Page 1


50 60

24 '328)287

64

DECEMBER 2016

O F  WA S H I N GTO N  L I F E

EDITOR'SLETTER

LIFESTYLES FASHIONEDITORIAL

FEATURES

Glitz and Glamour at the Greenbrier ........................ 

YEARSOFWASHINGTONLIFE A Walk Down Memory Lane 1991-2016 .................

TRENDREPORT

Our Favorite Portraits with Man's Best Friend .............

FASHIONFAREWELL

Society Roundtable................................................

Saks Jandel Closes its Doors .................................... 

Celebrating 25 years of Cafe Milano..........................

HEALTHWATCH

Diplomats:Where are They Now? .............................

Highlights from the Inova Summit.............................

In Memoriam:Washington Notables Remembered .........

HOTELWATCH

Black & Gold......................................................  Mary's Center 'Noche Tropical' Gala..........................  National Museum of Women in the Arts Lunch ............ 

Honoring the Librarian of Congress ........................  Citizens of Georgetown Gala ................................ 

FYIDC

Last Minute Ideas for Everyone onYour List ................

NSO Gala.........................................................  The Carmel Institute's 5th Anniversary ...................... 

MGM National Harbor ........................................

INSIDER'SGUIDE ........................................ HOLIDAYGIFTGUIDE

UNICEF Event for Syrian Refugees......................... 

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY

Spanish Catholic Center Gala ................................. 

SOCIALLIST 

Parties, Parties, Parties! ...........................................

Washington's Most Invited ......................................

PockitShip App Launch Party..................................

AROUNDTOWN

Parties, Parties, Parties! ...........................................

POLLYWOOD

The Evolution of Washington's Social Scene .................. 

Hope for Henry Bowling Benefit...............................

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

A Celebration of Diane Rehm.................................. 

Bill Murray Receives the Mark Twain Prize .................

OVERTHEMOON

HOMELIFE

Fight Night........................................................

Middleburg Chapter XXV ......................................

USO Gala.........................................................

BOOKTALK

Thurgood Marshall College Fund AwardsGala.............

Winter Reading Roundup ......................................

INSIDEHOMESMarika Meyer's Bethesda home ...  REALESTATENEWS Home for the Holidays ....... OPENHOUSE New Properties on the Market..........

WE Capital Launch Party .....................................

Sibley Gala..........................................................

MYWASHINGTON Lea Berman,

Hungarian Revolution 50th Anniversary Dinner ..........

Knock Out Abuse Gala .........................................

Former White House Social Secretary to George W. Bush .

TOP FROM LEFT: Buster Douglas, Kevin Plank and Gerry Cooney at Fight Night (Photo by Tony Powell). Susanna Quinn, Sally Quinn, Debbie Dingell and Esther Coopersmith (Photo by Tony Powell). AIDAN MATTOX bead embellished dress ($350), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; VINCE CAMUTO shoes ($150), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; TIFFANY & CO. (all these in one list?) Enchant Scroll platinum and diamond earrings ($11,000), Enchant double ring in platinum with diamonds ($6,000), Three Row Jazz Bracelet ($29,000), Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 301-657-8777 (Photo by Tony Powell) YVES SAINT LAURENT Opium 3 Leather Crossbody bag ($1,750) Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; 301- 657-9000.

8

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Nancy Reynolds Bagley EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Virginia Coyne SENIOREDITOR

Kevin Chaffee ASSOCIATEEDITORANDSENIORWEBEDITOR

Erica Moody ASSISTANTEDITOR

Catherine Trifiletti CONTRIBUTINGEDITOR

Roland Flamini COPYEDITOR

Evan Berkowitz COLUMNISTSANDCONTRIBUTINGWRITERS

Janet Donovan, Patrick McCoy,Vicky Moon, Stacey Grazier Pfarr and Donna Shor ART DIRECTOR

Matt Rippetoe PRINCIPALPHOTOGRAPHER

Tony Powell CONTRIBUTINGPHOTOGRAPHERS

Joy Asico,Tony Brown, Ben Droz, Alfredo Flores,Vithaya Phongsavan, Kyle Samperton, Erin Schaff and Jay Snap

PUBLISHER & CEO

Soroush Richard Shehabi SALESANDMARKETINGREPRESENTATIVE

John Arundel ADVERTISINGASSISTANT

Rita Khawand BOOKKEEPER

Michelle Frazer WEBTECHNOLOGIESDEVELOPMENT

Eddie Saleh,Triposs Mihail Iliev LEGAL

Mason Hammond Drake, Akerman, LLP INTERNS

Kyle Kerchaert FOUNDER

Vicki Bagley CREATIVE DIRECTOR EMERITUS (*)

J.C. Suarès CHAIRMAN, EXECUTIVE BOARD

Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased


EDITOR’S LETTER

25 YEARS STRONG

I

t is with a mixture of great fashion shoot at the Greenbrier in pride and satisfaction that I Sulphur Springs, West Virginia for write to you as Washington Life some under-the-tree inspiration. celebrates its 25th anniversary. What The long-anticipated MGM a time these years have been for National Harbor Resort and Casino those fortunate enough to have lived opens this month and we have all in the capital of our great country the details, from the iron entry arch at the end of one millennium and designed by none other than Bob the beginning of another. Our Dylan to the first-class restaurants in tumultuous city has grown in so the 24-story facility. many ways since we began and And speaking of casinos, Donald our readers would be the first to Trump, who once owned them in recognize that nearly every aspect Atlantic City, becomes our 45th At the WE Capital/Washington Life party with members of the Washington Life of life here has improved thanks to a president in January. To many of us team: Catherine Trifiletti, Virginia Coyne and Soroush Shehabi. dynamic economy, new and exciting at Washington Life, he’s no stranger. business opportunities and impressive growth in culture, the arts, Some speculate that his attendance at sporting life and the culinary scene. the 2011 White House Correspondents’ We couldn’t report on all the movers and shakers or cover every Association Dinner planted the seed for social event during that time, but we certainly made the scene quite a his presidential run. bit, even back in the early days when Washington Life was a 30-page Yearning for some non-political tabloid that came out just six times a year. distractions? Flip through this month’s To celebrate our history, the editors embarked on a trip down pages for our signature party coverage, memory lane, paging through more than 200 past issues to assemble including the WL-exclusive WE Capital a potpourri of parties and personalities that deserve a second look. launch party, the Carmel Institute’s 5th Yes, we’ve all gotten older, but we’ve grown wiser too, and I hope our anniversary celebration and the National Donald Trumps holds selections cause you to pause and reflect just as they did me. Women in the Arts gala kickoff luncheon. our April 2015 issue. Our roving columnists looked back as well. Roland Flamini’s You’ll also find the WL-sponsored Fight “where are they now” feature on well-remembered diplomats and Night/ Fight for Children, USO’s 75th national security officials is an engaging read, as are Vicky Moon’s Anniversary Gala, Sibley Hospital Gala, Thurgood Marshall College selective musings about Virginia’s famed horse country. We loved Fund Gala and Hope for Henry’s Strikes for Smiles. longtime contributor Donna Shor’s take on just how much things Be sure to check out newsstands next month for our special haven’t really changed on the social scene. Finally, we thought it Inaugural issue. In the meantime, I hope all of you have a wonderful fitting that Senior Editor Kevin Chaffee took time to pay tribute to holiday season! many rare and accomplished friends who have passed from the scene. Momentous changes have occurred and it is certain they are going to continue through equally fascinating and challenging times that lie ahead. We also turned to a quartet of women who have been fixtures on the social scene, connecting people in the media, government and business for decades, to discuss the state of society in the city, how it has changed and how it relates to power. Esther Coopersmith, the United Nancy R. Bagley States representative to the United Nations under President Jimmy Editor in Chief Carter, hosted a roundtable discussion in her Kalorama home, just days before her annual Thanksgiving dinner welcoming the newest foreign Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her ambassadors to the United States. The other formidable women in the at nbagley@washingtonlife.com group: Sally Quinn, Rep. Debbie Dingell and Susanna Quinn. Looking for things to do and gifts to buy this holiday season? Check out FYIDC for what’s happening around town in December, and don’t miss our holiday gift guide, book roundup and exquisite

12

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington BY ERICA MOODY

BOTANIC GARDEN HOLIDAY DISPLAY

SEASON’S GREENINGS

Model trains chug around plantbased renderings of national treasures like the Grand Canyon and the U.S. Capitol at the beloved annual U.S. Botanic Gardens holiday display. This year’s 100th anniversary celebration of the National Park Service will include one of the capital’s largest indoor trees decorated with ornaments from national parks. The best time to visit is on select Tuesday and Thursday evenings in December when the Conservatory is open until 8 p.m. and offers live seasonal music. Through Jan. 2, 2017, Free admission, open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., usbg.gov.

MGMTHEATERATNATIONALHARBOR When the massive new MGM National Harbor Resort & Casino opens on the banks of the Potomac this month, several of the nation’s hottest touring musical acts will be there to inaugurate the 3,000-seat MGM Theater.The inaugural month lineup includes Boyz II Men (Dec. 15), Lionel Ritchie (Dec. 22), Bruno Mars (Dec. 27) and Duran Duran (Dec. 31, Jan. 1). Acts scheduled to perform in 2017 include Kings of Leon (Jan. 12), Earth Wind & Fire (Feb. 18), Sting (March 12) and Cher (various dates in March).The Theater will also have seven VIP suites with lobby, full-service bar and catering.Tickets available at mgmnationalharbor.com.

JINGLE BALL

HOLIDAYHITMAKERS Catch all the artists you hear on the radio at Hot 99.5’s annual Jingle Ball. Meghan Trainor, The Chainsmokers, Fifth Harmony, Diplo, Ellie Goulding, DNCE, Alessia Cara, Tove Lo and Daya plus special guest Niall Horan will perform their beloved hits at the Verizon Center, with proceeds benefiting the Ryan Seacrest Foundation. Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m., Verizon Center, tickets start at $108.



rocking the holidays

GEORGETOWN GLOW & ZOOLIGHTS

SEASONOF LIGHTS

] Walk around Washington before

14

DOWNTOWN HOLIDAY MARKET

BOUTIQUEBUYS

Nix the indoor shopping center for the unique gifts of an outdoor market. The Downtown Holiday Market, now in its 12th year, features more than 150 regional artisans, crafters and boutique businesses of ethnically produced goods. Shop for jewelry, pottery, paintings and more while listening to live music, sipping hot chocolate and sampling sweet and savory treats from local restaurants. Noon to 8 p.m. through Dec. 23. F Street sidewalk in front of the Smithsonian American Art Museum & National Portrait Gallery between 7th & 9th streets NW, downtownholidaymarket.com.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

CO U RT E SY P H OTOS

it gets too cold to see the splendid public lighting fixtures of Georgetown GLOW. This year, the exhibition runs for a month, with contemporary light art juxtaposed against the backdrop of historic locations, including Grace Church and the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal. Access to all art installations is free, Georgetownglowdc.com, #GeorgetownGLOW, GeorgetownGLOWDC.com. ] Make Zoolights, the Smithsonian National Zoo’s annual light exhibition, a family holiday tradition. Half a million lights transform the park into a “winter wonderland” and musical light shows are sure to dazzle. There are winter treats, shopping opportunities and themed nights like “Date Night” and “Brew Lights.” Free admission, runs through Jan. 1, 2017, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., nationalzoo.si.edu/events/zoolights.


FYIDC | HOLIDAYGIFTGUIDE

``&)88)68,%2'3%0`` Make shopping a breeze with our guide for everyone on your list. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

*36,-1

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO US Bifold Wallet ($460), Salvatore Ferragamo CityCenterDC, 1001 H Street NW; 202-289-6610

IKE BEHAR Soft Cashmere Royal Blue Gray Scarf ($365), Ike Behar, 2900 M Street NW; 202-808-8715

LITTLE TREASURY JEWELERS SpeakeMarin Serpent Calendar Blue Watch ($12,100), Little Treasury Jewelers, 2506 New Market Lane Gambrills, Md.; 410-721-7100 GROOMING LOUNGE Double-Edged Safety Razor in Light Horn ($79), Grooming Lounge, 1745 L Street, NW; 202-466-8900 FILSON Large Duffle,Tan ($425), Filson, 1534 14th Street NW; 202-759-9570

JO MALONE Orange Bitters Cologne ($135), Jo Malone CityCenterDC, 996 I Street NW; 202-789-4239

'31*368.92/-)

CUYANA Cotton Bamboo blend Turkish Robe in Stone ($95), Cuyana, cuyana.com

RED DOOR SPA Gift Card (prices vary), Shops at Fairfax Square, 8075 Leesburg Pike, #110 Vienna,Va., 22182;703-448-8388

MAY LINDSTROM The Good Stuff Radiance Oil ($110), Follain at Union Market, 1309 5th Street NW, 844-365-5246

16

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

KIT AND ACE Burbank Shawl in Sable ($248), Kit and Ace, 3263 M Street NW, 844-548-6223

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

ALL IMAGE S COURTE SY

SHINOLA Black Shearling eye mask ($85), Shinola, 1631 14th Street NW; 202-470-0200


BEATS BY DR. DRE Beats Studio Wireless Over-Ear Headphones in Gold ($379.95), Apple, 1229 Wisconsin Avenue NW; 202-572-1460

&0-2+8,-2+7 MOËT & CHANDON Imperial in Gold Diamond Suit ($41), Rodman’s, 5100 Wisconsin Avenue, NW; 202-363-3466

PENNY PREVILLE Diamond X Ring with 0.34 carat diamonds ($2,995),Tiny Jewel Box, 1155 Connecticut Avenue NW; 202-393-2747

S’WELL FOR J.CREW Metallic Gold Water Bottle ($35), J.Crew, 3222 M Street NW; 202-965-4090

LILJENQUIST & BECKSTEAD Diamond Pear Shape Illusion Earrings ($9,250), Liljenquist & Beckstead, Shops at Fairfax Square, 8075 Leesburg Pike, Vienna,Va. 22182; 703-749-1200

DIOR “Lady Dior” croisière wallet in metallic champagne ($1,020), Dior, 933 Palmer Alley NW; 202-408-5990

78)4-894%238',

MORGENTHAL FREDERICS Rosemary frames in teal/ spotty horn ($2,195), Morgenthal Frederics CityCenterDC, 941 H Street NW; 202-204-3393

TIFFANY & CO. Victoria® mixed cluster necklace in platinum with diamonds ($1,000,000), Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, Md. 20815; 301-657-8777

CARTIER Ballon Bleu de Cartier Moonphase watch 18k Rose Gold ($45,000), Liljenquist & Beckstead Shops at Fairfax Square, 8075 Leesburg Pike,Vienna, Va. 22182; 703-749-1200 P H OTO S C O U RT E SY O F E AC H C O M PA N Y

HERMÈS Au coin du feu silk twill scarf ($395), Hermès CityCenterDC, 944 Palmer Alley NW; 202-789-4341

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

GUCCI GucciGhost Leather Tote Bag ($2,850), Gucci CityCenterDC, 1000 I Street NW; 202-795-7950

17


FYIDC | HOLIDAYGIFTGUIDE -8¸78,)0-880)8,-2+7

LINES Coaster Set ($36), Salt & Sundry, 1401 S Street NW; 202-621-6647 FITBIT Charge 2 in Blue/Silver ($149.95), fitbit.com KATE SPADE NEW YORK Pearl Place Dot Stemless Champagne Glass Set ($50), Kate Spade CityCenterDC, 994 Palmer Alley NW; 202-408-7598

PEET’S COFFEE Holiday Blend and Mug Gift Set ($23.95), Peet’s Coffee & Tea, 3299 M Street NW; 202-469-7877 CLARINS limited-edition Tonic Scented Candle ($75), clarinsusa.com

YETI 20 oz. Rambler Tumbler ($29.99), yeti.com

8,))28)68%-2)6

GREAT REPUBLIC Wine corkscrew with custom designed sterling silver inlay ($95), Great Republic, 973 Palmer Alley NW, 202-682-1812

KATE SPADE Large Charlotte Street Canister ($75), Kate Spade CityCenterDC, 994 Palmer Alley NW; 202-408-7598

MOSER Bar Decanter ($820), Neiman Marcus, 5300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, 202-966-9700

18

MIELE CM6110 Countertop Coffee System ($1,499), Miele, 8065 Leesburg Pike #110, Vienna,Va. 22182; 800-843-7231 ext. 7719

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

CALLISTO Tall Vase in Ocean ($130), Room & Board, 1840 14th Street NW; 202-729-8300

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

ALL IMAGE S COURTE SY

LAGUIOLE en Aubrac Steak Knife Set in Ebony and Ivory ($799.95), Williams & Sonoma Bethesda Row, 4824 Bethesda Ave, Bethesda, MD 20814; 301-718-3071


.)87)88)67

CAUDALIE Beauty Elixir ($49), Caudalie Boutique Spa CityCenterDC, 953 Palmer Alley NW; 202-898-0804

JETLINX Jet Card for Private Jet Membership Program (prices vary), Jetlinx, 402-991-8060; info@JetLinx.com

TUMI Alcott Backpack in Grey ($1,800), Tumi, CityCenterDC, 1051 H Street NW; 202-289-5208 LONGCHAMP Le Foulonné Passport Cover ($70), Longchamp, 990 I Street NW, 202-842-0625 ‘36 HOURS: 150 WEEKENDS IN THE USA & CANADA,’ Second Edition ($39.99), nytimes. com/store

LORO PIANA Baby Cashmere Plane Pillow in Red Berry Mel ($1,025), Loro Piana, 949 H Street NW; 202-682-4500

LAND OF NOD Perennial Playhouse ($199), landofnod.com

0-880)32)7 MONCLER Enfant Hat in White ($165), Moncler CityCenterDC, 913 Palmer Alley NW; 202-408-5249

BUCKETFEET Hookin’ Brookies Slip-ons ($40), Bucketfeet, 1924 8th St NW, #125; 202-847-3294

PAUL STEWART Cashmere baby blanket with whale motif ($275), Paul Stewart CityCenterDC, 906 I Street NW; 202-754-8866

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

RALPH LAUREN Limited-Edition Big Pony Bear ($298), Ralph Lauren, 1245 Wisconsin Avenue NW; 202-965-0905

19


POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPolitics﹐Hollywood﹐MediaandDiplomacy| Embassy Row, USO Gala, Hollywood on the Potomac and more!

Actor and comedian Bill Murray was awarded the Kennedy Center’s Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. (Photo by Tony Powell)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

21


POLLYWOOD

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

ONECOMEDICEVENING Actor and Funnyman Bill Murray Receives the Kennedy Center’s Mark Twain Prize. J A N E T D O N O VA N | P H O T O S B Y T O N Y P O W E L L

I

t was classic Bill Murray:While walking the red carpet at the Kennedy Center where he was being honored with the 2016 Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, the comedian surprised reporters by throwing a baseball down the aisle in honor of his beloved Chicago Cubs, who had just the night before advanced to the World Series for the first time since 1945. Friends and performers who doubled as the evening’s presenters and entertainment also appeared on the red carpet. “We did a love scene,” quipped Sigourney Weaver of her costarring role alongside Murray in “Ghostbusters.”

“Where the hell is my prize?” Humorist Roy Blount Jr. said Mark Twain would agree that Murray deserved the award. “Twain was not a guy who faded into the woodwork and neither is Bill.” Weaver and Blount were joined onstage in the concert hall by Jimmy Kimmel, Bill Hader, Aziz Ansari, Rhiannon Giddens, Miley Cyrus, Paul Schaffer and a bearded David Letterman, who all offered irreverent yet heartfelt tributes to their friend. Upon receiving the award – a bust of Mark Twain – Murray immediately passed it down to the audience and joked, “Thank you and good

night!” as the crowd laughed and applauded. Then Murray took on a more serious note. “It’s nice to be here and, as much as I dreaded this, I really had to come back to this idea that there is love, and that’s ultimately what we came with and what we go with,” Murray. said. “I love you and I love you. Let’s try to repeat that to each other, okay?” When asked by a reporter what was next on his bucket list, perhaps buying a Major League Baseball team and calling it the Bill Murray Cubs he responded: “I don’t think I’ll do that. I’d like to write a play and I’d like to figure out how to play guitar.”

David Letterman (Photo by Margot Schulman/Kennedy Center)

Jimmy Kimmel and Molly McNearney

Roy Blount Jr, Bill Murray and Sigourney Weaver (Photo by Margot Schulman/Kennedy Center) Bill Hader

Deborah Rutter Emma Stone Paul Shaffer

22

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


POLLYWOOD

Okieriete Onaodowan and Omar Miller Eric Ramsey and Russ Ramsey WL SPONSORED

FIGHT NIGHT Raul Fernandez, Dan Gilbert and Kevin Plank Washington Hilton | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL FIGHTNIGHTSETSNEWRECORDSKnown for its world-class entertainment, networking, cigars and steaks, Fight Night was started by the late Joseph E. Robert Jr. more than 26 years ago to raise money for atrisk youth in the District. This year’s event was bigger and better than ever, raising nearly $5.2 million for Fight For Children programs that support early childhood education. Under Armour returned as the presenting sponsor, with the company’s counder, event co-chairman Kevin Plank, on hand to celebrate along with Fight Night chairman Raul Fernandez. Nearly 2,000 guests enjoyed the evening’s magic moments, including exclusive pre- and post-receptions featuring a brand new interactive experience — a pool table hosted by Jeanette Lee, aka “The Black Widow,” once the world’s highest-ranked female pool player. Boxing legends Gerry Cooney and Earnie Shavers sat ringside with Mayor Muriel Bowser, taking in the main event, which featured undefeated prospect Daniel Franco facing Derrick Murray for the vacant U.S. Boxing Association featherweight title. Topping the evening off were live performances by Foreigner, Sheila E, “America’s Got Talent” host Sal Valentinetti, The Sugar Hill Gang, Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, and Biz Markie.

Kurt Newman, Brad Nierenberg and Michael Williams

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Leila Batties, Gloria Lawlah-Walker, Gina Adams and Marcella Jones.

Richard Kay and Ken Harvey 24

Jarrod Patten, Jack Evans and Jack Davies

Rep. John Delaney, Sen. Mark Warner and Harold Ford

Aimee Robert and Christine Robert

Neil Cohen and Chris Tavlarides WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


POLLYWOOD

Nigel Barker and JD Crouch

Jill Biden

Deshauna Barber and Kellie Pickler Elaine Rogers, Wes Bush and Natalie Bush WL SPONSORED

USO 75TH ANNIVERSARY GALA DAR Constitution Hall | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Alex Trebek and Ann Margaret

UNTILEVERYONECOMESHOMEHollywood heavyweights and local philanthropists came out for the 75th anniversary celebration of the United Services Organizations (USO), a nonprofit group that works to boost morale and provide a “Home Away from Home” to the U.S. armed forces and their families stationed around the world. Ryan Seacrest emceed the festivities at DAR Constitution Hall during an evening that included entertainment from Zac Brown Band and special guests/USO tour veterans Kellie Pickler, Alex Trebek, Ann Margaret, Carla Hall, Deshauna Barber, Craig Morgan, Nigel Barker and Trace Adkins. USO Service Members of the Year were honored as guests enjoyed a menu curated by celebrity chef Robert Irvine.

Trace Adkins VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Ryan Seacrest (Photo Courtesy USO) Service Member Honorees (Photo Courtesy USO) Janine Stange

Rachal Pichette and Lynly Boor

26

Gen. George Casey

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


T HANK YOU TO OUR MEN AN D WOME N I N U N I FO R M ...AND THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING THE USO!

2016 USO GALA Our 2016 USO Gala was especially meaningful as we celebrated our diamond anniversary. For the past 75 years we have been the Force Behind the Forces, going wherever our men and women in uniform served to keep them connected to family, home and country. Throughout those years, our mission has not changed, which is why, earlier this year, we launched a $7.5 Million Campaign to build and renovate more than 35 locations globally: from Turkey to Guam, Oklahoma to Japan, Kuwait to Alaska. This campaign will allow the USO to provide service men and women the simple comforts of home we take for granted — a hot cup of coffee, a chance to watch their favorite teams or call their child — wherever they are.These centers will host more than two million annual visits for service members. Additionally, it will allow us to reach 125,000 new service members previously without access to USO centers. On October 20, the USO celebrated and honored those who, through their incredibly generous contributions to the campaign, are enabling the USO to expand its reach, providing programs to more service members and their families here and abroad. Thanks to our generous sponsors, the funds raised from our gala went directly toward the USO’s center expansion effort.

GALA SPONSORS Chairman’s Circle: Deloitte, LLP National Football League PenFed Credit Union

Vice Chairman: Johnson & Johnson Pritzker Military Museum & Library USAA

Premier Sponsors: Chevron FedEx Huntington Ingalls Industries Lockheed Martin Corporation Northrop Grumman Corporation Yokota Foundation

2016 SERVICE MEMBERS OF THE YEAR USO SOLDIER OF THE YEAR First Sergeant Melanie D. Scott

USO AIRMAN OF THE YEAR Staff Sergeant Jonathan R. Bellio

USO MARINE OF THE YEAR Sergeant Terryn K. Thompson

USO COAST GUARDSMAN OF THE YEAR Petty Officer 2nd Class Richard A. Steidell

USO SAILOR OF THE YEAR Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary L. Arbuckle, Jr.

USO NATIONAL GUARDSMAN OF THE YEAR Staff Sergeant Clinton E. Brown

JANICE K. EMMERT USO VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR AWARD Ron Meier Ralph Nelsen Volunteer of the Year, Stateside

Volunteer of the Year, Overseas


POLLYWOOD

Traci Braxton-Stuart, Tommie Reed and Thomassina Perkins-Washington

Alexis Shokere, Rashada Turner, Jaya McFarland and Crystal Cleare

Katherine Broderick and Isabelle Clegg Roy Abdo, Jack Dorsey and Jeffrey Siminoff WL SPONSORED

Wendy Williams

THURGOOD MARSHALL COLLEGE FUND AWARDS GALA The Washington Hilton | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL DEVELOPINGMINDSNearly 1,500 contributors to a fund named for the Supreme Court’s first AfricanAmerican Justice gathered to support college scholarships at 47 publicly-supported Historically Black Colleges and Universities as well as medical and law schools. Sponsored by Koch Industries, the event honored Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, University of the District of Columbia Dean Shelley Broderick and Washington attorney Benjamin F. Wilson. “Over 400 students are here from across the country to remind us that education is an essential part of their pursuit to accomplish their goals,” said Johnny C. Taylor Jr., the Thurgood Marshall Fund’s president and CEO. Grammy winning R&B artist Peabo Bryson sang a soaring rendition of his #1 hit, “A Whole New World.” Talk show host Wendy Williams regaled guests with her New Jersey-tinged humor: “It’s the Beltway, dahling! Everyone straighten up ... I smell money in this room!” VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Benjamin Wilson

Scott and Rhonda Voynich Johnny Taylor, Jr. and Raleigh Davis

Singer V. Bozeman

28

Tom Vilsack

Renee Atwood, Jeffrey Siminoff, Debra Lee and Tobias Truvillian WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


POLLYWOOD

Josh Bernstein and Anna Mason WL EXCLUSIVE

WE CAPITAL LAUNCH

Eric Ramsey and Russ Ramsey From left: Kate Goodall, Heidi Patel, Jenny Abramson, Ami Aronson, Carol Melton, Sheila Johnson, Michelle Freeman, Gail MacKinnon, Sachiko Kuno, Jodie McLean, Linda Youngentob, Karen Schaufeld and Sharon Virts

Halcyon House | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL FEMALEPIONEERSGuests knowingly nodded at this Washington Life and Lowenstein Sandlersponsored launch party for the women of WE Capital as venture capitalist Heidi Patel explained that although women make up over 80 percent of the buying power in the country, the vast majority of businesses and investment firms are led and dominated by men. The members of WE Capital, a new consortium of women investors seeking to fund social change, wants to change that equation. With the support of venture capitalists Jenny Abramson and Patel of Rethink Impact, the 12 women have already committed over $12 million to companies with women on the management team. Dr. Sachiko Kuno and Sheila C. Johnson brought the group together in an effort to “pay it forward.� VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Hunter, Lyn and Mark McFadden

Alexis Kaufmann, Penny Lee and Tammy Haddad 30

Susanna Quinn, Laura Evans, Jack Davies and Kay Kendall

Sherrie Beckstead, Barbara McDuffie, Sid Beckstead and Alice Haase

Erin Hogan, Karen Wawrzaszek and Laura Gail Smith

Bob Hisaoka and David Lawson

Lou Aronson and David Gorodetski

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Katharine Weymouth and Rebecca Fishman

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


POLLYWOOD

Japanese Amb. Kenichiro Sasae, Nobuko Sasae and Bill Nitze Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson, Hungarian Amb. Reka Szemerkenyi and Ari Fleischer

WL EXCLUSIVE

Adrienne Vittadini

HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION 50TH ANNIVERSARY DINNER Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Aniko Gaal Schott and Sandor Erdei

REMEMBERINGAREVOLUTIONLeaders of Washington’s political, diplomatic, corporate and cultural communities gathered to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and to honor the bravery and commitment of the young freedom fighters who struggled so bravely against overwhelming odds. Dinner (foïe gras, veal paprikas, Dobos torta), a film tribute and performances by Hungarian musicians and singers topped off an evening of tributes on behalf of the 3,000 revolutionaries who lost their lives as well as the 200,000 refugees who fled after the Soviet invasion. “They were a special people,” said emcee Ari Fleischer, whose mother was a Hungarian immigrant. “They not only resurrected themselves, they survived and excelled.”

Former New York Gov. George Pataki and Steven Udvar-Hazy

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

32

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


SPECIAL FEATURE

O F  WA S H I N GTO N  L I F E Four presidents later we’re still going strong, despite being born into a ‘wobbly’ world.

W

hen President George H.W. Bush was wrestling with the decision to resist Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait, Margaret Thatcher famously urged him, “This is no time to go wobbly, George” – an English nanny phrase meaning no time for hesitation or uncertainty. That was August 1990. By February 1991 – six months later – Operation Desert Storm was over. A U.S.led allied coalition had chased Saddam out of Kuwait and blocked his attempted incursion into Saudi Arabia, but had stopped short of advancing into Iraq to finish the job, at least for the time being. Yet in other respects 1991 would turn out to be a wobbly year. The end of the Cold War and the unraveling of the Soviet empire led to uncertainty about the future political shape of Europe. In the Gulf, one of the war’s unintended consequences was the emergence of an Islamic militant named Osama bin Laden to protest the deployment on holy ground (in other words, in Saudi Arabia) of F16s and AWACs, and U.S. women military not wearing burkas. At home, a recession which gave rise to 7.8 percent unemployment cast a shadow over

34

victory in the desert, contributing to the defeat of George Bush senior. Democrats, for 12 years removed from The White House, were quietly regrouping after finding themselves in the political wilderness. Two Washington doyennes, both longtime socialites and DNC fundraisers, Pamela Harriman and Esther Coopersmith, held salons to keep spirits up and introduce friends to fresh Democratic leadership. At one of her famous salons in 1991, Harriman introduced the media and political establishment to a little-known Southern governor, Bill Clinton, and the rest is history. In Clinton’s wake came a swarm of newcomers whose melding with the denizens of Washington was recorded in a city magazine that was itself new on the scene. It was called Washington Life. For a lively quarter of a century, Washington Life has chronicled changing shifts in taste, power, and relationships through coverage of its revels, rituals and celebrations. It has paid tribute to the generous, shed light on the powerful and saluted the talented. From our launch in September 1991, the magazine offered a photo gallery of party-

ing Washingtonians at balls, charity events, and receptions – leading personalities in politics, business, fashion, the arts and sciences, even the church, at first mostly in black-and-white, but soon in resplendent color. And things haven’t gone wobbly for Washington Life. The large format tabloid bimonthly soon increased to eight issues a year, until 2005, when it went to a high quality bound formatt—and jumped again in frequency to 10 times a year. With time, its mission evolved to become more closely identified with its core readership and their charities. In 1993 our annual Washington Life diplomatic issue was first published, featuring listings and stories about the 200 or so foreign ambassadors in the nation’s capital. In 1994 we introduced the Social List with about 350 prominent names.When it started burgeoning to double that, an off-shoot was created for the A-List, and then another, the Power 100, to identify the city’s real power brokers. A Philanthropic 50 feature was a logical next step for us, to celebrate the generous giving among the broad spectrum of area residents. Younger readers were not neglected either,

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


O U R  B I G G E S T  FA N S ;

From L to R: Misty Copeland with Associate Publisher John Arundel, Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough, Former Rep. Aaron Schock, Gio Fernandez’s dog (via Fernandez’s Instagram account) and Donald Trump with issues of Washington Life.

and since 2005 the magazine has featured an annual Young and The Guest List (YGL) which highlights under-40 movers and shakers across different fields. The environment is another of our enduring concerns, reflected in the publication of periodic features (Who’s Next and Innovators and Disruptors) on this hot topic as smart, ambitious millennials and tech-savvy entrepreneurs have continued to pour into the Washington area, offering up their ideas and talent. And then there is its coverage of changes in urban Washington itself—especially its increased cultural activity and its burgeoning restaurant scene. Downtown Washington, once deserted at night with footsteps echoing off the walls of empty buildings, came alive. The District has earned a new reputation as a theater district (faintly ironic in a city where a president was assassinated watching a play), and gone are the days of run-of-the-mill steak houses and starchy, tourist fare. The sidewalks ceased from rolling up at five o’clock; some nights now you can sit in a traffic jam at midnight on K Street, with so many new clubs and restaurants opening each month. A quantum leap in the number and quality of our region’s restaurants received official acknowledgement earlier this year with the publication of Washington’s own Michelin Guide. Franco Nuschese’s Cafe Milano, which opened its doors shortly after we opened ours in 1992, is an old standby that’s more than holding its own. The city’s dining renaissance has attracted a bumper crop of talented

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

(and now famous) chefs to the city, including Jose Andres, Spike Mendelsohn, Bryan Voltaggio, Mike Isabella, Robert Wiedmaier and Eric Ziebold, while others like Daniel Boulud, Wolfgang Puck and Art Smith made their reputations elsewhere but decided that Washington is the new “must” for planting their culinary flags. The rash of new construction in the past five years is slowly changing the city’s appearance. Some developers are hoping that having one of their kind as president (whose own home is on the 60th floor of a Manhattan skyscraper) would increase the chances of removing Washington’s long-established Height Act that limits the elevation of buildings to about 110 feet. Washington’s traditional memorial landscape is also on the verge of change. The National Park Service has launched a competition to design a new national memorial space to be called “America’s Front Yard.” Why? Because Congress has declared the Mall, focal point of the nation’s memory, history and identity a “completed work of art.” Following the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture the Mall now has an official “full up” sign. Today, political transients, the periodic turnover of administration staff, are no longer the main ingredient of its population. The new hitech industrial belt around the city has lured a younger labor force to the area.These newcomers work in Virginia or Maryland, but are urbanites by preference and opt to live in the District. Developers rose to the occasion, creating

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

upscale neighborhoods like 14th and U streets in Northwest Washington – in the process pushing out the area’s longtime less affluent locals, say critics. In 1991, the population of metropolitan Washington was 600,870. By 2015, it had risen to 672,228, and the makeup of residents had become much more diverse. The millennials had discovered D.C. Washington “attracted more of these educated, diverse, twenty-something during the recession and recovery, growing its millennial population at a rate of 60 percent above that of the total U.S. in 2012 and 2013,” according to a report in January by the Kogod School of Business at American University. For millennials, the report went on, “Washington is 25 percent more attractive than other U.S. locations.” Don’t we know it. After 25 years of sitting in the front row of the city’s resurgence and its cultural, dining and philanthropic renaissance, and watching its evolution from just a “government town” to a city driven by changes in technology, defense, media and the internet, we feel blessed and fortunate that our readers and advertisers have sustained us for so long, to capture the changes, excitement —and yes, buzz — bracing our constantly evolving city. But as we like to think, we changed in so many ways as the city changed, adapting to an even more sophisticated and smart readership that came and remade a new, rejuvenated Washington.

35


SPECIAL FEATURE

CELEBRATINGYEARS

THROUGHTHEYEARS… AQUARTERCENTURYOFWASHINGTONLIFE

President George H.W. Bush and Mrs. Bush were caught in a silly moment for our “Off Guard” feature

FORMAL DEBUT: Washington Life Magazine launched in September of 1991, quickly becoming the city’s definitive chronicler of society events, culture, diplomacy and power in the nation’s capital.



“This magazine does not purport to be of a serious nature.There are too many wonderful hardline news publication in that area.What this magazine does instead is give you the other side, the happy side, the beautiful side.”

Our October cover showed partygoers giving a thumbs up at the Washington Life kick-off party at the Ritz Carlton



Rep. John Dingell, Loni Anderson, Larry Hagman and Lynda Carter were among the walkers at the 1991 Race for the Cure

–FOUNDERANDPUBLISHERVICKIBAGLEY

FIGHT NIGHT >> The second annual Fight for Children’s “Fight Night,” founded by Joseph E. Robert Jr. brought in celebrities from around the country raised over $100,000 to benefit local childrens’ charities.

Boxing legend Sugar Ray Leonard and Tommy Hearns at Fight Night

“Grand Acquisitor” Clement Conger was honored by Secretary of State James Baker, four of his predecessors and their respective wives at a gala 1992 dinner marking his long career as curator of the State Department’s Diplomatic Reception Rooms. Back row, from left to right: Edmund Muskie, William Rogers, Conger, Baker, Henry Kissinger and Alexander Haig. First row, seated from left to right: Jane Muskie, Adele Rogers, Susan Baker, Nancy Kissinger and Patricia Haig.

36

Sylvain Melloul with Mirella and Daniel Levinas at the Barlow Building holiday shopping spree benefiting the American Cancer Society.

CLOSE UP WITH THE MATTHEWS: Then-San Francisco Examiner Washington bureau chief Chris Matthews and Channel 7 anchor Kathleen Matthews welcomed Washington Life into their home and to meet their young children, Michael, Thomas and Caroline. “I care about the country and how it’s run politically…I have the unusual privilege of writing about it and talking about it for a living, with no restraints,” Chris Matthews told us long before his “Hardball” days.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


 TIM RUSSERT ROAST: Luminaries from journalism and politics attended the Spina Bifida Association’s Tim Russert Roast, helping raise $200,000 for the cause.

Mary McGrory, Helen Orth, Tim Russert and Maureen Orth

Eunice and Maria Shriver at the Tim Russert Roast

Celebrities Dana and Christopher Reeve, Quincy Jones, Natasha Kinsky, Faye Dunaway and Carly Simon converged on Washington for President Clinton’s inauguration

Evangeline Bruce and Paul Nitze at his 85th birthday party

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Placido Domingo and James Wolfensohn at the Opera Ball

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Vernon Jordan and Colin Powell at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner

NEW ADMINISTRATION, NEW ERA: The February issue welcomed the Clinton administration and the 103rd Congress to town and featured an in depth “get to know you” congressional directory listing members’ spouses, hobbies and previous occupations. “We hope that this magazine will remind you that it’s okay to add balance to your lifestyle and have a little fun as well,” Vicki Bagley wrote to the newcomers in her publisher’s letter.



Phyllis George holds her book, “Craft in America” at a party in her honor at at the home of Buffy Cafritz

EMBASSY ROW: The September/October issue featured our first annual ambassadors directory, putting contact info and personal information about every ambassador at our reader’s fingertips.

BIG BIRTHDAY: Paul Nitze, President Lyndon Johnson’s Navy secretary, turned 85 and celebrated with Amb. Sol Linowitz, C. Boyden Gray, Strobe Talbott and Evangeline Bruce at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel.

Arianna Huffington holds daughter Isabella at the Entertaining People Gala.

ON THE TOWN First Lady Hillary Clinton made headlines when she attended the premiere of “Only You,” a romantic comedy starring Marisa Tomei and Robert Downey, Jr.

37


SPECIAL FEATURE

CELEBRATINGYEARS

 THE IRON LADY: Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher celebrated her 70th birthday at Union Station with a dinner hosted by former first lady Nancy Reagan and former Canadian first lady Mila Mulroney. Barbara Walters, Diane Sawyer and Georgette Mosbacher were among the high profile guests.

Lady Margaret Thatcher

Bill and Elayne Bennett with Gaye and Stanley Gaines

SOCIAL DIRECTORIES: INSIDE THE WHITE HOUSE: Our first-ever Galas and Author Ron Kessler released his controversial Balls directory debuted book “Inside the White House.” Publishers in September 1995, as Weekly wrote: “He shows Lyndon Johnson well as the first Social as a vulgar megalomaniac, Nixon as almost “A” list. The now-called pathologically shut in, Carter as a petty nitpicker, “Balls and Galas” Reagan as dominated by his icy wife, Bush directory continues to as barely able to tolerate people en masse be an annual feature and Clinton as such a compulsive womanizer while the Social List as to make Jack Kennedy seem celibate.” and A List are now two different compilations



National Symphony Orchestra Ball chair Lynda Webster Judy Woodruff and Al Hunt

LOVE STORIES: A special Valentine’s Day issue detailed the “how they met stories” of prominent Washington couples like Al Hunt and Judy Woodruff, Colleen and Sen. Sam Nunn and Arianna and Michael Huffington. “We first met in July of 1976 playing a game of softball between the press and the Secret Service. Judy and I were on the same team, and frankly I was taken by her,” recalled Hunt.

38

LUXURY HOMES: Our Real Estate column highlighted the sale of Marwood, an historic Beaux-Arts estate in Potomac, once leased by Joseph P. Kennedy as a weekend and summer retreat. Kennedy hosted President Franklin D. Roosevelt there, reportedly installing an elevator for him. The home fetched $2 million. Today the home is owned by Monumental Sports CEO Ted Leonsis.

Sen. Ted Kennedy and Vicki Kennedy at the Kennedy Center’s 25th Anniversary Gala

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Rep. Loretta Sanchez and Sen. Mary Landrieu at the Women’s Ball

POLITICAL WEDDING: Vice President Al Gore and Tipper Gore’s daughter Karenna married Dr. Andrew Schiff at the National Cathedral on July 14, 1997. The rehearsal dinner was held at Meridian House and the reception following the ceremony was at the Vice President’s residence.

FOUR MORE YEARS: The first issue of 1997 covered the inaugural balls marking the start of President Bill Clinton’s second term. “One complaint partygoers did have was the lack of star power compared to four years ago,” wrote columnist Braden Keil.



Karenna Gore and Andrew Schiff

Letitia Baldrige with Mary and Michael Haft at a book signing for Baldrige’s book “More Than Manners,” where the author publicly thanked young Michael for his persistent questions about kindess and protocol while she was writing the tome.

Debbie Dingell and Marlene Malek at the Children’s Inn at NIH Gala

STYLISH WOMEN: An end-of-the year feature identified Washington’s ten most stylish women, including Aniko Gaal Schott whom we labeled “Audrey Hepburn comes to Washington” and the “exotic” Marlene Cooke for “turning heads when she walks into a room.” Knock Out Abuse gala founders Jill Robert and Cheryl Masri graced the cover of the holiday issue.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com



Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and husband John O’Connor at the Meridian Ball

39


SPECIAL FEATURE



CELEBRATINGYEARS

Sean Penn and JFK Jr. mingle at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner on the cover of our September 1999 Balls and Galas issue

STARR ABOUT TOWN: The Clinton sex scandal dominated the news in the late 1990s and its key players were out in full force, both in the courtroom and on the social scene. Prosecutor Kenneth Starr (author of the infamous “Starr Report”) and his wife Alice attended the Mount Vernon Candlelit Dinner.

LUCK OF THE IRISH: Actor Malachy McCourt and activist Kerry Kennedy attend Project Children’s ‘An Irish Valentine’ benefit at the Kennedy Center.

BUSH FAMILY ANTICS: Long before he engaged in “locker room talk” with president-elect Donald Trump, TV host Billy Bush lit up the scene in Washington. Here, at the esteemed Capital Club’s popular summertime event, the Sinatra Soiree.

HATS & HORSES: Charitable givers Carole Randolph and Kay Kendall (a board member of the Washington Ballet for more than 25 years) donned fancy hats for a polo match to benefit the company.

 40

ACCESS POLLYWOOD: A Best Buddies benefit was one of the top social events of the year, raising more than $750,000. “Access Hollywood” host Nancy O’Dell emceed the event which featured guests including Muhammad Ali, Ethel Kennedy and Thora Birch.

COMIC RELIEF: The Kennedy Center’s annual prize for American Humor brought comic legend Robin Williams and his wife Marsha Garces to Washington.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


  PEACE AND UNDERSTANDING: Queen Noor presented Grammy-award winning musician Sting with the Arab American Institute’’s “Spirit of Humanity” award for his work in promoting cross cultural understanding. “I think we can count Sting among the heroes of our time,” she said.

BOOKISH LADIES: Mary Regula and Coretta Scott King joined Hillary Clinton at the First Ladies’ Literary Gala at the National Museum for Women in the Arts.

THE DONALD HITS PALM BEACH: We don’t just cover Washington, but also the places Washingtonians travel. Sunny Palm Beach is at the top of that list. Back in 2001, we featured Donald Trump at the Red Cross Ball (Palm Beach’s most anticipated gala season soiree, held at his palatial residence Mar-aLago) with beautiful first lady-to-be Melania Knauss.

FRIENDLIER TIMES: U.S. relations with Russia were warmed when former President Mikhail Gorbachev visited Washington for a benefit event in aid of his late wife Raisa’s foundation for cancer research.

ELEVEN YEARS STRONG: Fabulous food, fun and conversation were had at our 11th anniversary soiree.

STYLISH MEN: “Men of Substance and Style” was a hit feature of the year. Fabulous men of Washington including Monumental Sports & Entertainment owner Jack Davies were photographed in the places they love. For Davies, that was a hockey rink. Go Caps!

Our October 2002 cover featured Congressman Mike Thompson and his wife Janet with their dog Katie.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

 

Nancy Bagley, Amb. Sir Christopher Meyer and Lady Meyer and Vicki Bagley

A VISION IN RED: Legendary TV host Oprah Winfrey turned heads at the annual Kennedy Center Honors. Lolo Sarnoff and Blaise Mills

Liz Boyer and Gene Sperling

41


SPECIAL FEATURE

CELEBRATINGYEARS

 

Chloe Cockburn, Olivia Wilde and Leslie Cockburn at Olivia’s wedding at Firefly Farm in Virginia

Our 2003 Ambassadors Issue focused on the lives of diplomatic wives, including Rima Al-Sabah of Kuwait, Rokela Ruperez of Spain and Pamela M. Aparacio of Bolivia.

STORYBOOK WEDDINGS: From actress Olivia Wilde to Emily Harrison, daughter of NBC 4 anchor Barbara Harrison, the best weddings in Washington have been documented in our pages.

Colombian Amb. Luis Alberto Moreno and Israeli Amb. Daniel Ayalon at the 25th annual Ambassadors Ball at the Grand Hyatt.

Prince and Princess Pahlavi at a book party for Farah Pahlavi’s autobiography.

JOURNALISTS ON STAGE: The late Gwen Ifill and Holly Morris delighted the audience with their comedy act during a benefit at Arena Stage to raise funds for the community engagement and education division.

  42

Thievery Corporations’ Rob Garza and friend Patricia

Actor Jeff Goldblum and then-fiance Catherine Wielord at the Helen Hayes Awards.

Social butterflies Winston Bao Lord, the late Gertrude d’Amecourt and Ann Walker Marchant graced the cover of our 2004 holiday issue.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


 

Kuwaiti Amb. Salem Al-Sabah, Angelina Jolie and Colin Powell at the Kuwait American Foundation Benefit dinner for Iraqi refugees

HORSE COUNTRY CHIC: Three years before famously crashing a White House state dinner while filming “Real Housewives of DC,” Michaele Salahi, a model and then-wife of Oasis Winery owner Tareq Salahi was featured donning cashmere and tweed pieces in our fashion pages.

POWER COUPLE: Ben Bradlee and Sally Quinn discussed Deep Throat, politics, Washington’s social scene and their relationship in the November issue. “I like Ben’s energy. And as much as it annoys me, I like his sense of invincibility,” Quinn said of her husband.

Calvin and Jane Cafritz

 

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Glickman, Christiane Amanpour…

WA SH I N G TO N’S PR E M I ER LUXURY LIFEST YLE MAGA Z I N E S I N C E 19 91

FASH IONABLE MASTERPIECES SPRING’S HOTTEST LOOKS DOCK AT THE PHILLIPS COLLECTI

ON

WASHINGTONLIFE

GOING, GOING, GONE! YOUR GUIDE TO ART, PLUS! PLÁCIDO DOMINGO ON M A R C H 2 0 0 6 % $ 3. 5 0

Carol Blue and Christopher Hitchens at the Washington Life party

The “Luncheon of the Boating Party” by Pierre Auguste Renoir was returning to its home at the Phillips Collection after being on loan for several years to various museums around the world. For our March 2006 cover, we dressed up the board of directors of the museum to celebrate its return.

Robert Redford, Pat Mitchell, Glenn Close, Dan

Sp

MAYOR TO BE: He hadn’t yet been elected, but popular young mayor-apparent Adrian Fenty and his glamorous then-wife Michelle opened their home to Washington Life. “Government should be measured by what officials do for the people who have the least,” said Fenty.

Pamela Sorensen stunned in a Carolina Herrera gown for our Balls & Galas feature ce r! an la nd cu Su ecta

ANNIVERSARY PARTY: Washington Life celebrated its first 15 years with an A-list cast of friends at the residence of the Kuwaiti ambassador. Cabinet secretaries, congressional leaders, real estate and tech executives, prominent journalists and society staples stopped by to raise a glass.

AND

ANTIQUES AND AUCTIONS

THE OPERA’S 50TH ANNIVERSARY

PARTIES, PARTIES, PARTIES!

LEFTTORIGHT;RICHARDRUTLEDGEC AROLINECUNNINGHAMPEGGYHUNTERGE TRISHVRADENBURGBRIANDAILEYTOASTTH ORGEVRADENBURG ERETURNOFRENOIR’SLUNCHEONOFTHEBO ATINGPARTY

43


SPECIAL FEATURE

CELEBRATINGYEARS

ETIQUETTE FOR THE MASSES: Ann Nitze, Letitia Baldridge and others dished about houseguest etiquette in our summer travel issue. Jane Stanton Hitchcock’s advice: “Just pretend you’re in a play. Act well and get off the stage before they want to give you the hook.”



Donald Trump, Bonnie McElveen-Hunter and Melania Trump at the 2007 International Red Cross Ball at Mar a Lago, Palm Beach

Barbara Harrison and JoAnn Mason

POP POLITICS: In a playful cover feature “Condi’s Opus,” columnist Roland Flamini discusses politics through a make believe conversation between then Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and the ghost of Ludwig Beethoven. (illustrations by J.C. Suares)



Chris Matthews, Andrea Mitchell Alan Greenspan at “Hardball’s” 10th Anniversary Party

FANTASY LAND: We gathered successful women and asked them to reveal their secret passions. Debbie Dingell saw herself as a four-star hotelier, Sally Quinn fantasized about being a chanteuse and former chief of staff to Jacqueline Kennedy Letitia Baldrige envisioned herself as a makeup expert. Photographer Clay Blackmore helped the imaginative ladies make their dreams a reality for a day.

STRAPPED WITH CASH: Ralph Waldo Emerson once said “Money often costs too much,” and in our June 2007 issue we took inventory of Washington’s wealthiest to see if indeed that was the case. We confirmed that there was a serious commitment to philanthropic causes – so we launched our “Philanthropy 50” feature to highlight the causes near and dear to wealthy Washingtonians.

Robert Duvall, Mary Mochary and Jaylee Mead in 2008 at the WPAS Opening Night

Pat Schoeder as a superhero

SOAKING IN SUNDANCE: Politicians including Mayor Adrian Fenty and Sen. Mark Warner, made their way to the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah to see the premiere of Ted Leonsis’ production of “Kicking It” a Susan Koch, Neil Barrett documentary about the Homeless World Cup of soccer, narrated by Colin Farrell. WL publisher Soroush Richard Shehabi, who brought the production to Leonsis, was one of the executive producers together with Jack Davies, Mark Ein, Raul Fernandez, Sheila Johnson, Nigel Morris, Doug Smith and Rick Allen. Washington Life hosted dinners and parties at the festival where Washington celebrities mingled with Hollywood celebs, which we chronicled in our Pollywood pages.

44

Roxanne Roberts, Kevin Chaffee and Bill Paley at a dinner dance in Chaffee’s honor

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

2007/2008 Highlights: Opening of the Harman Center for the Arts National Italian American Foundation Gala Honoring Martin Scorcese Dinner and Dancing Honoring Kevin Chaffee Meet the Press 60th Anniversary Inaugural Joan Hisaoka “Make a Difference” Gala

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

TO P O F PAG E : CO U N T E R C LO C K W I S E : P H OTO BY N E S H A N N A LTC H AYA N ; P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L ; P H OTO BY LU C I E N C A P E H A RT; B OT TO M H A L F O F PAG E : P H OTO BY C L AY B L AC KM O R E ; P H OTO BY N O E L RYA N ; P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L

Arturo and Hilda Ochoa Brillembourg at the Washington Ballet’s Noche Latina!


Ben Affleck and Sarah Silverman at the WL Hosted Pollywood Pre-Ball Dinner in 2009 (Photo by Tony Powell)

ETHEREAL FASHION: Our May fashion feature captured the grace and elegance of Washington Ballet dancers in motion. Gala gowns never looked so good!

At the Kuwait-America Foundation Dinner attended by Leonardo DiCaprio and his mother, hostessextraordinaire Rima Al-Sabah joined her husband Kuwaiti Ambassador Salem Al-Sabah to thank donors for their conservation efforts in Brazil and Indonesia.

Rima Al-Sabah and Leonardo DiCaprio (Photo by Vicky Pombo)

TO P O F PAG E : C LO C K W I S E : P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L , P H OTO BY R OY C OX , P H OTO BY V I C K Y P O M B O. B OT TO M H A L F O F PAG E C LO C K W I S E : P H OTO BY K Y L E S A M P E RTO N , P H OTO BY K Y L E S A M P E RTO N , P H OTO BY TONY POWELL , PHOTO BY TONY POWELL , PHOTO BY TONY POWELL PHOTO BY TONY POWELL AND PHOTO BY JOSEPH ALLEN.

  MODERNROMANTIC

EDENRAFSHOON Careful attention to detail pays off handsomely for this Georgetown style icon.

SOUTHERNBELLE

BONNIEMCELVEENHUNTER Long live glamorous

SILVERSCREENSTYLE

gowns! The American Red Cross chairman brings old Hollywood pizzazz to the city’s black-tie soirées.

SUSANPILLSBURY This former dancer and social butterfly wears bold, brightly-colored gowns that set her apart from the usual sea of black dresses.

GALAGLAMOUR

ANTONIAGORE Feathers, floor-length gowns, and flourishes to match define black-tie style in the capital.

FASHIONINGÉNUE

FEATURE | FAVORITEROOMS

Jared Nelson leaping over Jade Payette. (Photo by Roy Cox)

SPHERES OF INFLUENCE: Americans responded to the message of “hope” and elected Barack Obama as the country’s first African American president. WL tapped its contacts to get the scoop on his inner circles and key administration appointments. Our special inauguration feature ended up being 80 percent accurate– a testament to our robust Rolodex. We commissioned street artist Shepard Fairey to ink our collector’s edition cover. With the swearing in of a new commander-in-chief, came parties. Lots of them. We bounced around and sent our photographers in a tizzy trying to capture the smitten celebrities as they laid claim to the nation’s capital, making past White House Correspondent’s’ weekends look like peanuts.

Purposeful Partying: Vital Voices Global Leadership Awards where thenSecretary of State Hillary Clinton was presented with an award and declared a “Global Trailblazer”

WARDROBE WINNERS: Pushing back on the sometimesaccurate stereotype that Washington is not fashion-forward, we crafted our first ever fashion awards. Our courage in the face of snooty sartorialists came from our fearless fashion leader First Lady Michelle Obama. Among the chicest: Mary Haft for her “Polished Preppy” style and Jim Kimsey for his “Classic Charm.”

 

GREEN ENTREPRENEUR: We caught up with Nathaniel Ru for our Who’s Next column two years into his fast casual salad venture, Sweetgreen. Maybe you’ve heard of it. The small salad shop, which Ru co-founded with two fellow Georgetown University students, has grown into a culinary empire with over 50 locations spread across eight states.

ASHLEYTAYLOR With youthful effervescence, this gemologist seamlessly combines a preppy penchant with

THEREBEL

HEATHERPODESTA Podesta never lets tradition smother her astonishing sense of style, wearing creations h d i di id li

CREATIVECOCKTAIL

Victor Shargai and Angela Lansbury at the Signature Theatre Gala

NINIFERGUSON Never fearful of color or patterns, her flair for fashion perks up any special event.

Laura Bush and Lea Berman at Laura Bush’s Book Party

Wade Davis in his Travis Price-designed studycum-home office.

KISSES CAPTURED:

EYES UP: National Geographic Society Explorer- in- Residence Wade Davis impressed us with his Travis Price-designed home office

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Meridian International Center Celebrates 50 Years! Huda and Samia Farouki at the Meridian Ball

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Michael and Suan Pillsbury at the Opera Ball

ONE ON ONE WITH THE DONALD: Before being elected leader of the free world, Donald Trump sat down with us to talk about his recently opened Trump National Golf Club in Virginia. Political chatter was not off the record though. Of Susanna Quinn, Winston Bao Lord Sharon Bradley, and Washington leaders he said “ There’s a lot Jamie Dorros at the Washington Ballet’s Spring Gala of very bad management of our economy.”

REALITY BITES: Bravo’s first and last season of “Real Housewives of D.C.” aired starring the infamous state dinner party crashers, the Salahis.

“Snowmageddon” took Washington by storm, literally.

45


SPECIAL FEATURE

CELEBRATINGYEARS

 

POLLYWOOD

TheNexusofPoliticsďš?Hollywoodďš?MediaandDiplomacy|The BET Honors and After Party, Inside Sundance and the film “Arabia 3D

Gina Adams and Carol Lascaris at the LUNGevity Celebration of Hope

PHILLIP’S COLLECTION TURNS 90: The beloved art gallery off Dupont Circle turned 90 and we gathered all the reasons why it is one of the most romantic spots in the city. Renoir’s “Luncheon of the Boating Party� (1881) is number one.

Iman at the BET Honors

Iman at the BET Honors. (Photo byTony Pow

| M A R C H      | washingtonlife.com

an earthquake hits the district thoroughly confusing everyone DINING GUIDANCE: We dabbled with a food guide as Washington slowly began ditching starchy white table cloths to loosen up with experimental cuisine. At the forefront was our friend JosĂŠ AndrĂŠs making a splash in the national dining scene with his James Beard Outstanding Chef Award. We can look back and applaud AndrĂŠs’ foresight “Washington is a dynamic city with a lot of tradition but we are always looking to become better.â€? Abigail Adams Greenway

Rep. John Dingell and Debbie Dingell at the Folger Gala

  CLIMATE VOYAGE: Christy and Scott Wallace joined former Vice President Al Gore on a trip to Antarctica to see the damaging effects of climate change on the environment. They reported back for our annual Earth Day issue.

Ann and Lloyd Hand at their 60th Anniversery party at Cafe Milano

CAPITAL PORTRAITS: The National Portrait Gallery capitalized on a unique opportunity to exhibit art work from the personal collections of Washington’s prominent art enthusiasts. We sprung into action, taking portraits of owners with their prized pieces. Pictured: Ina Ginsburg with a portrait of herself by Andy Warhol

Dr. David Reines and Nina Totenberg at the Opera Ball EXCLUSIVE ART AND POLITI CS MINGLE AT SUNDA NCE FILM FESTIVAL

WASHINGTONLIFE

MARCH 2012



Aniko Gaal Schott at the Trust for the National Mall Lunch

$ 7.9 5

WISTFUL WONDERLAND: The Washington Ballet premiered Alice in Wonderland and we put its quirk to work in our March fashion spread by Dean Alexander.

Balls Galas THEESSENTIALGUIDETOTHEYEAR’SBESTEVENTS PHOTOGRAPHYBY TONYPOWELL WWW TONY-POWELL COM

INTERVIEW HIGHLIGHTS: Sharon Stone actress and global ambassador for amfAR, sat down with Janet Langhart Cohen to talk about her role raising awareness for HIV/AIDS. Violin virtuoso Joshua Bell on his experience playing as an icognito street performer outside of the metro: “It was about how people react to music in a context where they are not expecting it.� Martha Raddatz of ABC News advised young journalists to “dive deep� and “pay attention to the bigger stories.�

46

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

PHOTOGRAPHEDATTHEJEFFERSONHOTEL THST NW LIGHTINGASSISTANTS    

HAIRBYDARRELL THOMPSON THEARTISTAGENCY DARRELLTHOMPSON COM WITHASSISTANT HAIRSTYLISTS DIONNEANDERSON KEISHAGEORGE KISHAMARIEANDRAMĂ“N NAILSBY   #!   !MAKEUPBY KENYETTAGREENE VALENTINAGRETSOVAANDALINAGRECHANA-KARAMAN USINGFACEATELIERCOSMETICS

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Annie Magruder (Taste of the Stars 2012); Chris Edwards (Honoring the Promise); Sara Lange, Indira Mehrpour, Ava Deylami (Twb’s Dracula SoirÊe); Ashley and Matt Bronczek (Honoring the Promise & Meridian’s White-meyer Dinner); Kiki Ryan, Jason A. Denby, Erica Crocker (Honoring the Promise); and Nasim Deylami (Twb’s Dracula SoirÊe)

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

T O P O F P A G E C L O C K W I S E : P H O T O B Y J A S O N VA R N E Y; P H O T O B Y T O N Y P O W E L L , P H O T O B Y K Y L E S A M P E R T O N , P H O T O B Y T O N Y P O W E L L , P H T O B Y T O N Y P O W E L L A N D P H O T O B Y J A M E S B R A N T L E Y. B O T T O M H A L F O F P A G E : P H O T O B Y J O S E P H ALLEN, PHOTO BY TONY POWELL , PHOTO BY TONY POWELL , PHOTO BY TONY POWELL , PHOTO BY TONY POWELL

SHINGTON LIFE


GRAND ESTATE: We crossed District lines to tour Frank Islam’s 47,000 -square-foot mega mansion in Potomac that pays homage to the White House’s signature presidential aesthetic. Islam showed us his entertaining lounge, complete with floor-to-ceiling murals of the Capitol, White House and Lincoln Memorial.

HOME LIFE

 

RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandMyWashington RealEstateNewsandOpenHouse|To come

Dr. Robert Marrshall, Capricia Marshall, Lee Satterfield and Patrick Steele

J.C. Suares

REMEMBERING J.C.: 2013 stands out in our mind as we lost a beloved member of the Washington Life family. Designer J.C. Suares was the creative mind behind 80 issue covers through out the years and a huge part of our brand development. A beautifully written tribute by Gerry Byrne summed up J.C. best: “He went down artistic and creative alleyways most mortals could hardly fathom. He was fun, resourceful, experienced, accomplished and, considering his extensive credits, also very modest.�

Jillian Sackler with Alec and Hillaria Baldwin at a Freer Sackler Gallery’Reception

Claire Danes and Bob Schieffer at a White House Correspondents’ DInnerPre-Party

OBAMA 2.0: We revisit the President’s most trusted confidants in our second edition of Obamaland. Annie Totah for our Balls & Galas Shoot

DID YOU KNOW? In an interview for our My Washington column, Under Armour founder Kevin Plank told us he got his start in his grandmother’s Georgetown basement.

Sharon Malone and Eric Holder at the Ford’s Theatre Gala

T O P O F P A G E C L O C K W I S E : P H O T O B Y T O N Y B R O W N , P H O T O C O U R T E S Y, P H O T O S B Y T O N Y P O W E L L . B OT TO M O F PAG E : P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L , P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L , P H OTO BY A L F R E D O F LO R E S , P H O T O B Y YA S S I N E E L M A N S O U R I

QUOTABLE: In My Washington CNN’s Jake Tapper spoke candidly about the culture of scandals in Washington “People are chew-toys in this political and media culture, and the internet has only made that easier to do.� HORSES COMING THROUGH: Since we are always committed to getting the best shot, we enlisted the help of the D.C. Film Office and D.C. Police to help us block off parts of 8th and H Streets in Chinatown for our Balls & Galas portrait of Mary Elizabeth Cordia by Tony Powell.

 

TECH TIME: Our November creative issue evolved to reflect the booming innovation from tech startups that redefined a range of industries throughout Washington.

DC COOL:

Fashion on set of Cirque du Soleil’s “Amaluna�

Kevin Plank and Michael Phelps at the Preakness

Madeleine Albright and Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey at the NDI Democracy Dinner

Confirming what we as Washingtonians already know, Forbes named us the coolest city in the country.



PHILANTHROPIC POWERHOUSE KEVIN SPACEY& ADRIENNE ARSHT join forces to elevate the arts

&EPP& W +EPEW THEESSENTIALGUI DETOTHEYEAR’SBES TEVENTS HAUTE PROPERTIES

&YRR]1IPPSR¸WIWXEXIP MWXWJSVQMPPMSR )<'097-:) An ode to PRINCESS D IANA from her confid ante FALL FASHION: DRAMAUNDERTHEBIG

TOP

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

47

! ES TI AR S! S!PTIE E I R RT PA PA


CELEBRATINGYEARS

SPECIAL FEATURE

BEHIND THE LENS

>>

  A ANNUAL BALLS & GALAS ISSUE:

Mayor Muriel Bowser at a White House Correspondents’ Dinner pre-party DEFINITIVE GUIDE TO THE YEAR’S GRANDEST

EVENTS

<<

Members of the Young Nelson Society of Washington representing the Washington International Horse Show

Peter Selfridge and Evan Ryan at the Art in Embassies Luncheon

+)%694*36 8,)73'-%07)%732

QUOTABLE: “Listen more than you speak. In fact for every minute you spend talking, spend at least four times that long listening.” –Tony Williams in a YGL Interview

POST-WAR ART COLLECTION: We toured Dick and Jane Stoker’s contemporary art haven in Potomac. Pictured: a life-like Duane Hanson sculpture of a security guard in the dining room and Keith Haring sculptures in the garden.

Monaco Amb. Maguy Maccario Doyle and John Paszterka at the Meridian Ball

“OBAMA OUT”: For the last eight years President Obama has had an immeasurable impact on Washington’s liveliness and character. Young people from near and far have flocked to the political epicenter to be a part of historical change. As we bid him adieu, we thank him for his service to our country and our beautiful Washington.

 

WASHINGTON WELCOMES: - National Museum of African American History & Culture - MGM National Harbor

“I have enjoyed watching history unfolding before me, and I have enjoyed all the people I’ve met and interacted with. I’ve been to amazing places and I see the hard work involved behind the scenes.” – KYLE SAMPERTON

“It is hard to describe how shooting for Washington Life has impacted my life over the past 10 years. The relationships and bonds I have made stand out to me as the most important aspect of what I do.” – TONY POWELL

PHOTOGRAPHER FAVORITES: KYLE SAMPERTON:

FIRST LADY MICHELLE OBAMA AND PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA

LOOKING AHEAD: A new era begins when President -elect Donald Trump takes office in January. The landscape of Washington’s social scene will certainly evolve, as it does with every new administration. Exactly how, we can’t be sure, but we’ll be on the sidelines covering momentous events and state dinners in the same way we have for last

25 years.

48

PHOTOGRAPHERS KYLE SAMPERTON AND TONY POWELL OFFER SOME PERSPECTIVE ON WHAT IT’S LIKE TO COVER WASHINGTON’S GRANDEST AFFAIRS

Lupita Nyong’o, Oprah Winfrey and David Oyelowo at the museum opening

Christina DePaul and Septime Webre in 2006

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

TONY POWELL:

Smokey Robinson and Sir Paul McCartney at the Kennedy Center Honors Brunch in 2010

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

TO P O F PAG E C LO C K W I S E ; P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L , P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L , P H OTO BY J O S E P H A L L E N , P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L , P H OTO BY TO N Y B R OW N . B OT TO M O F PAG E C LO C K W I S E : P H OTO S BY TO N Y P OW E L L .

&

EXPENSIVE HOME SELLS FOR $15M-PLUS REAL ESTATE NEWS: DC’S SECOND MOST MANSION PHILANTHROPIST ANNIE TOTAH’S POTOMAC ASHLYN HARRIS DINE & DISH WORLD CUP WINNERS ALI KRIEGER AND

PA RT I PA ES! RT PA IE RT S! IE S!



EVAN THOMAS ON PRESIDENT NIXON NORA POUILLON’S MEMOIRS | JOURNALIST WALLET E APP THAT HELPS YOU VOTE WITH YOUR GALA WORTHY GOWNS | THE SMARTPHON


SPECIAL FEATURE

IFYOUWANTAFRIENDINWASHINGTON GETADOG Over the years WL has photographed prominent Washingtonians with their best friends.

Gio Gonzalez and Lea Moures with Stitch (Photo by Tony Powell)

Paige Johnson and Sheila Johnson with Macy in 2005

Jack Valenti with Lily in 2005 (Photo b y James Hicks)

Annie Kaemper with Ella in 2008 (Photo by Kyle Samperton)

Kellyanne Conway and George Conway with Jesse in 2002 (Photo by Anton Papich)

Donald and Ann Brown with Rosebud in 2009 (Photo by Joaquin Rivas)

Skip and Debbie Singleton with Little General MacArtthur in 2011 (Photo by Joseph Allen)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Outerbridge and Georgina Horsey with dogs in 2010 (Photo by Tony Powell)

Diana and Freddy Prince with Pickle in 2011 (Photo by Tony Powell)

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Ruth Buchanan with Cinderella in 2014 (Photo by Tony Powell)

Gloria Dittus with Coco Chanel in 2015 (Photo by Tony Powell)

49

DOGS


SPECIAL FEATURE

SOCIETYROUNDTABLE

POWERANDSOCIETY

Connectors in Washington discuss the state of the city’s social scene and the importance of breaking bread together to get things done. BY VIRGINIA COYNE | PHOTOS BY TONY POWELL | HAIR AND MAKEUP BY VELUXE

Susanna Quinn, Sally Quinn, Rep. Debbie Dingell and Esther Coopersmith in the living room of Coopersmith’s Kalorama home.

50

the world stage to her Kalorama home for a meeting of minds; Rep. Debbie Dingell, who succeeded her husband John as a U.S. representative from Michigan, and throughout her years as a lobbyist and Democratic lawmaker is known for bringing people together on a bipartisan basis; author and journalist Sally Quinn, a renowned Georgetown hostess whose parties with late husband and Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee were legendary; and Susanna Quinn, founder of the on-demand beauty and fitness app Veluxe, a granddaughter of former Senator Mike Monroney of Oklahoma and frequent host, along with husband and former White House general counsel Jack Quinn, to a rotating cast of journalists, politicos and tech entrepreneurs. >>

WASHINGTON LIFE  How has the social scene changed in the last quarter decade? DEBBIE DINGELL The social scene has

changed. Period. It used to be that that members of the House and the Senate got together with the media. There were hostesses like Sally and Esther who brought people together. You got to know each other. The thing that I’ve been most struck by, especially in the last two years, is how members get in a cocoon and never leave the Hill. They don’t go out at night, they don’t socialize. So, who is socializing in Washington right now is a good question. SUSANNA QUINN I think the congressio-

nal schedule makes such a difference. Twentyfive years ago members lived here with their

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

CO U RT E SY P H OTOS

I

n his best-selling book the “The Tipping Point,” Malcolm Gladwell labels individuals with “a very special gift of bringing people together” as Connectors. “People who link us up with the world ... who introduce us to our social circles ... people on whom we rely on more heavily than we realize.” Ahead of this 25th anniversary issue, we gathered a quartet of the city’s top connectors to discuss social life in Washington. The central question: how important are social gatherings to the fabric of the city? Weighing in were our gracious hostess Esther Coopersmith, who served as U.S. representative to the United Nations under President Jimmy Carter and who frequently welcomes ambassadors and others players on


“It’s easy to villify someone if you don’t know them.” SALLY QUINN

Sally Quinn

kids. Democrats and Republicans socialized together. Today their schedule doesn’t allow them much time here. They go home on the weekends. And then there’s the time they spend fundraising. SALLYQUINN Years ago I wrote in a column

that what killed the social life or certainly the atmosphere of bipartisanship and community in Washington was the advent of the airplane. What I meant was that people then could fly easily back to their home district. Whereas the families, as Susanna was saying, used to live here, most of them now live in their district so the members will come in Monday night, sleep on their sofa or in some group house and then fly out Thursday night. So, they’re not even here and when they are here they’re working until 10 or 12 at night, so they don’t go out. They don’t know each other.

SALLYQUINN When I first started cover-

ing the social life in Washington, at every dinner there were Republicans and Democrats. And they were friends. At five o’clock they’d shut down and go into each other’s offices and pull out the bottle of bourbon and sit there and schmooze and have a good time. And now they don’t know each other. It’s easier to villify someone if you don’t know them, don’t know their personal life and don’t know their stories. When President Obama and President-Elect Trump met at the White House recently, Trump seemed humbled by the conversation and it struck me, they’d never met each other. So he looked at Obama and saw that he was a real person - a human being and a decent human being. He wasn’t “the other.” And I think that one of the problems in Washington now is that everyone else is “the other.” You don’t see them as real people.

DEBBIEDINGELLI’m the first to say I’m the

member of the “last plane in/first plane out” club the minute votes are done. Rep. Candace Miller and I race to see to see who will be the first person on the plane. John’s at home. I want to be with him. But that is how the world has changed. WASHINGTON LIFE Do you think there’s any going back to how it used to be or will this be the status quo going forward? DEBBIEDINGELL We have to find ways for

people to get to know each other without there being a stigma attached to it. A lot of people would never even want to be part of a piece that says “Washington Society.” But it isn’t bad for people to get to know each other. It isn’t bad for people to work on causes.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

ESTHERCOOPERSMITHIt’s so much easier

when you come together socially and then from the social part it evolves to take care of business, because you’re actually meeting and talking and doing.

Rep. Debbie Dingell and Susanna Quinn

WASHINGTONLIFE  Some say that led to the Israeli-Egyptian peace agreement... ESTHER COOPERSMITH Yes. I decided it

was time they should know each other. I had the nerve to invite them both and it worked. It was fine and the women were terrific. The press was more concerned than me. WASHINGTON LIFE How would you describe the current social scene? I know the tech community is part of it now, too. SUSANNA QUINN The tech commu-

nity is very interested in policy. I host Sunday barbeques attended by fellow entrepreneurs, as well as members of Congress and the Secretary of Homeland Security. But, I feel unlike any other city that I’ve ever spent time in, Washington is a place where its all about “what have you done today? What have you accomplished today?” Even if you make $500 million the next question is: “What are you going to do with it? Are you going to do something good with it?”

WASHINGTONLIFE Can you give me examples of work that has gotten done at social events?

DEBBIE DINGELL People want substance now. You know, in Washington “social” is a bad word. People want to get to know each other but they want substance and policy. They don’t want fluff.

DINGELL John got a lot done at night. People

SALLYQUINN But there’s a fine line between

talked at night. You build up the trust that ended up resulting in bills, legislation being developed. As John says, compromise isn’t a dirty word.

having substance and having a meeting. You don’t want to have a meeting.You want people to have fun, but they also want to discuss things that they care about. I sort of go high/low. We can talk about Aleppo and then switch to Brad and Angelina’s divorce. That’s very important to having a great dinner party.

ESTHERCOOPERSMITHWhen I introduced

Madames Begin and Sadat, that was a big one.

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

51


SPECIAL FEATURE

CAFEMILANO

CAFEMILANOTURNS

A look back on years of refined Italian cooking, warm hospitality and the best people watching

Cafe Milano ran this ad in Washington Life’s 15th anniversary issue

THIS AD 15 YEARS AGO BEGAN A BEAUTIFUL RETIONSHIP BETWEEN CAFE MILANO AND WASHINGTON LIFE MAGAZINE ... WE STILL LOVE EVERY MINUTE OF IT!

3251 Prospect Street NW Georgetown 202-333-6183 CafeMilano.net

C

afe Milano keeper of the gate Laurent Menoud tells us that catering a birthday lunch for Pope Benedict XVI was “one of the greatest days of my life.” The 81st birthday celebration for His Holiness fell on April 16, 2008 at the Embassy of the Holy See during the Pontiff ’s visit to the Nation’s capital. “I’ve met many movie stars, sports celebrities and heads of state, but there is only one Pope,” Milano proprietor Franco Nuschese says of the occasion for which he personally crafted every detail, going so far as to fly to his hometown of Minori, Italy to design hand-painted plates with the Vatican logo at the center. On the menu? Braised veal cheeks, baby spring vegetables and purple mashed potatoes. And yes, like all good Catholics, Nuschese knelt down and kissed the papal ring. While that kind of day is not a typical stepand-repeat at Cafe Milano, it comes close in other ways.The Italian eatery has been running on adrenaline in the heart of Georgetown since it opened in November 1992. The ambiance is part elegance, part circus, part buttoned up and somehow amid the chaos, part relaxed. In

52

2017 the restaurant’s team celebrates 25 years of phenomenal success. As popular Democratic political operative Tommy Quinn put it: Milano is “still the only game in town.” The Atlantic’s Steve Clemons recalls being at a Milano dinner honoring Joanna Coles as the new editor-and-chief of Cosmopolitan. “Walking by was Colin Powell in one room, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi in another – and then Senator John Kerry sitting out front.” Working his social magic, Clemons “got all three to stop in to hang. It’s that kind of place,” he says. “Franco knew instinctively how to promote Cafe Milano,” says Washington Life Senior Editor Kevin Chaffee, who co-hosted parties there for George Plimpton, Dominick Dunne and the Martha Graham Dance Company. “It quickly became the gathering place for Washington insiders and visiting VIPs and has remained so for 25 years.” You’re likely to cross paths with interesting people on almost any given day. The hordes of “A” listers would make The Green Book jealous. And that doesn’t even include the Hollywood celebrities like Renee Zellweger,

Jon Voight, Eva Longoria and Harvey Weinstein. Then there’s the “Cooper Watch,” as in Bradley Cooper, who spends a lot of time at Milano since he went to college at Georgetown University. According to rumor, he worked there for a time as a waiter. We would have tipped him double. Hafizah Shahryar was first introduced to Cafe Milano when her late husband Ishaq was appointed ambassador of Afghanistan. Notable memories include dinner with Queen Noor of Jordan and the late Benazir Bhutto’s surprise 50th birthday party. We remember the night when then President of Afghanistan Hamid Karzai rolled up in a convoy of black SUVs after a lavish party at his embassy, followed by President Bill Clinton – just another night on Prospect Street. Former Chief of Protocol Lloyd Hand and his jewelry designer wife Ann practically live there, falling into the category of Milano regulars. They remember their momentous 60th wedding anniversary celebration and the launch of Ann’s Italian perfume, “Ann Hand’s Power.” “The unique atmosphere that Franco and Laurent have created has an international appeal,” she says, “attracting diplomats from around the world as well as top government officials.” Former Secretary of Defense Bill Cohen and his television host wife Janet Langhart have been seen with Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta Jones, Morgan Freeman, Quincy Jones and Rima Al-Sabah. “I love to people watch,” Cohen says. “I always see someone I’ve met on my international travels.” For others like founder of Innocents at Risk Deborah Sigmund, it’s a family gathering place as much a solid dining option. Sigmund speaks for many social Washingtonians when she says, “I don’t know what we would do without Cafe Milano!” Publicist Shelley Hymes feels the same level of comfort. She held her birthday party in Milano’s Domingo Room, named

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

CO U RT E SY P H OTOS

B Y J A N E T D O N O VA N


Franco Nuschese, Tiger Woods and Bob Johnson at Tiger Woods Luncheon in 2012. (Photo by Tony Powell)

after world tenor Placido Domingo. “After all the new restaurants that have come and gone Milano still feels like home,” she says. Young reporters are known to flock to Milano for a taste of old school Washington they can’t find at newly trendy hangouts. Plus, it’s a hot bed for celebrity gossip. Washington Post editorial columnist Jonathan Capehart recently hosted a viewing party there for his round on “Jeopardy!” during Power Players Week. Jay Newton-Small TIME magazine political correspondent and author of “Broad Influence” was feted at a book party in her honor hosted by Juleanna Glover, Giovanna Lockhart, Chris and Kathleen Matthews, Heather Podesta, Michael Scherer, Kimball Stroud and Brian Wolff. Naturally, it is a favorite of visitors from Nuschese’s native Italy. Italian President Sergio Mattarella lunched at Cafe Milano with his Foreign Minister Paolo Gentiloni and former Italian Ambassador to the U.S. Claudio Bisogniero on President’s Day. The Italian leader was in town for a meeting with President Obama as part of his week-long tour of the United States. No stop in Washington is complete without the allure of Nuschese’s famed dining salon. The National Italian American Foundation hosts a dinner there during its annual gala weekend. We remember sitting in the same room as Sophia Loren and Gina Lolobridgida some years back. Other celebrity guests at the dinner have included Joey “Pants” Pantoliano, Deana Martin and Barbara Sinatra. It’s

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

James A. D’Orta, Franco Nuschese and George Hamilton in 1998.

where Danny DeVito insisted we drink more. It’s where Yogi Berra explained that his famous line “When you come to a fork in the road, take it” was not some great philosophical point. It’s where we’ve dined elbow-to-elbow with Dion DiMuccia of Dion and the Belmonts. Cafe Milano is the first place talk show host Rita Cosby goes when she’s in town. “The atmosphere,” she says, “is always electric.” And it doesn’t hurt that she once boogied on the

“In Italy we used to say ‘l’ospite è sacro’: in our home, a guest is sacred. My greatest aspiration is to create for guests a little oasis of relaxation.” FRANCO NUSCHESE dance floor with Michael Jordan. “You often see Republicans and Democrats who have just left a sparring match on TV earlier, sharing a few glasses of Merlot at the bar right after,” Cosby says. Last year we caught up with Kira Kazantsev and Nina Davuluri – Miss America 2015 and 2014 respectively – at a luncheon in their honor where the twosome exchanged pageant experiences with summer camp-like excitement. In charge of the nightly parade is manager Menoud. Though he has Open Table as a resource, he prefers controlling chaos the old fashioned way: “a floor chart and a pencil

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

between juggling phone calls and using my mental Rolodex.” He says that he probably has the names and associated table preferences of a thousand guests ingrained in his memory. “Every client wants the best real estate tablewise. You need to be quick in making decisions, very discrete about your clientele and have a lot of patience.” His favorite guest was the late King Hussein of Jordan, whom he referred to as being “very humble.” We caught up with Nuschese, who is working on his newest venture, opening a Milano in Abu Dhabi. “It is not just another restaurant for me.” Nuschese says, fondly comparing his restaurant to a child. “You should go with him, teach him new things, follow his growth, correct his mistakes, love him.” From our vantage point he has done a spectacular job rearing his restaurant into a celebritystudded stomping ground. “Life can be stressful and challenging. The highest luxury that life holds for us is definitely that of time … quality time,” Nuschese says. “To know that people choose to spend their moments of relaxation at Cafe Milano fills me with pride but also with great responsibility. In Italy, we used to say ‘l’ospite è sacro’: in our home, a guest is sacred. My greatest aspiration is to create for guests a little oasis of relaxation.” Mission accomplished, we say. Michelle Obama celebrated her birthday there. As one journalist told us, “When the President goes to Cafe Milano, you know he has arrived.”

53


SPECIAL FEATURE

EMBASSYROW

WHEREARETHEYNOW?

Washington Life catches up with a few notable individuals who made waves on the international scene BY ROLAND FLAMINI

54

Jaime Ojeda

Chang Heng Chee in 2008

ing an old diplomatic acquaintance. Both had served as the head of their respective country’s mission in Beijing. “We reminisced of our days in Beijing where we became good friends and often cycled around town,” Ojeda said. He served in Washington for six years -and then never left. Since 1997, he has lived in the Shenandoah Valley, and has been ambassador-in-residence at Shenandoah University. Years ago, Ojeda had penned the only existing Spanish translation of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking Glass.”He is now working on a translation into Spanish of the American folklore classic Uncle Remus. “I’m half way through, but the [Joel Chandler Harris] text is so difficult to translate that it takes me a page a day. So much of the wonderful dialect is lost in translation, I sometimes wonder if it’s worth the effort.” Another long-time Washington resident was Singapore Ambassador Chan Heng Chee. A

scholar turned diplomat, she held the ambassador’s job for 16 years, and was noted for “salon dinners” at the embassy where Washington’s strategic thinkers and policy makers discussed hot-button issues. Small, energetic, popular, and always elegant in her qipao (traditional Chinese dress), she recently recalled that she had always been impressed by “the number of brainy people” working in the nation’s capital.

Jan Eliasson and Kerstin Eliasson in 2005

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

C LO C KW I S E : P H OTO BY CA R LOS R OS I L LO F O R E L PA I S A N D P H OTOS BY KY L E SA M P E RTO N

T

wenty-five years ago, the Washington swamp was a green pasture where policy makers and diplomats could safely graze. That’s how Maltese Ambassador John Lowell – now in retirement – and his wife Marie Therese recalled it. “We arrived in D.C. to find the garden of the residence deep in snow – quite a shock when you come from the Mediterranean,” e-mailed Marie Therese. The couple, like others in this column, are remembered as gregarious and popular. While the Lowells were in Washington, Marie Therese writes, “Malta joined the European Union and John found himself one of 27 EU ambassadors who met regularly.” But, John Lowell recalls, there were also bi-lateral negotiations, such as the lengthy visa waiver agreement. As ambassadors came and went it seemed that Saudi envoy Prince Bandar bin Sultan stayed forever. For 22 years, from 1983 to 2005, the ambassador, an inveterate networker and hawk, was an influential player in U.S. Middle East policy from the vantage point of his close relationship with five American presidents, from Jimmy Carter to George W. Bush. Back home, he headed Saudi intelligence and kept close high-level ties in Washington. But he was marginalized in the shakeup of senior Saudi officials that followed the death of King Abdullah, his uncle, and the accession of King Salman bin Abdulaziz in 2015, reportedly in large part as a result of the failure of his attempts to persuade President Obama to get involved militarily in Syria. He now divides his time between Saudi Arabia and his estate in Oxfordshire, England. His huge Colorado property in Aspen, Hala Ranch, recently sold for $49 million. It had been listed at $135 million. When Spanish Ambassador Jaime de Ojeda presented his credentials to President George H.W. Bush in 1990 he was renew-


Gen. Brent Scowcroft in 2016

P H OTOS BY TO N Y P OW E L L

Today, she is ambassador-at-large at the Singaporean ministry of foreign affairs, and holds several other positions, notably chairman of the Lee Kwan Yew Center for Innovative Cities at Singapore University of Technology and Design. She says one of her main achievements is the fact that Americans see Singapore as “the little country that could.” Swedish diplomat Jan Eliasson and his wife, sociologist Kerstin, can safely be classed as over-achievers. When he was ambassador Kerstin was a member of the embassy staff as the science and technology counsellor. By the end of Eliasson’s Washington tour Kerstin had been promoted to state secretary at the Swedish Ministry of Science. Later, Jan Eliasson was his country’s foreign minister, and in 2012 became U.N. deputy secretary general, a post he still holds. In his pocket at all times is a copy of the U.N. Charter, “which I often consult,” he says. These days, Kerstin, who among other commitments is a senior adviser to the University of Uppsala, commutes between Stockholm and the couple’s rented apartment in New York. Top of the list of U.S. national security advisers on the other side of the diplomatic fence is 91-year-old Brent Scowcroft, the Energizer bunny of American foreign policy, described by one of his biographers as “the

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Paula Dobriansky in 2013

United States’ leading foreign policy strategist of the last forty years.” The former U.S. Air Force lieutenant general was a top adviser to four GOP presidents, but he also advised President Obama on choosing his national security team, and earlier this year endorsed Hillary Clinton for president because, he said, “she shares my belief that America must remain the world’s indispensable leader.” Scowcroft founded and heads The Scowcroft Group, an international business consulting firm. Paula Dobriansky is another fixture in the foreign policy community. In 1991, Dobriansky was an associate director of USIA (the United States Information Agency), but by then she was already a seasoned public servant. At 24 she had joined the Reagan national security council as director of European affairs for six years, and then spent a further three as deputy assistant secretary of state for human rights. In the George W. Bush administration she was back at State as undersecretary for global affairs. In 2007, she was appointed the President’s special envoy to the Northern Ireland peace process and played a key role in cobbling up the political solution to the long and bloody internecine conflict. Asked how a Soviet/Russian expert ended up involved with Northern Ireland, she replied, “the answer is simple – the secretary asked

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

John Lowell in 2006

me to do it.” Now Dobriansky is a senior fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and a fixture on the foreign policy discussion circuit. When approached for this article, she was at the Halifax International Security Forum in Nova Scotia. The Washington revolving door that propels journalists and policy specialists into government jobs worked for Strobe Talbott, a senior staffer at TIME magazine who became deputy secretary of state in the Clinton administration. Talbott, a long time Russian specialist, and Clinton had become friends at Oxford where they were both Rhodes Scholars. At the time, Talbott – then in his mid-20s – was translating the memoirs of Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev for publication by TIME. So it must have seemed a good fit to newly elected Bill Clinton to have Talbott manage America’s approach to the rapidly fragmenting Soviet empire. At the end of the Clinton presidency in 2002, Talbott was briefly director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization before becoming president of Brookings Institution, the prestigious liberal think tank, where he remains. Talbott is also chairman of the Department of State’s foreign affairs policy board, and advised the Hillary Clinton campaign on security and foreign policy issues.

55


SPECIAL FEATURE

DEARLYDEPARTED

PAUSETO REMEMBER

A salute to notable Washingtonians who have passed from the scene (1991-2016)

From left to right, first row: Kara Kennedy and Ted Kennedy, Allison LaLand, Alan Kay, Austin Kiplinger, Lolo Sarnoff; second row: Bill Cafritz, Evangeline Bruce, Arnaud de Borchgrave, Ben Bradlee, Tim Russert and Lisa Pumphrey

Billy Abel-Smith Alice Acheson Joe L. Allbritton , Susan Mary Alsop R.W. “Johnny” Apple John D. Archbold Audrey Auchincloss Smith Bagley Letitia Baldrige Betty Beale & George Graeber Mary Belin Heidi Berry Livingston & Catharina Biddle William McCormick Blair, Jr. Huntington & Amie Block Lindy Boggs Thomas H “Tommy” Boggs, Jr. Tom & Joan Braden Ben Bradlee Anthony Browne J. Carter Brown David S. Bruce Evangeline Bruce Art Buchwald Ella Poe Burling Betty Burton William N. “Bill” Cafritz Neil Carothers

56

Katryna Carothers Henry & Jessica Catto Aldus “Aldie” Chapin David & Genia Chavchavadze Mary Chewning Taylor Chewning Tony Childs Deena Clark Warfield & Savanna Clark Clement & Lianne Conger Sarah Boothe Conroy Holly Coors Marshall Coyne Charles “Chick” Cudlip Lloyd Cutler Patrick Daly True Davis Gertrude “Gertie” d’Amecourt Stuart Davidson Mike Deaver Arnaud de Borchgrave Doda de Wolfe Eleanor Tydings Ditsen Ymelda Dixon Henry Dudley Melvin J. Estrin Rowland Evans, Jr. Katherine Dulin Folger

Gerald & Betty Ford Jean Friendly Clayton & Polly Fritchey Barbara Gamarekian Arthur & Joan Gardner Ina Ginsburg Louise Gore Katharine Graham Hermen Greenberg Meg Greenfield Brandon & Mariana Grove Adlumia “Lummy” Hagner Alexander and Patricia Haig Najeeb Halaby Dorcas Hardin Pamela Harriman John & June Hechinger Richard Helms George & Arleen Hesse Frances Humphrey Howard Richard Howland Nina Hyde Frank & Jane Ikard Pauline Innis Lady Bird Johnson Alan Kay Braden Keil Edward M. “Ted” Kennedy

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Kara Kennedy Randolph & Dorothy Kidder Austin & Gogo Kiplinger Fritz Korth Renée Kraft Allison LaLand Michael & Dorothy Lapadula Lucinda Leigh Martin & Betty Malarkey Leonard & Dorothy Marks Alice Marriott Forrest E. Mars Guy & Edith Martin Nan Tucker McEvoy George & Cecilia McGhee Diana McLellan Robert (“Bob”) McNamara Gilbert & Jaylee Mead Paul & Bunny Mellon Alice du Pont Mills Joan Mondale Robert A. Mosbacher Joseph Muldoon, Sr. Edwin & Jane Muskie Evelyn Nef Paul Nitze Richard and Patricia Nixon Gerson Nordlinger, Jr.

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Left to right: top row: Gertrude d’ Amecourt, Ina Ginsburg, Polly Fritchey and Susan Mary Alsop, Smith Bagley, Letitia Baldrige; second row: Lindy Boggs, Lloyd Cutler, J. Carter Brown; third row: Katharine Graham and Bob McNamara, Henry von Eichel, Mel Estrin, Nancy Reagan, Sarah Booth Conroy and Savanna Clark

Dimitri & Selene Obolensky Pamela Ohrstrom Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Marvin Breckinridge Patterson Sandra Payson Claiborne & Nuala Pell Charles H. “Chuck” Percy Harold “Hal” Petrowitz Laughlin “Loc” Phillips Gretchen Poston Patsy Preston Ellen Proxmire Robert & Lisa Pumphrey Gene Quinn Donnie Radcliffe Ronald & Nancy Reagan Elliott & Ann Richardson Lillie Lou Rietzke Dillon & Mary Ripley Eleanor Ritchie Joe Robert William & Adele Rogers Tim Russert Nancy Ruwe Lolo Sarnoff Brooke Shearer Tazewell Shepard Catherine Filene Shouse

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Sargent & Eunice Shriver Caroline Simmons Sigrid Spalding Garnett Stackelberg Roger & Christine Stevens Theodore “Ted” Stevens Mary Ann Stewart Robert & Helen Strauss Julie “Muffy” Stout Henry & Malan Strong Joy Sundlun Ruth “Bazy” Tankersley Giselle Theberge Russell Train Jack Valenti Ann Vanderpool Hildegarde “Hildy” Van Roijen Henry von Eichel Wilhelm “Willy” Wachtmeister Walter & Mary Washington Byron & Marion White Herb White Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Charles & Janet Whitehouse Virginia Williams Maggie Wimsatt Sidney & Evelyn Zlotnik

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

INMEMORIAM The Honorable

Robert O. Blake

Chitmansing (Jess) Jesseramsing

Alma Brown

James V. (Jim) Kimsey

E. Edward Bruce

Dana Stifel Kiplinger

Carlos Bulgheroni

Vibeke Lofft

Frida Winslow Burling Rodion Cantacuzene Princess (Eugenie) Chavchavadze

Eleanor (Ellie) Merrill Lucy Moorhead J. Barrett Prettyman, Jr. Nancy Reagan The Honorable

C. Wyatt Dickerson

Joseph Verner Reed, Jr.

Patricia (Pat) Dixson

Justice Antonin Scalia

Richard N. Dubin

Dr. Belinda Crompton Straight

Yolande Fox The Honorable

Brandon H. Grove

Malan Strong Dr. Sidney Werkman

57


LIFESTYLES

'PEWWMG +0%1396 FURSANDSHIMMERINGEVENINGWEARPROVETHEPERFECTPAIRINGFORAHOLIDAYGETAWAY TOTHEGREENBRIER WHERETRADITIONREIGNSSUPREME  PHOTOGRAPHYTONYPOWELL|WWWTONY-POWELLCOM WARDROBEDEBORAHMDURVWA|THEARTISTAGENCY MAKEUPANDHAIRPATTINELSON|WWWCAROLAMYERSCOM MODELELOISELANCSWEERT|THEARTISTAGENCY EDITORIALDIRECTIONCATHERINETRIFILETTI

SHOTONLOCATIONATTHEGREENBRIER SULPHURSPRINGS WESTVIRGINIA


AQUA velvet wrap gown ($228), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; IVANKA TRUMP shoes ($160), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; TIFFANY & CO. freshwater pearl earrings ($3,000), five row freshwater pearl bracelet ($800), freshwater pearl necklace ($1,150), Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 301-657-8777.


HUGO BOSS Diganira dress and Cipeila jacket; Hugo Boss CityCenterDC 1054 Palmer Alley NWWashington, D.C 20001 (202) 408-9845; STUART WEITZMAN nudist song patent heels ($398) Bloomingdales 5300 Western Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (240) 744-3700. TIFFANY & CO. Schlumberger multiplication earrings in 18k yellow gold with diamonds ($17,500) . Tiffany & Co, 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815 (301) 657-8777.

RENE RUIZ dress, Rene Ruiz, 3204 M Street NW, 305-445-2352; MANO SWARTZ blue dyed fox scarf ($395), Mano Swartz, 10801 Falls Road, Lutherville, Md., 410-8259000; BADGLEY MISCHKA shoes ($245), The Little Shoebox, 7625 Bellona Avenue, Towson, Md., 410-825-3191; KATWALK BOUTIQUE earrings ($32), Katwalk Boutique, 1709 Aliceanna Street, Baltimore, Md., 410-669-0600; TIFFANY & CO. Cocktail Deco watch ($29,000), Enchant heart ring ($6,000), three row Jazz Bracelet ($29,000), Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 301-657-8777.

++≠≠


MANO SWARTZ Natural gold cross fox collar ($950), Mano Swartz, 10801 Falls Road, Lutherville, Md., 410-825-9000; BCBG Malgosia jumpsuit ($298), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; KATWALK BOUTIQUE Earrings ($55), gold bangle set ($38), Katwalk Boutique, 1709 Aliceanna Street, Baltimore, Md., 410-6690600; SONDRA ROBERT clutch ($270), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; LIZZIE FORTUNATO tassel rope belt ($295), Ruth Shaw, 68 Village Square, Baltimore, Md., 410-532-7886.


DRESS THE POPULATION sequin midi dress ($278), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; TIFFANY & CO. Enchant Scroll platinum and diamond earrings ($11,000), Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 301-657-8777.


HALSTON HERITAGE one shoulder metallic gown ($445), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; MANO SWARTZ Natural Russian sable cape ($3,295), Mano Swartz, 10801 Falls Road, Lutherville, Md., 410825-9000; BADGLEY MISCHKA shoes ($245), The Little Shoebox, 7625 Bellona Avenue, Towson, Md., 410-825-3191; SERPUI clutch ($345), The Little Shoebox, 7625 Bellona Avenue, Towson, Md., 410-825-3191; TIFFANY & CO. Enchant dragonfly brooch ($9,800), Cocktail Deco watch ($29,000) Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 301-657-8777.

N / NICHOLAS dress ($529), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (301) 6522250; HALSTON HERITAGE clutch ($345) and SJP Sarah Jessica Parker pumps ($560), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; TIFFANY & CO. Enchant scroll earrings platinum withHOFFMAN diamonds patterned ($11,000), ON in EMMA: MARA Tiffany & Co., Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wismonokini ($253) and KATE SPADE Cameron consin Ave,bag Chevy Chase, MD 20815, Street Blakely ($378) Bloomingdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (301) 657-8777; CARTIER ParisCorner NouTysons Corner Center, 8100 Tysons velleMcLean, Vague Va., Delicate white gold and Center, 703-556-4600. diamond necklace ($16,300) and LOVE in white gold, pave diamonds ON bracelet ERIC: MORGENTHAL FREDERICS and ceranic ($43,700), Cartier, 5471B Hustler hand-crafted Japanese titanium Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase,CityMD sunglasses ($495), Morgenthal Fredrics, 20815, (301) 654-5858 CenterDC, 941 H St. NW, 202-204-3393.


LIFESTYLES | TRENDREPORT

VALENTINO Glittered embroidered tulle mini dress ($6,490); Saks Fifth Avenue, Chevy Chase, 301.657.9000

ANNE FONTAINE Black and gold floral statement collar ($125); Anne Fontaine,Tysons Galleria, 703.714.0509

ALICE & OLIVIA Jeri t-back jumpsuit ($695); Alice & Olivia, Georgetown, 202.602.0445

CHLOÃ&#x2030; Palm tree crewneck sweater, black/gold ($1,150); Neiman Marcus, Mazza Gallerie, 202.966.9700

&PEGO +SPH

This wintry color combination never goes out of style. BY ERICA MOODY

BURBERRY Metallic polka-dot long-sleeved silk dress ($1,395); Burberry, CityCenterDC, 202.463.3000

GUCCI Metallic jacquard jacket ($4,200); Gucci, CityCenterDC, 202.289.7950

VALENTINO Star-studded leather ankle-strap block-heel pumps ($1,395); Saks Fifth Avenue, Chevy Chase, 301.657.9000

DOLCE & GABBANA Embellished caged toe sandals ($1,375); zappos.com

STELLA MCCARTNEY Falabella chain fringed tiny tote ($1,725); Stella McCartney, stellamccartney.com

64

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


LIFESTYLES | SAKSJANDEL

THEENDOFAFASHIONERA Family-owned women’s clothing store Saks Jandel shuts its doors after 128 years. BY ERICA MOODY

Isaac Mizrahi flanked by Tracy Bernstein and Capricia Marshall at a charity fashion event at Saks Jandel

Model Dakota Oliphant walks the runway at annual Saks Jandel Holiday Brunch and Runway Show

Ernest Marx and Peter Marx in 1993

W P H OTOS FR O M WA S H I N GTO N L I F E AR C H I V E S

hen the president of the United States is on the line, you’d better take the call. That is, unless you’re at Saks Jandel getting a fitting. Fourth generation owner Peter Marx chuckles as he recalls the secretary of state (who shall remain nameless) who put her appointment at Saks above a chat with the commander in chief.“Tell him I’ll call him back,” she said. “I’m at Saks Jandel.” Such stories are not uncommon at the shop on Wisconsin Avenue that’s dressed Washington’s most important women (first ladies, Supreme Court justices, members of Congress, and more) since 1888. Now, after 128 years, Marx announced earlier this fall that the shop so integral to women’s attire in Washington will be closing its doors for good. “These aren’t ladies who lunch,” says Marx, of his clients. “These are substantial women and bright and intelligent women, so the fact that we were integral to their lives was really

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

our history.” Part of that legacy are the charity events, including fashion shows, he hosted over the years. Marx estimates that 80 percent of them were focused on women’s health and social services. And who can forget the fashion? Many will remember Marx’s father, Ernest Marx, for bringing Yves Saint Laurent and other major European designers to the United States. It wasn’t unusual to spot the likes of Karl Lagerfeld, Vera Wang, Valentino and Isaac Mizrahi at the shop, chatting with Ernest about their designs. “He was able to identify talent and commit to it earlier than others. He really had a great eye,” Marx says of his father, with whom he worked for 30 years until Ernest’s death seven years ago. “He had a 50-year relationship with Saint Laurent and Valentino. He was there from the very beginning of their careers.” Unlike other shops, Saks Jandel avoided trends,

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Peter Marx with a Cynthia Steele Vance (center) and a Valentino-clad model at a 2014 in-store fashion event (Photo by Tony Powell)

preferring to stick with classic designs that would withstand the test of time.“We were relentless in quality and fashion,” Marx recalls.“We have been elegant and sophisticated and stayed above the ups and downs of trendy fashion.” Marx’s father also instilled in him the importance of ethics when running a business, especially treating those who work there fairly. “Our employees don’t come for a couple of years, they come for decades,” he says. Marx is currently working on placing them in new positions. Where they go is where Washington women will shop. Marx has realized that the time has come to focus on his other passions, including real estate endeavors. And although all good things must come to an end, there is a silver lining this December. Stop by Saks Jandel in the next few weeks to get 50-80 percent off of everything in the store. Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815

65


LIFESTYLES | HEALTH

CONVERSATIONS THAT MATTER Inova’s thought-based leadership weekend comes into its own. n modeling a thought-based leadthe role of DNA mapping in predicership summit, now in its third year, tive medicine led by Dr. Donald L. Inova CEO Knox Singleton and Inova (Skip) Trump, CEO of the Inova Schar Foundation President Anthony BurCancer Institute, and J. Craig Venter, chard drew inspiration from the celeCEO of the Craig Venter Institute. brated Aspen Ideas Festival. “Medicine today is reactive, and The Aspen Institute’s weekend of we’re trying to make it proactive,” robust conversations on about 30 difVenter said. “A common misconcepferent policy areas became a hit among tion is that if you don’t have obvious the policy and business elites after it symptoms, you must be healthy. The was launched in Aspen, Colo. in 2005. goal of human longevity is to create Gary Mather, Bob Woodward, Tina Mather and In 2014, the Aspen-modeled Inova a healthy lifespan, not just live longer.” Mark Stauder. Summit was inaugurated in bucolic Venter said that in 2001 he and Middleburg, Va. at Salamander Resort a group of scientists sequenced the & Spa, owned by major Inova donor first genome in nine months at a Sheila Johnson. cost of $100 million. “Since then we With more than 500 philanthropists, have sequenced over 35,000 human community leaders, physicians, health genomes, the largest data set ever,” he care experts and friends on hand, the reported.“If we were able to map each 2016 summit, chaired by Dr. Gary and and every individual’s genome, this Tina Mather, raised $2.5 million for would change medicines from averprograms at the not-for-profit hospital ages to making an avatar out of each system that serves two million Northern person so we can attempt to increase Virginia residents. their longevity. InovaCEO Knox Singleton and Dr. Dialogue centered around person“Do you have immunity to cancer? Dr. Sanjay Gupta Tracy Fitzsimmons alized health and wellness, especially in By sequencing RNA in the genome the areas of cancer prevention, research and care. During free time, attend- we can isolate the killer T cells. One man we tested had 25,000 mutations ees were encouraged to clear their heads with a full menu of fun, includ- to it,”Venter explained. ing Tesla test drives, a cooking class and wine and bourbon tastings. Others Today, about 30 percent of males and 24 percent of females won’t reach participated in complimentary MediMap screenings, a DNA test that allows the age of 74, which is a huge advance given that most people born in doctors to more accurately prescribe dosages of prescription drugs. 1900 did not live past the age of 52. “We’re finding markers in the genome “This is a special time in health care, and we just wanted to create a that predict premature death,”Venter said.“These represent new targets for unique platform to discuss complex topics in a relaxed setting,” said Single- pharmaceuticals. Alzheimer’s Disease, for instance, will be one that we can ton, Inova’s CEO for 30 years.“By engaging in a group conversation on the eventually prevent.” future of health we could better nurture the evolution of the health system, “Health care has been for a long time about the haves and have nots,” and every person’s voice, and participation matters.” said CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta during the Held four days after the 2016 presidential election, the weekend kicked keynote luncheon. “Almost 60 percent of all illnesses can be obviated by off with a no holds-barred discussion on “The Power to Choose” led by lifestyle changes … Just look at three major causes of death: liver cirrhosis, the Washington Post’s Bob Woodward. suicide and accidental overdose from opioids. The increase in life expec“You always need to know what port you’re sailing into, and with [Pres- tancy has not affected those most susceptible to those three things.” ident-Elect] Trump, no one is really sure, including probably him,” WoodWith President-Elect Donald Trump threatening to scrap Obamacare ward said. “The question as to where the Trump presidency is going to is in his first year in office. Gupta made a prediction: “I have read all 27,000 unanswerable. The other question is why did journalism fail? We in the pages of the Affordable Care Act, and I just don’t think we’re starting all reporting business sometimes fail.” over here.The most popular aspects of the law are the non-discriminatory The following day, a CEO roundtable was led by the presidents of aspects, such as pre-existing conditions, and these will not go away. Changes five Inova System hospitals, followed by a thought-provoking session on to it are likely to be evolutionary.”

66

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

P H OTO S C O U RT E SY O F I N OVA

I


LIFESTYLES | MGMHOTELWATCH

MGM NATIONAL HARBOR Bob Dylan, José Andrés and 2,000 construction workers put the final touches on the Washington area’s first ever casino, opening this month.

An aerial view of the new 1 million square foot casino.

T

P H OTOS CO U RT E SY O F MG M

his holiday season, Vegas-style gaming finally arrives in the Nation’s Capital. MGM Resorts is planning to cut the ribbon on its much-anticipated $1.4 billion MGM National Harbor Resort & Casino, bringing slots and table games to a 23-acre plot overlooking the Potomac River, just five miles from the U.S. Capitol. The much-anticipated opening will give way to a world of nocturnal possibilities for those looking to scratch a midnight itch to play Blackjack with their pals, catch a heavyweight boxing match worthy of HBO or feast on a culinary program led by some of the region’s most renowned chefs. “In December our vision for building the finest luxury resort on the East Coast comes to fruition,” said MGM Resorts Chairman and CEO Jim Murren. “When we began this journey, we set out to design a property that would rival any in our portfolio and bring great pride to the region.” That journey began three years ago when National Harbor’s developer, legendary Fairfax builder Milt Peterson, met Murren for a site visit. “I picked up Jim from the airport and in the car we just talked about our mutual fondness for great art,” Peterson recalled. “Jim told me, ‘If you select MGM for National

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Bob Dylan constructing the casino’s iron archway.

Harbor, I promise you I will bring the best possible artwork to this project.’” Mission accomplished. When it opens December 8, guests will be ushered in through “Portal,” a sculpted iron archway designed by legendary folk artist Bob Dylan, winner of the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature. The 26-foot-high piece will adorn the casino’s west entrance as part of its permanent collection. It is Dylan’s first permanent work of art for a public space. Nothing about the 24-story gaming complex comes in small portions. Encompassing a sleek, progressive design, it sprawls over one million square feet of real estate, with more than 3,600 slot machines and 140 gaming tables. There’s also a 308-room hotel tower with villas, a luxury day spa and dozens of branded, high-end retail shops and 25,000 square feet of meeting space. Parking? No problem. MGM has built a massive garage which can house up to 5,000 cars. Dining will be top-notch, with 12 restaurants by master chefs José Andrés, Marcus Samuelson and brothers Bryan and Michael Voltaggio opening new outposts. “They’ll help to make us a culinary destination in the DMV,” vowed MGM National Harbor General Manager Bill Boasberg.

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

In December 2013, Maryland voters awarded MGM Resorts the sixth license to operate a casino in Prince George’s County; construction began in May, 2014. Since then, nearly 2,000 workers have been on site, often braving blustery winds, snow and freezing rain to work in a near frantic dash to get the massive project completed by early December. Once open, gaming experts have been quoted saying the new casino could attract as many as 20,000 people each day and throw off $250 million per year in profits, becoming – overnight – the most profitable casino on the East Coast. After originally estimating the cost at $800 million, earlier this year MGM officials boosted the estimated cost of construction to $1.4 billion. Murren said the additional $600 million was poured into more elaborate interior design, a redesign of the theater, a doubling of the number of specialty restaurants and building the complex to LEED specification. “It’s been a marvel to watch its incredible progress,” said Lorenzo Creighton, president and chief operating officer of MGM National Harbor. “We are grateful to the thousands of talented individuals – architects, construction workers, contractors and more – who have worked with great pride to make this amazing achievement happen so quickly.”

67


the sociallist

Matt and Ashley Bronczek

W P H OTO CAPT I O N H E RE

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

e love the diverse friendships we have developed here and hope our children, Birdie and Brody (and our baby boy, due in May 2017) will appreciate people of all kinds. There is no better place to cultivate that than here. Matt runs a residential design/build firm that specializes in historic renovations. I spent seven years working for my grandmother, jewelry designer Ann Hand, and became a certified gemologist. In 2006, I started a nonprofit called Once Upon a Prom and discovered my true passion for activism and philanthropy. We are committed to our support of wonderful non-profits including the Washington Ballet, Teach for America and the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Medical Center. 69


T H E WA S H I N G TO N

L I F E

2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST The 22nd annual record of notably social individuals from politics, diplomacy, business, philanthropy and the arts PORTRAITS BY TONY POWELL

A

B

Mr. and Mrs. JAMES ABDO (Mai)

Mr. and Mrs. BRET BAIER (Amy)

Mr. and Mrs. RAYMOND (RAY) BENTON (Nina)

Mrs. JOHN WILLIAM ABEL-SMITH (Mimi)

Mr. ROBERT BARNETT and Ms. RITA BRAVER

The Honorable and Mrs. ALAN

The Honorable and Mrs. TYLER ABELL (Bess)

Mr. MICHAEL BARONE

BERMAN (Michele)

The Honorable DAVID C. ACHESON

Mr. and Mrs. ALEXANDER BARTH (Mary)

Mr. MJ BERMAN

Mr. JOHN B. (JAY) ADAMS, JR.

Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES L. BARTLETT (Martha)

The Honorable and Mrs. WAYNE

Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN S. BEALE, JR. (Louise)

L. BERMAN (Lea)

The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM J. BENNETT (Elayne)

ADDISON (Sylvia Ripley)

Mr. and Mrs. HARRY BELIN (Susan)

Mr. and Mrs. ADAM K. BERNSTEIN (Tracy)

Mr. and Mrs. JORGE ADELER (Graziela)

Mr. JEREMY BEN-AMI and Ms. AILSA BIRAN

Mr. and Mrs. DADI AKHAVAN (Farinaz)

Mr. and Mrs. MORTON BENDER (Grace)

The Honorable and Mrs. STUART A. BERNSTEIN (Wilma)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN E. (CHIP) AKRIDGE, III (Sally)

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT BENNETT (Ellen)

Mr. MAX N. BERRY

Mr. DAVID ALBERSWERTH and Ms. CARY RIDDER The Honorable MADELEINE K. ALBRIGHT Mr. JAMES A. ALEFANTIS

Earl and Amanda Stafford

The Honorable and Mrs. LAMAR ALEXANDER (Honey) Justice and Mrs. SAMUEL ALITO, JR. (Martha-Ann) Mrs. JOE L. ALLBRITTON (Barbara Jean) Mr. ROBERT L. ALLBRITTON and Dr. ELENA ALLBRITTON Her Excellency the Ambassador of Oman HUNAINA AL-MUGHAIRY and Mr. FUAD AL-HINAI His Excellency the Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates and Mrs. YOUSEF AL-OTAIBA (Abeer) His Excellency the Ambassador of Kuwai Sheikh SALEM ABDULLAH AL-SABAH and Sheikha RIMA AL-SABAH Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT ALTMAN (Lynda Carter) Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL ANSARI (Karen) Mr. and Mrs. JAIME APARACIO (Petra) Mrs. R. W. APPLE, JR. (Betsey) His Excellency the Ambassador of France GERARD ARAUD Mr. and Mrs. LOUIS M. ARONSON (Ami Becker) Ms. ADRIENNE ARSHT Mrs. ARTHUR W. ARUNDEL (Margaret) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN ARUNDEL (Christine) Mr. ANDREW ATHY, JR. Mrs. MARTIN ATLAS (Liane)

70

W

e have lived in the Washington, D.C. area since being assigned here in 1982 when we were on active duty in the military. Although it initially took some time to adjust to the cost of living and traffic complexity, we have long since put our stake in the ground and very proudly consider this area our home.We are truly blessed to live in a culturally rich and diverse area that has afforded our children, and now grandchildren, with growth opportunities one is unlikely to find in many other places. We always find something rewarding — sports and entertainment at the Verizon Center; theater, symphony and opera at the Kennedy Center; fine dining and a gastronomically rousing experience at one of the outstanding local restaurants; or an eyeopening visit to the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture. We have a special penchant for charity and community involvement. Not only is there a vast and diverse range of philanthropic and humanitarian programs with which to be associated, but nearly everyone we know is somehow involved with doing good in the community. Through The Stafford Foundation, we collaborate with other organizations such as Habitat for Humanity, Central Union Mission and the Carpenter’s Shelter to provide opportunities for the underserved and even the homeless to volunteer and contribute to the community. Overall, the Stafford Foundation strives to make this world a better place, one good deed at a time! We are proud to be part of the Washington community.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

71


T H E WA S H I N G T O N L I F E 2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST The Honorable and Mrs. ALBERT J. BEVERIDGE, III (Madzy)

72

Mr. and Mrs. DWIGHT BUSH (Antoinette/Tony) Mr. and Mrs. MARVIN P. BUSH (Margaret)

The Vice President of the United States and

Mr. and Mrs. WESLEY G. (WES) BUSH (Natalie)

Mrs. JOSEPH R. BIDEN, JR. (Jill)

Mr. and Mrs. C. MICHAEL BUXTON (Charlotte)

Mr. and Mrs. R. HUNTER BIDEN (Kathleen) The Honorable and Mrs. JAMES H.

C

BILLINGTON (Marjorie)

Mr. and Mrs. CALVIN CAFRITZ (Jane)

Mrs. ROBERT O. BLAKE (Sylvia)

Mr. and Mrs. CONRAD CAFRITZ (Ludmila)

The Honorable ANTONY J. (TONY) BLINKEN

Mrs. PEGGY COOPER CAFRITZ

and the Honorable EVAN RYAN

Mrs. WILLIAM N. CAFRITZ (Buffy)

Ms. CAROL BLUE

Mrs. CHARLES A. CAMALIER, JR. (Anne)

The Honorable and Mrs. ROY BLUNT (Abigail)

Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES A.

Mrs. THOMAS HALE BOGGS (Barbara)

CAMALIER, III (Patricia)

Mrs. SAMUEL E. BOGLEY (Rose Marie)

Mr. and Mrs. F. DAVIS CAMALIER (Lynda)

The Honorable AVIS T. BOHLEN

Ms. LORI D. CAMALIER

and Mr. DAVID P. CALLEO

Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL

The Honorable and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER

CANTACUZENE (Elizabeth)

S. (KIT) BOND (Linda)

Mrs. RODION CANTACUZENE (Melissa)

Countess PEDER BONDE (Clarissa)

Mr. L. MICHAEL CANTOR and

Mr. and Mrs. PAUL BONNER (Elizabeth)

Ms. JENNY SPRINGER

The Mayor of Washington, D.C.,

The Honorable MORTIMER M. CAPLIN

MURIEL BOWSER

Mr. and Mrs. BERNARD J. CARL (Joan)

The Honorable BARBARA BOXER

Ms. MARGARET CARLSON

and Mr. STEWART BOXER

The Honorable and Mrs. RICHARD

Mr. and Mrs. BRUCE F. BRADLEY (Sharon)

W. CARLSON (Patricia)

Mr. and Mrs. DAVID G. BRADLEY (Katherine)

Mr. and Mrs. TUCKER CARLSON (Susan)

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM (BILL)

The Honorable and Mrs. FRANK

BRAWNER (Greta)

C. CARLUCCI (Marcia)

Miss EDITH H. (BOBBIE) BREWSTER Justice and Mrs. STEPHEN G. BREYER (Joanna)

Mr. JAMES (JAY) CARNEY and Ms. CLAIRE SHIPMAN

Mr. and Mrs. ARTURO E. BRILLEMBOURG

Mrs. JORGE E. CARNICERO (Jacqueline)

(Hilda Ochoa Brillembourg)

Mr. and Mrs. JORGE J. CARNICERO (Rima)

The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM

Mrs. SUSAN CARMEL

E. BROCK, III (Sandra)

Mr. and Mrs. STEPHANE CARNOT (Brooke)

Mr. and Mrs. KENNETH D. BRODY (Carolyn)

Mrs. CONSTANCE CARTER

Mr. and Mrs. RAYMOND C. BROPHY (Jeanette)

Mr. TOM CARVER and Ms. KATTY KAY

T

The Honorable ANN BROWN and

Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN M. (STEVE) CASE (Jean)

Mr. DONALD A. BROWN

Mrs. EUGENE B. CASEY (Betty)

Mr. and Mrs. LEONARD H. BROWN, III (Diane Ray)

Mr. and Mrs. HENRY C. CASHEN, II (Diana)

Mrs. RONALD H. BROWN (Alma)

Mr. and Mrs. ENRICO CECCHI (Andrea)

Ms. MAGALEN OHRSTROM BRYANT

Mr. and Mrs. G. JOHN CECCHI (Kristin)

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM L. BRYANT (Aliki)

Mr. and Mrs. GIUSEPPE CECCHI (Mercedes)

The Honorable and Mrs. MARK

Mr. KEVIN ST. CLAIR CHAFFEE

BRZEZINSKI (Natalia)

Mrs. DAVID CHALLINOR (Joan)

The Honorable and Mrs. ZBIGNIEW

Mrs. ALDUS H. CHAPIN (Dolly)

BRZEZINSKI (Emilie)

The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN

Alan Fleischmann and Dafna Tapiero

Mrs. RUTH HALE BUCHANAN

E. CHAPOTON (Sally)

Mr. and Mrs. WILEY T. BUCHANAN, III (Janis)

The Honorable and Mrs. O. DONALDSON

Mr. and Mrs. JOEL BUCHWALD (Tamara)

CHAPOTON (Mary Jo)

The Right Reverend MARIANN

Mrs. KEVIN P. CHARLES (Ellen MacNeille Charles)

EDGAR BUDDE, Episcopal Bishop of

The Honorable RICHARD B. CHENEY and

Washington, and Mr. PAUL BUDDE

the Honorable LYNNE B. CHENEY

Ms. MAUREEN BUNYAN

The Honorable and Mrs. MICHAEL

Mr. and Mrs. CHILDS FRICK BURDEN (Elaine)

CHERTOFF (Meryl)

Mr. and Mrs. I. TOWNSEND BURDEN, III (Valerie)

Mr. and Mrs. R. J. CICERO (Catherine Conover)

The Honorable RICHARD R. BURT

Mrs. BRICE MCADOO CLAGETT (Diana)

he old cliché is that Washington is a transitional city, with residents moving in and out as the political winds change. In our Washington, nothing could be further from the truth. Our Washington is a city of people with deep roots, driven by a desire to drive change at global scale. In endless ways, Washington is a breeding ground for the ideas that change our world and shape our culture. From the Atlantic Council, the Jane Goodall Institute, the Rock Creek Conservancy, to our universities, the world’s preeminent thought leaders convene here and export their insights nationally and abroad. Art and music lovers like us enjoy world class cultural institutions, such as the Phillips Collection (the first modern art museum in America!), the National Gallery of Art, and the Kennedy Center. We view our home as something like a town square. Our door is always open to neighbors and friends, and we’re constantly aspiring to bring together unlikely allies to find common ground. Most of all, our Washington is the perfect place to raise our two girls to be thoughtful, responsible, worldly and civicminded. We strive to bring them to Martha’s Table and N Street Village – both national models for innovative non-profits – and expose them to a community of diverse backgrounds, values, and languages.

The Honorable and Mrs. RAYMOND C. CLEVENGER, III (Leslie) The Honorable WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON and The Honorable HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON Mr. and Mrs. JOHN COCHRAN (Barbara) The Honorable and Mrs. THAD COCHRAN (Kay) Mr. and Mrs. ANDREW COCKBURN (Leslie) Mr. and Mrs. C. SHELBY COFFEY, III (Mary Lee) Mr. and Mrs. NEIL D. COHEN (Marcy)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


T H E WA S H I N G T O N L I F E 2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM

The Honorable ROBERT J. (BOB) DOLE

S. COHEN (Janet Langhart)

and the Honorable ELIZABETH DOLE

Mr. and Mrs. ROLAND A. FLAMINI (Diane)

Mr. CARL COLBY

Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER J.

Mr. ALAN FLEISCHMANN and Ms. DAFNA TAPIERO

Mr. and Mrs. ELBRIDGE COLBY (Susana)

DONATELLI (Karen)

Ms. DORETTE FLEISCHMANN

Mr. and Mrs. JONATHAN E. COLBY (Susan)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN DONOVAN (Linda Semans)

Mr. and Mrs. LEE M. FOLGER (Juliet)

The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM

The Honorable SHAUN DONOVAN,

Mrs. NANCY MCELROY (BITSEY) FOLGER

T. COLEMAN (Lovida)

director, Office of Management and

Mr. and Mrs. NEIL C. FOLGER (Izette)

Mr. CHARLES N. (CHUCK) CONCONI

Budget, and Ms. LIZA GILBERT

Mr. and Mrs. JAMES C. FREE (Ann)

and Ms. JANELLE JONES

Mr. and Mrs. GUY O. DOVE, III (Valerie)

The Honorable and Mrs. RODNEY P.

Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL M. (MIKE)

Miss AMANDA DOWNES

FRELINGHUYSEN (Virginia)

CONNORS (Julia)

Mrs. CHRISTINE DOWNEY

Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS FRIEDMAN (Ann)

The Honorable ESTHER COOPERSMITH

Her Excellency the Ambassador of Monaco

Mr. DAVID CORN and Ms.

MAGUY MACCARIO DOYLE

Mr. and Mrs. ALFRED FRIENDLY, JR. (Marie Louise/Pie)

WELMOED LAANSTRA

Ms. ELIZABETH DREW

Mr. DAVID FRUM and Ms.

Dr. and Mrs. MILTON CORN (Gilan Tocco)

The Honorable and Mrs. KENNETH

DANIELLE CRITTENDEN

Mr. and Mrs. WARREN J. COX (Claire)

M. DUBERSTEIN (Jacqueline)

The Honorable and Mrs. CRAIG L. FULLER (Karen)

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT H. CRAFT, JR. (Margaret)

Mrs. RICHARD N. DUBIN (Elizabeth)

Ms. FRANCESCA CRAIG

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM N. (BILL) DUDLEY (Martha)

Dr. and Mrs. WILLIAM H. CROCKER (Jean)

Mrs. ROBERT W. DUEMLING (Louisa)

Miss CAROLINE CROFT

The Honorable JOSEPH D. (JOE) DUFFEY

Ms. LAVINIA CURRIER

Mr. LAMMOT du PONT

The Honorable and Mrs. WALTER

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM H. (MIKE)

L. (WALT) CUTLER (Didi)

du PONT (Rein)

Mr. and Mrs. JAMES M. CUTTS (June)

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT DUVALL (Luciana Pedraza)

D

Miss DEESHA DYER

E

Mr. and Mrs. LEO A. DALY, III (Grega)

The Honorable DONNA F. EDWARDS

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN M. DAMGARD, II (Britty)

Mr. and Mrs. MARK D. EIN (Sally)

Miss REBECCA P. DARLINGTON

Ms. SUSAN EISENHOWER

The Honorable and Mrs. THOMAS

Mr. JAMES P. ELDER, JR.

A. DASCHLE (Linda Hall)

Mr. PETER ELLEFSON and Ms.

Mrs. STUART C. DAVIDSON (Sally)

DEBORAH F. RUTTER

Mr. JOHN L. (JACK) DAVIES

Mrs. ANNE LIVINGSTON EMMET

and Ms. KAY KENDALL

Mrs. RICHARD ENGLAND, SR. (Lois)

Mrs. MICHAEL K. DEAVER (Carolyn)

The Reverend Monsignor JOHN J. ENZLER

Mr. and Mrs. R. LESLIE DEAK (Moshira)

Mr. XAVIER F. EQUIHUA

Mr. and Mrs. ELI WHITNEY

Mr. and Mrs. RICARDO ERNST (Isabel)

DEBEVOISE, II (Heidi)

Dr. and Mrs. AHMAD R. ESFANDIARY (Judy)

Mrs. ARNAUD DE BORCHGRAVE (Alexandra)

Mrs. MELVYN J. ESTRIN (Suellen)

Mr. DAVID A. DECKELBAUM

Mrs. BENJAMIN C. EVANS, JR. (Jan)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN J. (JACK)

Ms. PAGE EVANS

DEGIOIA (Theresa)

Mrs. ROWLAND EVANS, JR. (Katherine)

The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN DELANEY (April)

F

Mr. and Mrs. DONALD DELL (Carole)

John Jeppson and Wendy Benchley

Mr. and Mrs. ALBERT J. DWOSKIN (Claire)

Ms. COLLEEN DALY

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM J. (BILL) DABBIERE (Ashley)

74

Mrs. HAMILTON FISH, JR. (Mary Ann)

Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES J. DIBONA (Evelyn)

Mrs. RICHARD M. FAIRBANKS, III (Shannon)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN DICKERSON (Ann)

Mr. and Mrs. A. HUDA FAROUKI (Samia)

Mrs. C. WYATT DICKERSON (Tandy)

Mrs. NORMAN FARQUHAR (Elinor)

The Honorable JOHN D. DINGELL and

Mr. and Mrs. HOSSEIN FATEH (Dalia)

the Honorable DEBBIE DINGELL

Mr. and Mrs. RAUL J. FERNANDEZ (Jean-Marie)

Ms. GLORIA STORY DITTUS

Mrs. GEORGE M. FERRIS, JR. (Nancy)

Mr. BARRY DIXON

Ms. KAREN FINNEY

The Honorable PAULA J. DOBRIANSKY

The Honorable JULIE FINLEY

The Honorable and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER

Mr. and Mrs. FRANK FIORINA (Carly)

J. DODD (Jacki Clegg)

Mr. JOHN D. FIRESTONE

W

ashington is a fascinating and welcoming place for us. We met in serendipitous fashion through mutual friends on a week-long raft trip on the Yampa river in 2010 and married in 2011. In the five years we’ve been here we’ve had a wonderful time enjoying the artistic and cultural charms of the city.We love attending PEN/Faulkner, Young Concert Artists,Transformer and Environmental Film Festival events and bringing together people we meet there with Wendy’s friends in ocean conservation and government and John’s in the international and business world for energetic gatherings at our home. Wendy lived in Princeton N.J. for 40 years where she served as an elected official, councilwoman and county commissioner for 12 years. She combined these responsibilities with ocean and other conservation causes brought into sharp focus through the many dive trips made with her late husband, author Peter Benchley. She has received awards from the International Seakeepers and is a member of the Woman Divers Hall of Fame. She hosts the Peter Benchley Ocean Awards and works with various ocean organizations.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


T H E WA S H I N G T O N L I F E 2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST

G

GROSVENOR (Mary Helen)

Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN A. HAYES (Theo)

Miss SARAH A. GROSVENOR

Mr. and Mrs. WEBB COOK HAYES, IV (Sara)

Mr. and Mrs. STANLEY N. GAINES (Gay)

Mr. and Mrs. ACHILLE MURAT GUEST (Judith)

Mr. and Mrs. S. ROSS HECHINGER (Susan)

Mr. JAMES E. GALE and Ms. LISA B. BARRY

Mr. ROBERT E. HEGGESTAD

Mr. and Mrs. DOUGLAS GANSLER (Laura)

Mrs. CHARLES GUGGENHEIM (Marion) The Honorable and Mrs. CARLOS

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM B. GARRISON, JR. (Mary)

M. GUTIERREZ (Edi)

Mrs. RICHARD M. HELMS (Cynthia)

Dr. and Mrs. MATTHEW B. GAVIN (Holidae Hayes)

H

Ms. HELEN LEE HENDERSON

Reverend WILLIAM GEORGE, S.J. Ms. ANN GERACIMOS

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT M. HAFT (Mary)

Mr. C. WOLCOTT HENRY

Mr. and Mrs. BERNARD S. GEWIRZ (Sarah)

Mr. and Mrs. GREGORY HALL (Wendy Adeler)

Mr. JOHN HENRY and Ms. ANN CRITTENDEN

Mr. and Mrs. CARL S. GEWIRZ (Nancy)

The Honorable and Mrs. LLOYD N. HAND (Ann)

Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL HERRALD (Susan)

Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL K. GEWIRZ (Cleo)

Mr. and Mrs. FRANKLIN L. HANEY, SR. (Emmy)

Mrs. ANITA G. HERRICK

Mr. and Mrs. STEVEN B. GEWIRZ (Katrina)

Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD HANLON (Pamela)

Mrs. CHRISTIAN A. HERTER, JR. (Catherine)

His Excellency the Ambassador of Spain

Mr. THOMAS HARDHART and

Mr. JULIO E. HEURTEMATTE, JR.

RAMON GIL-CASARES

Ms. VIRGINIA SHORE

Mr. ROBERT M. HIGDON, JR.

The Honorable and Mrs. JOSEPH

The Honorable JANE HARMAN

Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE G. HILL (Christine)

B. GILDENHORN (Alma)

Dr. and Mrs. MARTIN HARRELL (Sheila)

The Honorable and Mrs. DOUGLAS H.

Mr. MATTHEW T. HASTINGS

Mr. ROBIN HILL and Mrs. MARCIA MCGHEE CARTER

GINSBURG (Dorothy/Deecy)

Mr. TODD HATHAWAY and Ms. NORA

The Honorable CARLA HILLS

Justice RUTH BADER GINSBURG

MACCOBY HATHAWAY

Ms. IRENE HIRANO

Miss SUSAN GINSBURG

Ms. CARLA D, HAYDEN, Librarian of Congress

Mr. ROBERT G. HISAOKA

Mr. and Mrs. J. RODERICK HELLER, III (Kay)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN HENDRICKS (Maureen)

Mr. BRENT GLASS and Ms. CATHRYN KELLER The Honorable and Mrs. DANIEL R. GLICKMAN (Rhoda)

Wendy Burden Morgan

Mr. and Mrs. DONALD GLICKMAN (Mia) Ms. JULEANNA GLOVER Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN GOLDBERG (Diana) Ms. KATE GOODALL The Honorable and Mrs. BARTON J. (BART) GORDON (Leslie) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN C. GORE (Antonia/Toni) Mrs. MARY ELIZABETH (TIPPER) GORE Judge and Mrs. WALTER GORMAN (Sarah) Mr. and Mrs. KINGDON GOULD, III (Kristin) Mr. DONALD E. GRAHAM and Ms. AMANDA BENNETT Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN GRAHAM (Cathy) The Honorable C. BOYDEN GRAY Mr. and Mrs. JOHN D. GRAY (Melissa Phipps) Mr. GEORGE GRAYSON Mrs. HERMEN GREENBERG (Monica) The Honorable ALAN GREENSPAN and Ms. ANDREA MITCHELL Mr. and Mrs. G. LAUDER GREENWAY, II (Abigail Adams) Ms. NELSE L. (KUBIE) GREENWAY Mr. DAVID GREGORY and Ms. BETH WILKINSON Mr. and Mrs. ANDERSON GRENNAN (Mae Haney) Mr. and Mrs. ROLF GRAAGE (France) Ms. ANNIE GROER Mrs. RUTH NOBLE GROOM Mr. KEN GROSSINGER and Ms. MICHELINE KLAGSBRUN Mr. and Mrs. EDWIN S. GROSVENOR (Deborah)

I

arrived in Washington from New York in the summer of 1951 with my first husband, Walter Sohler, and baby daughter, Elaine. We bought a house on P Street in Georgetown where we lived for two years before moving to six acres in McLean. Jacqueline and Lee Bouvier were friends and we visited them at “Merrywood,” their mother and stepfather’s estate on the Potomac, which gave us the idea of having a house and pool there as well. Once settled, I had a second daughter, Sage. My husband and I divorced after some years and in 1960 I married ABC newsman Edward P. Morgan. We had been to the wedding of Jackie Bouvier and Jack Kennedy, so when J.F.K. was elected president it was incredibly exciting. After he was killed I joined a group of Jackie’s friends to help respond to the deluge of letters that came to her from around the world. My life with Ed Morgan was stimulating and we saw and entertained people in government, journalism and diplomacy. We hosted dinners for Hubert Humphrey, Justice William O. Douglas and Alice Roosevelt Longworth. I also volunteered for Planned Parenthood and soon became a board member and traveled with them to many parts of the world. Later I worked with Population Action International. This was deeply satisfying and I remain committed to this cause. In the 1980s our talented friends Townsend (Tim) and Ann Hoopes started The Hoopes Troupe, a group of singers and musicians who performed all the great pop composers including Gershwin, Lerner and Lowe, Cole Porter and Irving Berlin. These shows over 15 years were enormous fun as we were urged on and applauded by everyone we knew. I returned to live “in town” in Spring valley in 1981. Now in my 90th year I can say that living in Washington has been a joy. I cannot imagine a life more stimulating and delightful than the one I have so enjoyed here.

Mr. and Mrs. GILBERT M.

76

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Mack and Donna McLarty photographed at their residence


T H E WA S H I N G T O N L I F E 2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST Mr. JIM HOAGLAND and Ms. JANE

Mr. ROBERT (ROBIN) JOHNSON

STANTON HITCHCOCK

Mr. and Mrs. EVAN JONES (Cindy)

Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTIAN C. HOHENLOHE (Nora)

Mr. and Mrs. VERNON E. JORDAN (Ann)

The Honorable ERIC H. HOLDER, JR.

Mrs. J. HOWARD JOYNT, III (Carol)

and Dr. SHARON MALONE Mrs. WALLACE F. HOLLADAY (Wilhelmina)

K

Mr. and Mrs. WALLACE F.

Mr. MICHAEL KAHN and Mr.

HOLLADAY, JR. (Winton)

CHARLES MITCHEM

The Honorable and Mrs. STUART

Mr. MICHAEL KAISER and Mr. JOHN ROBERTS

W. HOLLIDAY (Gwen)

Mrs. ALAN I. KAY (Dianne)

The Honorable and Mrs. LINWOOD

Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES KEHLER (Marni)

HOLTON (Virginia/Jinks)

Mrs. JACK KEMP (Joanne)

Mr. and Mrs. H. CARTER HOOD (Amanda Smith)

Justice and Mrs. ANTHONY M. KENNEDY (Mary)

Mr. and Mrs. OUTERBRIDGE HORSEY (Georgina)

Mrs. EDWARD M. KENNEDY (Victoria)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN K. HOSKINSON (Ana)

The Honorable JOHN F. KERRY, Secretary

Mr. and Mrs. ARTHUR A. HOUGHTON, III (Peggy)

of State, and Mrs. TERESA HEINZ

Mrs. EDMOND N. HOWAR (Margaret)

Mr. JOSEPH KEUSCH and Ms. JAN NEUHARTH

Mrs. PATRICIA E. HOWAR

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM J. KILBERG (Bobbie)

Mrs. RAYMOND J. HOWAR (Pamela)

Mr. and Mrs. MARK KIMSEY (Sarah)

Miss JANET A. HOWARD

Mr. and Mrs. KNIGHT A. KIPLINGER (Ann)

Mr. and Mrs. HORACE HOWELLS (Ivy)

Mr. JAY KLUG and Ms. JAMIE HECHINGER

The Honorable STENY H. HOYER

Mr. and Mrs. STEVEN KNAPP (Diane)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN E. HUNNICUTT (Catherine)

Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER KOCH (Susan)

Mr. AL HUNT and Ms. JUDY WOODRUFF

Mr. and Mrs. EDWARD KOCH (Doro Bush)

The Honorable BONNIE MCELVEEN

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT KOGOD (Arlene)

HUNTER and Mr. BYNUM M. HUNTER

The Honorable TOM C. KOROLOGOS and

The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN M.

The Honorable ANN KOROLOGOS

HUNTSMAN, JR. (Mary Kaye)

Mrs. POLLY KRAFT

I

Mr. THOMAS KRAHENBUHL and

Mr. and Mrs. DAVID IGNATIUS (Eve)

Mr. and Mrs. RAJ KUMAR (Maria Teresa)

The Honorable and Mrs. PAUL

Dr. SACHIKO KUNO

R. IGNATIUS (Nancy) Mr. and Mrs. JEAN-LOUIS IMHOFF (Michele)

L

The Honorable and Mrs. MARTIN INDYK (Gahl)

The Managing Director of the International

Mr. JOHN PETERS IRELAN

Monetary Fund Mrs. CHRISTINE LAGARDE

Ms. MAXINE ISAACS

The Honorable and Mrs. JAMES C.

Ms. DOROTHY M. KOSINSKI

Mr. and Mrs. WALTER ISAACSON (Cathy)

LANGDON, JR. (Sandy)

Mr. and Mrs. C. OLIVER ISELIN, III (Swannie)

Mr. and Mrs. CHISWELL DABNEY

Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER ISHAM (Jennifer)

LANGHORNE, JR. (Barbara)

Mrs. EUGENE ISTOMIN (Marta)

Mr. and Mrs. ANTHONY LANIER (Isabelle)

J

Mr. and Mrs. CLIMIS G. LASCARIS (Carol)

Mrs. AARON G. JACKSON (Alexine)

The Honorable and Mrs. PAUL LAXALT (Carol)

Mr. HUGH NEWELL JACOBSEN

The Honorable and Mrs. PATRICK

T

he Mark & Brenda Moore Family Foundation supports in excess of 20 organizations, with a focus on education, healthcare, arts/culture, and Christian evangelism.We are also proud supporters of the Inova Health System. To date, we have pledged over $7.5 million in aid, benefaction, scholarship and advocacy.We serve on the boards of nine non-profit organizations and devote our time to helping inspire, promote, embrace and uplift the causes they further. In 2016, we chaired the Community Coalition for Haiti Gala and the iFaith annual golf tournament and also served on the executive committee for the Joan Hisaoka Make a Difference Ball. Recently, we reinforced our dedication to service during a mission trip to Haiti. Earlier this year were the proud recipients of both the Northern Virginia Urban League Community Service Award and the American Heart Association Community Partner Award. As founding donors, we were overjoyed and proud to be a part of the opening of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Mr. W. DAVID LAWSON, IV

Mr. and Mrs. SIMON T. JACOBSEN (Ruth)

LEAHY (Marcelle)

Mr. DAVID C. LEVY and Ms. CAROLE L. FELD

Mr. and Mrs. ERNEST D. (ERNIE)

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT E. LEE, IV (Carew)

Mr. and Mrs. H. FINLAY LEWIS (Willee)

JARVIS (Debbie)

Mr. and Mrs. DANIEL H. LEEDS (Sunita)

Mr. THOMAS L. LILJENQUIST

Mr. and Mrs. SAID JAWAD (Shamim)

Dr. and Mrs. LASALLE D. LEFFALL, JR. (Ruth)

Mr. and Mrs. JAN M. LODAL (Elizabeth)

Mr. JOHN JEPPSON, III and

Mr. LASALLE D. LEFFALL, III

Mr. and Mrs. SCOTT ALAN LOGAN (Lydia)

Ms. WENDY BENCHEY

Mr. and Mrs. JAMES LEHRER (Kate)

Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES PILLSBURY LORD (Gay)

Mr. and Mrs. FREEBORN GARRETSON

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT LEHRMAN (Aimee)

Mr. and Mrs. WINSTON BAO LORD (Stephanie)

JEWETT, JR. (Joan)

Mr. JAMES H. LEMON, JR.

Mr. JAMES A. JOHNSON

The Honorable and Mrs. THEODORE J. (TED) LEONSIS (Lynn)

His Excellency the Ambassador of Denmark LARS GERT LOSE and Ms. ULLA RØNBERG

Admiral (U.S.N. Ret’d.) and Mrs. JAY L. JOHNSON (Sydney/Nini)

78

Mark and Brenda Moore

Ms. ANNE MARIE LYNCH

Mr. and Mrs. DANI LEVINAS (Mirella)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Robert Higdon photographed at an interior design clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence


T H E WA S H I N G T O N L I F E 2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST

M

Dr. and Mrs. WENDELL G. MILES (Ann) Mrs. G. WILLIAM MILLER (Ariadna)

The Honorable JOHN D. MACOMBER

Mr. and Mrs. JAMES P. MILLS, JR. (Deborah)

Mr. and Mrs. VICTOR MADDUX (Michelle))

Mrs. CONSTANCE (CONNIE) MILSTEIN

Mr. and Mrs. RAY MAHMOOD (Shaista)

The Honorable and Mrs. NORMAN

Mrs. CHRISTOPHER J. MAKINS (Wendy)

MINETTA (Danealia/Deni)

The Honorable and Mrs. FREDERIC

The Honorable and Mrs. GEORGE

V. MALEK (Marlene)

J. MITCHELL (Heather)

Mr. and Mrs. FREDERIC W. MALEK (Britlan)

The Honorable MARY V. MOCHARY

Mrs. JAMES P. MALONEY, JR. (Rosalie)

The Honorable and Mrs. ANTHONY J.

Ms. ANN WALKER MARCHANT

(TOBY) MOFFETT, JR. (Myra)

Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE T. MARCOU (Karen Barker) The Honorable EDWARD J. MARKEY

His Excellency the Ambassador of Afghanistan anda Mrs. HAMDULLAH MOHIB (Lael)

and Dr. SUSAN BLUMENTHAL

Mr. and Mrs. JARL MOHN (Pamela)

Horace and Ivy Howells

W

Mr. and Mrs. DAVID S. MARRIOTT (Carrie)

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT J. MONAHAN, JR. (Laurie)

Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD E. MARRIOTT (Nancy)

Mr. and Mrs. C. BRAXTON MONCURE (Deborah)

Mr. and Mrs. J. WILLARD

Dr. ROBERT MONTGOMERY and

MARRIOTT, JR. (Donna Rae)

Ms. DENYCE GRAVES

Ms. JACQUELINE BADGER MARS

Mr. and Mrs. MARK MOORE (Brenda)

Mrs. VIRGINIA CRETELLA MARS

The Honorable CONSTANCE A. (CONNIE) MORELLA and Mr. DAVID MORELLA

Mr. and Mrs .ALEX MARSHALL (Amanda) The Honorable CAPRICIA P. MARSHALL and Dr. ROBERT MARSHALL Ms. CANDYCE MARTIN Mr. JUREK MARTIN and Ms. KATHLEEN NEWLAND Mr. and Mrs. JOHN J. MASON (JoAnn) Mr. and Mrs. PETER MARX (Toni) Mr. and Mrs. JOHN MURDOCH MATHESON (Susan) Mrs. BONNIE BUCHANAN MATHESON Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES T. MATHESON (Julie) Mr. and Mrs. MALCOLM MATHESON, III (Gail) Mr. CHARLES B. MATHIAS Mr. and Mrs. EDWARD J. MATHIAS (Dale) The Honorable DORIS MATSUI Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER MATTHEWS (Kathleen) Mr. ERNEST N. MAY, JR. The Honorable TIMOTHY J. MCBRIDE and

Mrs. WENDY BURDEN MORGAN Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT MOSES (Patricia Kluge) Mr. ERIC L. MOTLEY Mr. ROGER H. MUDD Mrs. PAT MUNROE (Mary) Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER MURRAY (Carlotta) Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS J. MURRAY (Evelyn)

N Mr. and Mrs. VALI R. NASR (Darya) The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN D. NEGROPONTE (Diane) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT C. NELSON (Julia) Mrs. JOHN A. NEVIUS (Sally) Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM V. NEWLIN (Louisa) The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM T. NEWMAN, JR. (Sheila Johnson) Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT C. NICHOLAS, III (Lynn) Dr. and Mrs. THOMAS P. NIGRA (Jane)

The Honorable ANITA MCBRIDE

The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM A. (BILL) NITZE (Ann)

Senator and Mrs. JOHN MCCAIN (Cindy)

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT H. (BOB) NIXON (Sarah)

Mrs. JOHN S. MCCAIN, JR. (Roberta)

Her Majesty Queen NOOR

His Eminence Cardinal THEODORE

Mr. FRANCO NUSCHESE

E. MCCARRICK

Mr. And Mrs. LAWRENCE C.

The Honorable MITCH MCCONNELL and

NUSSDORF (Melanie)

the Honorable ELAINE LAN CHAO Ms. DOROTHY MCGHEE

O

The Honorable and Mrs. THOMAS F.

The President of the United States BARACK

(MACK) MCLARTY, III (Donna)

OBAMA and First Lady MICHELLE OBAMA

The Honorable JULIETTE

Justice SANDRA DAY O’CONNOR

CLAGETT MCLENNAN

Mr. CHRISTOPHER OGDEN and

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM F. MCSWEENY (Dorothy)

Ms. LINDA FUSELIER

Mr. DAVID L. MERCER

Ms. DIANA (DEEDY) OGDEN and

Mr. THEODORE A. MILES and Dr. CARLOTTA (BUFFY) MILES

Ms. MARGO L. CARPER

80

Mr. and Mrs. CLARKE OHRSTROM (Molly)

ashington, D.C. charms with its profusion of opportunities to engage. It is an international city with the warmth of a small town and those who live here are as comfortable discussing policy as they are bingewatching Netflix. We love to listen to live music and the city provides endless opportunities for special experiences from the legendary 9:30 Club and beautiful Jazz Club at the Kennedy Center to the bucolic lawn at Wolf Trap.We love walking to neighborhood restaurants and the diverse choice of first class cuisine here, including such favorites as 2 Amys, St. Arnold’s for beer and mussels, and Bindaas, the newest offering from the James Beard-awardwinning chef behind Rasika. Local traditions are reflective of our diverse culture; we enjoy the beautiful spring garden party at historic Tudor place in Georgetown just as much as the Halloween high-heel drag queen race on 17th Street NW. We still miss the Corcoran Ball and the unique space it filled in our local arts community but are eager to see what fills its place. We’ve been privileged to raise our children among smart, hard working Washingtonians who keep our country running, incorporate service to others into their daily lives, and also have some fun.

Mrs. GEORGE L. OHRSTROM, JR. (Jacqueline) Mrs. RICARD R. OHRSTROM (Allen) Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER OLSEN (Michelle) Ms. MAUREEN ORTH Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE P. O’SULLIVAN (Nancy Howar) The Honorable MARY M. OURISMAN and Mr. MANDELL J. OURISMAN

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


T H E WA S H I N G T O N L I F E 2 0 1 7

SOCIAL LIST

P

The Honorable PENNY S. PRITZKER, Secretary

The Honorable SUSAN PORTER ROSE

of Commerce, and Dr. BRYAN TRAUBERT

Mr. and Mrs. BRUCE ROSS-LARSON (Shelly)

General (U.S.M.C. Retâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d.) and Mrs.

Mr. JOHN PYLES and Ms. BARBARA HARRISON

Ms. RYNTHIA M. ROST

PETER PACE (Lynne)

Mrs. EBEN W. PYNE (Nancy)

Mr. and Mrs. RANDOLPH D. ROUSE (Michelle)

Her Imperial Majesty FARAH PAHLAVI

Q

RANDALL (ED) ROYCE (Marie)

His Imperial Highness Crown Prince REZA

82

The Honorable and Mrs. EDWARD

PAHLAVI and Her Imperial Highness

Mr. and Mrs. WHAYNE S. QUIN (Ursula)

Mr. and Mrs. DAVID M. RUBENSTEIN (Alice)

Crown Princess YASMINE PAHLAVI

Mrs. J. EUGENE QUINN (Irene/Margy)

Mr. and Mrs. MILES RUBIN (Nancy)

Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM CUSHING PALEY (Alison)

The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN M. (JACK)

Mrs. OTTO J. RUESCH (Jeanne)

The Honorable and Mrs. CHARLES

QUINN (Susanna)

Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS D.

S. PASHAYAN (Sheila)

Ms. SALLY QUINN

RUTHERFOORD, JR. (Jean)

Mr. and Mrs. SAM PATTEN (Laura)

Mr. THOMAS H. QUINN

The Honorable and Mrs. FREDERICK J.

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN C. PATY, III (Alma)

R

RYAN, JR. (Genevieve/Genny)

Mr. and Mrs. MALCOLM E. (MIKE) PEABODY (Pamela)

The Honorable MARY (MOLLY) RAISER

and Mrs. PAUL RYAN (Janna)

Mr. and Mrs. PAYSON R. PEABODY (Karin)

Mr. and Mrs. MITCHELL (MITCH) RALES (Emily)

Mr. CHASE W. RYND

Mr. and Mrs. HAVEN N. B. PELL (Mina)

Mr. and Mrs. W. RUSSELL RAMSEY (Norma)

The Honorable NANCY PELOSI

Mr. FRANK B. RANDOLPH

S

and Mr. PAUL PELOSI

Mrs. DONALD RAPPAPORT (Susan)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN SAFER (Joy)

Mr. MARK PENN and Ms. NANCY JACOBSON

The Honorable and Mrs. JAMIN B.

Miss PATRICIA BENNETT SAGON

The Speaker of the House of Representatives

Mrs. CHARLES H. PERCY (Loraine)

(JAMIE) RASKIN (Sarah Bloom)

Mr. and Mrs. KYLE SAMPERTON (Kim)

Mr. LUCIAN PERKINS and Ms. SARAH TANGUY

Mrs. ELIZABETH B. (BETSEY) REA

Mr. and Mrs. ROGER SANT (Victoria/Vicki)

Mr. and Mrs. DAVID PERLIN (Skye Raiser)

Mr. and Mrs. GANT REDMON (Frances)

Mr. CHRISTOPHER S. SARGENT (Ann)

Mr. JOSEPH G. PERPICH and Ms.

Mr. and Mrs. SAMUEL S. REED (Juliet)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN A. SARGENT (Susan)

CATHY SULZBERGER

Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS A. REED (Vanessa)

Mr. and Mrs. ARTURO SARUKHAN

Mr. and Mrs. MILTON V. PETERSON (Carolyn)

Ms. DIANE REHM

(Veronica Valencia)

Ms. LAUREN PETERSON

Mr. and Mrs. CHARLES H. (CHIP)

His Excellency the Ambassador of Japan and

Dr. and Mrs. MICHAEL J. PETITE (Jeannette)

REID, JR. (Nina Black)

Mrs. KENICHIRO SASAE (Nobuko)

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN E. PFLIEGER (Donna)

Mr. CHRISTOPHER REITER

Mr. and Mrs. B. FRANCIS SAUL, II (Tricia)

The Honorable THOMAS R. PICKERING

Mr. and Mrs. RANDOLPH W. RENCHARD (Lila)

Mrs. ANTONIN SCALIA (Maureen)

Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL P. PILLSBURY (Susan)

Mr. and Mrs. ARLIE SCHARDT

Mr. and Mrs. PHILIP W. PILLSBURY, JR. (Nina)

His Excellency the Ambassador of Panama and Mrs. EMANUEL REVILLA (Luciana)

(Bonnie Nelson Schwartz)

Mr. and Mrs. WALTER H. PINCUS (Ann)

Mr. JAMES V. REYES

Mr. and Mrs. BOB SCHIEFFER (Patricia)

Mrs. SALLY ENGELHARD PINGREE

Mr. and Mrs. R. ROLAND REYNOLDS (Diana)

The Honorable CHELLIE PINGREE

Mr. and Mrs. WAYNE REYNOLDS (Catherine)

Mr. and Mrs. NASH WHITNEY SCHOTT (Aniko Gaal)

and Mr. DONALD SUSSMAN

Ms. CARY RIDDER

The Honorable CAROL L. SCHWARTZ

His Excellency the Ambassador of Colombia and Mrs. JUAN CARLOS PINZON (Pilar)

Mrs. WALTER T. RIDDER (Marie)

Ms. GAIL SCOTT

The Honorable and Mrs. THOMAS

The Honorable BRENT SCOWCROFT

Mr. BILL PLANTE and Ms. ROBIN SMITH

J. RIDGE (Michele)

His Imperial Highness Prince ERMIAS

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN D. PODESTA (Mary)

Mr. and Mrs. C. JACKSON RITCHIE, JR. (Jane)

SAHLE-SELASSIE HAILE SELASSIE

Mr. ANTHONY T. (TONY) PODESTA

The Honorable and Mrs. CHARLES

and Her Highness Princess SABA KEBEDE

Mr. and Mrs. JOHN J. POHANKA (Lynn)

S. (CHUCK) ROBB (Lynda)

The Honorable PETER A. SELFRIDGE,

Mr. and Mrs. CURTIS POLK (Amanda)

The Chief Justice of the United States and

Chief of Protocol of the United States,

Mr. KENNETH M. POLLACK and

Mrs. JOHN G. ROBERTS (Jane)

and Ms. PARITA SHAH

Ms. ANDREA KOPPEL

Ms. ROXANNE ROBERTS

The Honorable and Mrs. IVAN SELIN (Nina)

Mrs. ABE POLLIN (Irene)

Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN ROBERTS (Cokie)

The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM

Mr. and Mrs. HERMAN PORTEN (Regina)

The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN D. (JAY)

S. SESSIONS (Alice)

Mr. and Mrs. NORMAN S. PORTENOY (Winifred)

ROCKEFELLER, IV (Sharon)

Mr. VICTOR SHARGAI and Mr. CRAIG PASCAL

The Honorable and Mrs. COLIN

The Honorable and Mrs. FREDERICK

Mr. PAUL SHERRILL Ms. DONNA HAMILTON SHOR

L. POWELL (Alma)

B. ROONEY (Evelyn)

Mr. and Mrs. EARL A. (RUSTY) POWELL, III (Nancy)

Mr. and TIMOTHY C. ROONEY

Mr. and Mrs. MARK SHRIVER (Jeanne)

Mr. and Mrs. JEFFREY POWELL (Elizabeth)

and Ms. DANA DEMANGE

Mr.TIMOTHY SHRIVER and Ms. LINDA POTTER

Lady PREVIN (Heather)

The Honorable SELWA S.

Mr. and Mrs. SIMON SIDAMON-ERISTOFF

Miss JUDY LYNN PRINCE

(LUCKY) ROOSEVELT

(Nancy)

Mr. and Mrs. FREDERICK H. PRINCE (Diana)

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT M. ROSENTHAL (Marion)

Mrs. DONALD SIGMUND (Deborah )

Dr. and Mrs. JEROLD J. PRINCIPATO (Marjorie)

The Honorable JONATHAN C. ROSE and

Mr. JONATHAN SILVER and Ms. MELISSA MOSS

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Mr. and Mrs. J. ROBINSON WEST (Eileen)

L. SILVERSTEIN (Elaine)

Mr. and Mrs. VLADIMIR S. TOLSTOYMILOSLAVSKY (Suzanne)

Mr. JAMAL SIMMONS and Ms. JEWEL JAMES

Mrs. SAMI E. TOTAH (Annie)

D. WEST, JR. (Gail)

The Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution DAVID J. SKORTON and Ms. ROBIN DAVISSON

The Honorable KATHLEEN KENNEDY

Ms. KATHARINE WEYMOUTH

TOWNSEND and Mr. DAVID L. TOWNSEND

Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE Y. WHEELER, III (Frances)

Mr. and Mrs. ALBERT H. SMALL (Shirley)

Mrs. LEWIS R. TOWNSEND (Ann Van Devanter)

Mr. and Mrs. THOMAS WHEELER (Carol)

Mr. and Mrs. DOUGLAS SMITH (Gabriella)

Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN J.

Mr. and Mrs. DAVID WHITE (Kimball Stroud)

Ms. JAN SMITH

TRACHTENBERG (Francine)

The Honorable and Mrs. SHELDON

Ms. MOLLY SMITH

Mr. GEOFFREY O. TRACY and

WHITEHOUSE (Sandra)

Mr. and Mrs. ROBERT BLAND (BOB)

Ms. NORAH O’DONNELL

Mr. and Mrs. PAUL WILLIAMS (Catherine)

SMITH, JR. (Niente)

Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL TRAGER (Mariella)

Mr. and Mrs. WESLEY S. WILLIAMS, JR. (Karen)

Mrs. ROBERT H. SMITH (Clarice)

Mr. and Mrs. C. BOWDOIN TRAIN (Georgina)

Mr. and Mrs. GAVIN WILSON (Odile)

The Honorable and Mrs. LEONARD

The Honorable and Mrs. TOGO

Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN SMITH (Sally Bedell Smith)

Mrs. RUSSELL E. TRAIN (Aileen)

Mrs. CURTIN WINSOR, III (Deborah)

The Honorable and Mrs. MARION H.

Admiral (U.S.N. Ret’d.) and Mrs.

Mr. ELLIS WISNER

(JOE) SMOAK (Mary Frances)

STANSFIELD TURNER (Marion)

Mr. GRAHAM WISNER and Ms.

Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD (DICK)

The Honorable JOSEPH DAVIES TYDINGS

RANIA HANANO WISNER

SNOWDON, III (Catharine)

U

His Excellency the Ambassador of

Mr. and Mrs. DANIEL SNYDER (Tanya) Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM C. SONNEBORN (Karen)

The Honorable and Mrs. TOM UDALL (Jill Cooper)

HUBERTA von VOSS-WITTIG

Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL R.

Dr. RYUJI UENO

Mr. and Mrs. DONALD M. WOLF (Jean)

SONNENREICH (Linda)

V

The Honorable PAUL WOLFOWITZ

Mr. GENE SPERLING and Ms. ALISON ABNER Mr. and Mrs. EARL W. STAFFORD, SR. (Amanda)

Mrs. JACK J. VALENTI (Mary Margaret)

and Ms. NICOLE ELKON

Mr. and Mrs. DAVID J. STEEL (Susan Watters)

Mr. JAMES F. VALENTINE and

Mr. and Mrs. KENNETH R.

Mr. and Mrs. PATRICK STEEL (Lee Satterfield)

Ms. KATHY KEMPER

WOODCOCK (Dorothy)

Mr. T. GARRICK STEELE

Mr. CHRISTOPHER T. VAN ROIJEN

Mr. ROBERT (BOB) WOODWARD

Mr. and Mrs. ANDREW STEPHEN (Katherine Field)

Mr. and Mrs. PETER P. VAN ROIJEN (Beatrice)

and Ms. ELSA WALSH

Mr. and Mrs. JAMES MORGAN

His Excellency the Ambassador of Italy ARMANDO VARICCHIO and Mrs. MICAELA BARBAGALLO

Mr. JAMES R. WOODYARD

(JAMIE) STERLING (Lisa) Mrs. ISAAC STERN (Linda) Mr. and Mrs. EDWARD R. (TED) STETTINIUS (Sarah) Mr. and Mrs. JOSEPH STETTINIUS, JR. (Regina) Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE C. STEVENS, JR. (Elizabeth/Liz) Mrs. THEODORE F. STEVENS (Catherine) The Honorable ANN STOCK and Mr. STUART C. STOCK Mrs. AUCHINCLOSS STRAIGHT (Nina) Mrs. FRANKLIN L. STROUD (Kandy) Ms. JOANNA STURM Mr. A. MICHAEL SULLIVAN, JR. Mr.. KEVIN SULLIVAN and Ms. MARY JORDAN The Honorable and Mrs. JAMES WADSWORTH SYMINGTON (Sylvia)

T

The Honorable NEAL S. WOLIN

Mrs. MICHAEL WOYEVODSKY (Xenia) His Eminence Cardinal DONALD W. WUERL

The Honorable RICHARD N. VIETS

Mr. and Mrs. STEVEN WYATT (Cate Magennis)

Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE VRADENBURG, III (Trish)

Y

W

Mr. and Mrs. ANGUS YATES (Elizabeth/Sissy)

MARY FRANCES SMOAK

Z

Mr. ADAM WALDMAN and Dr.

Ms. FRANCESCA ZAMBELLO

BARBARA STURM WALDMAN

and Ms. FAITH GAY

Mr. WILLIAM L. WALDE and Dr.

Mr. and Mrs. MALLORY WALKER (Diana)

Mr. and Mrs. JEFFREY ZELL (Lauri)

Mr. and Mrs. CHRISTOPHER WALLACE (Lorraine)

Mr. PAUL ZEVNIK and Ms. GINNY GRENHAM

Mr. REDMOND WALSH and Ms. TIA CUDAHY

Mr. and Mrs. JEFFREY D. ZIENTS (Mary)

Ms. CHRISTINE WARNKE

Mrs. WARREN ZIMMERMANN (Christina)

The Honorable and Mrs. JOHN W. WARNER (Jeanne Vander Myde) Ms. MARGARET G. WARNER The Honorable and Mrs. MARK

The Honorable STROBE TALBOTT Mrs. W. WAVERLY TAYLOR (Edmée) Mr. RILEY K. TEMPLE Mrs. DANIEL J. TERRA (Judith) Mr. and Mrs. EVAN THOMAS (Oscie) Mr. and Mrs. PHILIP THOMAS (Patti) Mr. D. DODGE THOMPSON Mr. RICHARD E. THOMPSON Mr. and Mrs. MAURICE B. TOBIN (Joan)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

The Honorable PHILIP L. VERVEER and the Honorable MELANNE VERVEER

Germany PETER WITTIG and Ms.

R. WARNER (Lisa Collis) Miss VIRGINIA (OZZIE) WARNER Mrs. C. LANGHORNE WASHBURN (Judith) Mr. GEORGE T. WEBB Mr. J. SEPTIME WEBRE

Visit WASHINGTONLIFE COM

The Honorable and Mrs. WILLIAM H. WEBSTER (Lynda) The Honorable EDWARD L. WEIDENFELD and The Honorable SHEILA RABB WEIDENFELD Mrs. ERIC W. WEINMANN (Mary)

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

83


AROUNDTOWN

Plus ça change Much has changed on the social scene since Washington Life was founded 25 years ago; others remain exactly the same. We like it that way. BY DONNA SHOR

I

t doesn’t seem possible, but it’s true. We have reached the 25th anniversary of Washington Life. And it feels good Much has changed since Vicki Bagley, the mother of our editor-in-chief Nancy Reynolds Bagley, founded this magazine in 1991. This was soon after the society magazine Dossier folded and Vicki realized that no one was giving much — if any — coverage to the parties and charity events that Washington Life covers so well. That is still true, and the magazine has evolved even more fully over the time span. Many years earlier there was only a relatively small number of such events to record, invariably the organized social happenings were shepherded by an entrenched Old Guard, rigid in their habits and unimaginative in their planning. While the circumstances had to a great extent changed before Washington Life appeared, the magazine was present early in these developments and ever since has showcased the events it was founded to chronicle. The next transformation was inevitable. Suddenly a younger set — often comprising Old Guard offspring — was calling the shots. Spurred on by new economic factors and opportunities, they were achieving financial stability it would have taken their parents many years to attain. They not only discovered that dressing up to support charities was not only fun, it was also for a good cause, and that made it even better. A happy by-product was the jobs the events created. As they multiplied in number each year, they required an army of workers to carry them out. Venues, usually hotel ballrooms, had to be rented; caterers and waiters hired; f lorists, musicians and entertainers found, not to speak of dresses

84

Donna Shor (Photo by Tony Powell)

bought and hairdressers needed. It became almost a civic duty to party for a cause! Foreign embassies also found a welcome role to play. They opened their doors to serve as glamorous setting for balls, benefits and receptions. Such community outreach also finds favor in an ambassador’s home country as it underscores his or her importance and effectiveness here. It also doesn’t hurt that it provides an excellent opportunity to acquaint American officialdom, especially lawmakers, with the embassy’s country in a very f lattering light.

One social element has changed over the years. The amount of alcohol consumed at celebrations here has dwindled in comparison to what it was. While heavy drinking was never a wise thing to do inside the Washington goldfish bowl, it was once blamed for leading many into escapades they would just as soon forget. Part of the change occurred because wine, so much lower in alcohol than hard liquor, has become the drink of choice for many, especially those who are frequently on the social scene. Even usually decorous ambassadors (as well as their ladies!) became entwined in some rather hilarious hi-jinks. There was the time a notoriously randy man-about town got trapped on an embassy rooftop for an entire night when the ambassador returned home early from a trip. His wife had the presence of mind to throw her gentleman caller’s clothes into a closet, but not enough time to give him a blanket to cover himself on the roof where he had been unceremoniously pushed. Next morning he had to await his chance to retrieve his clothes and get his near-frozen and rather disheveled self down Embassy Row in broad daylight. Then there was that surprising morning when le tout Washington awoke to discover that another beautiful and very popular ambassadorial wife had been perhaps too popular. She had skipped town, permanently, on the arm of her husband’s longtime best friend. Over the years, a far greater number of our own official and prominent civilian ranks have been known for resting their heads on the wrong pillows. (They know who they are and now, thanks to the zeal of investigative journalism, so do we.) So much for progress!

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


David Woolston and Rebekah Woolston Carol Tennenwald, Ati Jain and Elizabeth Jain

Diane Rehm and Rep. John Lewis Michael Kahn, Molly Raiser, Justice Stephen Breyer and Jane Harman

WL SPONSORED

A CELEBRATION OF DIANE REHM The Willard-Intercontinental | BYALFREDOFLORES THEDIVAOFDISCUSSIONAfter nearly four decades on air hosting WAMU’s “The Diane Rehm Show,” the ground-breaking journalist announced her retirement from daily public radio last year. Friends, colleagues and family came from near and far to salute her at an elegant dinner at the Willard Intercontinental that was followed by dessert and dancing. After heartfelt toasts from friends who included Rep. John Lewis, Sandra Baker, Vicki Sant and Deborah Tannen, a teary-eyed Rehm took the stage to thank everyone, asking WAMU producers (all women, incidentally) to stand and be acknowledged along with her personal physician (who saved her voice) and family members who had traveled from Portland. NEW VENTURE: As she took the stage, Rehm assured guests that she would not be retiring completely. She will be launching a weekly podcast in the near future.

Katherine Bradley and Hal Rogoff

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Michael Oreskes and Jarl Mohn

Sandra Baker WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Caryn Mathes, Neil Kerwin and Mary Kennard

Kojo Nnamdi and Jonathan Smith

Bec Feldhaus Adams, Allison Aguilar and Maddie Poore

85


OVERTHEMOON

Middleburg Chapter XXV Wealthy visionaries have helped rewrite the history of hunt countrey over the past quarter century. BY VICKY MOON

ONTHESTREETWHEREYOULIVE How many people does it take to change the sidewalks in Middleburg? Dozens. Plus one more to yap about how the great the old ones were. Many residents still mourn the day the one and only stoplight was installed at the main intersection of town. When a whiff of change is in the air, long-time Middleburgers start to hyperventilate. And the latest arrivals want to burn all the bridges. Such was the case over the past year, when a $4.2 million traffic-calming, pedestrian and safety improvement project along Route 50 from Aldie through Middleburg and on to Upperville wreaked havoc for business owners, visitors and anyone looking for a place to park. The renovations over a dozen messy months included new brick crosswalks, granite curbs, pedestrian lighting, enhanced sidewalks and an upgrade to the underground water pipes. The construction was often accompanied by the rumble of grumble. “I believe some of the biggest changes in these last 25 years are physical changes,” Mayor Betsy Davis says. “If one could step back in time, you’d see a few less buildings along Washington Street and some of the side and back streets. These changes always come as a bit of a scare to those of us that have been here for a long time. But after time, those changes aren’t really noticed as much. We become accustomed to it and life goes on. “Of course, our newly renovated streets, crosswalks and lighting have changed our streetscape a bit, but I believe this has only added to the beauty and safety of our town, its citizens and visitors.” It’s a good thing these sidewalks can’t talk. Because, as Washington Life celebrates its first 25 years, quite a bit has unfolded out in Hunt Country over that span.

86

Jack Kent Cooke and his last wife, Marlene, with the Vince Lombardi Trophy won by the Redskins for Super Bowl XXVI in 1991. (Photo ©Vicky Moon)

Jacqueline Cooke, at about age 5, dressed as a Redskin for Halloween. Her mother Suzanne Martin Cooke looks on. (Photo ©Vicky Moon)

DAYSOFWINEANDROSES Jack Kent Cooke, the late, colorful Washington Redskins owner, provided reams of copy for sportswriters and broadcasters. His third wife, Suzanne Martin, a long-time resident of the community, bore him a daughter she named Jacqueline Kent Cooke, while his football team was headed to victory in Super Bowl XXII in San Diego. His marriage to Martin lasted 73 days. After that, Jacqueline would visit her father at his estate on weekends. She frequently invited a little tow-headed friend for play dates. The little boy came home to his writer parents with stories about Cooke’s fourth-and-fifth wife, Marlene Ramallo Chalmers, often referred to as the “Bolivian firecracker,” especially when she was sun-bathing topless by the pool. Jacqueline, meanwhile, grew up to be a poised, beautiful young woman who is now involved in the world of fashion. Upon his death in 1997, Cooke left the ownership of the football team to the Jack

Kent Cooke Foundation, which provides high school, college and graduate school financial aid to hundreds of worthy brilliant students, most of them from impoverished backgrounds. When his son, John Kent Cooke, lost in the bidding for the team to a group of investors led by Dan Snyder, he got into the wine business. His 140-acre Boxwood Estate Winery, designed by architect Hugh Newell Jacobsen, is just around the corner from the new sidewalks in town where many come to slowly sip the French-inspired reds called Boxwood, Topiary and Trellis. Meanwhile, Jack Kent Cooke’s “Far Acres at Kent Farm,” originally 640 acres and once part of former Sen. John Warner’s “Atoka Farm,” has been subdivided and sold several times. Now called “Foxmount Farm,” the 133acre property changed hands in 2013 for $3.3 million. OSCAROSCAR Dynamo entrepreneur Sheila Johnson already

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Paige and Sheila Johnson on Washington Life’s Holiday 2005 cover

A view of Salamander Resort & Spa from the air. Courtesy Photo

P H OTO CAPT I O N H E RE

owned an estate in the area when she purchased Pamela Harriman’s 340-acre property on the edge of town for $7 million in 2001. She later announced plans to develop it as the luxury Salamander Resort & Spa. Gaining approval was not easy, and controversial. “I’m worried about the Aspenization of this town,” Catherine C. Murdock, who was then a member of the Middleburg Town Council, told the Washington Post in 2007. “If you have a five-star resort here, these little mom-and-pop businesses won’t be able to keep up. You have name-brand shops that are in every other posh town like Aspen, Southampton, Greenwich, Beverly Hills. It’s going to ruin Middleburg.” Murdock cast the only dissenting vote for approval In the end, Johnson’s efforts yielded splendid results. Salamander is now a go-to place for locals seeking a massage (ask for Lucy) or dinner with out-of-town friends. It provides a stunning setting for a charity ball, destination wedding and, of course, is the perfect venue for the now prestigious Middleburg Film Festival founded by Johnson. “Now that Salamander is built, we need it to be a success and bring in the revenue for the town,“ Murdock said. A former deputy chief of protocol in the Reagan Administration, she added that the film festival has been a great boost for the town. “We don’t have easily accessible films here and at a movie theater 30 minutes away it’s usually action movies or something for children. Now we have quality documentaries, musicals and other films that get nominated for

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

On the street where you live in Middleburg. (Photo ©Vicky Moon)

an Oscar.” PRIDEANDSENSIBILITY In 1997, Sandy Lerner, the somewhat eccentric co-founder of Cisco Systems, purchased and renovated the Carr House in Upperville. The Jane Austin aficionado then announced plans to convert it into an English-style pub. Her neighbors pitched a wing-ding. “There will be late night drinking in the village,” they said, as if that doesn’t go on all around these here parts. And guess what? Lerner’s Hunter’s Head Tavern is now a popular gathering place and a splendid al fresco spot in warm weather. In colder months, sitting at a table by the fireplace, the Shepard’s pie also warms the soul. Lerner owns a 42-room mansion on the 800acre “Ayrshire Farm,” but recently closed down her Home Farm food emporium near the traffic

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

light in Middleburg. There’s no official word if the recent construction project contributed to the decision to leave. Lerner’s latest venture is Gentle Harvest, a market and cafe in nearby Marshall that is expected to expand to other nearby locations close to interstate exits. In time, this business also likely will host hungry and happy visitors. Finally, it should be noted the Middleburg construction project was completed on time and under budget. And, Mayor Davis believes the look and true spirit of Middleburg endures. “We ‘re passionate about our beautiful town and the peace and stability that we’re blessed with here,” she said. “We’ll continue to protect what we hold so dear and to honor our past, to enjoy the present and look forward to our future.” Stay tuned.

87


| BOOKROUNDUP

WINTERREADING ROUNDUP Curl up by the fire with these compelling new releases. BY ERICA MOODY

OURREVOLUTION By Bernie Sanders We’ve all heard from Senator Bernie Sanders (who some argue might have beaten Donald Trump) but how much do you really know about his background and vision for America? His new book combines personal, even sometimes amusing, tales from his life in politics along with an in-depth plan for progressive “economic, environmental, racial and social justice agenda that will create jobs, raise wages, protect the environment, and provide health care for all.” (Thomas Dunne Books, $27)



RAISINGAN ENTREPRENEUR By Margot Machol Bisnow While your children are home for the holidays, why not reflect on how you’ve raised them? Local publishing powerhouse Margot Machol Bisnow wrote her first book after observing hundreds of parents over the years and her own sons’ success. Featuring interviews with more than 50 mothers of successful entrepreneurs (including UnderArmour’s Kevin Plank and Nantucket Nectars’Tom Scott), Bisnow’s book is an engaging 10-step guide to encourage children to chase their dreams. (New Harbinger Publications, $18.95) MYOWNWORDS By Ruth Bader Ginsburg, with Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams Get inside the mind of one of the most intelligent and powerful women in the nation. The first book from “notorious” Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg includes a diverse collection of writing and speeches that span topics ranging from gender

88

equality to her love of the opera. Ginsburg wrote the intro, and Hartnett and Williams did the rest, with quotes selected from hundreds of Ginsburg’s interviews. (Simon & Schuster, $30) MARCHBOOKTHREE By Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell The first graphic novel ever to win a National Book Award, this 256-page book tells the story of Rep. John Lewis’s work during the Civil Rights Movement, as chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. The last book in the historical memoir trilogy is an insightful, educational read for both adults and younger readers from the eighth grade up. (Top Shelf Books, $19.99)

baby, a haunted house and a disappearing train in enchanting, original holiday tales that defy cliché. (Grove Press, $24) THANKYOUFOR BEINGLATE By Thomas L. Friedman As anyone living in the 21st century has noticed, technology, globalization and climate change are three forces accelerating at a rapid pace. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Thomas L. Friedman’s latest book is a contemporary history of a changed world, a reflection on what it means for the future and a field guide to deal with it. For one, he argues for “being late” and pausing to reflect on the times. (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux, $28)

THESPEECHWRITER By Barton Swaim The New York Times described it as “Veep meets All the King’s Men,” an apt take on this fascinating, hilarious tale of a speechwriter working in the office of a controversial Southern governor.Anyone who’s worked for a difficult boss or in the world of politics will be able to relate to the struggles Swaim outlines in this memoir. (Simon & Schuster, $15)

THENINEOFUS By Jean Kennedy Smith For a glimpse into the lives of the revered Kennedy clan, look no further than Jean Kennedy Smith’s elegant memoir.The last surviving child of Joseph P. and Rose Kennedy vividly recalls dinner table conversations with her eight siblings. Charming anecdotes and photographs are scattered throughout. It’s an excellent gift for those who still look on the Kennedys as America’s “royal” family. (HarperCollins, $29.99)

CHRISTMASDAYS By Jeanette Winterson Get into the holiday spirit with festive tales from literary master Jeanette Winterson. The British author has penned 12 stories with Christmas themes — one from each of the 12 days — and a bonus of Christmas memories from her own life. Her imaginative tales feature mysterious, magical elements like a talking tinsel

PILGRIMAGE By Mark K. Shriver Washington-based author Mark K. Shriver set out on a journey to discover the true story of Pope Francis. His deeply personal book lays bare his own struggles with his Catholic faith and the result is the perfect Christmas gift for any Catholic on your list, lapsed or not. (Penguin Random House, $28) 

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Chip Davis and Morgan Adessa

Stephanie and Dan Lennon

Kristen Pruski with Don and Anne Kelly

Chief Justice John Roberts and Roy Kapani

WL SPONSORED

SIBLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL GALA The Four Seasons Georgetown PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Ade Adeshoye and Dana Davis

HOPEFORONCOLOGYSibley Memorial Hospital Foundation’s 16th annual “Hope and Progress” gala raised more than $880,000 for expanding oncology programs and the New Sibley. Chairmen Stephanie and Dan Lennon joined guests and sponsors including Judy and Peter Kovler, Elizabeth and Michael Galvin and Susie and Steve Canton for an evening of cocktails, dinner and dancing. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Annie Totah and Andrea Travis Niloofar Razi Howe and Jack Evans Avery and Yoko Sen

Michael and Laurie Farr WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Julia Farr and James Byles 89


Jayne Sandman, Debbi Jarvis, Mayor Muriel Bowser and Barbara Martin

KNOCK OUT ABUSE GALA Ritz-Carlton, Washington, D.C. | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

John and Anna Mason

Andre Wells and Cheryl Masri

Maria Trabocchi and Courtney Allen

WOMENFORWOMEN This emotional yet celebratory evening, which for the first time since 1993 occurred on a different night than its male-dominated counterpart Fight Night, raised over $500,000 to aid victims of domestic violence. Barbara Martin and Jayne Sandman, principals at the public relations firm BrandlinkDC, co-chaired the dinner event that found guests holding hands and wiping away tears as personal stories of abuse were shared from the stage. Later, the same women were laughing and cheering during the live auction for a day of beauty for 10 girlfriends that included blowouts from Drybar (founder Alli Webb was in attendance) and brunch at Fiola Mare courtesy of Maria Trabocchi.

Mary Barth and Ginny Grenham

Mary Butler and Nadine Matar

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

90

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Mayor Muriel Bowser, Maria Gomez, Dave Velazquez and Pedro Alfonso

Tiffani Turner Greene and Brett Greene Marianne Moore, Susan Haas and Shea DeLutis-Smith

Michael Harreld and Rynthia Rost

WL SPONSORED

MARY’S CENTER ‘NOCHE TROPICAL’ GALA Washington Hilton PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Lucero Ortiz, Kathy Whelpley and Andrea Gilliam

PROMOTINGWOMEN’SHEALTH “This is an organization that knows what service is!” Mayor Muriel Bowser said at Mary’s Center’s annual gala, thanking the organization for keeping Washington residents healthy and strong. More than 700 guests raised $574,000 for programs to promote healthy pregnancies, improve birth outcomes and reduce infant mortality. Guests including emcee Doug Kammerer, Rep. Xavier Becerra and co-chairmen David Velazquez and Pedro Alfonso enjoyed a reception, dinner and attractions that included a casino, photo booth and “La Hora Loca” with masks and colorful hats. HONORED BY OPRAH: Mary’s Center was one of ten nonprofit groups (out of 1,200 in the country) to be featured in the Hero Effect, which will air on the Oprah Winfrey Network in February 2017.

Phil Mendelson and Ana Harvey

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Sean Darling-Hammond and Valentina Xavier and Doug Kammerer

Dorothy Stein and Carola Mandelbaum

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Dr. Linda Wharton-Boyd

Leilani Halkiotis and Paul Lettieri

91


Andrew Cockburn and W. Horton Beebe

Nick Dale, Nithi Vivatrat, Mary Kate Chaath, Elena Jarvis and Aseel Albanna

Rania Hanano, Leslie Cockburn and Cary Ridder

WL EXCLUSIVE

HELPING SYRIAN REFUGEES Andrew and Leslie Cockburn Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYBROWN CALLTOACTION Syria has been upended by terror, violence and death and an estimated 8.4 million of its children are now refugees in other countries or displaced in their own. Shocked and concerned about the increasing urgency of their plight, Rania Hanano, Cary Ridder and Leslie Cockburn gathered friends to hear about the increasing severity of this humanitarian disaster while raising funds for The Middle East Children’s Institute and UNICEF’s joint efforts to provide food, safe water, medical care and temporary schooling to those whose lives have been shattered. “Any assistance to help them, whether in cash or in kind,” Hanano told guests, “goes a long, long way.”

Christopher Wall, Graham Wisner and Jackie Ceuillen

John Henry and Ann Crittenden VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Cindy Jones and Wilhelmina Cole Holladay

Jean-Marie Fernandez, Lizette Corro and Kay Kendall

WL EXCLUSIVE

Annie Totah, Julie Kent and Isabel Ernst

NMWA LADIES LUNCHEON National Museum of Women in the Arts | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL CELEBRATINGWOMEN A who’s who of power women and society staples joined hostess Cindy Jones, president of the board of trustees of the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA), for a celebratory luncheon in anticipation of the National Museum of Women in the Art’s 30th anniversary gala on April 21, which will be chaired by Amy Baier, Kristin Cecchi, Jamie Dorros and Jones. Guests toured a contemporary art exhibit from the Rubell Family’s collection before lunching downstairs in the atrium surrounded by 16th- and 17th century works. Jones acknowledged museum founder Wihelmina Cole Holladay, noting that the original 500 works in the permanent collection had multiplied substantially since 1987. “Not only have we grown that to almost 5,000 pieces,” Jones said, “we really have expanded the history of art to include more women.”

Hilda Brillembourg, JoAnn Mason, and Barbara Harrison

Jamie Dorros, Amy Baier and Kristin Cecchi

Izette Folger and Dawn Saul VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

92

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Huberta von Voss Wittig and German Amb. Peter Wittig

Micaela Varricchio and Italian Amb. Armando Varricchio

Cissy Viebranz, Donald Elliott, Terry Thompson and Gail Elliott

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SEASON OPENING GALA John Kerby, Terry Thompson, Rick and Jerri Crawford

Denise Grant and Frank Raines

Susan DiMarco and Eliana Davidson

Ann and Vernon Jordan

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Mariella Trager, Ann Stock and Janice Kim

Kennedy Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL EASYONTHEEARSymphony supporters flocked to the Kennedy Center Concert Hall for the NSO’s annual season opening gala, where more than $1 million was raised for the orchestra’s musical and educational programs. Dinner was followed by a concert conducted by Maestro Christoph Eschenbach that included a performance of Rachmaninoff’s first piano concerto by pianist Lang Lang. The program’s second half paid tribute to the new National Museum of African American History and Culture and included appearances by singer Brian McKnight and the a cappella group Take 6. Dessert and dancing followed the show. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Cherrie Doggett

93


Ambassador of the Russian Federation Sergey I. Kislyak and Natalia Kislyak

Igor Butman, Susan Carmel and Wynton Marsalis

Deborah Sigmund, Gina Steinway, Christine Warnke and Kimberly Heatherington Wynton Marsalis

WL EXCLUSIVE

THE CARMEL INSTITUTE’S 5TH ANNIVERSARY The Lincoln Theatre | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELLANDIMAGELINK

John Beyrle and Jocelyn Greene

SOFTDIPLOMACY Few people in Washington have done more for advancing (and repairing) diplomatic relations between the United States and Russia than Susan Carmel, founder and advisory chair of the Carmel Institute of Russian Culture and History. The institute celebrated the common language and mutual love of jazz that Americans and Russians share by hosting a standing-room only concert for 1,200 guests featuring jazz greats Wynton Marsalis and Igor Butman and the Moscow Jazz Orchestra. “ The Carmel Institute emphasizes shared values, common interests and cultural dialogue, which are important qualities necessary to achieve cooperation, mutual respect and overcome pervasive stereotypes.” Russian Federation Ambassador Sergey Kislyak agreed: “What started as a modest cultural initiative, five years later has grown both in scope and scale. It has strengthened interest and knowledge of the culture and history of Russia and contributed to the mutual understanding between the two nations.”

Igor Butman

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Marjorie Anne Brennan, Susan Carmel, James H. Billington and Anton Fedyashin

Lucky Roosevelt, John Beyrle and Joseph Duffey

The Billington Rose and and its history WL EXCLUSIVE

HONORING THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS American University | PHOTOSBYIMAGELINKPHOTOGRAPHY THEICONANDTHEAXE Fifty years ago, James H. Billington, Ph.D. wrote an interpretive history of Russian culture, “The Icon and The Axe,” which became perhaps the most seminal book examining Russian culture from the bird’s eye view of an American scholar. Former US ambassadors to Russia and noted Russian scholars traveled from as far as London to honor Billington, who served as Librarian of Congress from 1987 to 2015. The symposium, which was followed by a lavish seated buffet dinner, was presented by the Association for Slavic, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies, The Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute, and American University’s Carmel Institute for Russian History and Culture. “Dr. Billington’s work has been an inspiration for me,” said Carmel Institute Founder Susan Carmel. “I want to add my thanks to the chorus of gratitude for all Dr. Billington has done and continues to accomplish towards greater cultural understanding and a more peaceful world.”

Anita Kondoyanidi and Vladislav Zubok

Jan Du Plain and John Curd VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

94

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Sally and Mark Ein

Chris and Candace Ourisman with Stephanie and Keith Lemer

Kristin and John Cecchi WL SPONSORED

CITIZENS ASSOCIATION OF GEORGETOWN GALA Four Season Hotel, Georgetown | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Greg and Holly Styles with Ann vom Eigen

GEORGETOWNROCKS Nearly 500 black-tie and creatively dressed partygoers boogied the night away at the rock’n’roll-themed Citizens Association of Georgetown gala. Revelers not dancing to the beat of the Philadelphia-based Rockets had plenty to keep them busy at the cigar bar, watching American artist Jonn Marc create paintings onsite or bidding on silent auction items that included getaways to Paris and Aspen. Kristin and John Cecchi, Sally and Mark Ein, Robert Pincus, Roxanne Li le and Christopher and Dana Tavlarides co-chaired the event, which raised funds to make Georgetown “safer, more beautiful and more connected.”

Erika Schiller and Barbara Crocker

Kristen Lund VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Msgr. John Enzler, Katie Atmonavage and Cardinal Donald Wuerl

Alejandra and Enrique Segura

Colombian Amb. Juan Carlos Pinzón and Pilar Pinzón WL SPONSORED

Gladis Bellamah and Monica Porro

SPANISH CATHOLIC CENTER GALA Ronald Reagan Building | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES UPLIFTINGEVENING This annual black-tie event raised more than $720,000 for Catholic Charities’ Spanish Catholic Center, which provides medical, dental, employment and legal services to immigrants and native-born residents alike. The gala, chaired by Carolina Corredor DeSouza and Andrea Cecchi, featured keynote remarks by Cardinal Donald Wuerl, archbishop of Washington. Longtime supporters Alejandra and Enrique Segura were honored with the Blessed John Paul II award in recognition of their mission to positively impact the lives of vulnerable residents in our community. The 350-plus crowd closed the evening dancing to the music of Gregorio Uribe & Verny Varela’s Band.

Carolina Corredor DeSouza and Andrea Cecchi WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Scott and Patrice Brickman with Dave and Jen Whipp

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

95


PARTIES PARTIES PARTIES

Dreamers,Youth Advocates and Local Foodies VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM!

6

2

1

CELEBRATE LOGAN EVENT

CITYDANCE DREAM BUILDERS INVESTMENT LAUNCH

SELECTLOGANCIRCLERESTAURANTS(Photo by Tony Powell)

VERNONANDANNJORDANRESIDENCE(Photos by Naku Mayo) Vernon and Ann Jordan were the enthusiastic hosts of a new fundraising campaign to raise capital for CityDance’s newest venture – the DREAM center for dance. The facility will piggyback on CityDance’s efforts to provide dance classes, performance opportunities, mentoring, tutoring and college counseling to students from underserved District neighborhoods.

Washington foodies gathered at 12 restaurants in the 14th Street corridor to sample dishes from Kapnos, Lupo Verde and other popular eateries. All proceeds from ticket sales went to N Street Village, a safe haven for homeless and low-income women. The event, in its fourth year, was sponsored by TTR Sotheby’s International Realty. 6. Stuart Allen, Trish Yan, Jonathan Taylor and Michael Moore

1. Alexe Nowakowski, Linda Po er, Vernon Jordan and Tanya Baskin 2. Nuumo Adjetey Klufio and Chyna McCleary

8

3

9 4

5

PASSION FOR CARING GALA RITZCARLTON TYSONSCORNER(Photos by Erin Schaff)

BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF GREATER WASHINGTON TIM RUSSERT CONGRESSIONAL DINNER RITZCARLTON WASHINGTON(Photos by Tony Brown)

Capital Caring hosted a themed “Night in Havana!” gala where 400 community leaders and friends of the organization gathered to support its mission of improved care for patients with serious illnesses. A fedora shop and mojito bar helped capture the Cuban spirit. Jack Taylor, along with the entire Washington Area Toyota Dealers organization, were recognized for the funds and volunteer hours they have contributed to the cause.

The annual dinner recognized Maryland State Senator Thomas Mike Miller, special assistant to the President Michael Smith and BGCGW Youth of the Year Faith Moore for their commitment and dedication to the Boys and Girls Club cause. Although the event has been around since 1986, it was renamed a@er the death of “Meet the Press” anchor Tim Russert, a champion for the BGCGW cause. His son, Luke Russert, served as the event’s emcee.

3. Antonia Garre and Danielle Bress

8. Emmanuel Bailey, Ross Bierkan, Beverly Perry and Councilmember Jack Evans

4. Meaghan Warner and Monte Durham 5. TJ Mathieson

9. Maryland State Senator Mike Miller, Faith Moore and Michael Smith

96

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Tara Ashworth, Brad Nierenberg, Callie Nierenberg and Susan McLaughlin

Steve Senkus and Garrett O’Shea

Katy Senkus, Vince Pepicelli, Matt Pletchall, Eric Kuwana and Kim Patrick

POCKITSHIP APP LAUNCH Don Tito, Arlington, Va. | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ HEAVYLIFTING Area tech startup PockitShip celebrated the debut of a new app dedicated to moving heavy stuff from here to there. At its lively launch party, the only heavy lifting required involved spicy margaritas and frosted cupcakes topped with crunchy bacon. PockitShip founders Garrett O’Shea and Steve Senkus conceived the idea of an on-demand pickup and delivery company specializing in the transport of heavy items greater than 50 pounds during a backyard barbeque in 2014. “People are tired of finding something great on Craigslist and then having to rent a trailer or search for a friend with a pickup truck,” O’Shea said. “We’re changing all of that so it’s just a matter of a few clicks to ship something heavy or get it delivered.”

Molly Brady and Jon Kling

Lina Kalife VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

97


PARTIES PARTIES PARTIES

Russian Culturists, Nonprofiteers and Conscientious Chefs VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM!

1

2 5

6

DANISH DANCE THEATER BLUE HOPE BASH

DANISHAMBASSADOR’SRESIDENCE(Photos by Tony Powell)

FAIRMONTHOTEL(Photos by Jay Snap) Danish Ambassador Lars Gert Lose and his wife Ulla Rønberg, a noted cultural diplomatist, hosted the Danish Dance Theater company on the eve of its two-night performance at the Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theater. Artistic Director Tim Rushton and his dancers enjoyed champagne and hors d’oeuvres with guests, many of whom later viewed the company’s spectacular production of “Black Diamond,” in which both the shadowy darkness and the light side of man are explored.

Blue was the color of choice at the Colon Cancer Alliance’s sixth annual benefit to raise funds for research, prevention and patient care. Guests toasted Perrier-Jouët champagne and themed blue cocktails to celebrate the group’s record-breaking evening.

1. Danish Amb. Lars Gert Lose and Ulla Rønberg, Kay Kendall and Jack Davies

5. Maurisa Po s, Pamela Sorensen and Nina Snow

2. Dancers Milou Nuyens, Lucia Pasquini and Merete Hersvik.

6. Michael Sapienza and Alison Hansan

7

3

4

CHEFS FOR EQUALITY RITZCARLTON(Photos by Tony Brown)

8 FAIR CHANCE BUTTERFLY BASH NATIONALMUSEUMOFWOMENINTHEARTS(Photos by Tony Brown)

Elaborate cakes were the stars of the show at this year’s Human Rights Campaign benefit where the best of Washington’s dining community gathers to support marriage equality. Guests sampled dishes from local chefs and walked away with swag bags overflowing with local goodies that included Gordy’s cocktail brine and Compass Coffee.

The annual event honoring Debbi and Ernie Jarvis raised funds for local nonprofit leaders working to beXer the lives of disadvantaged children in the District. Paul Wharton served as emcee for the soirée, which began with cocktails and ended with lively dancing.

3. Bart Vandaele and Nicholas Stefanelli

7. Eleanor Maguire, Patrick Chauvin, Elizabeth Spra Cooper

4. Patrick O’Connell and Mark Furstenberg

8. Gretchen Van der Veer, Paul Wharton, Amanda Marshall, Debbi Jarvis and Ernie Jarvis

98

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Tommy McFly and Katherine Kallinis Berman WL SPONSORED

Sarah Brice and Leon Harris

Jill Diamond and DeMarcus Corley

Chip Davis, Laurie Strongin and Jake Tapper

HOPE FOR HENRY STRIKES FOR SMILES Pinstripes Georgetown | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL NOTYOURTYPICALFUNDRAISER Journalists, business leaders, athletes and politicos from both sides of the aisle traded in their coats and ties for bowling shirts (and Valentino Rockstud pumps for comfy bowling shoes) at this second annual benefit for the Hope for Henry Foundation. The upbeat crowd, including host and CNN anchor Jake Tapper, radio personality Tommy McFly, Georgetown Cupcake’s Katherine Kallinis Berman and boxing champ DeMarcus Corley raised more than $200,000 to help the group’s efforts to improve the quality of life of children fighting cancer and other serious illnesses. “Hope for Henry is reinventing the pediatric patient experience thanks to their support,” founder and executive director Laurie Strongin said.

Laura Evans, Craig Little and Eun Yang VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Joe and Allen Goldberg

WASHINGTON LIFE PHOTOS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE!

Visit www.washingtonlife.com and click on “photos” to download your favorite picture ... or buy a print, T-shirt, canvas painting, and more! Hundreds of photos from events are available online. Washington Life’s website is the only place you can purchase professionally shot photos from the city’s exclusive A-List events.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

99


Welcome Ury & Associates We are proud to announce that Ury & Associates has combined with Toka Salon & Day Spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Georgetown location. We believe that the joining of these two extraordinary salons with highly complementary industry strengths will position us to provide a broader set of services to our clients. Toka Welcomes Ury & Associates

Georgetown Court 3251 Prospect Street, NW Suite #19, 2nd floor Washington, DC 20007 202.333.5133

Madison Avenue 768 Madison Avenue 2nd floor, between 65th & 66th New York, NY 10065 212.517.5133

Great Falls 9867 Georgetown Pike Great Falls, VA 22066 703.759.5700

tokasalon.com

Cameron Station 4907 Brenman Park Drive Alexandria, VA 22304 703.370.5133


HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandMyWashington

(MWXMRGX (YVEFPI(IWMKR Marika Meyer brings a designerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye to her Bethesda residence, creating classic interiors that are both impeccable and family friendly. BY ERICA MOODY PORTRAITS BY TONY BROWN INTERIOR PHOTOS BY TONY BROWN AND ANGIE SECKINGER


HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

y husband will come home and either a chair is gone or the table’s painted or there’s a new chest or new lamps,” Marika Meyer says with a laugh. “I’m always changing things.” This comes as no surprise, considering Meyer is the founder of Marika Meyer Interiors. The native Washingtonian (who grew up less than a mile from her current Bethesda residence) spends her days creating functional, luxurious living spaces for clients in the metropolitan area and beyond. Her personalized approach to design starts by sitting with each client to discuss their passions before deciding what goes m into their home. “Do they love to travel? Do they love to boat? Do they love to fish? What do they like to do in their free time? And how does that resonate into the theory of their home?” the mother-of-two inquires. “At the end of the day I want houses that we do to feel more collected than designed.” It’s an approach you can see in her own dwelling, which is filled with antiques, family heirlooms and items collected from her travels. “If I had to use one word to describe my aesthetic, it would be classic,” she says. One of her favorite piece, a 19th century Italian commode with silver leafing, is in her living room. Another is a bronze lion centered on her mantle, purchase from her friend Loi Thai at Tone on Tone in Bethesda. It’s from an 18th century building in France. “As a Leo, I’ve always loved lions,” Meyer explains. “It’s probably the one thing in the house that’s not a family item that I would not part with for all the money in the world.” Many family pieces sit in the library, close to the kitchen on the first floor of the two-story residence. When she and her husband purchased the house seven years ago it was a formal dining room, but Meyer’s eye told her it would make an amazing library, a place where she could display her grandfather’s collection of antique books. Placed in between them are items collected from travels, including pairs of foo

102

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


THIS PAGE: (clockwise from top left); The family room includes a vintage sideboard painting by Marika Meyer and pillow fabrics by Marika Meyer Textiles; the library’s antique table with faux marble finishes from Billet Collins and a Circa Lighting fixture; the fabric on the back of shelves filled with bibelots and antique books is “Roman Fig” by Marika Meyers Textiles; an acrylic painting by Marika Meyer inspired by meadows seen on a trip to Virginia hangs over an antique chair with Marika Meyer fabric; the well-lit “lego room” keeps her boys entertained for hours.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

sheee

PREVIOUS PAGE: (clockwise from top left): Meyer’s living room is filled with antiques. The custom sofa is by Marika Meyer Interiors with Perrennials Fabric. Club chairs are vintage Kintinger, with Cowtan & Tout Fabric. The chest and side chairs are also vintage, and the wall color is Benjamin Moore Manchester Tan; all art by Marika Meyer, vintage hickory chair, and antique lamp and chest, candlestick holder from Christ Child Opportunity Shop in Georgetown, chair fabric is “San Michele” by Marika Meyer Textiles; vintage dining room chairs are covered in Perennials fabric. Table, chairs and secretary are also vintage and the faux finish on the secretary is by Billet Collins. The wallpaper is Farrow & Ball and chandelier is by Circa Lighting; the antique mirror in the living room is by John Rosseli Antiques and the antique lion is from Tone on Tone.

dogs (“If I ever see foo dogs, I pick them up,” she says) and little pagodas found at a Chelsea flea market on a trip to New York. But the books take center stage. “I just love them. They have so much character,” Meyer says, excitedly describing Second Story Books’ Rockville warehouse, a treasure trove of unique antiquarian books. With the library being so central to the house, she hopes her boys (Grayson, 6, and Colin, 3) will wander in and pick one off a shelf, read a chapter and learn something, an activity she remembers fondly from her own childhood. Meyer has been so taken by literature over the years that the second line of her fabric collection is inspired by antique book covers. Fabric, she says, is where she always starts design projects because the right choices can truly set a tone for the overall atmosphere of a house. A former fine arts student, Meyer hangs her own colorful works of art throughout her home. Two acrylic paintings in the living room were inspired by meadows in Middleburg. As she works on paintings or sketches for fabric, her boys sit beside her and paint their own watercolor versions. Meyer stresses the importance of having a home that her children can be kids in but that is comfortable and sophisticated enough to host the dinner parties that she and her husband regularly plan. “I didn’t want to have to sacrifice my aesthetic just because there were children in the house,” she says. “The great thing about doing family design now is that the industry has really recognized that we need durable resources and materials so it’s become much easier to source indoor outdoor fabrics or krypton fabrics.” The large cream colored sofa in Meyer’s living room is an indoor-outdoor piece so it won’t be a problem when her kids come in with muddy shoes. “Colin honestly had spaghetti on the ceiling a few months ago,” she laughs. The trend of distressed woods also helps when designing for families, as does having antiques. “They’ve already taken a beating,” she says. “They already have a patina.” Most of her clients have children under the age of ten and Meyer is uniquely prepared for the challenge. “I always have my designer hat on but a lot of time in projects I put on my mom hat,” she explains. “The great thing about designing for families now is that you don’t have to sacrifice style.”

103


HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

Home for the Holidays Hawaiian Airlines CEO buys in Georgetown, the home of the late scientist Dr. Ralph Cicerone changes hands in Kent, and a cleared lot in Spring Valley fetches almost $3 million. BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

John Fahey,chairman emeritus of the National Geographic Society, and his wife Heidi sold DENT PLACE NW FOR    to Marilia Duffles and Mark Dunkerley. Ms. Duffles is a contributor to the Financial Times and the Economist. Mr. Dunkerley is president and CEO of Hawaiian Airlines. The charming 19th-century wisteria-covered Georgetown Federal townhouse boasts four bedrooms and five baths, a renovated and expanded open floor plan, a large beautifully landscaped private rear yard, and a detached caretaker suite overlooking the garden. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Michael Rankin represented both sides of the transaction.

THE DISTRICT David and Mimi Strouse sold INDIAN LANE NW for $2.95 million to Josh Rales. The couple purchased the Spring Valley property from Katherine Morgan in 2012 and subsequently demolished the 1921 Colonial that once sat on the private half-acre lot. Mr. Rales is a major real estate investor and former U.S. Senate candidate from Maryland. Josh is also brother to billionaire Steve Rales, film producer and chairman of the Danaher Corporation. Dr. Strouse is a cardiologist

in Fairfax. The Strouses sold the property privately.  THSTREETNE in Capitol Hill changed hands when Shikha Dalmia and Arthur Melzer bought the three-bedroom Victorian from John Tsapogas and Astri Kleivdal for $1.3 million. The light-filled 1891 townhouse exudes character with fine crown mouldings, a chef â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen and two car garage. The listing agents were John Smith and Aaron Smith of Berkshire Hathaway Home Services;William F. X. Moody,

Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe, and Christopher R. Leary of Washington Fine Properties represented the buyer.

MARYLAND: An attractive five-bedroom brick Colonial at  SANDALFOOTDRIVE in Avenel sold for $1,470,000 when Samuel Zenebe Alemayehu purchased the property from Nouchin Akmal and Monir Moghaddam. The three-level, 7,700-square-foot Potomac residence was built in 1997 and features a gourmet kitchen,

Samuel and Amanda Davidoff bought  UNIVERSITYTERRACE from Carol Cicerone for $3.5 million. Mrs. Cicerone shared the Kent residence with her late husband, Ralph, a former president of the National Academy of Sciences and a renowned authority on climate change and atmospheric chemistry. Mrs. Davidoff is a partner at Sullivan & Cromwell while her husband is a civil and criminal litigator at the Williams & Connolly law firm. The elegant International-style house was built in 2004 and encompasses over 9,000 square feet of exquisitely crafted living space, high ceilings and treetop views. Other features include six bedrooms all with en-suite baths, six fireplaces, an elevator and an expansive basement with wet bar. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Michael Rankin was the listing agent while Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Elizabeth Lavette was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent.

108

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Jeff Copeland and one time Washington Post television critic Lisa de Moraes purchased RDSTREETNW from Andrew and Susan Robertson for $1,340,000, The beautifully renovated 19th century two-bedroom Federal townhouse in Georgetown exudes charm and character with two fireplaces, marble baths, custom built-ins, a private rear garden and brick patio. The listing team was William F. X. Moody, Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe, and Christopher R. Leary of Washington Fine Properties while Washington Fine Properties Nancy Taylor Bubes was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent.

an impressive rear deck spanning the width of the home, a lower level theater room and golf course vistas.The listing Agents were William F. X. Moody, Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe, and Christopher R. Leary of Washington Fine Properties. Remaxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Solomon Laieke was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent.

VIRGINIA Robert and Hilary Brandt sold  DUKE STREET in Alexandria for $4,685,000 to a private trust. Mr. Brandt is an attorney at The Law Firm of Robert S. Brandt. The richly appointed fivebedroom center hall Colonial in the heart of Old Town was built in 1997 and offers elegant rooms with high ceilings, quarter sawn hardwood floors, six fireplaces and a gorgeous staircase as entryway focal point. McEnearney Associates Inc.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jennifer Halm was the listing agent while Babs Beckwith also of McEnearney Associates represented the buyer.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Washington Post Chief Financial Officer Steve Gibson and his wife Laurie bought  FRANKLIN AVENUE in McLean for $3.2 million. The brand new brick and stone manor house was built earlier this year by Bethesda Builders in the heart of Franklin Park. The 7,100-square-foot, three-level residence boasts five bedrooms and a three-car garage. Washington Fine Properties Jennifer Thornett was the listing agent.

|  D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

109


HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

PROPERTYLINES LIFE IN THE DREAMHOUSE: For a $20 million price tag you could be the proud owner of the most expensive listing in the Washington,D.C. metro area. The undeniably stunning  CHAIN BRIDGEROAD in Kent, now listed by TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marc Fleisher, was designed by Jones & Boer Architects and constructed by Banks Development. The 13,500square-foot dream house is a Regency style stucco mansion modeled after late 18th-century English manors. Extraordinary landscaping, a pool and separate pool house complement this one-of-akind property.

FIFTIES TO FAB: Lifetime Construction and Wilson-Boland Design Group built   TAYLOR STREET NW in Crestwood, which is now on the market for $1,695,000. The sun-drenched 1955 Contemporary was renovated from top to bottom by Daniel Gaddy and is perfect for intimate family gatherings as well as large scale entertaining. State-ofthe-art amenities featured throughout the five bedroom, four-and-a-half bath residence include a dramatic gourmet kitchen with an 11-foot island and stunning glass walls. It is isted by TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Real Estateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greg Gaddy and Carroll Dey.

MCINTURFF (UN)MCMANSION: Philippe Dongier, the World Bank country director for Tanzania, Uganda and Burundi, listed   LEROY PLACE NW for $3.25 million. The 1912 Adams Morgan residence was recently renovated by local architect Mark McInturff to feature seven bedrooms and six baths across 5,440 square feet of luxe living space. The classic Spanish-style townhouse boasts high ceilings, original flooring and moldings, and an elevator to all four floors plus a library, a twobedroom in-law suite and two-car parking. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realtyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Michael Rankin is the listing agent.

110

GLASS CEILING: James and Elizabeth Murphy are selling FSTREETNW for $1.3 million with Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; William F. X. Moody, Robert Hryniewicki, Adam T. Rackliffe, and Christopher R. Leary. This twobedroom residence is the town home facade portion of The Ventana condominium building; the adjacent glass tower is a focal point of F street. The custom-designed 2,000-square-foot floor plan includes 10-foot ceilings, a gourmet kitchen that opens to a spacious living room with bay window seating and city views. Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@washingtonlife.com.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Open House

HOME LIFE | OPENHOUSE

Three spacious, upscale properties are now on the market.

KALORAMA BANCROFTPLACENW

ASKING PRICE: $6,250,000

This elegant 8,000-square-foot residence with LISTING AGENTS: 14-foot ceiling, three fireplaces, eight bedrooms, Stan Kelly, four baths and three half baths once housed the 202.997.1872, TTR art collection of Joseph Hirshhorn. Notable Sotheby’s features include a large living room, spacious International Realty library and a dining room with the original fireplace mantels fabricated in 1924. A spacious floor plan offer the new owners a great home for family or diplomatic use.

MCLEAN  BALLANTRAEFARMDRIVE This replica of the Governors Mansion in Williamsburg,Va. has been renovated from top to botton with over $1 million in renovations. Its four levels include a foyer with towering Palladian windows, 5 fireplaces, a custom kitchen with two chef tables and a separate breakfast room with heated floors. Also featured: seven bedooms, a mahogany library with a fireplace, a private screened porch, a lower level club room, gorgeous swimming pool and a gazebo.

ASKING PRICE: $4,200,000 LISTING AGENT: Lilian Jorgensen, Long & Foster Real Estate Inc., 703.790.1990.

KENT

  ESKRIDGETERNW ASKING PRICE: This distinguished property, its façade dominated $3,750,000 by a rounded stone tower, occupies an elevated site LISTING AGENTS: overlooking a private driveway and lush front and Heidi Hatfield back lawns. Inside are large, luminous rooms with and Anne high ceilings, oversized windows, wide mouldings Hatfield Weir and beautiful detailing. The main level has generous - 202–243-1634, living and dining rooms, a library, a sun room an Washington Fine Properties open family room and kitchen. Upstairs are two master suites plus two additional bedrooms with a sitting room and upstairs laundry. The lower level features an above ground family room, exercise room, bedroom and full bath. A level back yard and detached garage are accessible from the kitchen and sun room.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

111


MY WASHINGTON Lea Berman,White House social secretary to President George W. Bush BY KEVIN CHAFEE

2

3

4

WHAT WERE YOUR FAVORITE WHITE HOUSE TRADITIONS WITH REGARD TO RECEIVING AND ENTERTAINING GUESTS? I loved welcoming people to the White House who had never been there before. It’s a deeply emotional moment to arrive on the State Floor and realize they share this amazing common heritage with the presidents who lived and worked there. It’s their house, too. Being a guest becomes a part of their family lore, something they tell their grandchildren with pride – and the photographs with the President and/or first lady are especially coveted and cherished. ARE THERE TRADITIONS OR CUSTOMS THAT HAVE LARGELY DISAPPEARED BUT YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEE REVIVED? I wish more people understood the etiquette of a White House invitation. Traditionally, it’s something you accept unless you have a serious illness or some other extreme circumstance that prevents you from attending. It’s a privilege to be invited, not a tool to reject the sitting president’s point of view. Another thing I miss: people who RSVP to an invitation. I never expected that to be a problem at the White House, but we spent countless hours calling people to ask if they planned to respond to the President’s invitation. If someone has taken the time and effort to invite you to something, the least you can do is tell them if you’re coming. TELL US ABOUT THE BOOK YOU ARE PLANNING WITH JEREMY BERNARD, WHO SERVED AT THE OBAMAS’ SOCIAL SECRETARY. While Jeremy and I worked for very different administrations, we had

82

surprisingly similar experiences as social secretaries, and that’s the basis for our book, “Treating People Well.” Most people believe that social skills are innate, but that’s not the case. Charm, humor, confidence and other traits that successful people employ are all eminently learnable and essential for personal growth and effectiveness in the workplace, at home and at school. We hope a simple book about the elegant art of persuasion, based on the sometimes difficult lessons that we learned at the White House, will help readers find a more positive and productive way to deal with the stresses of daily life.

MY TOP SPOTS Design Cuisine (1) for bespoke meals with the highest culinary standards. Ritzy Bee Events – the event planner’s event planner (The Alice in Wonderland birthday event they did for my daughter was the best party ever). Le Diplomate (2) (1601 14th S. NW) for the most incredible roasted chicken. The Four Seasons (2800 Pennsylvania Ave. NW) for breakfast – especially on Saturdays when you can relax and enjoy the pampering Plume at the Jefferson Hotel (1200 16th St. NW) for a romantic supper. The view of the Washington Monument and the Jefferson Memorial from the Blue Room of the White House Heavenly Hydrangeas (3) in McLean, Va. for the most imaginative and lush floral arrangements. Christian Dior at CityCenter (933 Palmer Alley NW), because I always find something to love there. Oliver Dunn, Moss and Co./Catharine Roberts (1657 Wisconsin Ave. NW) in Georgetown for the best hostess gifts Ford’s Theatre (4) (511 10th St. NW) especially at Christmas when Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” is playing.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| D E C E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

P H OTO CO U RT E SY O F D E S I G N CU I S I N E ; P H OTO F R O M W I K I M E D I A CO M M O N S ; P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F H E AV E N LY H Y D R A N G E A S ; “A C H R I S T M A S C A R O L . ” P H OTO B Y S C OT T S U C H M A N .

1

WHAT WOULD YOU ADVISE THE INCOMING TRUMP ADMINISTRATION TO BE MINDFUL OF WHEN THEY COME TO LIVE IN THE NATION’S CAPITAL? It’s hard to overestimate the power of a White House invitation. I hope the Trumps entertain early and often and throw open the doors of the White House to as many people as possible. Making themselves socially accessible is a shrewd and confident political move; it blunts criticism and begins to build the narrative of what their presidency will be like.


Washington Life Magazine - December 2016  

Celebrating 25 Years of Washington Life

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you