy, Sen. Ted Kennedy, and is a veteran of over 40 campaigns; David, a Republican, was most recently a senior health care analyst for The Motley Fool], they recently co-founded the Civic Engagement Fund. WASHINGTON LIFE: What is the best party that you attended in the past year? DAVID WILLIAMSON: The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture first anniversary party was a special celebration and truly memorable evening. We also loved the annual NARAL Gala at the Hamilton. WASHINGTON LIFE: What is your favorite philanthropic cause and why? ANDREA HAILEY: As founders, our favorite philanthropic cause is the Civic Engagement Fund.We support a new generation of civic change makers by providing fiscal sponsorship, capacity building, and grants to accelerate their vision and collaboratively scale.The Fund’s growing community of over a dozen grassroots groups have over 4 million members, trained thousands of organizers, coached hundreds of candidates, engaged tens of thousands of citizens at town halls, and brought incredible new tech resources to the civic space. From gun violence prevention to voting rights to empowering women from diverse backgrounds to run for office, we are just getting started.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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“The best event is one where you leave feeling connected to people, a greater cause, a new idea.” ANDREAHAILEY


T H E WA S H I N G T O N L I F E 2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST

Dr. and Mrs. JEROLD J. PRINCIPATO (Marjorie) Mr. JOHN PYLES and Ms. BARBARA HARRISON Mrs. EBEN PYNE (Nancy)

Q Mr. and Mrs. WHAYNE S. QUIN (Ursula) Mrs. J. EUGENE QUINN (Irene/”Margy”) The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN M. (JACK) QUINN (Susanna) Ms. SALLY QUINN Mr. THOMAS H. QUINN

R The Honorable MARY (MOLLY) RAISER Mr. and Mrs. MITCHELL (MITCH) RALES (Emily) Mr. and Mrs. W. RUSSELL RAMSEY (Norma) Mr. FRANK B. RANDOLPH Mrs. DONALD RAPPAPORT (Susan) The Honorable and Mrs. JAMIN B. (JAMIE) RASKIN (Sarah Bloom) Mrs. ELIZABETH B. (BETSEY) REA Mr. and Mrs. GANT REDMON (Frances) Mr. and Mrs. SAMUEL S. REED (Juliet) Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS A. REED (Vanessa) Ms. DIANE REHM and the Reverend Dr. B. JOHN HAGEDORN, JR. Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES H. (CHIP) REID, JR. (Nina Black) Mr. CHRISTOPHER REITER Mr. and Mrs. RANDOLPH W. RENCHARD (Lila) His Excellency the Ambassador of Panama and Mrs. EMANUEL REVILLA (Luciana) Mr. JAMES V. REYES Mr. and Mrs. R. ROLAND REYNOLDS (Diana) Mr. and Mrs. WAYNE REYNOLDS (Catherine) Ms. CARY RIDDER Mrs. WALTER T. RIDDER (Marie) The Honorable and Mrs. THOMAS J. RIDGE (Michele) Mrs. C. JACKSON RITCHIE, JR. (Jane) The Honorable and Mrs. CHARLES S. (CHUCK) ROBB (Lynda) The Chief Justice of the United States and Mrs. JOHN G. ROBERTS (Jane) Ms. ROXANNE ROBERTS Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN ROBERTS (Cokie) The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN D. (JAY) ROCKEFELLER, IV (Sharon) The Honorable and Mrs. FREDERICK B. ROONEY (Evelyn) Mr. TIMOTHY C. ROONEY and Ms. DANA DEMANGE The Honorable SELWA S.

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(LUCKY) ROOSEVELT Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT M. ROSENTHAL (Marion) The Honorable JONATHAN C. ROSE and The Honorable SUSAN PORTER ROSE The Honorable and Mrs. WILBUR L. ROSS, JR. (Hilary Geary) Mr. and Mrs. BRUCE C. ROSS-LARSON (Shelly) Ms. RYNTHIA M. ROST Mrs. RANDOLPH D. ROUSE (Michelle) The Honorable and Mrs. EDWARD RANDALL (ED) ROYCE (Marie) Mr. and Mrs. DAVID M. RUBENSTEIN (Alice) Mr. and Mrs. MILES RUBIN (Nancy) Mrs. OTTO J. RUESCH (Jeanne) Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS D. RUTHERFOORD, JR. (Jean) The Honorable and Mrs. FREDERICK J. RYAN, JR. (Genevieve/”Genny”) The Speaker of the House of Representatives and Mrs. PAUL RYAN (Janna) Mr. CHASE W. RYND

S Mr. and Mrs. JOHN SAFER (Joy) Miss PATRICIA BENNETT SAGON Mr. and Mrs. KYLE SAMPERTON (Kim) Mr. and Mrs. ROGER SANT (Victoria/Vicki) Mr. CHRISTOPHER S. SARGENT Mr. and Mrs. JOHN A. SARGENT (Susan) Mr. and Mrs. ARTURO SARUKHAN (Veronica Valencia) His Excellency the Ambassador of Japan and Mrs. KENICHIRO SASAE (Nobuko) Mr. and Mrs. B. FRANCIS SAUL, II (Tricia) Mrs. ANTONIN SCALIA (Maureen) Mr. and Mrs. ARLIE SCHARDT (Bonnie Nelson Schwartz) Mr. and Mrs. FRED SCHAUFELD (Karen) Mr. and Mrs. BOB SCHIEFFER (Patricia) Mr. and Mrs. NASH WHITNEY SCHOTT (Aniko Gaal Schott) The Honorable CAROL L. SCHWARTZ Ms. GAIL SCOTT The Honorable BRENT SCOWCROFT His Imperial Highness Prince ERMIAS SAHLE-SELASSIE HAILE SELASSIE and Her Highness Princess SABA KEBEDE The Honorable PETER A. SELFRIDGE and Ms. PARITA SHAH The Honorable and Mrs. IVAN SELIN (Nina) The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM S. SESSIONS (Alice) Mr. VICTOR SHARGAI and Mr. CRAIG PASCAL Mr. PAUL SHERRILL Ms. DONNA HAMILTON SHOR

Mr. and Mrs. MARK SHRIVER (Jeanne) Mr.TIMOTHY SHRIVER and Ms. LINDA POTTER Mr. and Mrs. SIMON SIDAMONERISTOFF (Nancy) Mrs. DONALD SIGMUND (Deborah ) Mr. JONATHAN SILVER and Ms. MELISSA MOSS The Honorable and Mrs. LEONARD L. SILVERSTEIN (Elaine) Mr. JAMAL SIMMONS and Ms. JEWEL JAMES The Honorable DAVID J. SKORTON, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, and Ms. ROBIN DAVISSON Mr. and Mrs. ALBERT H. SMALL (Shirley) Mr. and Mrs. DOUGLAS SMITH (Gabriella) Ms. JAN SMITH Ms. MOLLY SMITH Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT BLAND (BOB) SMITH, JR. (Niente) Mrs. ROBERT H. SMITH (Clarice) Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN SMITH (Sally Bedell Smith) The Honorable and Mrs. MARION H. (JOE) SMOAK (Mary Frances) Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD (DICK) SNOWDON, III (Catharine) Mr. and Mrs. DANIEL SNYDER (Tanya) Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM C. SONNEBORN (Karen) Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL R. SONNENREICH (Linda) Mr. GENE SPERLING and Ms. ALISON ABNER Mr. and Mrs. EARL W. STAFFORD, SR. (Amanda) Mr. and Mrs. DAVID J. STEEL (Susan Watters) Mr. and Mrs. PATRICK STEEL (Lee Satterfield) Mr. T. GARRICK STEELE Mr. and Mrs. ANDREW STEPHEN (Katherine Field) Mr. and Mrs. JAMES MORGAN (JAMIE) STERLING (Lisa) Mrs. ISAAC STERN (Linda) Mr. and Mrs. EDWARD R. (TED) STETTINIUS (Sarah) Mr. and Mrs. JOSEPH STETTINIUS, JR. (Regina) Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE C. STEVENS, JR. (Liz) Mrs. THEODORE F. STEVENS (Catherine) The Honorable ANN STOCK and Mr. STUART C. STOCK Mrs. AUCHINCLOSS STRAIGHT (Nina) Mrs. FRANKLIN L. STROUD (Kandy) Ms. JOANNA STURM Mr. A. MICHAEL SULLIVAN, JR. Mr.. KEVIN SULLIVAN and Ms. MARY JORDAN The Honorable and Mrs. JAMES WADSWORTH SYMINGTON (Sylvia

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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T The Honorable and Mrs. STROBE TALBOTT (Barbara) Mrs. W. WAVERLY TAYLOR (Edmée) Mr. RILEY K. TEMPLE Mrs. DANIEL J. TERRA (Judith) Mr. and Mrs. EVAN THOMAS (Oscie) Mr. and Mrs. PHILIP THOMAS (Patti) Mr. D. DODGE THOMPSON Mr. RICHARD E. THOMPSON Mr. and Mrs. MAURICE B. TOBIN (Joan) Mr. and Mrs. VLADIMIR S. TOLSTOYMILOSLAVSKY (Suzanne) Mrs. SAMI E. TOTAH (Annie) The Honorable KATHLEEN KENNEDY TOWNSEND Mrs. LEWIS R. TOWNSEND (Ann Van Devanter) Mr. GEOFFREY O. TRACY and Ms. NORAH O’DONNELL Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL TRAGER (Mariella) Mr. and Mrs. C. BOWDOIN TRAIN (Georgina) The President of the United States and Mrs. DONALD J. TRUMP (Melania)

U The Honorable and Mrs. TOM UDALL (Jill Cooper)

V Mrs. JACK J. VALENTI (Mary Margaret) Mr. JAMES F. VALENTINE and Ms. KATHY KEMPER Mr. CHRISTOPHER T. (CHRIS) VAN ROIJEN Mr. and Mrs. PETER P. VAN ROIJEN (Beatrice) His Excellency the Ambassador of Italy ARMANDO VARICCHIO and Mrs. MICAELA BARBAGALLO The Honorable PHILIP L. VERVEER and the Honorable MELANNE VERVEER The Honorable RICHARD N. VIETS Mr. GEORGE VRADENBURG, III

W Mr. WILLIAM L. WALDE and Dr. MARY FRANCES SMOAK Mr. ADAM WALDMAN and Dr. BARBARA STURM WALDMAN Mr. and Mrs. MALLORY WALKER (Diana) Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM. M. (WILLY) WALKER (Sheila) Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER WALLACE (Lorraine) Ms. CHRISTINE WARNKE The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN W. WARNER (Jeanne Vander Myde) Ms. MARGARET G. WARNER

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

The Honorable and Mrs. MARK R. WARNER (Lisa Collis) Miss VIRGINIA (OZZIE) WARNER Mrs. C. LANGHORNE WASHBURN (Judith) Mr. GEORGE T. WEBB The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM H. WEBSTER (Lynda) The Honorable EDWARD L. WEIDENFELD and The Honorable SHEILA RABB WEIDENFELD Mrs. ERIC W. WEINMANN (Mary) Mr. and Mrs. J. ROBINSON WEST (Eileen Shields-West) The Honorable and Mrs. TOGD. WEST, JR. (Gail) Ms. KATHARINE WEYMOUTH Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE Y. WHEELER, III (Frances) The Honorable and Mrs. THOMAS WHEELER (Carol) Mr. and Mrs. DAVID WHITE (Kimball Stroud) The Honorable and Mrs. SHELDON WHITEHOUSE (Sandra) Mr. DAVID WILLIAMSON and Ms. ANDREA HAILEY Mr. and Mrs. PAUL WILLIAMS (Catherine) Mr. and Mrs. WESLEY S. WILLIAMS, JR. (Karen) Mr. and Mrs. GAVIN WILSON (Odile) Mrs. CURTIN WINSOR, III (Deborah) Mr. ELLIS WISNER Mr. GRAHAM WISNER and Ms. RANIA HANANO WISNER His Excellency the Ambassador of Germany PETER WITTIG and Ms. HUBERTA von VOSS-WITTIG The Honorable NEAL S. WOLIN and Ms. NICOLE ELKON Mr. and Mrs. KENNETH R. WOODCOCK (Dorothy) Mr. ROBERT (BOB) WOODWARD and Ms. ELSA WALSH Mr. JAMES R. WOODYARD Mrs. MICHAEL WOYEVODSKY (Xenia) His Eminence Cardinal DONALD W. WUERL Mrs. CATE MAGENNIS WYATT

Y Mr. and Mrs. ANGUS YATES (Elizabeth/Sissy)

Z Ms. FRANCESCA ZAMBELLO and Ms. FAITH GAY Mr. and Mrs. JEFFREY ZELL (Lauri) Mr. PAUL ZEVNIK and Ms. GINNY GRENHAM Mr. and Mrs. JEFFREY D. ZIENTS (Mary) Mrs. WARREN ZIMMERMANN (Corinne)

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IN MEMORIAM Charles L. (Charlie) Bartle* Alma Brown William L. Bryant The Honorable

Zbigniew Brzezinski Dorothy Langdon (Dolly) Chapin The Honorable

William T. (Bill) Coleman Roma Crocker Jennie Darlington Carolyn Deaver Dina Merrill Hartley Patricia E. Howar Polly Kra+ Ada H. Linowes Stacey B. Lloyd, III Gail Matheson The Honorable

Robert H. (Bob) Michel Mandell J. (Mandy) Ourisman Raymond L. Poston, Jr. Elizabeth Powell C. Jackson Ritchie, Jr. Randolph D. (Randy) Rouse Maurice B. (Maury) Tobin Aileen Bowdoin Train Trish Vradenburg

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LIFESTYLES

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PHOTOGRAPHYTONYPOWELL|WWW TONY-POWELL COM STYLISTJOELLEFIRZLI|THEARTISTAGENCY MAKEUPJOCELYN‘JOSSY’CHIAGLAMSQUAD HAIRMIAARTIS GLAMSQUAD ACTOR/MODELSBRITNEYCOLEMAN=BRIDGETRILEY= HEIDIKERSHAWQUICK=JAYADRIELANDTIMROGAN EDITORIALDIRECTIONCATHERINETRIFILETTI

PHOTOGRAPHEDATARENASTAGE|THSTSW WWWARENASTAGEORG “THEPAJAMAGAME”PLAYSTHROUGHDECEMBER


PREVIOUS PAGE: On Britney: D/ELEVEN Rabbit schollar ($80) d/eleven, 11 District Square, SW, (202) 554-0915. COSABELLA Pret-a-porter bralette ($69); IN BLOOM BY JONQUIL 2 piece set silk pant ($68); MAJORICA pearls ($395) Bloomingdales, 8100 Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. (703) 556-4600. On Tim: POLO Ralph Lauren pants ($38); POLO Ralph Lauren plaid robe ($65) Bloomingdales, 8100 Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. (703) 556-4600. THIS PAGE: ALL SAINTS Elders sweatpants ($160); ALLSAINTS Brace hoody ($90) Bloomingdales, 8100 Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. (703) 556-4600.


On Bridget: JONQUIL white robe ($128) Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, Md. (301) 657-9000. HUE fishnet tights ($15); KENDALL AND KYLIE velvet bodysuit ($98); AQUA necklace ($34) Bloomingdales, 8100 Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. (703) 556-4600. On Heidi: JONQUIL ivory robe ($138) Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, Md. (301) 657-9000. COSABELLA thong ($24); COSABELLA bra ($52); GORJANNA tassel necklace ($110) Bloomingdales, 8100 Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. (703) 556-4600.


HUGO BOSS Diganira dress and Cipeila jacket; Hugo Boss CityCenterDC 1054 Palmer Alley NWWashington, D.C 20001 (202) 408-9845; STUART WEITZMAN nudist song patent heels ($398) Bloomingdales 5300 Western Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (240) 744-3700. TIFFANY & CO. Schlumberger multiplication earrings in 18k yellow gold with diamonds ($17,500) . Tiffany & Co, 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815 (301) 657-8777.

On Jay: ALL SAINTS Elders sweatpants ($160)Bloomingdales, 8100 Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. (703) 556-4600. On Bridget: WACOAL lace underwear ($27); HUE socks ($8) Bloomingdales, 8100 Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. (703) 556-4600. WYLIE GREY Pink Floyd Tshirt ($160); ZYNNI Cashmere pants ($410); LAURIE & JOE Black pom pom necklaces ($50 each) d/eleven, 11 District Square, SW, (202) 554-0915.


NATORI floral robe ($180); FLORA NIKROOZ 2 piece set ($112) Bloomingdales, 8100 Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. (703) 556-4600. VANINA Wilie gold tassel choker ($346); IRO PARIS Bootroky in grey ($765); JOELLE KHARRAT spiral and bubbles ring ($65); JOELLE KHARRAT double twisted spiral ring ($65); JOELLE KHARRAT Gypsy large flexible bracelet ($220); JOELLE KHARRAT Arrow large flexible bracelet ($220) d/eleven, 11 District Square, SW, (202) 554-0915. LA PERLA lace bra ($155) Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, Md. (301) 657-9000.

N / NICHOLAS dress ($529), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (301) 6522250; HALSTON HERITAGE clutch ($345) and SJP Sarah Jessica Parker pumps ($560), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; TIFFANY & CO. Enchant scroll earrings platinum withHOFFMAN diamonds patterned ($11,000), ON in EMMA: MARA Tiffany & Co., Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wismonokini ($253) and KATE SPADE Cameron consin Ave,bag Chevy Chase, MD 20815, Street Blakely ($378) Bloomingdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (301) 657-8777; CARTIER ParisCorner NouTysons Corner Center, 8100 Tysons velleMcLean, Vague Va., Delicate white gold and Center, 703-556-4600. diamond necklace ($16,300) and LOVE in white gold, pave diamonds ON bracelet ERIC: MORGENTHAL FREDERICS and ceranic ($43,700), Cartier, 5471B Hustler hand-crafted Japanese titanium Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase,CityMD sunglasses ($495), Morgenthal Fredrics, 20815, (301) 654-5858 CenterDC, 941 H St. NW, 202-204-3393.


LIFESTYLES | TRENDREPORT

PRADA Feather-embellished silk blouse ($2,050); saksfifthavenue.com

LOEWE Draped satin dress ($2,450); loewe.com ETRO Oriental coat ($1,757); etro.com

'LMRE4EXXIVRW

Chinoiserie motifs and lots of satin. BY ERICA MOODY

FOR RESTLESS SLEEPERS Forest and bird print kimono dress ($1,299); farfetch.com

BRENT NEALE Small door pendant necklace with floral archway ($3,650); modaoperandi.com SCOTCH & SODA Printed colorblock pants ($148); bloomingdales.com

GIANVITTO ROSSI Dragon mule ($895); gianvittorossi.com

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OF RARE ORIGIN Pagoda earrings ($1,075); neimanmarcus.com

GUCCI Ophidia embroidered medium shoulder bag ($2,600); gucci.com

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Welcome Ury & Associates We are proud to announce that Ury & Associates has combined with Toka Salon & Day Spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Georgetown location. We believe that the joining of these two extraordinary salons with highly complementary industry strengths will position us to provide a broader set of services to our clients. Toka Welcomes Ury & Associates

Georgetown Court 3251 Prospect Street, NW Suite #19, 2nd floor Washington, DC 20007 202.333.5133

Madison Avenue 768 Madison Avenue 2nd floor, between 65th & 66th New York, NY 10065 212.517.5133

Great Falls 9867 Georgetown Pike Great Falls, VA 22066 703.759.5700

tokasalon.com

Cameron Station 4907 Brenman Park Drive Alexandria, VA 22304 703.370.5133


LIFESTYLES | HOLIDAYGIFTGUIDE

``746)%(',))6`` Last minute gi+s and stocking stuffers for everyone on your list. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

HEIFER DARK CHOCOLATE SEA SALT CARAMELS ($25), heifer.org. These single- and sustainably-sourced, premium dark chocolates support small-scale Ecuadorian farmers. “Heifer works to sustainably improve the quality of life for small-scale chocolate farmers and their families by providing training and resources so families can increase the production of high-quality products and increase their prices.” WARBY PARKER Hadley Sunglasses ($145), 1924 8th St. NW; 202-618-5606 “We work with a handful of partners worldwide to ensure that for every pair of glasses sold, a pair is distributed to someone in need.”

UNICEF KID POWER Orange Bitters Cologne ($39.99), unicefkidpower.com “The first Wearable-for-Good®, band, which empowers kids to help other children suffering from malnutrition ... As kids get active, they earn points for their activity to unlock lifesaving Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food Packets that UNICEF delivers to severely malnourished children around the world. The more kids move, the more points they earn and the more lives they save.”

PAY IT FORWARD +MJXWXLEXKMZI FEGOXS XLSWIMRRIIH

LE CREUSET (RED) Special Edition Collection Oval Dutch Oven ($285), lecreuset.com “10 percent of the suggested retail price from every item in the (Le Creuset) RED Special Edition Collection will go to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS.”

ALEX AND ANI Daisy Charm ($38), alexandani.com “20 percent of the purchase price will be donated to UNICEF, an organization that helps children affected by conflict and natural disaster by providing life-saving medicine, food, clean water, sanitation and education in emergency situations.

TOMS Melange Del Rey Sneakers ($79.95), toms.com TOMS Shoes operates under the One for One® concept: for every pair purchased, the company gives a new pair of shoes to a child in need.

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WAKAWAKA Power + Solar powered charger and flashlight ($49.99), us.waka-waka.com With WakaWaka, everyone is able to access the power of the sun using solar powered technology. A portion of each purchase goes toward The WakaWaka Foundation, which donates products for emergency aid and offers WakaWakas to developing areas at a subsidized price or in exchange for community work.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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JOS. A. MAGNUS & CO. Straight Bourbon ($92), 2052 West Virginia Ave. NE; 202-450-3518

BONBON BRASIL Brigadeiros, Brazilian truffles ($45/ box of 18), Union Market; 301-802-7991 NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART The “Capital Houses” coffee table book ($75), National Gallery of Art gift shop, 6th and Constitution Ave. NW

LABYRINTH GAMES & PUZZLES D.C. Metro Puzzle ($16), 645 Pennsylvania Ave. SE; 202-544-1059

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES TINY JEWEL BOX Exclusive Tiny Jewel Box Decoupage 4 x 6 inch box featuring the White House with a Washington, D.C. map on the inside lid (can be personalized) ($225), 1155 Connecticut Ave NW; 202-393-2747

SALT & SUNDRY Abe Lincoln flask ($34), Salt & Sundry, 1625 14th St. NW; 202-621-6647

THE WHITE HOUSE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION Mug ($24.95), shop. WhiteHouseHistory.org

DON CICCIO & FIGLI Limoncello ($33.99), Don Ciccio & Figli, 6031 Kansas Ave. NW; 202-957-7792

GROOMING LOUNGE Our Best Smeller Body Wash, Super Powder and Greatest Pits Deodorant ($45), Grooming Lounge, 1745 L St. NW; 202-466-8900

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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QUEEN BEE DESIGNS Large Coral Statement Necklace ($160), 3690 King St., Bradlee Shopping Center, Alexandria,Va.

JOSÉ ANDRÉS FOODS Galician Clams ($67.95), tienda.com

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LIFESTYLES | HOLIDAYGIFTGUIDE CORAVIN Wine Opener ($199.95),Williams Sonoma, 4824 Bethesda Ave. Bethesda, Md.; 301-718-3071

LACOSTE Classic Pique Robe ($95), Macy’s 996 I St. NW; 202-789-4239 JUNIPER BOOKS Fall in Love collection ($150), juniperbooks.com

AXIOS Cabernet Sauvignon 2009 (Napa Valley) ($135), axioswine.com

MINNIE ROSE Cashmere Pom Slippers ($158), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, Md.; 202-657-9000

NEST Learning Thermostat ($249), nest.com

MICHAEL KORS x Fujifilm Instax® Camera ($149), 3105 M St NW; 202-342-3103

SHINOLA Canfield over-ear headphones ($595), Shinola, 631 14th St. NW; 202-470-0200

STAY ON THE COUCH 36 EXPLORE THE WORLD

JO MALONE Green Almond & Redcurrant candle ($205), Jo Malone CityCenterDC, 996 I St. NW; 202-789-4239

SOFIA CASHMERE Plane Intarsia Cashmere Travel Set ($395), Neiman Marcus, 5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW; 202-966-9700 W & P DESIGN The Carry On Cocktail Kit ($24), Anthropologie, 322 M St. NW; 202-337-1363

TUMI Short Trip Packing Case ($1,195),Tumi CityCenterDC, 996 I St. NW; 202-789-4239

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WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

GREENBRIER GIFT SHOP Carleton Varney Brazilliance iPhone 7 Dorothy Draper phone case ($48), shop.greenbrier.com

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TIFFANY & CO. Schlumberger® Fleurage necklace in platinum and 18k gold with diamonds ($625,000), 8045 Leesburg Pike,Vienna,Va. 703-893-7700

DJI Mavic Pro Drone ($999), dji.com

LILJENQUIST & BECKSTEAD Dazzling Sapphire & Diamond Earrings 14.31 Carats of Sapphires 3.72 Carats of Pear Shaped & Brilliant Diamonds (by appointment), Liljenquist & Beckstead; Shops at Fairfax Square, 8075 Leesburg Pike, Vienna,Va., 703-749-1200

KHAVYAR Beluga Siberian Caviar ($264 for 30 G), khavyar.com

ASSOULINE “The Impossible Collection Of Design” ($845), assouline.com

INGLOT Portable Mirror ($210), INGLOT, 7868 Tysons Corner Center,Tysons,Va.

PAUL STUART Stuart Velvet Smoking Jacket ($995),Paul Stuart CityCenterDC, 906 I St. NW; 202-754-8866

SPOIL YOURSELF ROTTEN NIKOS KOULIS Nikos Koulis 18k white gold and black enamel Oui Hoop Earrings ($7,725),Tiny Jewel Box, 1155 Connecticut Ave NW; 202-393-2747 MOËT & CHANDON MCIII Prestige Cuvee ($450), moet.com

MIELE Compact C2 Electro+ vacuum ($599), Fairfax Square, 8065 Leesburg Pike, Ste. 110 ,Vienna,Va.; 800-843-7231 ext. 7719 LA MER The Restorative Collection ($475), Sherber + Rad, 1101 15th St. NW; 202-683-9271

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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lifestyles | book roundup

Winter Reading Roundup Cozy up with recent releases, from political tell-alls to fictional escapes. By Erica Moody

VANITY FAIR DIARIES By Tina Brown The drama and triumphs of resurrecting a failing “Vanity Fair” in the 1980s are described in delicious detail by longtime editor in chief Tina Brown. (Henry Holt & Co.) THE WARBIRD By Tara Copp Military Times’ Pentagon bureau chief Tara Copp’s book details her grandfather and grand uncle’s experiences during World War II as well as her own experiences in Iraq. She journeys to recover the details of her grandfather’s war story while revealing her own story of life in a warzone. (Squadron Books

THE WEDDING DATE By Jasmine Guillory Two high-powered young professionals find themselves as each other’s wedding dates after being stuck on an elevator together. The first novel by Stanford Law grad Guillory is hilarious, heartfelt and romantic. (Berkley) STICKY FINGERS By Joe Hagan Rolling Stone founder Jean Wenner’s biography is an indepth and at times brutally honest portrait of the man who revolutionized music journalism. (Alfred A. Knopf)

fresh complaint By Jeffrey Eugenides Pulitzer-Pr ize-winning author Jeffrey Eugenides’ first collection of short stories is a treat. Two new tales join older ones from 1989 on (including one that informed his novel “Middlesex”) that treat themes of greed, obsession and money. (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

UNCOMMON TYPE By Tom Hanks Is there anything Tom Hanks can’t do? It doesn’t seem so. His debut book of short stories reveals the actor’s talents on the page, with original, humorous, intelligent tales in an easy-toread style. Vintage typewriters make an appearance throughout and connect the stories. (Knopf Canada)

THE NAUGHTY NINETIES By David Friend The 1990s marked the dawn of reality TV, when scandal was everywhere and the “tabloidization of pop culture” was just beginning. Vanity Fair writer David Friend’s cultural study of the decade includes first-person accounts from scandalous key players including Monica Lewinsky and the inventor of Viagra. (Hachette Book Group)

LEONARDO DA VINCI By Walter Isaacson This 600-plus page, #1 New York Times bestseller has been hailed as a masterpiece. You’ll learn everything you ever wanted to know about one of the most famous and influential artists of all time written by one of the country’s most celebrated biographers. The secret behind Mona Lisa’s smile remains unsolved. (Simon & Schuster)

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the leavers By Lisa Ko Lisa Ko’s debut novel received the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction and was a finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction. She tackles both the immigrant and the adoptee experience in alternating narratives of an undocumented Chinese woman and her American-born son. (Algonquin) no time to spare By Ursula K. Le Guin Science fiction heavyweight Ur sula Le Guin shares wisdom on topics ranging from aging, literature and the state of the nation in her new collection of essays. It’s like reading the best of her personal blog. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) HIDDENSEE By Gregory Maguire The bestselling author of “Wicked” and “After Alice” has penned an enchanting tale to get you in the holiday spirit. Maguire blends the origin legend of the famous Nutcracker with Drosselmeier, the curious toymaker who carves him to bring the story to life. (William Morrow) THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF GUCCI MANE By Gucci Mane and Neil Martinez-Belkin Gucci Mane, the prolific hip-hop artist from rural Alabama tells the compelling story of his radical transformation from incarcerated drug dealer to rap superstar. His sense of humor keeps it from becoming overly earnest. (Simon & Schuster)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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2017

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Political picks LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE By Celeste Ng A picture perfect family in the progressive suburban neighborhood of Shaker Heights, Cleveland begins to crumble when a bohemian mother and daughter move into their guest house. Questions of class, conformity and the American Dream are front and center in this thrilling read. (Penguin Press) the girl of the lake By Bill Roorbach These nine stories are imaginative, funny and filled with unforgettable characters, including a tech genius out to avenge his cheating wife, three sisters fighting over the same man and a couple whose relationship comes to a head on a hiking trip. (Workman Publishing) THE FOUR TENDENCIES By Gretchen Rubin We are all looking to be more productive and creative, aren’t we? Gretchen Rubin aims to facilitate this in her self-help book, “The Four Tendencies.” More than one million people have taken her personality quiz, which fits people into four categories, or “tendencies”: Upholders, Questioners, Obligers and Rebels. (Harmony) the chilbury ladies’ choir By Jennifer Ryan District-based author Jennifer Ryan’s debut novel follows a group of women living through World War II in the village of Chilbury, England in 1940. This simultaneously funny and heartwrenching read is told in the form of diaries and letters from the point of view of the various women characters. (Crown) THE BETTENCOURT AFFAIR By Tom Sancton Former “Time” Paris bureau chief Tom Sancton takes on the outrageous life story of

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L’Oreal heiress Lillian Bettencourt, who was the richest woman in the world. Bettencourt’s daughter sued her mother’s much-younger male friend for exploitation of weakness. This well-researched book offers a peek inside the French judicial system and the private lives of a scandal-ridden family. (Dutton) IMPROVEMENT By Joan Silber Silber’s concise and lyrical writing is at its best in her latest novel, “Improvement.” Her story of a young single mother in New York and her relationship with her eccentric aunt demonstrates how seemingly small decisions can have unexpected consequences. (Counterpoint Press) my absolute darling By Gabriel Tallent Stephen King has called Gabriel Tallent’s debut novel “a masterpiece” and others are following suit. Told from the perspective of an abused teenage girl,Tallent never uses her suffering as a plot point or to reduce her to a stereotype. The result is an original and multi-faceted character study. (Hachette Books) sing, unburied, sing By Jesmyn Ward A family in rural Mississippi takes a road trip to pick up their father from a state penitentiary in Jesmyn Ward’s award-winning third novel that brings to mind Faulkner’s “As I Lay Dying.” It’s an intense and rewarding exploration of family — what bonds us and what tears us apart. (Scribner) COMING TO MY SENSES By Alice Waters Self-described “counterculture cook” Alice Waters is known for her activism as much as her food. Set against the backdrop of 1960s San Francisco, her memoir traces how she “came to her senses” by deciding to forge her own path in the culinary world with a focus on organic food. (Penguin Random House)

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obama: an intimate portrait By Pete Souza Relive eight years of Barack Obama’s historic presidency with White House photographer Pete Souza’s official book on the Obama years. The heartwarming and tearjerker pics are all there: Obama holding adorable babies, dancing with Michelle at inaugural balls and deep in thought conducting business in the Oval. (Little, Brown & Company) PROMISE ME, DAD By Joe Biden Former Vice President Joe Biden is known for wearing his heart on his sleeve, and “Uncle Joe” exposes his vulnerability in a powerful new memoir. In 2013, his son Beau was diagnosed with a brain tumor and died within the year. Biden takes us inside this unprecedented period in his life, from grieving his son to finding renewed purpose in his work. (Flatiron Books) BOBBY KENNEDY By Chris Matthews MSNBC host Chris Matthews’ eighth book is an extensive look at the lesser known Kennedy brother. Matthews illuminates moments in Robert Kennedy’s life that had a lasting impact on American politics, demonstrating how the family underdog was behind JFK’s successes. (Simon & Schuster) HACKS By Donna Brazile For those still reeling over Hillary Clinton’s surprise loss to Donald Trump, there’s a new book that might provide some answers. Democratic operative Donna Brazile’s controversial memoir suggests that the DNC had indeed rigged state primary elections to swing in Hillary’s favor. Whether you believe it or not, it’s a juicy read. (Hachette Books) LOSING AN ENEMY By Trita Parsi This one’s for the foreign policy wonk on your list. Former Obama advisor Trita Parsi has penned the “definitive book on the historic nuclear deal with Iran.” (Yale University Press) 65


LIFESTYLES

|ARTSPOTLIGHT

THE ASYLUM ARTIST

From war-ravaged Cambodia to the White House, the artist who never stopped painting

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“Pakan Penn … A Lifetime in Motion” runs through Dec. 24, by appointment only at Pakan Penn Gallery in Arlington. www.pakanpenn.com.

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A M A N D A B Y P H O T O P E N N ; P A K A N B Y O B A M A B A R A C K P R E S I D E N T

diplomat arranged for the teenager’s safe transport to Bangkok, filling out the paperwork that granted him political asylum and eventually citizenship in the United States. Arriving in Washington penniless and speaking little English, Penn washed dishes in District restaurants to make ends meet. He reconnected with his high school sweetheart, then living in France under political asylum, and they married. His new wife Phalasith encouraged him to pursue his passion for landscape painting, and

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Pete Rouse and Pakan Penn at the artist’s A Life in Motion Reception

he won a plum scholarship to the Corcoran School of Art, whose instructors were so impressed by his work that they allowed him to skip the first two years of its four-year fine arts program. Selling paintings in the galleries of Georgetown earned him a tidier living than in Phnom Penh, but with their first child on the way, Pakan started a construction company to earn a better living. He stopped painting for 21 years. “Some of my construction clients told me to put down the hammer and pick up a paintbrush,” Penn recalls. Then one day he did, closing his construction firm in 2001 to paint full time, using a palette knife to create his most distinctive works. Despite the history of violence and trauma that shaped his upbringing, Penn found that he’d never lost his passion or talent for art. Soon his paintings found their way into the State Department’s Art in Embassies Program and into the living rooms of some of Washington’s most powerful players. Penn describes most of his work as “semi-realist” or “neo-impressionist,” inspired by the styles of Van Gogh and Monet. “I don’t really like crazy abstract,” he says. “Everything I paint I must have a strong feeling for.” Strolling through the vast gallery that is both his home and studio in North Arlington, you’ll find impressionistic, realistic, abstract paintings and portraiture. “This is the only country in the world where you can work hard as an artist and someday find your paintings hanging in the White House.”

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t was summer 2009 and recently-inaugurated President Barack Obama was being introduced in a White House hallway by Pete Rouse and Valerie Jarrett to a Cambodian artist whose work both senior advisors to the President favored. After Obama viewed Pakan Penn’s “Chicago Skyline” painting in Rouse’s office, he turned to him and said, “Let’s go to my office.” The Oval Office, of course. Tears welled up in Penn’s eyes. He was a long way from Phnom Penh, where he once sold his paintings on the streets as a teenager before fleeing Cambodia’s murderous Khmer Rouge regime. Now standing before him was the Leader of the Free World, also a fighter of life’s indignities, who’d chosen to hang his artwork in the West Wing. “Chicago Skyline” had been suggested as a painting subject by Rouse in 2007. Rouse went on to become the first Asian-American White House chief of staff, and the advisor who is said to have brought “No drama to Obama.” Rouse and Jarrett both had Penn’s works in their homes and Penn was thrilled when the administration agreed to hang three in the White House as well. It was such an incredible feeling to see those paintings there,” Penn recalls. “My father would have been so proud.” Penn lost both parents and five of his 11 siblings to the Khmer Rouge, who were responsible for the deaths of up to three million Cambodians (one quarter of the country’s then population) during the “Killing Fields” era between 1975-1979. In 1973, a military attaché at the U.S. Embassy bought one of his paintings at a gift shop in Phnom Penh. “He was crazy for my work and looked everywhere to find me,” he recalls. With a civil war raging in Cambodia, the

W A R D E N

BY JOHN ARUNDEL


HEALTH

MEDICAL INNOVATOR Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Health Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shireen Atabaki is making waves in health technology with research into pediatric concussions BY ERICA MOODY

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ports fans know the fear of head injuries indefinitely sidelining their favorite athlete. The stress is far worse for parents with children who play sports. With almost half a million of them visiting hospital emergency rooms annually in the U.S. for traumatic brain injury, a misdiagnosis just adds insult to injury. On top of that, the radiation and price of CT scans only exacerbates a parentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worries. Ninety percent of children Dr. Shireen Atabaki with head injuries have concussions, and while CT scans detect serious bleeding in the brain, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t detect Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also worked with the Center for concussions at all. Disease Control to come up with mobile apps Thankfully, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Health that start at the time of the nursing triage. A System emergency medical specialist Dr. Shireen screen pops up when a patient arrives with Atabaki has spent the last 20 years develop- head trauma and it takes the nurse down a ing a â&#x20AC;&#x153;near-perfect diagnostic tool for concus- path of screening for concussions. The piloted sionâ&#x20AC;? that reduces the need for CT scans. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mobile programs can go home with the kids, received recognition for this work including Atabaki says, allowing for automatic commuthe National Heroes Award for Research by the nication with a school nurse or athletic trainer, Maternal Health Child Bureau. reminding a nurse to give the child a modiâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been estimated that people who get fied school day and rest, or not to push them a single CT scan in the first 22 years of life with standardized testing as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re recovering. have a 300 percent increase risk of cancer in Thanks to a grant from the District of Columtheir lifetime,â&#x20AC;? Atabaki explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aside from bia two years ago, Atabaki and her team were doing unnecessary testing, what was hap- able to train 100 percent of the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public pening around the country and the world school nurses and even make a documentary was that kids werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t being screened for the thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s viewable to all on YouTube called, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Play disease that they actually had, which was Smart,Your Brain Matters.â&#x20AC;? usually, after head trauma, a concussion [not â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our ultimate goal is to get funding to take a strain or a sprain].â&#x20AC;? the mobile app and send daily reminders to The health technology Atabaki developed the young kids every day, taking them through is now in the electronic health record at Chil- the concussion checklist,â&#x20AC;? she explains. drenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It automatically takes doctors The cost-saving potential is huge. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to a checklist based on really refined research National was able to save more than $800,000 in weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done over the years that helps them make one year by reducing CT scans by 556. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you a decision,â&#x20AC;? she says.The checklist includes ques- can get these tools into every electronic health tions such as,â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do you have a headache, dizziness, record in every emergency department in the sadness, irritability or trouble with sleep?â&#x20AC;? U.S.,â&#x20AC;? Atabaki says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we can have at least a $500

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million cost saving in one year of reduced CT scans.â&#x20AC;? Awareness has grown appreciably in the last 20 years. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re increasingly seeing the harm of misdiagnosing or not treating concussions properly. Professional sports players, particularly NFL players, have had a lot to do with that. In 2014, 15 former NFL players sued the organization over concussions. Violence and even suicide by football players have been linked to chronic traumatic encephalopy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease that occurs from repeated concussions. When Aaron Hernandez died at age 27, a posthumous examination of his brain showed that of a player well into his 60s. These instances showcase how important early recognition of the first concussions are, oftentimes beginning in childhood. Atabaki remains optimistic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sports are great for kids,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I put all three of my children in sports. Sometimes you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t avoid these injuries, so the key is early recognition. Pull your child out and get them the evaluation they need.â&#x20AC;? by the numbers

1.7 Million

Number of people diagnosed with traumatic brain injury annually in U.S.

 Yearly amount Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National saved by reducing CT scans

300% Percentage of increased risk of cancer from a single CT scan received in the first 22 years of life

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WASHINGTON S O C I A L  D I A R Y overthemoon﹐aroundtown﹐bookparties﹐whitehatgalaandmore!

UAE Amb. Yousef Al Otaiba, Nobu Matsuhisa and Robert De Niro at the Nobu Sake Ceremony. (Photo by Tony Powell)

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MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, helmed by director Kim Sajet highlights lesser- known faces ahead of its 50th anniversary. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I PORTRAIT BY TONY POWELL

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housands of portraits line the walls of Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, from a painting of Katy Perry donning a cupcake outfit by Will Cotton, to the earliest known photograph of a president – a recently acquired image of John Quincy Adams by Philip Haas.The mere range of portraits indicates that the museum is accomplishing its broad goal of showcasing the American experience through individuals who have spurred the country’s progress. But museum director Kim Sajet wants visitors to dig deeper as she has done over a five year tenure helming the gallery, and ask: “What does American achievement really mean? Who got to make the decisions and who didn’t?” It is the absence of faces in the nation’s only dedicated portrait gallery that Sajet seeks to access. It’s about those who may have otherwise been left out of the American narrative up to this point, she says, calling it the “presence of absence.” Portraiture is, at its very core, “an elitist art form,” Sajet explains, notably listing “Men of Progress” by Christian Schussele as one of her favorite pieces in the museum because of

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the moment in time it represents. It pictures 19 noteworthy male inventors, including Charles Goodyear and Samuel Colt, standing in a fictitious setting. Although there were many women with inventions during that time, Sajet notes, they weren’t included. A walk from early galleries through newer ones reflects the nation’s progress, highlighting America’s pursuit of identity along the way. The current exhibition “The Sweat of their Face,” which chronicles and celebrates portraits of American laborers, is just one example of the gallery’s evolution. In addition to an impressive resume, including a stint at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Nigerianborn Sajet has brought a global perspective to the institution, trying to marry America’s coolness — as she perceived it growing up internationally — with its history. She has spearheaded diversity initiatives including the museum’s transition into a wholly bilingual space for the benefit of Spanish speaking visitors. They are also in the process of adding accessible materials, including Braille, to portrait descriptions. As the museum approaches its 50th anniversary, Sajet and her team have a

variety of unique programs scheduled including an exhibit that explores the art of silhouettes opening next year called “Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now.” Barack and Michelle Obama’s portraits, commissioned respectively by Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, will be unveiled early next year. The former president’s likeness will take up permanent residence in the newly updated “America’s Presidents” gallery while the former first lady’s portrait will be on the ground floor for the first year. Sajet hopes to move the needle forward and continue to reshape the narrative about what, and more specifically who, constitutes American progress. She does not take her role or the gallery’s lightly especially in a time of such divisiveness, where once again America seems to be battling an identity crisis. “I do feel like we are right at the center of these very critical conversations and we want to be respectful, we want to be inclusive, we want to be innovative,” Sajet says. “You want to break down those barriers, you want to have some fun.”

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Gilan Corn, Jeanne Ruesch, Carol Schwartz and Nobuko Sasae

Margot and Kate Greer

Bjorn Amelan and Bill T. Jones

Rita Moreno and Andrea Mitchell

WL SPONSORED

Kim Sajet and Robert Redford

AMERICAN PORTRAIT GALA National Portrait Gallery | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Alma Gildenhorn and Fred Malek

Madeleine K. Albright and Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

PICTURESWORTHATHOUSANDWORDSThe National Portrait Gallery presented five distinguished recipients with its biannual Portrait of a Nation Prize, which recognizes “individuals who have made contributions of national significance,” with a portrait to be held within the Smithsonian collection. The presenters, each chosen specifically by the honorees, struggled with their allotted two minutes of speaking time to sufficiently extoll the social, cultural and political impacts each have made throughout their careers. Similarly, honorees had difficulty verbalizing their personal gratitude for the high honor. Rita Moreno, an actress from Puerto Rico, said her mother would be beaming with pride to know her daughter’s portrait would be on display in the nation’s capital. Former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright, who called her presenter Robert Redford an old crush, took advantage of her opportunity to plant a big smooch on the famed actor after her acceptance remarks. The other honorees were filmmaker Spike Lee, leading AIDs researcher Dr. David D. Ho and choreographer and dancer Bill T. Jones. Museum director Kim Sajet called the awardees “the best of our nation” — “pioneers, immigrants, women who have broken glass ceilings, innovators, entrepreneurs who created new paths because traditional doors were closed to them.” SENSORYFEAST After dinner prepared by Ridgewell’s Catering (espresso rubbed filet mignon and pan seared sea bass), four-time Grammy winning artist Esperanza Spalding ended the night with a jazz-fusion musical performance.

Dr. David D. Ho

Jeffrey and Randi Levine with Christie and Jeff Weiss

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José and Patricia Andrés

Mary Mochary with Climis and Carol Lascaris

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AROUNDTOWN

The Power of Positive Parlays BY DONNA SHOR

The Sustained Dialogue Institute, which promotes conflict resolution through discussion, was honored when Rep. Nancy Pelosi presented the 2017 National Dialogue Award to a remarkable couple at its annual dinner. The pair are Gabrielle “Gabby” Giffords, the valiant former congresswoman who survived a bullet to her head in an assassination attempt and Capt. Mark Kelly, her much-decorated astronaut husband who established the “Courage to End Gun Violence” foundation. Former Rep. Jim Moran presented the NDA Global Peacemaker Award to Ambassador-atLarge Ray Mahmood and his wife Shaista. Ray, a tall commanding presence, is a successful Pakistani-American real estate developer. He and Shaista are long time philanthropists, and he strongly supports her tireless work toward world peace. Their home is the frequent setting for cause-related meetings, luncheons and dinners; their ballroom can seat 100 and frequently does. Esther Coopersmith’s NDA Lifetime Achievement Award is especially apt. A longtime “political animal,” she was only 17 when she successfully ran a Wisconsin political campaign for Sen. Estes Kefauver. She married Jack Coopersmith, a prominent Washington lawyer and developer, and raised four

children while continuing her activism. Quick-witted and warmhearted, she spotted future achievers early and help their careers. A famed hostess and born facilitator, she brings together people she feels should know one another at her 28-room Kalorama home. A well-connected international traveler who knew many world figures, she was an effective U.S. representative and advisor to the United Nations during the Carter and Reagan administrations. A close friend, Rear Adm. Susan J. Blumenthal, M.D., presented her award. Often named one of the top physicians in the country, she served four presidents in her 20-year military career. A psychiatrist and global health expert, who served for a time as U.S. Assistant Surgeon General, she was also an outspoken public health advocate who championed women’s special needs. A striking platinum blonde, Susan was accompanied by her husband, Sen. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.). Pakistani Amb. Ahmad Chaudary, the evening’s honorary diplomatic chairman, was spotted among the guests who included Judith Terra, Annie Totah, former Washington first lady Michelle Fenty, Christine Warnke, Monica Greenberg, Judy Esfandiary and Swanee Hunt, daughter of the late Texas oil tycoon H.L Hunt,

who just moved to town. A former ambassador to Austria, she plans to make her home here. Jan Duplain coordinated the evening. Two student-related awards embodied the spirit of the Institute: Xiomara Contraras is a recent Northwestern University graduate who furthered the Institute’s program there and will continue her advocacy in her new career at Google. Case Western Reserve University administrators were also honored for helping campus groups integrate Sustained Dialogue principles in racial, ethnic and other issues. The Institute’s techniques originated years ago with an assistant secretary of state, the late Harold Saunders, a chief architect of the Camp David Accords. There, after 12 days of dialogue and parlays between Egypt and Israel, the two sworn enemies reached a peaceful accord that has endured for half a century. The five-point Sustained Dialogue “blueprint” Saunders created continues to be used at 50 U.S. and 15 foreign universities and by many groups and corporations globally. It succeeded in the Iran hostage crisis and the deadly Tajikistan civil war, where peace was achieved after 35 days of dialogue. As the Institute’s director, Rev. Mark Farr, emphasized:“They use it because it works.”

Judith Terra and Mark Farr

Kristen Shaw and Michael Grady “Killing Reagan” Director Rod Lurie and Novelist Kyra Davis Jack Norton and Jean Case

Sen. Ed Markey , Mark Kelly, Jim Moran and Gabrielle Giffords

NATIONAL DIALOGUE AWARDS Sheeza Mahmood, Shunna Mahmood, Ray Mahmood and Mary Jo Myers

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National Press Club 

Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Esther Coopersmith and Susan Blumenthal

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Nicole DiCocco, Martha Boneta, Bill Detty and Lola Reinsch

Todd Hitt and Michelle Dolansky

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David O’Brien and Abbey Slitor

JDRF DC HOPE GALA National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Larry and Janell Duncan

ANIGHTINCASABLANCA More than 700 guests were transported to 1940’s- era Morocco at the old Hollywood, Casablancathemed Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation gala. Over $2 million was raised for research to fight Type 1 diabetes at the 17th annual event, sponsored by private equity firm Kiddar Capital. Highlights included husband and wife Paul Sparks and Annie Parisse, who shared their personal diabetes story to help raise awareness of the critical need for diabetes research. Dr. Kurt Newman and Children’s National Health System were honored for their commitment to curing children with the largest diabetes program in the mid-Atlantic. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Faisal Al Enezi and Amin Salam

Christina Conn with her dog Bogart and Mike Stock

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Francesca Dugarte, Jonathan Jordan and Jane Rosenthal Cafritz

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OVERTHEMOON

Equines and Easements Leah Palmer designs high-end homes for humans, horses and dogs; Atoka Farm goes under easement; and famed early television star Arthur Godfrey’s estate goes on the market. BY VICKY MOON

ike many 20-something equineknow the area will never be overecstatic young girls, Leah Palmer developed. moved to Middleburg from New And speaking of large estates Jersey in 1993 to pursue a life of … the late ukulele-playing, downriding, grooming and training horses. home broadcast personality Arthur This occasionally included mucking Godfrey (1903-1983), who got his stalls, but that never squelched her start in Washington, bought Beacon equestrian ambition and obsession. Hill Farm near Leesburg in 1946. He “I did what I set out to do,” says added additional acreage through the Palmer, now 47.“I rode and sold horses years and listed his then-2,000 acre that went on to the Hall of Fame. I spread for $6 million in 1977. Prince rode everything, I did it myself.” By Talal Bin Abdulaziz, a half brother of age 30, she decided to go to college, the late King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, Beacon Hill, the former Loudoun County estate of the late TV host and earning a degree in architecture and purchased the estate from Godfrey for horse enthusiast Arthur Godfrey, is on the market for $2.49 million. graduating with honors from Catholic $5.1 million in 1979. University in 2005. rather figure out how to move a stairway and Now occupying 37 acres, the tenSince leaving school, Palmer has completed add a small addition and raise the roof than bedroom mansion has been owned by the 50 different projects involving structures for build a whole house.” sellers for 20 years. There are tenant and guest horses, dogs and humans. At any time, she has Just up the Atoka Road from the Spytek houses and a ten-car garage plus stables (where between five and nine works in progress in project, Wendy and Mike Smith have placed Godfrey’s Palomino, Goldie, once resided, various stages of development. She handles a 350-acre tract known as Atoka Farm into remember?). Middleburg-based agents Cindy everything including barns, mudrooms, conservation easement through the Land Trust Polk and Brandy Greenwell of TTR Sotheby’s renovations, additions, pond placements and of Virginia. International Realty of McLean have it listed magnificent new kennels for the Piedmont This sprawling farm once owned by steel for $2.49 million. Fox Hounds. heir Hubert B. Phipps was later home to former A final tidbit: Godfrey is buried in Sitting on the kitchen counter in an Virginia Senator John Warner. It’s where he Leesburg’s circa-1855 Union Cemetery and extraordinary Victorian house she’s remodeling married actress Elizabeth Taylor in December, his granddaughter, Mary Schmidt Amons, off the Atoka Road for Middleburg owners 1976. Jack Kent Cooke, the late Washington was a 2010 television personality on “The Real Joe and Stephanie Spytek, Palmer says she Redskins owner, was a neighbor. Housewives of Washington, D.C.” has never advertised. “It’s all been word of Smith, originally from Winchester and the mouth. I’m too busy for a website, I don’t president of the Upperville Horse Show, paid have a landing page.” $7.17 million for Atoka in 2016. Her clients include long-time Middleburg “As a very young man, I fell in love with resident Pippy McCormick, who has a circa- the countryside in and around Middleburg,” he 1800 Federal brick and stone home off Route says. “Once I started riding horses, my dream 50 that had “several questionable additions” of owning a horse farm came true six years and needed renovation. For singer-songwriter ago when I bought “Poplar Grange” (across the Mary Chapin Carpenter, she consulted on street) and moved in with my wife.” a major renovation and re-building. And, for The Smiths hope to protect Atoka’s “view, weekenders Lisa Jacobs and Paul Brinkman, history and natural resources of plants and Palmer reworked a portion of their older home, animals.” The tax incentives for setting aside, Leah Palmer has recently worked on more than 50 which had two front doors and no hall. dividing and building more on the farm are building and design projects in Middleburg. “I’m a puzzle person,” Palmer says. “I’d lucrative.” Smith adds that it’s comforting to

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Unitd Arab Emirates Amb. Yousef Al-Otaiba, Nobu Matsuhisa, Robert De Niro and Hiro Tahara

Panamanian Amb. Emanuel GonzalezRevilla and Jennifer Camel Toueg

Hande Kassim, Futoun Bilbeisi, Abeer Al-Otaiba, Samar Langhorne and Nadine Selim WL EXCLUSIVE

, NOBU SAKE CEREMONY Nobu | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Helgi Walker and Skye Raiser with Paul and Elizabeth Dougherty

ATOASTTOGOODFORTUNE Torrents of rain didn’t stop Washington’s A-list from coming out on a Sunday night to officially welcome chef Nobu Matsuhisa to town. Actor Robert De Niro made the trip from New York to stand beside his business partner and friend with whom he has opened 38 Nobu restaurants worldwide. Their third partner, Meir Teper, had good reason to be absent as his wife was due to give birth. United Arab Emirates Ambassador Yousef Al-Otaiba and COO of Nobu Restaurants Hiro Tahara joined De Niro and Matsuhisa on stage to crack open a barrel of sake with wooden mallets for the restaurant’s traditional Kagami Biraki ceremony, said to symbolize good fortune. The Hokusetsu Sake was then poured and passed to guests by the sake master himself Hazu Famio, who journeyed from Japan to show his support. SUSHILOVERSREJOICE Endless parades of sashimi, specialty rolls and signature hot and cold dishes kept guests sated throughout the evening.

Wolf and Lynn Blitzer

Romie and Nick Stefanelli with Jennifer Isham

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Netherlands Amb. Henne Schuwer and curator Arthur K. Wheelock

Mitchell and Emily Rales WL EXCLUSIVE

National Gallery of Art Director Rusty Powell

OPENING OF ‘VERMEER AND THE MASTERS OF GENRE PAINTING’ National Gallery of Art PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Julie Folger and Andrew Saul

Thomas Lloyd and Rickie Niceta

RICH ARTISTIC HERITAGE: Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675) is one of history’s most revered painters so it was no surprise that VIPs from the art and philanthropy worlds — “Vermeerists” — all flocked to the opening of the National Gallery’s sure-to-be-a-runaway-success exhibition of 70 works by the artist and his Dutch Golden Age contemporaries. After a preview stroll through the show, cocktails and a grand repast in the West Wing’s main hall, clued-in guests knew to remain behind for a rare post-dinner opportunity to have the masterpieces all to themselves for a precious hour before departing into the night. VIEW ALL THE PHOTOS AT WWW.WASHINGTONLIFE.COM

Sharon Bradley, Cheryl Masri, Amra Fazlic and Barbara Martin

Congresswoman Debbie Dingall and Dorothy McAuliffe

KNOCK OUT ABUSE The Ritz-Carlton, Washington |

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PHOTOS BY BEN DROZ

Elizabeth Webster, Kenya Felix Pierce, Mekki Karrakchou and Tara Engel

BREAKING THE CHAINS: Hundreds of charitably-minded women (and a few men) gathered at Knock Out Abuse’s annual gala to aid victims of domestic violence through the support of shelters for women and children. The evening began with cocktails, Inglot cosmetics tutorials/touch-ups and the viewing silent and live auction items (a wine connoisseur’s dream dinner for 10, luxury vacations), followed by dinner and dancing to a live band. The honoree, Rep. Debbie Dingell, brought guests to tears with her story of childhood domestic violence, as did author Rene Denfield, who spoke out for foster parenting. Dingell spoke about the difficulty of coming forward about abuse when it cold mean loss of a job, stating, “So many women don’t have the luxury of saying, ‘me, too.” VIEW ALL THE PHOTOS AT WWW.WASHINGTONLIFE.COM

Rebecca Magnuson, Rene Denfeld and Patricia Coleman WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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David Rubenstein and Kaya Henderson

Michael Gaal and Katherine Bradley

WL SPONSORED

D.C. ED FUND CELEBRATION Renwick Gallery | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL TRANSFORMINGPUBLICSCHOOLS The D.C. Public Education Fund marked its tenth anniversary with a celebration at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Among the guests: Mayor Muriel Bowser; former D.C. Public Schools Chancellors Kaya Henderson and Michelle Rhee; Citybridge Education Founder Katherine Bradley; and philanthropist David Rubenstein, who also led a conversation with current DCPS Chancellor Antwan Wilson about the Ed Fund’s partnership with schools. Since 2007, the organization has raised over $120 million to “dramatically transform D.C. Public Schools from an underperforming district to one that is nationally recognized for its student achievement.”

Josh Edelman

DCPS Chancellor Antwan Wilson and Deputy Mayor for Education Jennifer Niles

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Jessica Rauch and Katie Aiello-Howard

Helen Westmoreland and Maura Marino

Members of the DCPS student choir Kimber Pennington, Jodi Dodds Kinner, Jeanie Lee and Emily Mulshine

Shana Young, Ahnna Smith and Helen Westmoreland

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Carol Wilson, Chavon Jones and Mary Beth Maggio

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Debbi and Ernie Jarvis

Daphne and Bill Jarvis

Gene and Gina Adams, Leigh Adams and Reginald Van Lee WL SPONSORED

TENNIS SHOES, TIES AND AFTER 5

Cora Masters Barry, Clay Lawrence

Southeast Tennis and Learning Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL GRANDSLAM The Recreation Wish List Committee, a non-profit founded by former first lady of the District Cora Masters Barry to improve the quality of recreational opportunities for city’s underserved youth, hosted its annual bash to support the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center, a world-class, state-of-the art, premier tennis facility and educational space located in Ward 8. True to protocol, guests — including event chairwoman Debbi Jarvis — came to dine and dance in cocktail attire and their snazziest sneakers. SPOTTED: Councilmember Phil Mendelson, former council chairwoman Linda Cropp and Marie Johns, deputy administrator of the U.S. Small Business administration under President Obama.

Paxton and Rachel Baker

Tony Burchard

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Dede and Rudy Schmidt

Kelly Uthoff and Ryan Hayes Caleb Davy

David Trout, Michael Williams and Paul Innella

WL SPONSORED

WHITE HAT GALA Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium |

PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES

BETTINGONKIDS More than 300 cyber security professionals and supporters of Children’s National Health System gathered for a “Casino Royale”- themed evening to raise funds for the renowned hospital. Chaired by Paul Innella and David Trout, the event included a moving appearance by patient Caleb Davy, a local high school student who suffers from kidney failure and cerebral palsy. Guests ended the night in an “after-hours lounge,” where they hit the game tables and networked with fellow members of the cyber security community. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Denise Pho and Sunny Tuteja

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Jesse and Meredith Dean

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Amy Richards, Kristina Bouweiri and Dr. Mitchell Cohen

Sharon Virts, Jill Biden and Scott Miller

Mary Ann Elliot and Jim Richards

David Kersey and Lauren Peterson

WL SPONSORED

INOVA SUMMIT Salamander Resort | PHOTOSBYNANCYKLECK

Geof and Shari Ling with Jim and Diane Ecklund

Kris Debye and Dr. Skip Trump

DEEPDIVESMore than 300 philanthropists, corporate executives, university presidents, government leaders and healthcare professionals took part in the Inova Foundation’s weekend-long summit, keynoted by Jill Biden. Modeled loosely after the Aspen Institute Ideas Festival, Inova’s Thought Leadership Series has become the region’s top healthcare stakeholder event, featuring deep dives from leading experts on such topics as cancer care, genomics, wellness through personalized health, cardiovascular diseases, women’s health and the state of philanthropy. This year’s sessions were moderated by Sheila Johnson, Inova’s Dr. Donald “Skip” Trump, U.S. Trust’s Ann Limberg, Virginia Health Secretary Dr. Bill Hazel and Inova Summit co-chairmen Sharon Virts and Sco Miller, who announced a $2 million gift to the cause. “Healthcare giving is on the rise, up to $12 billion last year” Miller told the crowd, adding that “Inova is a great example of great talent, great passion and great philanthropy.”

Frank Ruffing and Elisebeth Driscoll

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Dr. Kelly Epps and Montez Anderson Marsha Bonet and Rafael Farina

Knox Singleton and Tracey Fitzimmons WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Dr. Bill Hazel and Ann Limberg

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Drs. Priya and Amit Rastogi

Marge and Phil Odean

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LIFESTYLES

Take these Reads Fireside FALLBOOKPARTIES|PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELLNAKUMAYOANDDANCHUNG

Hans Bruland, Walter Isaacson and Marie Arana Eric Motley with Mirella and Dani Levinas

‘LEONARDO DA VINCI’ ‘MADISON PARK: A PLACE OF HOPE’ FOURSEASONS Friends and colleagues of Eric Motley gathered to celebrate “Madison Park: A Place of Hope,” a charming autobiography that chronicles his extraordinary journey from a small African-American community in Alabama to a job in the White House and beyond. The author’s inspiration, he said, came from “the desire to celebrate an idea, an American spirit, a people ... [who] manifested true and tangible aspects of the American Dream.” The book contains two narratives, he added: “my own story and the history of this special place, but they are intimately interwoven.”

TOPOFTHEHAY THEHAY-ADAMSHOTEL Celebrated journalist and biographer Walter Isaacson held court at the Hay-Adams’ Author Series luncheon celebrating his newest work, “Leonardo da Vinci.” Guests included National Gallery of Art Director Rusty Powell, whose institution holds the only Leonardo in a museum outside of Europe, and with whom Isaacson bantered about the authenticity of the artist’s “Salvator Mundi,” a painting which days later would sell at auction for an unprecedented $450 million. Diners indulged in root vegetable salad, wild mushroom tagliatelle and Anjou pear tart — a menu created by the hotel’s Vice President & General Manager Hans Bruland and Executive Chef Nicolas Legret to pay homage to da Vinci’s vegetarian lifestyle.

Juleanna Glover and Sheila Johnson

Jenna Bush Hager, Connie Milstein, Barbara Bush and Susan Blumenthal

Fred and Genny Ryan Fritz and Brooke Brogan, Barbara Brogan and Ryan Williams

‘SISTERS FIRST: STORIES FROM OUR WILD AND WONDERFUL LIFE’ THEJEFFERSONHOTEL If Congress ever got together to declare a national holiday celebrating sisterhood, Jenna Bush Hager and Barbara Pierce Bush might be first in line to testify for it. The former first daughters’ New York Times #1 bestseller, “Sisters First,” was celebrated at a book party hosted by Connie Milstein and co-hosts Tammy Haddad, Mark Dybul and Anita McBride. There was no shortage of sisterly love (or ribbing) onstage as the 35-year-olds shared intimate tales and reflections from a life in the public eye, from the Texas countryside to the halls of The White House. Jenna Bush, now a contributor to “The Today Show,” said she’s in “awe” of her fraternal sibling: “I mean my sister started a global health nonprofit ... Her commute is to Rwanda.”

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John Coale, Greta Van Susteren and Howard Fineman

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Mark Dybul and Laura Cox Kaplan

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Laura Linney and Michael Kahn

HARMAN CENTER 10TH ANNIVERSARY GALA

Jane Harman, Andrea Mitchell and Jack Diamond

Nora Pouillon

Sidney Harman Hall and National Building Museum| PHOTOSBY

Tony Williams, Jim Moran and Jack Evans

TONYPOWELL

CELEBRATINGTHEARTS It was a bittersweet evening for Jane and Barbara Harman, widow and daughter respectively, of the late Harman Center founder Sidney Harman. “Sidney would have loved this,” said Jane Harman of the varied performances, from children reading Shakespeare to the dance and musical numbers marking the venue’s first decade. Actress Laura Linney received the Shakespeare’s Theater Company’s prestigious William Shakespeare Award for Classical Theater and former Mayor Anthony Williams, Councilman Jack Evans and former District CFO Natwar Gandhi took home the Sidney Harman Award for Philanthropy in the Arts. Guests were then bid to follow the all-woman percussion band Batalá outside and down a carpeted sidewalk to dine and dance at the National Building Museum.

Stefanie Erkiletian and Mason Arthur

Debbie Driesman and Frank Islam

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PARTIES, PARTIES, PARTIES

‘TIS THE [PARTY] SEASON VIEW ALL THE PHOTOS AT WWW.WASHINGTONLIFE.COM

Mitchell Schear, Antonietta Corvasce, Stephen Goldstein and Sherry Rhodes

FOOD HISTORY GALA

HIGHER ACHEIVEMENT ‘GOING PLACES’ GALA

[NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY]

P H OTO S BY W I L L K I R K

Taylor Leyden, Elizabeth Barentzen and Wendy Feldman Block

P H OTO S BY P I X E L M E ST U D I O

John Gray and Danny Meyer

[WARNER THEATRE]

Higher Achievement held its 10th annual ‘Going Places’ Gala celebrating 42 years of closing the opportunity gap for middle school youth from at-risk communities. The event was headlined by John B. King, Jr. President and CEO of the Education Trust and former Secretary of Education, who was honored for his commitment to the cause.

Will Guidara, Nick Lander and Eric Spivey

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History kicked off its third annual Food History Weekend with a black-tie gala benefitting the Smithsonian Food History Project. The Julia Child Foundation for Gastronomy and Culinary Arts honored Danny Meyer, CEO of the Union Square Hospitality Group and the man behind beloved burger joint Shake Shack.

CITIZENS ASSOCIATION OF GEORGETOWN GALA [FOUR SEASONS] P H OTO S BY E R I N S C H A F F

Historic preservation and a thriving community are two pillars of the Citizen’s Association of Georgetown’s core mission. At this year’s event, chaired by Michelle Korsmo, Colman Riddell and Amy Porter Stroh, over 450 supporters and friends joined in the “Streets of Georgetown” celebration featuring dinner, a silent auction, cigar bar and entertainment by local band For the Win.

Stuart Holliday and Rickie Niceta

SOCIAL SECRETARIES RECEPTION [MERIDIAN INTERNATIONAL HOUSE] P H OTO S BY TO N Y P OW E L L

Social secretaries from past administrations and the current one gathered at the Meridian House to swap stories and enjoy a celebration in their honor.

Amy Porter Stroh, Michelle Korsmo and Colman Riddell

Barbara Crocker and Dr. Tina Alster

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Jack Evans and Erika Schiller

Kristin and George Lund

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POLITICO 50

HALF-EARTH DAY

[DOCK 5 AT UNION

[NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC]

MARKET]

P H OTO S BY TO N Y P OW E L L

P H O T O S B Y B E N D R OZ

Rep. Darrell Issa

Eli Yokley, Anna Palmer and Adam Green

Politico Magazine celebrated its annual list of “thinkers, doers and dreamers reshaping American politics” with a reception at the hip warehouse space Dock 5. “Politico 50” list members Steve Bannon (the former White House strategist), Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, may not have been in attendance, but a lively cast of journalists and politicos mingled the night away.

Nat Geo CEO Gary Knell and Paul Simon

Half-Earth Day was celebrated by scientists and conservationists who attended the all-day inaugural event hosted by the E.O Wilson Biodiversity Foundation and National Geographic. The event featured two large-scale public events and a scientific discussion session where scientists debated their research on the achievability of the Half-Earth goal. The event emphasized the importance of halting rising extinction rates and conserving half the planet. The event was inspired by Edward O Wilson’s book, “HalfEarth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life.” Special guests in attendance included actress Glenn Close and recording artist Paul Simon.

Glenn Close and Edward O. Wilson

MENTOR PRIZE ‘BANDING TOGETHER’ ANNUAL FUNDRAISER [THE WOMAN’S CLUB OF CHEVY CHASE]

Anita LaRue-McAfee, James Cooper and Lori Soto

P H OTO S BY B RY N N A C L E L A N D, D D C P U B L I C A F FA I R S

Sally Rosenberg and Ami Aronson

More than 200 guests dressed in their best “denim and diamonds” for MentorPrize’s annual event to help recruit volunteers for nearly two dozen mentoring programs that serve at-risk youth in the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. Highlights included a spirits tasting bar from One Eight Distilling, craft beers from Seven Locks Brewing and a barbecue feast from Hill Country BBQ. Luxury getaways, sporting events and dining experiences made for a top-notch silent auction.

Catherine Zimmermann and Gizelle Bryant

Kenneth Grossfield, Leslie Adelman and Alfred Carr Jr.

WHARF WATER TAXI PREVIEW [THE DISTRICT WHARF] P H OTO S BY TO N Y P OW E L L

Entertainment Cruises CEO Kenneth Svendsen, PN Hoffman Founder and CEO Monty Hoffman, Mayor Muriel Bowser, Madison Marquette Chairman Amer Hammour, Ward 6 Councilmember Charles Allen

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Real estate developers of the Southwest waterfront’s District Wharf Monty Hoffman of P.N. Hoffman and Amer Hammour of Madison Marquette joined Mayor Muriel Bowser for a maiden voyage on the Potomac Water Taxi, which will leave from the Wharf, and make stops in Georgetown, Old Town Alexandria and eventually National Harbor. Guests and media drank bubbly aboard the new boat run by Entertainment Cruises while toasting Washington’s newest (and most scenic) transit option.

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HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandmywashington

8LI:MGI4VIWMHIRX¸W6IWMHIRGI Second Lady Karen Pence personalizes One Observatory Circle while paying homage to the house’s past inhabitants. BY VIRGINIA COYNE PHOTOGRAPHS BY TONY POWELL


HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

t’s a cold, rainy morning in early November, perhaps the first seasonably appropriate day of an unseasonably balmy fall in Washington, but Karen Pence is undeterred by the drop in temperature. She and her family’s Australian Shepherd, Harley, have already taken their daily swim in the heated pool on the grounds of One Observatory Circle. Her husband, Vice President Mike Pence, frequently uses it for exercise as well. “It’s great,” she enthuses. “That’s the thing that Joe Biden said to us as he got into the limo and left the Capitol on inauguration i ‘you’re gonna love the pool.’” day — he said, Her predecessor, Jill Biden, also had parting words for Mrs. Pence during the presidential transition in January, telling her to “just enjoy the house” and expressing a wish that the Pences create warm memories there. Ten months after moving in, Mrs. Pence, herself no stranger to government life (she was most recently first lady of Indiana and, prior to that, a congressional spouse), says she and the Vice President have indeed created their own unique memories and hosted numerous “very special” visitors. Guests have included President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump, the King of Jordan and the prime ministers of Israel and Ireland, the latter on St. Patrick’s Day, a visit she says was especially significant for the Vice President, who is of Irish descent. But Mrs. Pence, whose oldest child Michael serves in the Marine Corps, seems most nostalgic about events where she and her husband have welcomed members of the military and their families to the property on the grounds of the Naval Observatory. Over the summer, the Pences threw a pool party for children of soldiers deployed abroad. They’ve honored military women at the house, and hosted wounded warriors ahead of their annual Memorial Day bike ride. The former art teacher is also passionate about art

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PREVIOUS PAGE: (clockwise from top left) “Meadow Brook,” circa 1912, an oil on canvas by Charles P. Gruppe, graces the wall in the foyer. The work is on loan to the Pences from the Smithsonian American Art Museum; the brick Queen Anne-style house was built in 1893 for the superintendent of the U.S. Naval Observatory; the dining room chairs were brought in during Vice President Dan Quayle’s term. The blue hues in the upholstery served as design inspiration for Mrs. Pence. The mahogany dining table, a 19thcentury antique, was loaned to the house by the State Department during Vice President Dick Cheney’s tenure. The first floor library offers the Pences a comfortable spot to sit by the fire and watch television. THIS PAGE: (clockwise from top left) The sunroom is a neutral oasis and another favorite area in the house. A print of a watercolor by Mrs. Pence depicting One Observatory Circle hangs there; the living room is appointed with comfortable but elegant overstuffed chairs and a sofa; the Pences have hosted President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump; the pool and pool house were added in 1991 when the Quayles lived there.

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wshee

OPENING PAGE: Karen Pence sits on the veranda, a favorite family dining spot, with Harley, an Australian Shepherd puppy she surprised the Vice President with on Father’s Day. “I think if we just had the porch and not the house we would be happy,” she says. “It’s such a peaceful place.”

therapy, which she has declared as her initiative as second lady. In September, Pence hosted leaders in the field who are working with soldiers suffering from PTSD. She is a watercolorist herself and often paints at the living room table in the private quarters on the second f loor. Two of her works hang in the public spaces below. Her rendering of the U.S. Capitol dome is underneath the staircase and a print of a larger painting she did of One Observatory Circle is framed in the sunroom. The Pences have gifted prints of that piece to departing residence workers. When it came to choosing other artworks to hang on the walls, the Pences borrowed landscapes by American artists from the Smithsonian’s archives, including Charles P. Gruppe’s “Meadow Brook” and Addison Thomas Miller’s “Waterfall,” which they placed in the foyer. “Woman Walking Down Path” by Edward Mitchell Bannister is in the living room and “Birch-Clad Hills” by Ben Foster in the library. A cozy spot with one of seven wood-burning fireplaces in the house, the library is also a room where the Pences replicated their predecessors’ decor. “We loved the way the Bidens had it set up, so we pretty much made it very, very similar,” she says. “They had a leather couch in there. They had four chairs. We set it up the same way.” As for decorating and furnishing the rest of the house, a task funded by the non-profit Vice President’s Residence Foundation, Pence says she used the blue tones in the fabric on the existing dining chairs as inspiration for choosing new upholstery and rugs. The chairs date back to the residency of a fellow Hoosier, Vice President Dan Quayle. “I actually called Marilyn [Quayle] and said I’m taking your chairs and I’m decorating the whole downstairs based on that,” Pence says with a laugh. On the piano in the living room are photos of the Pences with previous vice presidents and their spouses, including their friends the Quayles. The oldest photo dates back to the 1980s: a young Mrs. Pence on her first visit to Observatory Circle posing with then-second lady Barbara Bush, who was hosting a luncheon for spouses of congressional hopefuls. Pence says she still has a paper napkin from that lunch, bearing the Vice Presidential Seal, in a scrapbook.

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HOME LIFE | BOOKTALK

THE HOUSE ON THE HILL Charles Denyer traces the history of the Vice President’s Residence with exclusive interviews and glossy photographs in “Number One Observatory Circle.” BY ERICA MOODY

The Gore family engages in some playful touch football on the grounds of the residence in November 2000. (Photo by Joyce Naitchayan, Staff/Getty Images)

President-elect George H.W. Bush and Barbara Bush - a day after their landslide victory in the 1988 presidential election in which Vice President Bush routed Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis - stand surrounded by many of the Navy stewards responsible for the care and operation of the residence. (Photo by David Valdez)

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f you don’t know where the Vice President lives, you’re in the majority. When historian Charles Denyer conducted an (informal) survey, he got some surprising answers. “The Blair House; in the basement of the White House; the East Wing of the White House,” Denyer laughs. “I was shocked at some of the ignorance to this question.” So, Denyer set out to educate people. His scholarly coffee table book is the first to really look at where the country’s secondin-command has resided since 1974 — in a charming 9,200-square-foot residence perched on a hill on the northeast grounds of the 72-acre U.S. Naval Observatory. It is set away from the street and shielded from view, totally unlike the White House. What was meant as a short-term residence back in the ’70s ended up sticking; it’s still the “offi-

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Vice President Mondale lifts a turkey from the broiler on Thanksgiving Day, 1977 in the basement kitchen of the residence. (AP Photo)

cial temporary residence” under public law. “The secrecy lends itself to the mystique of the home,” Denyer says. “Every vice president loves the house for a number of reasons, the biggest being that it’s secluded.” More than 300 photographs and interviews provide insight into the personal lives of the vice presidents who lived there, and Denyer had access to every White House photographer assigned to the VP since Rockefeller. “The photographer has a front row seat to what these men and one day women do and act and think and undertake as vice president.” Denyer posits that the rise of the vice president’s influence coincided with the move into One Observatory Circle. “A lot of people are unaware that the home dawned when the office changed dramatically,”

the author explains. “Before Walter Mondale, the vice presidents are living in their own home, they’re insignificant, their presidents don’t like them, they keep them uninformed. Then you fast forward to Mondale and the vice president gets a brand new beautiful home and Air Force Two whenever he wants.” In addition to in-depth history and photos that showcase décor and family lives (including furry family members), the book includes particulars on how vice presidents and second ladies have entertained over the years. The Bushes were quite the party animals, throwing around 900 shindigs in their first five years, Denyer says. And, “Al Gore gets the stigma of being a stiff guy but he actually liked to whoop it up. Once [on Halloween] he answered a house call dressed as Frankenstein.”

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

Merry Maryland Montgomery Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s real estate boom continues unabated with spectacular sales in Potomac and Bethesda BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

The oldest farmhouse in the District of Columbia changed hands when Chantal Attias and Andreas Kotzur sold their 1865 house and adjacent 12,000-square-foot lot to Decon Group LLC for $1.35 million. The existing residence located at FOXHALLROADNW near Phillips Park, designated as historic by the D.C. Historic Preservation Review Board, will be preserved and co-exist with the new ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; future home plans. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theo Adamstein was the listing agent. Kevin Friend, also of TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty, represented the buyer.

VIRGINIA Washington Capitals star player TJ Oshie and his wife Lauren bought

LANGLEY LANE in McLean from Boston Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; real estate executive Ray Ritchey and his wife, Anne, for $5.2 million. The Ritcheys bought

 CHAIN BRIDGE ROAD in McLean for $3.325 million knowing they  CSTREETSE fetched $2.15 million when would eventually sell their Langley Lane Jonathan Schmidt of Connell & Schmidt house (where they resided for more than Builders sold the newly built Federal style 20 years). Their new home, a classic 1937 Capitol Hill row house. The modern interior Colonial, was the former residence of the features an abundance of shiplap paneling and late hotelier and philanthropist H. Cabell Raymond D. Martz sold  THSTREET reclaimed barn wood adorning the walls in the Maddux II . TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International NW in Chevy Chase for $2.05 million. The gourmet kitchen and posh open living room. Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mark Lowham represented the six-bedroom 1940-built Colonial recently Compassâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Todd Bissey was the listing agent Ritcheys while Sherif Abdalla, also of TTR underwent a major two-story renovation and while Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty represented addition by Van Dusen Architects and Lustig Christopher Cushman was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent. the Oshies.

THE DISTRICT Andy Reynolds, a former deputy of science and technology advisor to the secretary of state, sold LOGANCIRCLENW for $2.9 million to an undisclosed buyer. The 1883 mansion is one of the few remaining original structures in the historic neighborhood. The classic Federal brick row house includes original pocket doors, fireplaces, wood shutters and floors.Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kimberly Casey represented the seller. Daryl Judy, also of Washington Fine Properties, represented the buyer.

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Associates. Among its many features are an expansive eat-in kitchen, butlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pantry, large screened-in porch and a luxurious ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suite with a spa bath. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AnneMarie Finnell was the listing agent. Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joseph Berman represented the buyer.

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The chairman and CEO of Ritz Camera, David Ritz, and his wife Robyn, sold their 14,800-square-foot Potomac house for $4 million to Julianna B. Marriott.  FOXMEADOWLANE in Bradley Hills is a seven-bedroom, Nantucket style abode that was built in 2002 by acclaimed architect Bruce Rich and includes a two-story English conservatory, a library with nautically influenced custom mill-work, a gourmet kitchen with a two-story ceiling, a detached exercise facility and an eight-car garage on three-plus private acres. The listing agents were Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties and Marsha Schuman and Betsy Schuman Dodek of Washington Fine Properties. Susan Rosenblum of Buyers Edge Co. Inc. was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent.

Boman Najmi sold  BENTCROSS DRIVE in the Falconhurst neighborhood of Potomac for $3.425 million to Drs. Jay and Gail Wasserman. The 1988-built, 13,000-square-foot Tudor features a stunning three-acre lot with a meditation garden and sanctuary, a chipping green with sand trap and a waterfall. The interior of the six-bedroom estate features meticulously maintained entertaining rooms as well as a gourmet kitchen, home theater, billiards room and ballroom. Michael Matese of Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc. was the listing agent. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices PenFed Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Carol Nerenberg was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent.

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Carol Grefenstette and David Bates sold their seven-bedroom Colonial at  COUNTRYCLUBDRIVE in Bethesda for $3.45 million to William Clarke Ewart and Constance M. Ewart. The house was built in 1995 and sits on two acres bordering Congressional Country Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s golf course. The residence boasts grand scale proportions with 10-foot ceilings and detailed moldings throughout, six fireplaces, a wine cellar, golf room, a walk out lower level with a huge wet bar and an expansive garden with a stone terrace and fountain. Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe, and Christopher R. Leary of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties listed the house while Margaret Percesepe represented the buyer.

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

PROPERTYLINES

UPDATED CLASSIC: A private LLC (aptly named ENA 4401 W Street NW) is selling  WSTREETNW in Foxhall/Berkley for $3.595

million with the assistance of Robert Hryniewicki and Adam T. Rackliffe of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties. The six-bedroom, white brick Colonial was recently renovated from top to bottom; all four levels were gutted and re-designed using the highest quality materials and finishes. While the outside remains classic (the property was built in 1962), the interior design is clean and modern. SALE OF A CENTURY: For the first time since 1868,   N STREETNW is for sale. A private corporation, 2709 N Street LLC, listed the historic former rectory of the Alexander Memorial Baptist Church for $6.795 million. The circa 1810 semi-detached Federal in Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s East Village sits adjacent to the former church at 2709 N Street NW, which was converted into three condominium units. The 5,200-square-foot property boasts seven bedrooms, all with their own walk-in closets, a gourmet kitchen with a pantry, a wine cellar and elevator. Both the house and condo units are being marketed as Alexander Hall. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shahab Nasrin is the listing agent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;QUALITY HILLâ&#x20AC;?: One of Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most historic properties,   PROSPECT STREET NW, is listed for $7.75

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million. The former residence of Sen. Clairborne Pell and his wife Nuala, which was sold to Arent Fox law firm partner Ralph Taylor and his wife Nancy in 2004, was built in 1798 with bricks and materials imported from England. The gray brick Federal was dubbed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quality Hillâ&#x20AC;? by its first owner, John Thomson Mason, a nephew of Founding Father George Mason. Another owner of note was Albert Clemons, owner of nearby â&#x20AC;&#x153;Halcyon House,â&#x20AC;? who used the mansion across the way on Prospect Street for storage. The nine-bedroom, 10,000square-foot property was also host to Thomas Jefferson, who is said to have dined there. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Real Estateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Russell Firestone is the listing agent. Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@ washingtonlife.com.

CHAMP CAR PAD: Former Indy Racing League vet Will Langhorne and his wife, Samar have dropped the price of  NSTREET NW by a million dollars down to $7.995 million. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Russell Firestone III is the listing agent. The six-bedroom contemporary townhouse was built by Georgetown developer Richard Levy for his mother in 1960. Langhorneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents bought the property from Levy, and the racecar driver in turn bought it from his parents. The main entry features a 1,000 pound pivoted door with smart glass that switches from clear to translucent at the touch of a button, Boffi-designed bathrooms, a glass elevator, second floor Bulthaup gourmet kitchen and media room. The exterior features a garden terrace with a heated pool.

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OPENHOUSE

Open House Give yourself a new home this holiday season. CLEVELANDPARK  LOWELLST NW

ASKING PRICE: $4,995,000

This iconic and much-admired 7,000-plus-square-foot Cleveland Park home on coveted Lowell Street has many schools, trendy restaurants and shops just steps from its front door. Grand-scale entertaining rooms, a multi-room owner suite with a fireplace, spacious and private surrounding garden with pool and gorgeous views of the National Cathedral.

LISTING AGENT: Margot Wilson, 202549-2100, margot. wilson@wfp.com. Washington Fine Properties

EASTERNSHORE   BENNETTPOINTRD This Chesapeake masterpiece in Queenstown is just over the bridge from Annapolis and provides a perfect blend of elegance and comfort. The property features stunning waterfront views and boasts a pool, gourmet kitchen, spacious main level master, theater room and a separate guest house with two additional bedrooms. A private dock rounds out the amenities featured in this water lover’s dream estate.

ASKING PRICE: $3,650,000 LISTING AGENT: Jimmy White, 410-3203647, Long & Foster | Christie’s

CABINJOHN  CARAWAYST

ASKING PRICE: $2,595,000

Explore this spacious “California” Modern in Cabin John, Maryland. Custom built in 2014, this extraordinary property LISTING AGENT: Russell Firestone, 202.271.1701, features six bedrooms, five full bathrooms and an open TTR Sotheby’s International floor plan of over 6,000 square feet. Replete with modern Realty amenities, including a lower-level media room, chef ’s kitchen and custom Maine-milled wood floors, this tree-lined residence sits on a well maintained half-acre lot, offering luxury living just minutes outside of Washington.

CAPITOLHILL AST SE A historic gem on Capitol Hill that is on the market for the first time in 40-plus years. This commanding townhouse offers grand proportions and significant period detail. A rare side garden and in-ground pool offer tantalizing possibilities for indoor/outdoor entertaining. There is a separate garage and rental unit. It is located close to the U.S. Capitol and Supreme Court.

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ASKING PRICE: $2,150,000 LISTING AGENTS: Gary Jankowski & Michael Schaeffer, 202.439.6009, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

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MY WASHINGTON KATHERINEBRADLEY President, CityBridge Foundation BY KEVIN CHAFFEE | PORTRAIT BY TONY POWELL

When David and I first married, we lived Westend Bistro :is my go-to in Watergate East ... I never get jaded place for business lunches. I love about the beautiful Potomac River. the booths by the window.

The Eastern Shore of Maryland. My best weekends there include kayaking on the Tred Avon River.

Compass Coffee, founded by our godson Michael Haft, serves unmatched good coffee.

National Museum of African The Khalil Gibran Memorial Garden American History and Culture I on Massachusetts Ave. is so close to spend hours there and never get past my home that I was there all of the time the underground history galleries. when my boys were young. It has beauty, architectural interest, water and flowers. Don’t have a departure deadline.

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WHAT COMPELLED YOUR MISSION? In the year 2000, my CityBridge colleague Arthur McKee and I decided to study the most exciting projects happening all around the country in combating multigenerational poverty. Our search convinced us that CityBridge should work exclusively in public education, and that the early childhood field was where we should start. LOCAL STUDENTS HAVE A VERY LOW SUCCESS RATE DESPITE HAVING A LARGE PER-CAPITA OUTLAY OF TAX DOLLARS SPENT ON THEIR BEHALF. WHAT CAN BE DONE TO CHANGE THAT? My short answer: It’s working! No other city in the country has had as sustained a run of progress in our public schools as Washington, D.C. Both our traditional public and charter sectors are thriving, improving and growing, and part of the reason for that progress has been generous funding, distributed fairly across sectors. Our political leaders deserve a lot of

credit, too. We have avoided the “stop and start” politics that have slowed down progress in other cities. PLEASE SHARE ONE OF YOUR SUCCESS STORIES. It’s impossible to choose just one! KIPP DC launched early childhood programs for 3- and 4-year-olds here in 2007. Last year, Mathematica studied the impact of starting early for KIPP students in D.C. and Houston. They found tremendous positive results, even compared to the results KIPP already gets with student who start later. Believe it or not, showing results in a decade is fast in the education world. Washington Leadership Academy (WLA) opened in 2016 in a beautiful former monastery near Catholic University, renovated by John Wilkinson of the Boundary Companies. This year WLA’s 103 black and Hispanic students will take AP Computer Science. Last year, in all of D.C., the comparable number was 49 – so that’s a 210 percent increase, just based on one innovative school. WLA will increase the number of black and Hispanic women taking the test by 300 percent. This is exactly what our work should be all about. YOU AND YOUR HUSBAND DAVID ARE WELL KNOWN WASHINGTON HOSTS. HOW DO YOU MAKE YOUR GUESTS FEEL AT HOME AND WHAT ARE YOUR SIGNATURE ENTERTAINING HALLMARKS? Our home is constantly open for groups of our colleagues, for journalists, book parties and family celebrations. For large events, the secret is Susan Gage and her masterful team. When we are a smaller group, our signature is probably hot cookies, made by Emery Santo, at the end of every meal. More than one dessert is standard fare in our household.

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P H OTO C R E D I T H E R E P H OTO C RE D I T H E RE P H OTO C RE D I T H E R E

MY TOP SPOTS

YOU ARE BEST KNOWN FOR STARTING THE CITYBRIDGE FOUNDATION. WHAT DOES IT DO? Since 1994, our family foundation has been a vehicle for supporting nonprofit groups and public education in Washington, D.C. In January 2017, we created CityBridge Education, a public charity that will bring innovative public schools to market here. Education can sometimes be what we call “unpleasant by design,” a one-size-fits-all model that doesn’t take into account the diversity of our students and their need to engage with a global economy. But it doesn’t have to be that way. The next crop of public schools being designed can use personalized learning and innovative pedagogical models to engage District students in school, life and the future economy in a whole new way.


Washington Life Magazine - Holiday 2017  
Washington Life Magazine - Holiday 2017  

The 2017 Social List