Page 1

I N N O V A T O R S A N D D I S R U P T O R S I ssu e

exclusive:

The Women of

WE CAPITAL

Book Talk: NEW YORK TIMES CEO MARK THOMPSON | TRAVEL: APPALACHIAN ESCAPE My Washington: Judy Woodruff | FOOD: MICHAEL SCHLOW’S RESTAURANT EMPIRE

&

2016 Tech 25

pa rt i pa es! rt Pa ie rt s! ie s!

Harnessing the Power of Female Investors


53 24

26 '328)287

51

N OV E M B E R 2 01 6

EDITOR'SLETTER

FEATURES WECAPITAL A new consortium of female investors .......................... TECH Entrepreneurs creating buzz in 2016 .........................

Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Awards...........

Community of Hope hosts Night of Hope ...................

BOOKTALK NewYork Times Company President and CEO Mark Thompson's "Enough Said:What's Gone Wrong with the Language of Politics?" ............................................

Boys and Girls Club NationalY outh of theYear Celebration ...................................... Washington National Opera Opening Night ...............

FYIDC



Reopening of the National Gallery's East Building .......

INSIDER'SGUIDE ........................................ SOCIALCALENDAR ................................... WHO'SNEXT

LIFESTYLES FASHIONEDITORIAL

Jill Kargman's "Sprinkle Glitter on my Grave" Book Party ...................................... 

Casual chic ensembles for a day in Georgetown .............

Kyle Hendrick's Arab Angel Fund.............................

WATCHTRENDS

THEDISH

Limited edition, train-inspired 'Royal Blue' watch .......... 

An inside look at three of Michael Schlow's eateries .......

JEWELRYREPORT

POLLYWOOD EMBASSYROW Ambassadors' chefs and the 1956 Budapest uprising ...... Prince Albert II visits from Monaco ............................

Crushing on Crystals.............................................

PERFORMINGARTS A conversation with tenor Lawrence Brownlee ...............

TRAVEL Weekend getaway in the Blue Ridge Mountains............

Christie's Luxury Specialists Conference......................  Human Rights Campaign Annual Dinner ..................  PEN/Faulkner Celebration ....................................  NOFAS Gala ....................................................  UsAgainstAlzheimers Out of the Shadows Dinner ........  Peet's Coffee & Tea Opens in Georgetown ...............  Dining Away Duchenne .......................................  Creighton Farms Invitational Benefit .........................  Parties, Parties, Parties! ...........................................

Reception for Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark ..........

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY

HOMELIFE

National Geographic Channel's "Killing Reagan" .........

AROUNDTOWN

48th Annual Meridian Ball ..................................

A tribute to Ina Ginsburg ........................................

Joe Conason's Book Party .......................................

Inova Honors Dinner .............................................

INSIDEHOMESJoe Perta's Fauquier estate ......... REALESTATENEWS Pedigreed Architecture .........  OPENHOUSE New properties on the market ..........

Washington welcomes the Michelin Guide ...................

OVERTHEMOON

MYWASHINGTON Judy Woodruff,

Wolf Trap Ball .....................................................

Fall season highlights in horse country .........................

Co-anchor of PBS NewsHour ................................. 

ONTHECOVER Fromt left: Carol Melton, Sharon Virts, Jenny Abramson, Gail MacKinnon, Ami Aronson, Patrice King Brickman, Karen Schaufeld, Sachiko Kuno, Sheila Johnson, Michelle Freeman and Linda Youngentob (Photo by Tony Powell) TOP FROM LEFT: Sen. Al Franken at Joe Conason's book party (Photo by Tony Brown); Roanoke Star (Photo Credit Star City SkyCams, Courtesy of Roanoke Valley CVB) ; Tim Matheson and Cynthia Nixon at "Killing Reagan" premiere (Photo by Tony Powell) OSCAR DE LA RENTA round crystal cocktail ring ($295) available at neimanmarcusr.com.

8

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Nancy Reynolds Bagley EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Virginia Coyne SENIOREDITOR

Kevin Chaffee ASSOCIATEEDITORANDSENIORWEBEDITOR

Erica Moody ASSISTANTEDITOR

Catherine Trifiletti COPYEDITOR

Evan Berkowitz COLUMNISTSANDCONTRIBUTINGWRITERS

Janet Donovan, Roland Flamini, Patrick McCoy,Vicky Moon, Stacey Grazier Pfarr and Donna Shor ART DIRECTOR

Matt Rippetoe PRINCIPALPHOTOGRAPHER

Tony Powell CONTRIBUTINGPHOTOGRAPHERS

Joy Asico,Tony Brown, Ben Droz, Alfredo Flores,Vithaya Phongsavan, Kyle Samperton, Erin Schaff and Jay Snap

PUBLISHER & CEO

Soroush Richard Shehabi ACCOUNTEXECUTIVE

Jeryl Parade ADVERTISINGASSISTANT

Rita Khawand BOOKKEEPER

Michelle Frazer WEBTECHNOLOGIESDEVELOPMENT

Eddie Saleh,Triposs Mihail Iliev LEGAL

Mason Hammond Drake, Akerman, LLP INTERNS

Elizabeth Harvey, Kyle Kerchaert and Mona Mirmortazavi FOUNDER

Vicki Bagley CREATIVE DIRECTOR EMERITUS (*)

J.C. Suarès CHAIRMAN, EXECUTIVE BOARD

Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased


EDITOR’S LETTER

W

INVESTORS & ENTREPRENEURS

hen S&R Foundation president and CEO Dr. Sachiko Kuno discovered the dearth of female investors, she set out to change the landscape. Together with friend and Salamander Resort and Spa owner Sheila Johnson, Kuno formed a consortium of 12 women (and counting) who have so far brought in more than $12 million earmarked for ventures that create social change. The group, called WE Capital, invests through the women-led venture capital firm Rethink Impact, which focuses on businesses with gender-diverse management teams who are “trying to solve some of the world’s greatest problems.” The WE Capital consortium formally launches this month, and its members spoke to us exclusively for our Innovators and Disruptors issue. Also in this issue is our second annual Tech 25, which features a different slate of individuals each year who are creating buzz and making an impact. The list includes industry veterans (like Steve Case and Ted Leonsis) as well as startup founders who have launched technologies to spark social movements, pay college tuition and calm the nerves of new parents through ready medical advice via an app. The Dish column provides a peek inside the restaurant empire of Michael Schlow who continues to wow hungry Washingtonians with his versatility. Casolare, his newest eatery inside the Glover Park Hotel, serves up coastal Italian food that will make diners want to jump on a plane to Capri. Speaking of jet-setting, Arab Angel Fund founder Kyle Hendrick does just that, flying back and forth to the Middle East to connect investors with U.S. technology startups. He tells us all about his unique venture capital fund in Who’s Next. After a crazy election year, it’s time to reflect on this unprecedented presidential campaign. How does rhetoric influence elections? We spoke with New York Times CEO Mark Thompson about his book “Enough Said: What’s Gone Wrong with the Language of Politics?” We also chatted with “PBS NewsHour”

12

co-anchor Judy Woodruff about her experience on the campaign trail in My Washington. Need a clean break after a seemingly endless campaign season? The arts and culture of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains are just a short (and scenic!) drive away. Check out our picks for a weekend in Roanoke in our lifestyle section. Opera fans are in for a treat. Performing arts writer Patrick McCoy interviewed superstar tenor Lawrence Brownlee about his upcoming performances and passion for social change. Our fashion shoot took us up and down the streets of Georgetown, where we captured easy comfortable looks for a day out in one of Washington’s hottest shopping destinations. This issue also features coverage of the WL-sponsored Boys & Girls Clubs of America National Youth of the Year Gala, Meridian Ball, Inova Honors Dinner and the Wolf Trap Ball. Next month, we’ll have the USO Gala, Fight Night, the Kennedy Center’s Mark Twain Prize for American Humor honoring Bill Murray and Catholic Charities’ Spanish Catholic Center Gala.

Nancy R. Bagley Editor in Chief Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her at nbagley@washingtonlife.com

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington BY ERICA MOODY

‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’ at ford’s theater

TIME-HONOREDTALE

ANNIVERSARYJAM

Celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Center for Democracy in the Americas at an exclusive concert featuring Cuban singer-songwriter Carlos Varela and Grammy-winning U.S. musician Dave Matthews. Proceeds support the Center’s efforts to normalize relations between the U.S. and Cuba. Nov. 13, The Hamilton, 7:30 p.m., $250 General Admission, $350 General Admission with preferred seating. For sponsorship and ticket information, 202-234-5506 ext. 2002 or email: info@democracyinamericas.org.

HOLIDAY SHOPPING

CRAFTS&CUISINE Rock out for refugees, support local musicians and see Grammywinning performers during a jam-packed month of music. ] Emporiyum: Let’s face it, the holidays are as much about indulging in delicious food as they are about gift giving, so why not combine the two at Union Market’s annual Emporiyum celebration? The two-day market brings together more than 95 artisans, producers, chefs and restaurants from across the country. There will be topquality products and samples galore, so be prepared to stuff yourself silly as you search for the perfect artisanal treat for the foodie in your life. Nov. 12-13, 1309 5th St. NW, the emporiyum.com. ]Museum Shop Around: The best gifts for out-of-town relatives can often be found at museum gift shops, so why not get all your shopping done in one place at the Strathmore Museum’s 26th annual Museum Shop Around? Eighteen local museums will be represented, including the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the National Geographic Museum and the Phillips Collection. Proceeds support the museum’s arts enrichment programs. Nov. 12-15, 10 a.m.Tickets $9, strathmore.org.

14

RESTON TOWN CENTER HOLIDAY PARADE

FAMILYFESTIVITIES

Giant balloons, musicians, special characters and guest emcees make Reston Town Center’s annual Holiday Parade the next best thing to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day extravaganza in New York. The one-hour half-mile parade ends with the arrival of Santa and Mrs. Claus in a horse-drawn carriage (stick around for photo opps afterwards). Festivities go on all day, rain or shine, with activities that include a tree lighting, sing along, and mini-train and carriage rides. Nov. 25, 11 a.m., restontowncenter.com.

BRUNCH & MUSIC WITH JOAN OSBORNE

SOULSINGER

Join the Kara Kennedy Fund, the organization that honors Sen. Ted Kennedy’s late daughter, for a benefit brunch and concert featuring Grammy- award-winning singer/ songwriter Joan Osborne’s Soul Revue. Casual attire is encouraged at this Sunday fundraiser to support the learn-to-swim program at Horizons Greater Washington. Nov. 13, Bethesda Blues & Jazz, Brunch at noon, Concert follows, Donor levels start at $150, Parking is free, karakennedyfund.org.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

COURTE SY PHOTOS, CRAIG WALLACE STARS IN THE FORD’S THEATRE 35TH ANNUAL PROD U C T I O N O F “A C H R I S T M A S C A R O L . ” ( P H OTO B Y S C OT T S U C H M A N ) , P H OTO O F J OA N OS BO R N E BY J E FF FA SA N O

DAVE MATTHEWS & CARLOS VERELA

Don’t be a Scrooge this holiday season. Get into the Christmas spirit by experiencing one of our most beloved holiday tales. Ford’s Theater will be showing its longstanding musical version of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” as it has for the past 35 years, this time with acclaimed actor Craig Wallace playing Ebenezer Scrooge. Nov. 17 – Dec. 31, fords.org, Tickets range from $24-$107.


FYIDC | SOCIALCALENDAR

2

NOVEMBER HI GHERACHIEVEMENTSGOING PLACESGALA

The event celebrates its 41st year honoring the dedication and commitment exhibited by Higher Achievements scholars. The gala will recognize special honoree Mitchell N. Schear while treating guests to a performance by Higher Achievements alumni, a cocktail reception and a buffet dinner. The Warner Theatre; 6:30 p.m.; business/cocktail attire; $250; sponsorships $5,000; contact higherachievementgala@ gmail.com.

3

K NOCKOUTABUSEGALA

Knock Out Abuse strives for a community free of domestic violence. Corporate executives, politicians and philanthropists will gather to celebrate the work of four local beneficiaries who serve victims of domestic violence. The Ritz-Carlton Washington; 6:30 p.m.; black-tie; $650; sponsorships start at $1,000; tables start at $7,500; contact Bobette Gilette, 202-8139161.

leadership and commitment to their surrounding communities. Marriott Marquis; 6 p.m.; black-tie; $450 nonmember, $400 member, $350 government or student; sponsorships start at $3,000; contact 202347-7201 ext. 1897, dvaughn@dcchamber.org.

10

FIGHT NIGHT One of Washington’s most anticipated annual events, the black-tie fundraiser combines networking and entertainment in a one-of-a-kind experience. Proceeds benefit Fight for Children’s support of at-risk youth, for which the event has raised nearly $60 million over the past 27 years. Washington Hilton; 6 p.m.; black-tie; party deck tickets $500, individual tickets $1,100; tables start at $10,500; sponsorships start at $35,000; contact Judy Wrench, 202-772-0417, judy. wrench@fightforchildren.org.

10

THE WAMU GALA: A CELEBRATION OF DIANE REHM Legendary radio journalist Diane Rehm steps away from the microphone this December after almost 40 years of advocating for public discourse. The night of dinner, dancing and a D.CCHAMBEROF COMMERCE‘CHAMBER’S live auction will celebrate her contributions to the field and benefit the Diane Rehm Fund CHOICE’AWARDS Business leaders will gather to network and for Public Dialogue. Willard Intercontinental honor the best and brightest of the city’s Hotel; 6:30 p.m.; contact Carolyn Peachey, 202business community. This year’s award recipients 636-8743, for more information and to purchase were chosen based on their professionalism, tickets.

4

11-13

Rick Kay, George Muresan and Brian Mitchell at Fight Night 2015 (Photo By Tony Powell)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

INOVA THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

WEEKEND A weekend of events attracts philanthropists, healthcare experts and community leaders who participate in discussions about the latest problems in healthcare and the innovative solutions being discussed to correct them. Last year’s summit raised nearly $1 million for Inova programs that promote cancer research, prevention and care. Salamander Resort & Spa, Middleburg, Va.; business casual; Friday evening $1,000, Saturday evening $2,000; sponsorships start at $10,000; contact Kara Burke, 703-289-2077, kara. burke@inova.org.

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

15

AMERICAABROADMEDIA

POWEROFFILMAWARDS DINNER This year’s event honors “Homeland,” Saudi TV comedian Nasser Al Qasabi and Afghan TV network Tolo TV for using the power of media to inform, educate and empower audiences around the world with regard to critical global issues. Andrew Mellon Auditorium; 6:30 p.m.; tickets $350; contact Shafer Bush, sbusch@ americaabroadmedia.org.

15

MARCHOFDIMESHEROINESOF WASHINGTON

The organization that works to ensure all babies are born healthy and at full term will honor local women for their outstanding dedication to community service. The Ritz-Carlton Tysons Corner; 6 p.m.; black-tie; $300; sponsorships $5,000; contact Kate Leib, 571-257-2309, kleib@marchofdimes.org.

17

LAB SCHOOL OF WASHINGTON GALA A night of dinner and dancing will benefit the school’s mission and recognize exceptional individuals who have overcome learning differences to achieve great success. Actor David Arquette and author Jacqueline Woodson are among this year’s honorees, with Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) set to deliver the keynote speech. National Building Museum; silent auction and cocktail reception 6 p.m.; program and dinner 7 p.m.; black-tie optional; tickets $250; sponsorships $1,000; contact Ellen Cutlet, 202-944-2207, ellen.cutlet@labschool.org.

19

RED CROSS SALUTE TO SERVICE GALA The evening salutes men, women and families of the military and community members who put themselves on the line to respond to emergencies. This year’s event honors the 75th anniversary of the country entering World War II with vintage wartime photography and video displays. Hilton McLean Tysons Corner; 6:30 p.m.; black-tie or mess dress attire; $400; half table $2,500, full table $5,000; sponsorships start at $2,500; contact Lisa Futterman, lisafutterman@redcrossorg.

15


FYIDC | WHO’SNEXT

WHO’S NEXT

Arab Angel Fund founder Kyle Hendrick gets Middle East investors involved with U.S. startups. BY ERICA MOODY

H

I really enjoy the Middle East and think it gets a bad rap in the media here. The bottom line is that you hear about Syria and ISIS every day in the news, but you don’t hear about Dubai having the most stateof-the-art solar panels and Abu Dhabi having the biggest solar field in the world. You don’t hear about innovations that are happening and how they’re sponsoring startups. For us, if we can get media buzz about individuals from the Middle East who want to invest in companies and help them grow and succeed, that’s a much different narrative for people who may otherwise have connotations associated with negative things. The United Arab Emirates is very modern but the people are what make the culture. They’re very hospitable. They’ve invited me to their homes for Ramadan where I might be the only person there not in national dress, but I’m treated just like any of them.

How is yours different from other venture capital funds?

Our investors are 100 percent individuals and family offices, so we don’t have any institutional administrators. What we’re doing is pooling together our investors to give them access to U.S. technology startups that they didn’t have access to before, whether it be geography or that they’re not connected to the networks of Silicon Valley, D.C. or New York startups. It’s a new approach. My position at the embassy gave me the ability to identify that gap. Of your 20 investments so far, is there one that you’re most proud of?

The Tamara Mellon brand is one. She was the co-founder of Jimmy Choo and now she’s doing a direct to consumer e-commerce model for women’s shoes. She’s trying to disrupt the women’s shoe market by releasing lines that you can buy immediately, right after you see them on the runway at New York Fashion Week, with prices kept down because you’re not going the traditional retail sales route.

16

What about the tech scene in Washington? Is it changing? There’s always

been a big tech presence here, going back to the AOL days. Silicon Valley is about scaling and building customers and building products that people and enterprises will like. D.C. is more about getting government as a customer. If you can get a contract with the health agencies (or any agency really), that’s a huge and nice-paying client. Having government as a customer can make or break a startup and there’s obviously a lot of upside to that, but there are higher barriers to access. D.C. is going to be a nice intersection for what’s happening in tech as it becomes more entrepreneurial in nature.You’re going to have people that were with different government agencies and have identified problems saying, “we can create a business to solve this problem.” 

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L , TA KE N AT T H E D U P O N T C I RC L E H OT E L

Was traveling to the Middle East different from what you expected?

e’s a venture capital fund founder with Middle East expertise who was raised in rural Fauquier County, Va. After grad school at Georgetown, Kyle Hendrick worked for Fransmart in Alexandria, launching Five Guys and Elevation Burger in the United Arab Emirates, where his work caught the attention of UAE Ambassador Yousef Al-Otaiba. Hendrick, 28, became one of the first American hires at the Embassy and while there, came up with the idea for a venture capital firm to connect overseas investors with U.S. technology startups. In September, his Arab Angel Fund closed on its first $10 million.


FYIDC | THEDISH

SCHLOW’S EMPIRE IN A DAY Brunch, lunch and dinner at Michael Schlow’s popular eateries. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

Chilled seafood salad at Casolare (Photo by Andrew Propp)

The entrance at The Riggsby (Photo by Scott Suchman)

M

ichael Schlow does what he wants. Being a chef in Boston didn’t stop him from bringing his culinary concepts to Washington and being a kid from Brooklyn didn’t dictate the food he would cook. In Washington alone he has unfurled two Italian restaurants, one American and one Spanish. Unfazed by state lines or international boundaries, Schlow’s eclectic taste is a testament to his talent and versatility. Washington’s evolution into an exciting food destination made the Boston-based restaurateur want to “throw his hat in the ring� years ago. The ring itself is dynamic, giving way to a host of up and coming chefs trying their luck with innovative concepts in hip evolving neighborhoods. But Schlow relies on neither to make his five Washington eateries solid dining options. Despite our best efforts we couldn’t manage to try them all, so Alta Strada and its sister restaurant Conosci, a small crudo bar next door, will have to wait until round two. Let the three we did conquer serve as a guide to the emerging empire of Schlow. >>

CASOLARE (LUNCH)

TICO (BRUNCH)

THE RIGGSBY (DINNER)

  THSTREETNW - -

A part of the 14th Street corridor’s exuberant brunch scene, the vibe in Tico screams “weekend.� Bartenders mix cocktails utilizing 140 varieties of tequila in the colorful art-laden space (don’t forget the art on the ceiling). While the menu offers old favorites like an open faced omelette and a burger for less adventurous diners, it’s the less expected dishes that shine. A quick Google image search proves that the caramelized banana pancakes with crunchy hazelnuts are a widely-revered option, and for good reason, because the popular dish has no bad angles. For more savory-seeking brunch-goers, the crispy exterior on the crunchy and spicy fried chicken will stick with you all day. DRINK: Hibiscus Margarita – 100 percent Blue Agave tequila, citronge, lime, lemon and hibiscus

 NEWHAMPSHIREAVENUENW - -

The Riggsby, located in the lobby of the Carlyle Hotel, is Schlow’s answer to a classic American speakeasy – rich burgundy booths and Everest green walls make you want to sit back and listen to Sinatra crooning overhead, martini in hand. Gatsby would surely approve. For starters, the creamy burrata is a winner as it’s paired with seasonally appropriate ingredients (peaches, coppa and balsamic). The deviled eggs live up to the hype as does the beef carpaccio – thin medallions of meat anchored by rich golden olive oil, a medley of shaved mushrooms and fresh Parmesan chips. If there is room for an entrÊe, the pork chop is tender and flavorful and if dessert beckons, respond with an order of velvety Tahitian vanilla creme brulÊe. DRINK: Last Frontier – bourbon, Amaretto, lemon and cinnamon

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

 WISCONSINAVENUENW - - 

 Located in the Kimpton Glover Park Hotel, Casolare is a nod to Schlow’s Italian travels, spotlighting fresh coastal cuisine from Southern Italy. His newest Washington establishment proves an ideal spot for a light weekday lunch. A chilled “Capri style� seafood salad of sweet scallops, shrimp, calamari rings and mussels is simply dressed with olive oil, lemon, black pepper and bits of biting Fresno chiles. Although every pasta dish but one is made in-house, a server recommends the cauliflower orecchiette above all others, saying it might be the best pasta he’s ever eaten. He needn’t have said more. The large circular discs cooked to al dente perfection hold their own next to tender chunks of cauliflower and crunchy bread crumbs.The only way to upgrade the meal would be with an order of cannolis and we’re not above that. DRINK: A glass of Vermentino

17

CO U RT E SY P H OTOS

Caramelized banana pancakes at Tico (Photo by Scott Suchman)


POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPoliticsďš?Hollywoodďš?MediaandDiplomacy| Human Rights Campaign Dinner, Out of the Shadows Dinner and more!

Kimbell Duncan and Michelle Kosinski at the Meridian Ball. (Photo by Tony Powell)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

21


POLLYWOOD | EMBASSYROW

Ambassadors, Chefs and a Well Commemorated Uprising A mixed bag of new ambassadors, five chefs from Valencia and remembering Budapest in 1956 BY ROLAND FLAMINI

NEW ON THE BLOCK In Mozart’s opera

“Don Giovanni,” the servant Leporello sings an aria listing his master’s many romantic conquests. In Spain alone, he sings, they include “country wenches, chambermaids, citizens, but also countesses, baronesses, princesses.” If U.S. Chief of Protocol Peter Selfridge were to recite a list of the professional backgrounds of the new foreign ambassadors who presented their credentials throughout 2016, he could make quite an aria out of it – politicians, bankers, school teachers, economists, engineers, retired soldiers, doctors, union leaders, a former child actor and an archbishop. Of the 41 new envoys extraordinary and plenipotentiary who joined the Washington diplomatic corps — roughly a fifth of all the chiefs of mission — less than half are career diplomats. Nine are former government ministers, including Joe Hockey, until recently the equivalent of finance minister in Australia’s current government, and Tim Groser of New Zealand, who previously held several ministries in the Wellington government (he’s the boy actor, and former rock band member.) Six are women, including the elegant Dina Kawar of Jordan, and Luxembourg’s Sylvie Lucas, formerly political director at her country’s ministry of foreign affairs. European countries adhered to the tradition of appointing senior career diplomats. British Ambassador Sir Kim Darroch was former Prime Minister David Cameron’s security advisor. He has the delicate task of reassuring a nervous Washington that post-Brexit Britain remains a strong ally and bilateral partner. Italian Ambassador Armando Varricchio was foreign policy adviser to Prime Minister Matteo Renzi. The cleric in the group, meanwhile, is the new papal nuncio, Archbishop Christophe Pierre, a Vatican career diplomat.

22

Chefs from Valencia, Spain gathered to cook in celebration of Spain’s national day here. First row from left to right: Samuel Marti and Daniel García Peinado. Back row from left to right: Angel Campillo, Francisco Hernández Martínez, Sebastien Gros and Edgar González. (Courtesy of the Embassy of Spain)

NOT TOO MANY COOKS: The old adage

FREEDOM FIGHTER: 1956 was a turbu-

about the negative effect of too many cooks was stood on its head in October when the Embassy of Spain imported five chefs to create a highly successful national day celebration. They were from a leading cooking and hospitality school in Valencia. Guests lined up for three different versions of paella and an array of other culinary offerings. Another excursion into culinary diplomacy in October was the French embassy reception to launch the new Michelin Guide for Washington, D.C. José Andrés’ Minibar, was one of four restaurants that earned two stars under the peculiar rubric “worth a detour”—a throwback to the original function of the Guide Michelin as a touring guide for French motorists. No Washington restaurant was awarded the coveted three stars in the Michelin’s “worth a trip” category.

lent year. There was an effort by the United Kingdom, France and Israel to take back the Suez Canal nationalized by the Egyptian dictator Gamal Abdel Nasser. That bid, with all its long-term promise of a different situation in the Middle East, came to an abrupt end when President Eisenhower bullied the three nations to end the conflict. And then was the Hungarian Revolution, brutally suppressed by Soviet troops and armor. At a 60th anniversary dinner hosted by the Embassy of Hungary, the most moving moment was a brief, factual and almost laconic remembrance by Imre Toth, one of the last surviving leaders of the Uprising, of what it was like organizing the civilian population to resist the Russians. More than one dinner guest thought of Ukraine, Georgia and how much has not changed.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Crown Prince Reza Pahlavi of Iran

VISIT OF PRINCE ALBERT II OF MONACO

Amb. of Monaco Maguy Maccario Doyle with Prince Albert II of Monaco

Lynda Carter and Kelly Ripken

Embassy of the Principality of Monaco | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL GLITTERYGATHERING His Serene Highness Prince Albert II marked the tenth anniversary of Monaco’s full diplomatic relations with the United States by greeting VIPs, diplomats and personal friends at his tiny nation’s Kalorama embassy. “We have a longstanding historical bond,” he said after Monaco’s ambassador, Maguy Maccario Doyle, pointed out that Monaco had sent a consul to Washington as early as 1868. PRINCELY PASSION: A longtime champion of the environment, the Prince made sure to emphasize that the world’s oceans were neither “infinite” nor “endlessly exploitable.”

Shahin Mafi and Bonnie McElveen-Hunter

Prince and Princess Michael Romanoff-Ilyinsky

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Former U.S. Ambassadors to Denmark Laurie Fulton and Stuart Bernstein

Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary of Denmark are welcomed by Anne Grete Weisskopf and Siw Lose, daughter of the Danish Ambassador.

DANISH ROYAL VISIT

Danish Minister of Food and Environment Esben Lunde Larsen and Danish Amb. Lars Gert Lose

Embassy of Denmark | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES HEIRAPPARENT Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary of Denmark greeted guests during an intimate reception at their country’s embassy during a visit that marked the beginning of a 60-country export promotion and the opening of an exhibition of contemporary Danish art at the residence of Danish Amb. Lars Gert Lose and his wife Ulla Rønberg. The heir to Queen Margrethe II, who studied political science at Harvard, and his Australian-born wife mingled easily in the crowd, greeting friends in both Danish and English while discussing various issues of the day, especially the prince’s particular passion, climate change and energy sustainability.

Chase Rynd, Sarah Tanguy, Dodge Thompson and Colleen Day WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

23


POLLYWOOD

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

PORTRAYINGAPRESIDENT National Geographic Channel’s ‘Killing Reagan’ provides insight into the President’s life before and after the infamous assassination attempt. B Y J A N E T D O N O VA N

veteran Pamela Stevens, who worked on the Republican convention in Dallas, the ReaganBush inauguration and then for White House Chief of Staff Howard Baker, saw President Reagan and his wife often and praised the film for portraying the characters accurately. “I thought it was very true to life,” she said. Many viewers were impressed with the film’s insight into the Reagans’ marriage. “It’s not even the president and the first lady, it’s a husband and a wife,” said Fox News Channel’s Ed Henry, who was only 10 years old when Reagan was shot. “That’s what the movie really brought across. It was still a marriage. She was there with him every step of the way. ” The actors worked hard to perfect their roles. Cynthia Nixon, who plays Nancy Reagan, had to work on the adoring “gaze” the former first lady was known for casting upon her husband. Nixon called it “a real challenge.” Post-premiere, we chatted with Michael Cole, who plays White House Press Secretary James Brady, affectionately known to his friends as “Bear.” One of Hinckley’s bullets

hit Brady, leaving him permanently disabled. He died from complications associated with the gunshot wound in 2014. The Brady Bill, enacted 33 years later on Nov. 30,1993, mandated federal background checks on firearm purchasers in the U.S. and imposed a five-day waiting period. President Reagan supported the bill after he left office. Cole said he found a lot of similarities between himself and the character he portrays, particularly a comment Brady made at his first press conference when he joked that he didn’t get the prestigious job because of his good looks. “That just made me connect with him as a human,” Cole said. “It took a lot for him to prove himself to Nancy because she wasn’t really a huge fan of his at first.” “He treated the presidency like a performance,” said Tim Matheson, the charismatic actor who portrays President Reagan before mentioning that he studied both the actor and the president to nail down the role. Reagan “knew that the best way to communicate was through stagecraft.”

Kristen Shaw and Michael Grady Kyle S. More “Killing Reagan” Director Rod Lurie and Novelist Kyra Davis

‘KILLING REAGAN’ PREMIERE Newseum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Jack Norton and Jean Case

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Cynthia Nixon and Tim Matheson 24

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

P H OTO CO U RT E SY O F N AT I O N AL G EO G RA P H I C C H AN NE L

O

n March 30, 1981, six shots from a .22-caliber pistol rang out at the Washington Hilton. Holding the gun was a disturbed man driven by his infatuation with actress Jodie Foster. On the other end was the 40th president of the United States, Ronald Reagan. John Hinckley Jr.’s unsuccessful assassination attempt changed Reagan’s life, his marriage and the course of history. At the world premiere of Bill O’Reilly’s “Killing Reagan” at the Newseum, we had a chance to talk to the cast and creators of the National Geographic Channel film. This is the fifth installment in the O’Reilly “killing series,” which was intentionally timed to air just prior to the 2016 presidential election. “It’s all about commercialism and putting your film in a slot that most people will watch it in,” he said. “It’s just a business decision.” Some of the guests knew Reagan personally, others only though history books. Political


UAE Amb. Yousef Al Otaiba, Tony Podesta, Abeer Al Otaiba, Adrienne Arsht, Stuart Holliday, Luciana GonzalezRevilla, Panamanian and Amb. Emanuel Gonzalez-Revilla

Portugese Amb. Domingos Vital, Isabel Vital, Tunisian Amb. Fayçal Gouia, Lala Abdurahimova and Azerbaijan Amb. Elin Suleymanov

WL SPONSORED

THE MERIDIAN BALL

Katy McKegney, Megan Wilson and Neil Grace

Meridian International Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL DIPLOMATICDANCEGlamorous guests in their best black-tie finery flocked to the 48th Annual Meridian Ball, taking a strictly non-partisan night off to dine at ambassadorial residences (or White-Meyer House) before converging on Meridian International Center for desserts and dancing. The highly anticipated event marked a rare opportunity to mix and mingle in a crowd that ranged from political, diplomatic and business VIPs to a hoard of energetic millennials who danced up a proverbial storm in the party tent until the wee hours. The ball benefits the Center’s programs to prepare international leaders for a complex global future. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Evan Ryan and Peter Selfridge

Annie Totah and Leo Sahakian

Paul and Ioana Lee Edilia and Karina Gutierrez with Ana Navarro

Katherine Vernott-Jonas, Margarita Arroyave-Wessel and Pilar O’Leary

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Gwen Holliday, Susanne Larsen and Loran Brueggen Aiken

Lorena and Jeremy Jewart 25


POLLYWOOD

George Stevens, Alyssa Ritch and Nina Ritch

Dan Morgan and John Henry

Erica Payne and Harold Ickes

Elizabeth Wagley and Joe Conason

JOE CONASON BOOK PARTY Residence of John and Christina Ritch | PHOTOSBYTONYBROWN

Sidney Blumenthal and Jamie Stiehm

PHILANTHROPICPRESIDENT New York Times bestselling author Joe Conason’s latest book, “Man of the World: The Further Endeavors of Bill Clinton” (Simon & Schuster), looks into what the 42nd president has done after he left office with plenty of insight into the Clinton Foundation. John and Christina Ritch hosted a book party at their home with many politicos, journalists and supporters in attendance including Sen. Al Franken, Ilyse Hogue, Jonathan Capeheart, Michael Beschloss, Jane Mayer, Bill Hamilton and Elizabeth Newhouse.

Andrew Cockburn and Mike Cantor VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

French Amb. Gerard Araud, Izette Folger, Pascal Blondeau and Jennifer Isham

Micaela Varricchio and Italian Amb. Armando Varricchio

Fabio and Maria Trabocchi

Patrick O’Connell and José Andrés

MICHELIN GUIDE LAUNCH French Ambassador’s Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Nora Pouillon

Claire Dorland Clauzel

BONAPPETITDC Chefs, restaurateurs, gourmets and gourmands alike were nodding in agreement when French Amb. Gerard Araud pronounced that the nation’s capital “is no longer a dark, dark spot without a Michelin Guide.” The iconic red-covered booklet includes only three two-star- and nine one- star- restaurants among the 100 rated, so it was perhaps inevitable that many guests (including more than a few honorees) were keen to discuss the pros and cons of the rigorous (and anonymous) selection process. Despite vastly differing opinions, one bit of news was happy enough: reservations had spiked at many of the selected restaurants and are likely to do so for some time to come.

Celia Laurent and Eric Ziebold VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

26

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


George and Laura Bush

Tim and Ann Keating, Sally Jewell and Kim and Fred Humphries Denyce Graves performs in the Filene Center

Alex and Hilery Sirpis

WOLF TRAP BALL Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts | PHOTOSBYJOYASICOAELANDESANDDANIELSWARTZ SOIRÉEINTHEWOODS More than 800 guests were entertained by mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves while dining on delectable fare by Design Cuisine before dancing into the night at this year’s Wolf Trap Ball. Former President George W. Bush delighted the crowd when he made a surprise appearance on the Filene Center stage to introduce former first lady and guest speaker Laura Bush, who spoke of the special role the National Park Service (NPS) plays in America’s cultural heritage. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell served as honorary chairwoman of the event, which also celebrated NPS’s centennial. Co-chaired by Fred and Kim Humphries and Tim and Ann Keating, the event raised $1.6 million for the nonprofit Wolf Trap Foundation and its arts and education programs.

Joan and Ken Darby

Beth Buehlmann and Jim Kroll VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Cicely Tyson

Rep. John Conyers, Britt Stevenson and Leron Gresham

Donnie Simpson and Dionne Warwick

CONGRESSIONAL BLACK CAUCUS FOUNDATION AWARDS Shakespeare Theatre | PHOTOSBYTONYBROWN

Malinda Williams and Chadwick Boseman

FINEARTSACHIEVEMENT Academy Award-nominated actress Cicely Tyson, Golden Globe-nominated actor Richard Roundtree and music icon Dionne Warwick were honored with lifetime achievement awards at the 20th annual Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Awards. Actor Chadwick Boseman (who’s set to play the coveted role of Marvel’s Black Panther in an upcoming film adaptation) received the trendsetter award. “Soul Food” actress Malinda Williams hosted the evening, radio legend Donnie Simpson was a guest presenter and the Marcus Johnson Band kept guests entertained throughout the night.

Richard Roundtree and Rep. Jim Clyburn VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

27


pollywood

Bill Conway and Kelly Sweeney McShane

Kojo Nnamdi and Lesli Foster

Janet and Bob Sloan w l sp o ns o red

Night of Hope 101 Constitution Ave | Photos by TONY Brown

Rachelle Toman and Caty Poulin Andrea Miano, Kevin Hodges and Claire Hodges (Photo by Kristian Whipple)

IT ALL STARTS WITH HOPE: Community of Hope’s donors, friends and partners came together for their annual Night of Hope celebration, which focused on “Caring for Families. Improving Lives. Leading Change.” The nonprofit organization, whose mission is to create opportunities for low-income families in the District, strives to help the homeless “achieve good health, a stable home and familysustaining income.” The lively event attended by more than 400 supporters was held on 101 Constitution’s roof terrace, where guests sipped signature cocktails, munched on hors d’oeuvres and participated in a live auction. Shirlene Phillips, a Community of Hope client said that the organization “restored my family and added to our lives.” View all the photos at www.washingtonlife.com

Kelly Sweeney McShane, Betsy Carr, Dodie Brady and Tippor Gore (Photo by Jela Lewter)

Joshua and Lily Jarrett and Cabell Jonas-Lazerow

Scott and Sherri Bohinc 28

Monique Diop

Ariel and Emmett Flood

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| no v e m b e r

2016

| washingtonlife.com


SPONSORS:


POLLYWOOD | BOOKTALK

A CRISIS OF LANGUAGE

New York Times Company CEO Mark Thompson unpacks political rhetoric in ‘Enough Said.’ BY ERICA MOODY

P

ublic language matters.” So Mark Thompson begins his insightful and ever-relevant new book, “Enough Said: What’s Gone Wrong With the Language of Politics?” (St. Martin’s Press). The former BBC director general and current New York Times Co. CEO draws from his decades in media to explore how what he sees as a “crisis of trust” in politics across the Western world is, at its core, a crisis of language.

got incredible freshness and memorability, and one of the ways he made his mark is he seemed to be filling the digital space with his views, his comments, his reactions, his rebuttals 24/7. WL: What do you think can be done at

WASHINGTON LIFE: Obviously this book

is very timely. When you started writing it, did you have any idea about Brexit or Donald Trump? MARKTHOMPSON I didn’t. I started it in 2012 when I became interested in the way the healthcare debates in America and in the U.K. were developing. My book begins with Sarah Palin in the summer of 2009 when she coins the phrase “death panels” to talk about one aspect of Obamacare. She tweeted it out and within a few weeks most Americans had heard the phrase and many believed that it must be actually in the legislation. Trump represents an extraordinary development of that kind of style - that very high impact, very tweetable, very compressed use of language and it carried him from being a rank outsider to becoming one of the central figures, as we speak, in American politics. It’s incredible. And a lot of it’s about language. What’s fascinated me about this election cycle is about how much, on both sides, it’s about a critique of language more than a critique of policies.

it’s harder for journalists and editors to really think these things through. The second thing is you get these very rapid feedback loops. We can see it right now in the election campaign because everyone involved is very anxious to keep up and to ref lect exactly what’s going on. These real time blogging sites mean that people react in seconds. The kind of ways in which stories would develop and people would react, which would perhaps have taken days or even weeks once, now happen in minutes and hours, and it can sometimes lead to really exaggerated responses to stories. In terms of the way language is changing, I think the 24/7 cycle acts as a really powerful accelerant.

WL: As a longtime TV producer, how did

WL: Does the rise of digital media have a

you see the language of politics change with the rise of the 24/7 news cycle? MT First, it squeezes thinking time, so

lot to do with that? MT Donald Trump’s intuitive use of Twitter in particular is very striking. It’s

30

this point to change this trend in the language of politics? MT We all need to take a deep breath. Politicians need to stop talking down their profession. Doctors don’t attack the profession of medicine when they talk in public. They don’t say, “It’s horrible being a doctor, all doctors are liars and cheats.” Most politicians are not bad people, most are basically very public spirited people, so I think politicians need to give each other more space, treat each other with a little more respect. The parliamentary debate setup is there for a reason; those conventions are broken down and need to be reestablished. The media need to give the politicians more space. But the biggest thing is to make sure that children and young people are given the chance to develop the critical faculties that one needs to unpack and understand what politicians are saying and how the media works. What I worry about is if we lose the idea of an electorate and a citizenry who can actually make informed decisions because then, if you’re not careful, you end up with a democracy based on surges of emotion and instinct, and I think history suggests that that’s dangerous. WL: You write that the media needs to reject perspectivism, the notion that everything is a point of view and that truth is a meaningless concept. How do you see that playing out in this election? MT It’s been very difficult. There’s been so

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


much mud f lying and so many allegations and all the rest of it. I find it hard to be fair in an election period because we tend in elections to widely report what candidates claim but over the course of this election, the New York Times and other newspapers have become more confident about saying, when it’s appropriate, that something isn’t true. For example, Donald Trump’s claim that he had been against the Iraq war simply doesn’t accord with the record of the time when he said he was in favor of the war. I think we’ve gotten better at saying facts are facts. Once you start arguing in a postmodernist way that everything is opinion, that there’s no such thing as a fact, journalism begins to break down. We need to be thoughtful about facts and sophisticated about the reality that many facts are in fact mediated and adjusted by opinion. We need to stand up for free speech and the right of the press to report what’s going on and that was very neatly expressed in the response written by our lawyer David McCraw to Mr. Trump’s lawyers, about what the first amendment actually means. WL: You write about Margaret Thatcher’s public persona and how she struggled to connect with people, and a lot of people say Hillary Clinton is too serious or humorless and they just find her unlikable. Do you see any similarities there and do you think gender has anything to do with that? MT It seems there’s something else going on, which is that it’s very tough to be the first. It’s very tough to be the first black president. It’s very tough to be the first completely serious female candidate to be president of the United States. And the fact that the public is unused to the idea of a black president, of a female president, means that unreasonable scrutiny, prejudices and possibly exaggerated expectations of what’s possible all make life more complicated for the first person to do that. Theresa May is still subjected to some sexist comments and some scrutiny of what she wears and her family life, which

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Mark Thompson (Photo by Kathy Ryan)

would not be true of a male politician, but for the most part she is regarded as another British prime minister. The fact that she’s a woman has been far less talked about and discussed in the U.K. than when Thatcher was. I think it’s just like in the workplace - when it’s routine for women to reach the very highest offices in the land, to become chief executives, to become vice president and president, when that’s routine ... life will be easier. Unreasonable scrutiny and yes, prejudice, are part of what’s going on, and with Hillary, I’ve been very struck by the difference between her persona when you talk to her one-on-one and her public persona. WL: How is Hillary different in person

than she appears in public? MT I certainly have the sense that there’s

a guardedness and an armor plating to her public persona, which may simply be the result of so many decades in the public eye and often under attack. I would hope

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

that if she becomes president some of the Hillary Clinton I saw - more mischievous, more relaxed, would come forward. That’s probably true of all public politicians. It’s a pretty punishing environment. The ideological divide has become much more sharp, politics much more personal. Allegations are far more common than they used to be. It’s become a world of rage and paranoia on the internet. That hasn’t helped. The relationship [between politicians and the media] feels very frayed at the moment. And although I always think the media should hold politicians to account, I also think [it’s important to] create some space for politicians to present themselves to the public and set out their ideas in a way which is not always filled with challenge because, if you’re not careful, you will end up with politicians who are always speaking behind barricades so you’ll never really get to know them. . This interview has been edited and condensed

31


SPECIAL FEATURE

WECAPITAL

N

From left to right: WE Capital’s Carol Melton, Karen Schaufeld, Sheila C. Johnson, Sachiko Kuno, Michelle Freeman, Ami Aronson, Patrice King Brickman, Linda Youngentob, Sharon Virts and Jodie McLean with Rethink Impact’s Jenny Abramson.

32

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


;)'%4-8%0 A new consortium of women investors seeks to break barriers and fund social change. BY VIRGINIA COYNE PHOTOS BY TONY POWELL

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

33


SPECIAL FEATURE

WECAPITAL

T

hree years ago, when former pharmaceutical company founder and S&R Foundation president Sachiko Kuno was launching Halcyon Incubator, a program to support and empower social impact entrepreneurs, she says she came to realize the importance of investors. At the same time, she found the field to be male-dominated, leaving her wondering where the women were – and how the lack of diversity in investment teams impacted businesses. Studies show the imbalance translates into fewer funds for women-owned businesses. A 2016 Bloomberg analysis found that femaleled companies get 77 cents for every dollar male businesses receive, nearly mirroring the national pay gap. A more dire statistic comes from the Wharton School, which found that although 38 percent of new businesses in the U.S. are started by women, female founders receive just two to six percent of venture capital funding. Recent reports by Forbes and TechCrunch also confirm that investing is indeed a man’s world: only six to seven percent of partners at top VC firms are women. In late 2015, Kuno decided it was time to do something about that disparity. “Many successful women have not had the chance to be investors,” she says, “so I thought we should gather a group of them here in D.C. to invest in other women.” She reached out to her friend Sheila C. Johnson first. The founder and CEO of Salamander Resort and Spa is also vice chairman of Monumental Sports and Entertainment, making her the only African American woman to have ownership in three professional sports teams. Additionally, she was a co-founding partner of Black Entertainment Television. Johnson immediately took to the idea. “I told Sachiko it was absolutely perfect,” she remembers. “I see so many men doing it. They start these funds and women are never allowed to be a part of them, or they’re never asked. It’s about time we do it, too.” Johnson was also eager to support womenled businesses, lamenting she’d had her own troubles securing funding. “Even as [an established] businesswoman, I could never get a loan from a bank,” she says. “If I hadn’t had the means I would have never

Sheila C. Johnson and Dr. Sachiko Kuno

, 34

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


been able to start a hotel company.” The duo began to seek out other successful area women interested in investing in companies that make a social impact and WE Capital, which formally launches this month, was born. Today, their consortium of 12 women, working through the venture capital firm Rethink Impact, has already committed over $12 million dollars for gender-diverse companies that have women leaders or women on the management team. Gender diversity on management teams has been shown to improve company’s bottom lines. Rethink Impact’s founder and managing partner Jenny Abramson and her San Francisco-based partner Heidi Patel say their firm “invests in businesses trying to solve some of the world’s greatest problems with the goal of generating appropriate returns for investors at the same time.” Rethink Impact’s website lists a portfolio that includes Neurotrack, a women-led, computer-based brain health test, and Purpose, which boasts a mixed gender leadership team and helps people start political and social movements through technology. “What WE Capital is doing is investing in women venture capitalists who are in turn investing in gender diverse teams, so they’re multiplying the impact,” Abramson says. It’s a model that drew in many of the consortium’s members, who may also become advisors to the companies benefitting from their funds. “The idea that women could support other women, participate in the venture capital world and have the same type of returns, if not better than men, was really fun,” says member Karen Schaufeld, a philanthropist and entrepreneur, “but it’s also really nice to be able to think that we could do something that would help start, nurture and grow businesses.” Sharon Virts, who has nearly 30 years experience leading companies in the maledominated federal market adds, “Women make decisions a whole lot differently than men do. Men tend to be profit driven, while women tend to be mission driven.” “The profit is important,” she adds, “but it’s the mission that you’re investing in.” 

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

THEWOMENOF

Ami Aronson Executive Director, Bernstein Family Foundation Patrice King Brickman Founder and Managing Director, Inspire Capital LLC Teresa Carlson Vice President of Worldwide Public Sector, Amazon Web Services Michelle DiFebo Freeman Owner and CEO, Carl M. Freeman Companies Sheila C. Johnson Founder and CEO, Salamander Hotels and Resorts Sachiko Kuno, Ph.D. President and CEO, S&R Foundation Gail MacKinnon Executive Vice President and Chief Government Relations Officer, Time Warner Cable Carol A. Melton Executive Vice President of Global Public Policy, Time Warner Jodie W. Mclean Chief Executive Officer, EDENS Karen Schaufeld Founder and President, 100WomenStrong Sharon Virts Founder and Chairman of the Board, The Sharon D. Virts Foundation Linda Youngentob Educator and advocate for underserved youth

VENTURECAPITALISTS Jenny Abramson Founder and Managing Partner, Rethink Impact Heidi Patel Partner, Rethink Impact

35


SPECIAL FEATURE

TECH

XLI

WA S H I N G TO N L I F E

8)',



Leaders and Entrepreneurs Creating Buzz and Making Headlines in 2016

36

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


78):)'%7)

8)(0)327-7

@SteveCase THE BASICS: AOL co-founder turned investor, venture capitalist, philanthropist and author. Now chairman and CEO of Revolution LLC, which invests in “ideas that can change the world” and whose local holdings include CustomInk, Framebridge, Optoro and Sweetgreen. THE BUZZ: Released in April, Case’s first book, “The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur’s Vision of the Future” became a New York Times bestseller. While promoting it, he completed his fifth “Rise of the Rest” startup bus tour, visiting five cities with emerging entrepreneurial ecosystems and investing $100,000 in startups at each location. In June, his Revolution Growth entity, run in collaboration with Donn Davis and Ted Leonsis, announced a new $525 million fund to invest in businesses outside Silicon Valley that are leveraging technology to disrupt existing multi-billion-dollar industries.

@TedLeonsis THE BASICS: Founder, chairman, majority owner and CEO of Monumental Sports and Entertainment, which owns four professional sports teams. Co-founder and partner in Revolution Growth and board member of several D.C. area startups, including CustomInk, FedBid, Optoro and Resonate. Outspoken and influential leader on the topics of smart cities, technology in sports and drones. THE BUZZ: In late September, Leonsis, along with Magic Johnson, LA Dodgers and Golden State Warriors owner Peter Gruber and others bought the international e-sports franchise Team Liquid, which sponsors players who compete at the highest level in games such as Starcraft 2, Leagues of Legends, Dota 2 and most recently, Civilization6. Back in Washington, Leonsis’ Monumental Sports just announced a deal with Comcast SportsNet to stream live Wizards, Capitals, Mystics,Valor and other games, to the delight of fans.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

37


SPECIAL FEATURE

TECH

(%0) 2-6:%2- comm” by President Obama for being the only person inducted in both the Cable Tele4*-)*)6 @GoodWorld SCREENSHOT: She’s made it possible for anyone to donate to charity by using the hashtag #donate on Facebook and Twitter. Through her company, GoodWorld, launched in 2014, Pfiefer has fueled over $2 million for more than 2,000 nonprofits. This year, Kiddar Capital founder Todd Hitt made the biggest donation yet using #donate in a tweet: $25,000 to the Alexandria-based Child & Family Network Centers, which provide early education and health services to the working poor. In August, the District of Columbia’s innovation finance program invested $485,000 in the startup, a figure matched by incubator 1776.

86):)6 *%()2 @Trever THE DOWNLOAD: Since launching this March, Faden’s property management service Atlas Lane will end the year with a team of 10, and hundreds of properties in the District and Maryland under its purview. Through the company’s app, tenants can troubleshoot maintenance issues in real-time and pay their rent, while owners can secure leases and find replacement tenants.

4,-0)78)61%2 %2(.37)(%:-(1'4))/

THE DOWNLOAD: These Yale University computer science grads founded Storytime, which sends free stories by text message and messaging apps to families without books. The service now reaches 10,000 parents through U.S. Head Start, and has been praised for increasing nighttime reading.

38

831 ;,))0)6 @TomWheelerFCC THE BASICS: Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) with three decades experience in cable, wireless and video communications. Former president and CEO of the National Cable Television Association; entrepreneur; and venture capitalist. Wheeler has been nicknamed “the Bo Jackson of Tele-

vision Hall of Fame and the Wireless Hall of Fame. THE BUZZ: The FCC regulates all things communication, including internet broadband and next-generation wireless networks, and Wheeler is in the driver’s seat at the intersection of technology and policy. In the past year he’s been focused on promoting competition, unleashing spectrum and ensuring the Internet remains fast, fair and open. Wheeler is currently pushing forward new rules to liberate consumers from paying set-top box fees to cable companies.

.3243;)67 @powersjon THE SCREENSHOT: Veteran who helped revolutionize the U.S. Army’s energy program and former chief sustainability officer in the Obama administration. Powers co-founded CleanCapital , a platform in which private investors are able to invest in a portfolio of solar projects and other clean energy initiatives. Over the summer, CleanCapital received $21 million in funding from the John Hancock Insurance and in October, the startup was named a finalist in 43North, the world’s largest business idea competition.

)0-7);,%2+ @snobswap THE SCREENSHOT: I t started out as a peerto-peer clothing resale business but CEO and co-founder Whang soon pivoted in a direction no one else had ever done: connecting brick and mortar consignment boutiques with online shoppers by eliminating geographic barriers. SnobSwap curates pre-owned luxury wares from hundreds of consignment shops across the country, earning a commission on each sale. The company has raised nearly $2 million dollars in funding.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


&)21-00)6 @Fundrise THE DOWNLOAD: Lucrative real estate investing need no longer be just for institutions and investment partners. Miller’s Fundrise gives “everyone the opportunity to invest directly in high quality real estate, without the middlemen.” Miller’s team worked with the Securities and Exchange Commission for a year to clear their plan before launching in 2012 and today more than 80,000 members of Fundrise have invested in nearly $3 billion worth of real estate. The minimum investment is $1,000.

&)2092(-2 @pacifyapp THE DOWNLOAD: New parents invariably have many questions for medical professionals and Lundin’s subscription-based Pacify app helps them get answers–fast. The on-demand platform connects parents nationwide, including in rural areas where medical professionals may not be close by, to a network of pediatric nurses, lactation consultants and dieticians 24/7. The goal? “To bring peace of mind to parents when they need it most.”

83((1336) @toddmoore SCREENSHOT: Created the widely popular White Noise app that has been downloaded millions of times since its 2008 launch. Moore released a seventh version of the sleep-inducing app this year, which allows users to upload their own soothing sounds. He’s also the author of “Tap, Move and Shake,” a DIY guide for turning your game ideas into iPhone apps. In October, Moore launched a new app-based game called “Slot Champions.’’

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

78):)7)2/97 +%66)883¸7,)% @pockitship THE BASICS: Ever bought a couch on Craigslist but had no idea how to get it home? Enter PockitShip, an on-demand pick-up-and-delivery service for heavy items, large household goods and apartment moves. The business was founded in 2014 by CEO Senkus, a 20-year veteran of the transportation and logistics industry previously with NonstopDelivery, a nationwide last-mile home delivery company. Senkus saw a void in the market when it came to transferring heavy goods purchased via online listings, local retailers and estate sales. O’Shea, a former executive vice president and partner at RedPeg Marketing, is PockitShip’s president. He says he made the transition to “stretch [his] entrepreneurial spirit and build a brand from the ground up.” THE BUZZ: In October, the Falls Churchbased startup launched a new Uber-like app that allows customers to arrange for local pickups and deliveries with just a few clicks on their mobile device. “All you have to do is take your phone out of your pocket, enter the item description, when and where you want it delivered and our driving professionals take care of the rest,” Senkus says. The company plans to expand its services to Baltimore in the next few months and eventually to other cities. PockitShip has raised more than $1.7 million in funding, including investments from the Center for Innovative Technology (CIT) and Edgewater Equity.

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

39


SPECIAL FEATURE

TECH

1)%+%2 1)8>+)6

possible via tax deductible donations to the PYT Foundation.

@meaganmetz SCREENSHOT: A former executive in the federal space bringing new technologies to government through Dcode42, an emerging growth IT accelerator program designed to guide innovative tech companies through “the maze of rules and regulations involved in doing business with the federal government” and connecting government entities, startups and venture capitalists.

=96-/3 ,36:%8,

&)2.%1-2=392+

+6)+36='30)1%2 @Sworkit THE DOWNLOAD: The duo appeared on the popular ABC reality competition “Shark Tank” earlier this year and won what was widely reported as the largest tech deal in the show’s history. The deal fell apart off air when Young and Coleman could not agree on terms with investor Mark Cuban. Still, their fitness app Sworkit, which guides users through yoga, pilates and customized circuit training workouts (without special equipment!) has been downloaded more than 12 million times and is consistently ranked in the top 10 health and fitness apps in the Apple app store.

40

@SquashedTwinkie SCREENSHOT: Director of technology for global incubator 1776 who this year oversaw the launch of Union, a community described as “a LinkedIn on steroids” for startups and incubators all over the world.The service helps connects entrepreneurs with people and resources that will help grow their businesses. “Smart entrepreneurs with highly promising ideas exist everywhere on the planet,” says 1776 co-founder Donna Harris. “Together we can empower them to share classes, content, mentors and other critical resources needed to succeed.”

78%'-) ;,-732%28 @StaciehelpsPYT THE DOWNLOAD: This Army vet who paid her own way through college launched PYT Funds (Pay Your Tuition) in 2014 to help tackle the college loan funding gap through technology. Whisonant’s platform allows users to create a crowdfunding profile similar to that of Kickstarter or GoFundMe to attract donations from family, friends and community members, as well as to apply for need-based scholarships or microloans made

'%6)=%22) 2%()%9 @OpenDataNation THE DOWNLOAD: Awardwinning former Brookings Institution and Urban Institute analyst who launched Open Data Nation , which combines public data with data science to increase transparency in public agencies and decrease risk to citizens. Example: using public data to predict restaurants that will fail health inspections in order to encourage health departments to make earlier inspections and thereby keep the public safe from foodborne illness.

',%60)2) &63;2 @reciprocalldoc THE DOWNLOAD: Brown, a preventive medicine physician and graduate of Harvard Medical School, founded ReciproCare after being inspired by family members working in home care as paid, but underemployed, caregivers. The technology-enabled social enterprise aims to increase the capacity of the home care industry to serve seniors by making it easier for caregivers to find additional employment to occupy otherwise unused blocks of time.

)6-'7,-, @eshih THE DOWNLOAD: Want to create positive changes where you spend money? Stanford grad Shih’s online petition platform, Spendrise , helps users who want Trader Joe’s to stop using polystyrene packaging or Target to sell “ugly” fruits and vegetables and will enable the changes by buying store gift cards if the companies comply.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


6)++-) %++%6;%0 @ReggieAggarwal THE BASICS: Founder of Cvent , a cloud-based software company focused on event management, growing it from a two-person startup in 1999 to a 1,900+ person publicly traded company with 15,800 customers managing hundreds of thousands of events. THE BUZZ: CVENT was purchased in April by Vista Equity Partners for $1.65 billion. As the owner of 4.3 million shares, or 10 percent of the company, Aggarwal cashed out with $164 million. Sanju K. Bansal, an early Cvent investor and lead independent board director, and sales chief Chuck Ghorrah, also cashed out, with Bansal receiving $98.85 million for his initial $2 million investment in the company, and Ghoorah, $48 million, according to the Washington Post. All have remained with the company, with Aggarwal staying on as CEO.

FOR MORE INSPIRATION, READ OUR MONTHLY INNOVATORS AND DISRUPTORS COLUMN AND VISIT US ONLINE AT

WASHINGTONLIFE.COM

%.%=/36-%2(.)**7,))0= @SendUrbanStems THE DOWNLOAD: Frustrated and disappointed by the traditional flower delivery model, this duo created their own: a seed-to-door supply chain that sources directly from Rainforest Alliance Certified farms and cuts out the middle man, upping both quality and reliability. Their on-demand flower delivery service, UrbanStems, offers four to five bouquets each month (right now it’s the Pennsylvania Avenue Collection, guest-designed by former White House Florist Laura Dowling). Bicycle couriers deliver the arrangements less than an hour after they are ordered.The company has already expanded to New York City, Baltimore and just last month, to Philadelphia.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

41


LIFESTYLES

%.EYRXMR +)36+)83;2 ASTHEWEATHERCOOLSDOWNLAYERUPWITHCOMFORTABLEANDCHICPIECES PERFECTFORWEEKENDSTROLLSAROUNDTHEDISTRICT PHOTOGRAPHYTONYPOWELL|WWWTONY-POWELLCOM WARDROBEPOLLYSPADAVECCHIA|THEARTISTAGENCY MAKEUPANDHAIRCAROLAMYERSASSISTEDBYSHERLEYZ/|WWWCAROLAMYERSCOM MODELSAUDREYZANTZINGER|THEARTISTAGENCY EDITORIALDIRECTIONCATHERINETRIFILETTI EDITORIALASSISTANTKYLEKERCHAERT SPECIALTHANKSTOROSEWOODHOTEL STQSTNW


KIT AND ACE Burbank cashmere shawl ($198), Kit and Ace, 4838 Bethesda Avenue #16, Bethesda Row, Bethesda, Md., 844-5486223; T BY ALEXANDER WANG bicolor cropped button down shirt ($250), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; CORTLAND PARK Mairead cashmere v-neck sweater ($330), Tuckernuck, 1053 Wisconsin Avenue NW,; ANN MASHBURN wide leg crop pant ($195), Ann Mashburn, 3251 Prospect Street NW, 202-864-0367; ANN MASHBURN colorblock tote ($425), Ann Mashburn, 3251 Prospect Street NW, 202-864-0367; ANN MASHBURN wrap ankle boot ($595), Ann Mashburn, 3251 Prospect Street NW, 202864-0367; TABANDEH Gas Bijoux hoop earrings ($185), Tabandeh, 5300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, AMC Mazza Gallerie, 202-244-0777.


HUGO BOSS Diganira dress and Cipeila jacket; Hugo Boss CityCenterDC 1054 Palmer Alley NWWashington, D.C 20001 (202) 408-9845; STUART WEITZMAN nudist song patent heels ($398) Bloomingdales 5300 Western Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, (240) 744-3700. TIFFANY & CO. Schlumberger multiplication earrings in 18k yellow gold with diamonds ($17,500) . Tiffany & Co, 5481 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815 (301) 657-8777.

BALENCIAGA sporty vareuse hoody ($755), Hu’s Wear, 2906 M Street NW, 202-3422020; ANN MASHBURN Susie tunic ($295), Ann Mashburn, 3251 Prospect Street NW, 202-864-0367; ZADIG & VOLTAIRE Pharel deluxe leather leggings ($798), Zadig & Voltaire, 983 Palmer Alley NW, CityCenterDC, 202-789-8700; VINCE Pierce perforated slip on sneakers ($195), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; CÉLINE Shadow acetate sunglasses ($435), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240744-3700; TABANDEH gold bracelet with double pearl closure ($170), 5300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, AMC Mazza Gallerie, 202-244-0777.


FILSON wool Watch cap ($45), Filson, 1534 14th Street NW, 202-759-9570; FILSON lightweight Alaskan guide shirt ($115); Filson, 1534 14th Street NW, 202759-9570; ZADIG & VOLTAIRE Sydney deluxe leather overalls ($830), Zadig & Voltaire, 983 Palmer Alley NW, CityCenterDC, 202-789-8700; KIT AND ACE Cloud cashmere sweater ($348); Kit and Ace, 4838 Bethesda Avenue #16, Bethesda Row, Bethesda, Md., 844548-6223; JIMMY CHOO Andie round sunglasses ($460), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240744-3700; TABANDEH Samira13 double rose gold and cubic zirconia ring($235), 5300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, AMC Mazza Gallerie, 202-244-0777.


PARKER Cooper leather jacket ($610), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; LONGCHAMP suede lambskin and dyed rabbit fur dress ($1505), Longchamp, 990 I Street NW, CityCenterDC, 202-842-0625; LONGCHAMP Le Pliage Héritage small handbag ($895), Longchamp, 990 I Street NW, CityCenterDC, 202-842-0625; AQUATALIA Geena weatherproof mid calf boot ($495), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; TABANDEH ribbed cuff ($155), Tabandeh, 5300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, AMC Mazza Gallerie, 202-244-0777.


TOSS DESIGNS plaid Scotland wrap ($88), Tuckernuck, 1053 Wisconsin Avenue NW,; FILSON crewneck guide sweater ($275), Filson, 1534 14th Street NW, 202-759-9570; MAJE Jema belted leather skirt ($545), Bloomingdales, 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., 240-744-3700; TABANDEH Ima gold leaf cuff ($355),Tabandeh, 5300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, AMC Mazza Gallerie, 202-244-0777. Shot at Café Milano, Georgetown

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| S U M M E R     | washingtonlife.com

47


LONGCHAMP velvet pants ($290), Longchamp, 990 I Street NW, CityCenterDC, 202-842-0625; ANN MASHBURN boatneck sweatshirt ($195), Ann Mashburn, 3251 Prospect Street NW, 202-864-0367; ZADIG & VOLTAIRE Lena Clous boots ($528), Zadig & Voltaire, 983 Palmer Alley NW, CityCenterDC, 202-789-8700; TABANDEH Pau Hannelio turquoise necklace ($890), Tabandeh, 5300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, AMC Mazza Gallerie, 202-244-0777; TABANDEH Samira13 double armor black ring ($195), Tabandeh, 5300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, AMC Mazza Gallerie, 202-244-0777. Shot at The Rye Bar, Rosewood Hotel, Georgetown

48

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| S U M M E R     | washingtonlife.com


N / NICHOLAS dress ($529), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Avenue, FILSON logger cap MD ($45),20815, Filson,(301) 1534 65214th Chevy Chase, Street NW, 202-759-9570; VINCEclutch boy 2250; HALSTON HERITAGE blazer ($545), Vince, Palmer Alley NW, ($345) and SJP 1093 Sarah Jessica Parker CityCenterDC, 202-730-0157; ZADIG & pumps ($560), Bloomingdales, 5300 VOLTAIRE Tanael scarf ($198), Zadig & VolWestern Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; taire,TIFFANY 983 Palmer Alley NW, CityCenterDC, & CO. Enchant scroll earrings 202-789-8700; RAG & diamonds BONE Hudson long platinum withHOFFMAN ($11,000), ON in EMMA: MARA patterned sleeve tee ($150), Bloomingdales, 5300 Tiffany & Co., Tiffany & Co., 5481 Wismonokini ($253) and KATE SPADE Cameron Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md.,20815, 240consin Ave,bag Chevy Chase, MD Street Blakely ($378) Bloomingdale’s 744-3700; KENNETH COLE Kalvin suede (301) 657-8777; CARTIER Paris NouTysons Corner Center, 8100 Tysons Corner slip on McLean, sneakers ($130), Bloomingdales, velle Vague Va., Delicate white gold and Center, 703-556-4600. 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy diamond necklace ($16,300) andChase, LOVE Md., 240-744-3700; Verdugo ultra in whitePAIGE gold, pave diamonds ON bracelet ERIC: MORGENTHAL FREDERICS skinny coated jeans ($219), Bloomingdales, and ceranic ($43,700), Cartier, 5471B Hustler hand-crafted Japanese titanium 5300 Western Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md., Wisconsin Chevy Chase,CityMD sunglasses ($495), Morgenthal Fredrics, 240-744-3700. 20815, (301) 654-5858 CenterDC, 941 H St. NW, 202-204-3393.


LIFESTYLES | WATCHFEATURE

TRAIN INSPIRED TIMEPIECES Collector’s edition watches commemorate the B&O Railroad and Webster C. Ball. BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

Royal Blue train

The “Royal Blue” ($1,999) has a simple, clean dial design and genuine alligator strap.

B

efore the world had cell phones and wristwatches became a fashion statement, train conductors used pocket watches to keep time. The only catch was that, in the late 19th century, universal time zones hadn’t yet been created, leaving railway operators to rely on individual versions of time based on the position of the sun. As the U.S. railroad system expanded over greater distances, the variable timekeeping system became increasingly precarious. The ongoing issue came to a head in 1891 when a two-train collision in Ohio left several people dead. In response to the incident, Webster C. Ball, a jeweler from Cleveland, was enlisted by a consortium of railway operators to set up a system for accuracy. Ball took his position as “Chief Time Inspector” very seriously and developed strict criteria to ensure the safety of railways. Eventually, he began to manufacture his own product, which became known as the Cadillac of pocket watches. His “RR Standard” would dictate the industry guidelines until

50

Congress officially adopted time zones in 1918. Steve Hammalian of Little Treasury Jewelers in Gambrills, Md., was fascinated by the history and the important relationship between watches and trains. After seeing some historic Ball watches on display at the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Museum in Baltimore a decade ago, he pitched Ball Watch Company on a collaboration. Together they created the “First Mile” watch honoring the first mile of commercial track in the U.S., built by the B&O Railroad in 1827 and commencing at the current museum roundhouse. The success of the limited edition design inspired Little Treasury and Ball to team up again to create a new, high-quality Swiss-made timepiece called “Royal Blue.” 233 pieces were manufactured to represent each mile on the B&O which ran between Washington, D.C. and New York. The watch design specifically recognizes the luxurious Royal Blue train that was popular with President Franklin D.

Roosevelt and other esteemed Washingtonians. Hammalian says that the Royal Blue has created quite a stir among watch enthusiasts because of the rich history attached to it. “Anybody can go down the street every few miles and buy themselves a Cartier or a Rolex, but it’s the story behind a brand that makes these watches unique and desirable for many.” Little Treasury Jewelers; 2506 New Market Lane, Gambrills, Md. ;410-721-7100.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Royal Blue case bac

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

PHOTOS COURTE SY OF THE B &O RAILROAD MUSEUM AND LITTLE TREASURY JEWELERS

Passengers lounge in the Royal Blue’s observation coach


LIFESTYLES | JEWELRY

KATE SPADE NEW YORK Trellis blooms large brooch ($148); Kate Spade, CityCenterDC, 202.408.7598 BULGARI Black sapphire and onyx crystal and diamond serpent watch (price upon request); Bulgari, Friendship Heights 202.559.2001

OSCAR DE LA RENTA ‘Riva’ Diamond Stacking Ring ($425); Cusp, Georgetown 202.625.0893

COACH ‘Daisy rivet choker necklace ($395); Coach, Georgetown 202.333.3005

LANA Elite Jetset Crystal Remix Earrings ($1,795); Cusp, Georgetown 202.625.0893

'VYWLMRKSR 'V]WXEPW Match cocktail ensembles with crystal pieces for added glam BY C AT H E R I N E T R I F I L E T T I

TIFFANY & CO. Paloma’s sugar stack ring ($3,650); Tiffan& Co., Chevy Chase 301.657.8777

MONICA RICH KOSANN Small yellow gold carpe diem necklace ($2,250); Liljenquist & Beckstead, Fairfax Square 703.749.1200

ROBERTO COIN Ring with diamonds and rock crystal ($4,200); Little Treasury Jewelers, Gambrills, Md. 410.721.7100

JEAN PAUL GAULTIER FOR ATELIER SWAROVSKI ‘Riva’ Diamond Stacking Ring ($1,250); Swarovski, Union Station 202.898.6349

TORY BURCH Triangle statement bracelet ($275); Tory Burch, Georgetown 202.337.1410

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

51


LIFESTYLES | PERFECTPITCH

BEL CANTO

Superstar tenor Lawrence Brownlee is set to take center stage in Washington National Opera’s production of Gaetano Donizetti’s ‘The Daughter of the Regiment.’ We chatted with Brownlee, 43, about his upcoming performances, his passion for singing and using his voice for social change. BY PAT R I C K D. M C C OY

WL: With your rigorous performance schedule, how do you make sure that each unique opera character maintains their distinct qualities? LB It helps when you can understand the vision of the production. It is important to live within what you’re given and let your performance be informed by your colleagues, the costumes, set, direction, etc. Currently, I am in San Francisco singing “Don Pasquale” and the cast is quite good. I feel that I have been successful in making my Ernesto different than other roles I’ve played, but it is because I have used all that I stated above to do so. Playing off my colleagues and living in the moment and looking for nuances to make the character I am playing and situation as real as possible. WL: You have sung this particular role of Tonio in Donizetti’s “The Daughter of the Regiment” numerous times, including at the Metropolitan Opera. How will you bring a fresh interpretation to the role here in Washington? LB What I try to bring is youth and energy. I am 43 years old, but Tonio must be seen

52

as youthful and exuberant. One of my most successful and earliest performances of Tonio was at the Hamburg State Opera with my good friend Alexandra Kurzak, who was a fantastic Marie. Most people know how athletic I like to be, so I suggested toe touches, crawling on the ground, climbing things on stage, etc. The director loved it. It is hard for me to play him without being active. Those performances were extremely successful and I look forward to bringing that same energy to WNO. WL: Not only does your passion for music take center stage, but your zeal for a variety of causes does as well. Talk to us about autism and the role that your voice has played in informing the public. LB I am the proud father of an autistic child, Caleb, who is 6 years old. He is my pride and joy. I have linked up with Autism Speaks to promote autism awareness. It is close to my heart and I want to use my voice to bring awareness. I have a learned a lot myself and I am hopeful for the future.

WL: In addition to your classical singing, you have explored the performances of spirituals. Would you view this as a return to your musical core, and do you see spirituals get the same respect that the concert repertoire does? LB Yes, I do feel it as a return to my musical core. Perhaps the performance practice [classical singing] is different, but the material is the same. My mother sang “Sinner Please Don’t Let This Harvest Pass” but it was a different version. Still, all of our music is steeped in the spiritual tradition. Many of my African American predecessors sang spirituals, and I want to be a link that carries on those traditions. I do feel that it should be respected and considered concert repertoire. It is folkloric, historic and unique to the American experience. It should be presented in formal recitals. WL: You’re performing at Carnegie Hall in December for a special evening of gospel music. How did this come about? LB We were approached by the producer of that evening who had an idea of me performing with those greats. They know that gospel is in my background so he wanted to do something creative. I look forward to performing alongside those iconic singers, and maybe show off my gospel chops. WL: If you could be at the center of a “dream” musical project, what would it be? LB I want to do a tribute album for people like Nat King Cole, Sammy Davis Jr., Johnny Mathis, etc. — a crossover album that could tour widely — perhaps in the realm of “Pavarotti and Friends.” Tenor Lawrence Brownlee sings the leading role of Tonio in Donizetti’s “The Daughter of the Regiment” Nov. 12-20 at the Kennedy Center.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

P H OTO BY FA D I L B E R I S H A

WASHINGTON LIFE: You are one of the nation’s leading operatic tenors. When did you catch the ‘opera bug?’ LAWRENCEBROWNLEE The bug wasn’t there until people started to encourage me to sing opera in my late teens. I was told by a few that they heard something special in my voice and it was suitable for opera. I’ve been blessed with teachers who helped me to far exceed my dreams. My friends, family and supporters back home are all proud of me and try to support me in every way they can. Some travel to see me perform, but many of them marvel that a young man from Youngstown, Ohio has made it to the most important stages of the world.


LIFESTYLES | TRAVEL

APPALACHIAN VACATION Experience the arts and culture of Virginia’s Blue Ridge BY ERICA MOODY

D

rive four hours southwest of Washington, through the scenic Shenandoah Valley, and you’ll arrive in Roanoke, Va. Many know this cultural hub for its history and hiking, but it also boasts a renowned symphony and world-class museum featuring works by some of the country’s top artists. Soon, you’ll be able to discover all this via a direct train departing from Union Station; Amtrak service is scheduled to begin next year to a new and convenient downtown station. Here’s what to do on your Blue Ridge Mountains getaway: >>

1

2

3

4

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

SYMPHONY AND THEATER

Those looking for nighttime cultural activity will be impressed by the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra, the largest professional orchestra in western Virginia. Eleven performances each season include many with the Roanoke Symphony Chorus, along with three “Holiday Pops” concerts. Catch shows like “The Odd Couple” and Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas” downtown at the newly renovated Mill Mountain Theatre, a charming venue that has been part of the city’s cultural scene for more than 50 years.

ART & ARTISANS

A unique mix of local talent (including craftsmen, fine artists, photographers and printmakers) are represented in the dozens of galleries and studios of walkable downtown Roanoke. The city nurtures its cultural scene, and artists across the country have relocated to the area for the vibrant arts community and the opportunity to make a living with their craft. Other artists like ambidextrous painter Erik Fitzpatrick have been in the area their entire lives and have no plans to leave; his studio is worth visiting for its eclectic decor alone. The prestigious Taubman Museum of Art (1) features regional talent plus exhibitions of prominent 19th- and 20th-century American artists including Norman Rockwell. Railway history buffs will appreciate the O. Winston Link Museum (2) devoted to the works of an artist who pioneered night photography and recorded the last days of steam locomotive railroading in his sound recordings and haunting black-and-white images. Meet the stars of the DIY Network’s “Salvage Dogs” (including three friendly Labrador Retrievers) at the expansive Black Dog Salvage (3), a shop created with the idea of preserving Virginia’s architectural past. You can spend hours perusing vintage finds in this one-of-a-kind shop, including old industrial mantels, doors and beautiful stained glass.

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

BOTETOURT COUNTY

Small town charm meets big-time talent in nearby Botetourt County, a short drive from Roanoke. Stop at the gallery of Jake Cress in Fincastle (his house also functions as a onebedroom bed-and-breakfast, if you’re lucky enough to secure a spot). View his clever woodwork and you’ll see why the Smithsonian added one of his whimsical handcrafted chairs to its permanent collection. Other notable studios include that of Ed Bordett, a serigraphy specialist whose gallery is housed in an auto dealership from the 1930s. You’ll want to have lunch at the historic White Oak Tea Tavern for tea by the fire and amazing homemade chicken salad. WHERE TO STAY

The luxurious Tudor-style Hotel Roanoke (4), dating to 1882, is one of the last surviving railroad hotels, a National Historic Landmark conveniently located near all the downtown shops, restaurants and museums. It’s also a bargain, with rates starting at $119. The antique-filled lobby takes you back in time, and the French-inspired Southern cuisine will nourish you after an art-filled weekend excursion. To plan your stay, go to visitroanokeva.com.

53


WASHINGTON S O C I A L  D I A R Y overthemoonďš?michelinguidelaunchpartyďš?wolftrapballandmore!

Jean-Marie Fernandez, Amy Baier and Cindy Jones at the party for author and actress Jill Kargman. (Photo by Tony Powell)

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

55


AROUNDTOWN

Andy’s Muse Andy Warhol and Ina Ginsburg’s unique friendship continues to impact the Washington art scene. BY DONNA SHOR

W

hat Washington woman, who, with pluck and foresight, escaped the terror and destruction of World War II to create an estimable new life here, and while so doing bestowed a legacy to enrich the lives of present and future generations? The answer: Ina Ginsburg. With vision and tireless effort, Ina created programs that have marked some of our most prestigious institutions — and had a grand time doing it. Some of the organizations that felt her impact are the Washington National Opera, the American Film Institute, the Federal Reserve Board and the Kennedy Center — which held a memorable celebration of her life upon her passing two years ago. She would have been 100 years old on October 10 of this year. It wasn’t easy for her to arrive here, in any sense. Viennese-born Ina managed to get a French passport and a Mexican transit visa to reach a Portuguese cargo ship slated for a stop in New York. Then, disaster! The ship was ordered to return its passengers to Europe. Only the intercession of first lady Eleanor Roosevelt finally let them disembark on U.S. soil. Ina supported herself as an actress, appearing with a Baltimore troupe and at Washington’s National Theatre. She returned to Europe after the war, hoping to reclaim family property. There she met David Ginsburg, a Washington lawyer then serving as an official under Gen. Lucius D. Clay Sr., who was in charge of the postwar U.S. occupation. They married, eventually settling in Georgetown, where they raised three children: Jonathan, of Fairfax County, Susan, of Alexandria, and Mark, of Berlin, Germany. The Ginsburgs divorced in 1985; David

56

Ina Ginsburg contemplates her portrait by Andy Warhol at the Federal Reserve Board’s art gallery six weeks before her death at the age of 98. (Courtesy of Mark Ginsburg)

Ginsburg died in 2010. Their children grew up in an amazing atmosphere. Their house, handsomely restored under Ina’s watchful eye, was always filled with newsmakers: senators, Supreme Court justices, artists and ambassadors, musicians, Cabinet secretaries, society figures and celebrities — all appreciative of Ina’s f lair, her fine table and the bright conversations around it. There was Andy Warhol, the famous artist and longtime friend, for whose magazine, “Interview,” Ina served as Washington editor. His silk-screen portraits of her are among his iconic works. An arts patron, she became an effective fund-raiser for related causes she believed in. For the American Film Institute she created an entire series of programs, replete with lures of special screenings and embassy events for supporters. Shocked by the bare walls of the stunning Federal Reserve Board building — “The reception room had a still life of a dead fish!”— she suggested that her friend,

Fed Board Chairman Arthur Burns, set up a fine arts advisory board for the entire complex, which he did; so far resulting in over 150 exhibitions supported by private funding. To mark her mother’s 100th year, Susan Ginsburg invited a small group of Ina’s friends there for a private tour (featuring Warhol’s portrait of Ina) with Fine Arts Program Director Stephen Phillips followed by lunch and reminiscences in a quiet corner at Cafe Milano. Guests included Aniko Gaal Schott, Willee Lewis, Kevin Chaffee, Mario Velasquez, Dean Reed and Berta Brenha. Ina was unique. The avant-garde didn’t faze her. She lived it. While she had closets full of the classic greats — Dior, Courrèges — she was no clotheshorse. Ina was the epitome of chic, not as a “style-setter,” but as style itself, one that was inimitably her own. Her impeccable taste set the bar quite high. We are all the richer for her time spent among us.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Tony Burchard, Patrick Christiansen, Shaza Andersen and Inova CEO Knox Singleton

Bill DuBose and Linda Monson

WL SPONSORED

INOVA HONORS DINNER Ritz Carlton, Tysons | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Nina Totenberg and David Reines

HEALTHBENEFITMore than 500 guests turned out for Inova’s annual honors dinner where physicians, nurses and hospital professionals joined Inova Health Systems CEO Knox Singleton and event chairmen Gary and Tina Mather to celebrate their ongoing dedication to the healthcare system. A silent auction benefiting Inova’s research and community outreach programs helped raise more than $600,000, including more than $50,000 for its Nursing Stars Program. One lucky guest snagged a South African safari for two. DC Fusion entertained with R&B tracks while football fans scrambled to get a high five from a very special guest, Washington Redskins linebacker Ryan Kerrigan. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Gary and Tina Mather with Loring Flint

Ashley Dabbiere and Alfred Khoury

Redskins’ Ryan Kerrigan and Jessica Mazura

Michael Schoenfeld and Marc Andersen

Lauren Peterson

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Ashley Baker and Catalina Bernier

John and Bonny Fitzgerald 57


OVERTHEMOON

Horses and Books Highlights of the fall season include a muddy running of the Virginia Fall Races and a toney party for an English lord. BY VICKY MOON

W

eather of any type never gets “Now that Churchill will be on the in the way of a good time in new £5 note, we thought it would Middleburg. Ninety degrees in the be fun to host a reception,” Danielle shade? The Upperville Colt & Horse Bradley said. Show will still go on. Twenty degrees For history buffs who would like to and two feet of snow in February? The move to the country, Jim Thompson cows will get their hay. Drenching of Washington Fine Properties in downpours from the remnants of Middleburg has listed “Keene House.” Hurricane Matthew? They’ll still be off Situated on the outskirts of the historic and running at Glenwood Park. village of Unison, the circa-1855 Such was the case for the 62nd Georgian Revival residence was once running of the Virginia Fall Races used as a Confederate Army hospital. recently. The grounds were sticky and It boasts four bedrooms, 3.5 baths greasy with mud.The jockeys were wet, and six fireplaces, which were once but the spectators such as Jacqueline considered a barometer of one’s wealth. Ohrstrom, Stephen Price and Dorsey All six have endured much updating deButts carried on with Bloody Mary’s and renovation over the years. There and other libations. All the horses wore are heart pine floors throughout, saddlecloths bearing the catchphrase magnificent porches for entertaining “Welcome to Middleburg.” and sleeping and a small guest cottage. Jockey Bernard Dalton parted ways with his mount Ryvit in the sixth race at the Virginia Fall Races in Middleburg. Both were uninjured. This slogan transformed into an The 21-acre property also has a bank (Middleburg Photo) ironic moment in the sixth race, the barn of course. All for $2.1 million. $15,000 James P. McCormick Memorial, named “Churchill’s Legacy: Two Speeches to Save Welcome to Middleburg. for one of Middleburg’s late, great bon vivants. the World” in which he analyzes the power His daughter, Katherine “Pippy” McCormick, of Sir Winston Churchill’s most famous 1946 who serves on one of the committees, said she speeches and how they propelled the formation missed the action because she was shuttling of the Truman Doctrine, NATO and what officials around in an all-terrain vehicle. would later be the European Union. Jockey Bernard Dalton was between horses The guest list included: Candy and Greg over a big, solid timber fence and got squeezed. Fazakerley, Beatrice and Adie von Gontard, As he landed aboard Irv Naylor’s Ryvit, they Jay Adams, Pat and Don Brennan of nearby started to bobble and Dalton came off. Both “Llangollen” in Upperville, as well as Elizabeth were unhurt and the race was eventually won Locke and John Staelin, who live just up the by Mark Beecher on the Irish bred Rodriguez road from Locksley. owned by Kiplin Hall and trained by William Appointed to the House of Lords by Queen Dowling. Elizabeth II in 1999, Lord Watson has done “The attendance wasn’t bad,” McCormick extensive work in television and media, served said, adding that there were “plenty of horses as president of the Liberal Party in the United in each race.” Kingdom and is High Steward at Cambridge Danielle and Ron Bradley recently hosted University. a reception for 60-plus guests at their Millwood Following his visit to the countryside, Lord estate, “Locksley Manor,” for Lord Watson of Watson went on to speak in Washington at Lord Watson of Richmond (Courtesy photo) Richmond, who spoke about his new book, the 33rd International Churchill Conference.

58

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Nicole Venable, Emil Hill and Majida Turner Misty Copeland, Mickey Mouse and Jocelyn Woods

WL SPONSORED

BOYS & GIRL CLUBS NATIONAL YOUTH OF THE YEAR CELEBRATION National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Manus Cooney and Jack Stahl JB Smoove and Shahidah Omar

EMPOWERINGYOUTHBallerina and Boys & Girls Clubs alum Misty Copeland, Grammy Award winning singer Ashanti and comedian JB Smoove were a few of the big names present at the annual Boys & Girls Clubs of America National Youth of the Year Celebration. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan gave a keynote address about the importance of preparing America’s youth for the future; he spoke to a crowd of BGCA alums including Rep. Steny Hoyer, Sen. Thom Tillis and Rep. Steve Scalise. More than $1.5 million was raised for programs that impact 4 million youth across the U.S. Congrats to Jocelyn Woods who received the honor of Youth of the Year, which comes with $145,000 in college scholarships. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Lynne Lightfoote, Matt Bronczeck and Ashley Taylor Bronczek, Stephanie Strategos Polis and John Polis, Lloyd and Ann Hand Chewbacca

Rep. Steny Hoyer, Paula Faris, Ashanti, Speaker Paul Ryan and Jim Clark

Rep. Maxine Waters

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Tedd Alexander and Rynthia Rost

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Majida Turner and Rep. Mike Turner, Carolyn Turner, Mourad Charine and Rep. Darryl Issa 59


Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, WNO Chairwoman Jacqueline Badger Mars, Natalie Wexler and Jim Feldman

Judy and Dr. Ahmad Esfandiary with Monica Greenberg

Andrew Jorgensen and WNO Artistic Director Francesca Zambello

OPERA SEASON OPENING NIGHT Kennedy Center Roof Terrace Restaurant | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL OPERAINTHEOUTFIELD The opening night of the opera is a perennially glamorous affair — although this year’s event had a major twist. Instead of viewing Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro” from their boxes in the Kennedy Center’s Opera House, many of the company’s top supporters elected to watch the performance via satellite at National’s Park alongside a crowd of 8,000 opera fans. “They were all eating popcorn and it came off beautifully,” WNO Chairwoman Jacqueline Badger Mars raved to guests later at a post-performance cocktail buffet in the Center’s Roof Terrace restaurant. “Everyone laughed and clapped at the right times.” MOZART BATS A THOUSAND: “The families all stayed for the whole thing,” WNO artistic director Francesca Zambello reported. “We’re all so proud of our home team.” VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Artist Brice Marden

Maestro Jim Gaffigan and Kennedy Center President Deborah Rutter

Kristin Lund and Molly Hogan

Micaela Varricchio and Italian Amb. Armando Varricchio Guests mingle on multiple levels at a reopening event for the National Gallery of Art’s East Building

EAST BUILDING PREVIEW The National Gallery of Art | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL STARTINGOVER Guests knew they would experience something spectacular as they flocked to inspect the National Gallery of Art’s newly renovated East Building. An estimated 1,400 mid-level donors, curators and artists turned out for the massive cocktail buffet preview party to exclaim over the changes in the past three years, including a roof terrace and 12,250 square feet of added space that includes eye-popping galleries devoted to the works of Alexander Calder, Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko.

Curator James Meyer

Buck and Sally Chapoton VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

60

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Alison Paley Kieren Emery, Katherine Bradley and Campbell Marshall Jill Kargman and Mary Haft

JILL KARGMAN BOOK PARTY Robert and Mary Haft Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Melissa Moss and Ludmila Cafritz

ONEWOMAN’SQUIRKYLIFEThe creator and star of Bravo’s hit comedy “Odd Mom Out” gloried in the limelight at a party where it wasn’t hard to dispute that her personality matches “Sprinkle Glitter on My Grave,” a book that has been called as “wonderfully indecent as a spring break road trip with your best friend — assuming your best friend is the kind of gal who still wears a motorcycle jacket to pick up the kids at school.” Mary Ha , who hosted the fête with Katharine Weymouth and Molly Elkin, described the guest of honor as “bitingly smart and witty … with brains, heart and humanity” while guests lined up at a special table for inscriptions from the author. “I’m a Kardashian,” Kargman said at one point, “so I’m happy to make it out for either Christmas or Hanukkah.” VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Bill and Dorothy McSweeny Sissy Yates Molly Elkin and Katharine Weymouth

Lisa Brandt Beek, Robert Haft and Evelyn Brandt

Barbara Harrison

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Jennifer Camel-Toueg, Conrad Cafritz and Isabel Ernst

61


Barry Reddler, Sarah Funt, Zelda Heller and Kathy Cuomo

CHRISTIE’S LUXURY SPECIALISTS CONFERENCE

Lynda O’Dea and Karen Hubble Bisbee

Eric Stewart and Katie Zarpas

The Hay-Adams Hotel | PHOTOSCOURTESYOFLONG&FOSTER LUXELIVING Long & Foster Realtors welcomed some of the world’s top producing agents from Christie’s International Real Estate for a lively welcoming reception on the rooftop of The Hay Adams, as Christie’s held its first 2016 Luxury Specialists Conference in Washington. Previously takiong place in Dublin, Paris, London and New York, the two-day conference of networking and luxury real estate forums was held at the Mandarin Oriental for 200 of Christie’s top agents who flew in from Europe and the Americas. The reception was hosted jointly by Christie’s Global CEO Dan Conn, Long & Foster President “Boomer” Foster and and Chief Operating OfficerJeff Detweiler. Long & Foster employs 12,000 of Christie’s 32,000 agents, and Long & Foster last year completed a record $32 billion in transactions VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Kornelia Stuphan

Kirby Mae Been

Jacob Tobia

Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Lea DeLaria and Justin Mikita

Bruce Rohr and June Crenshaw Samira Wiley

HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN Washington Convention Center | PHOTOSBYERINSCHAFF EQUALITYFORALL The Human Rights Campaign National Dinner finds a way to outdo itself year after year, and its 20th anniversary was no different. A sold-out crowd of LBGTQ supporters listened to keynoters ranging from Rep. John Lewis to Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine, who spoke of hope for the future with references to struggles of the past. Charismatic celebrities made light of the red carpet entrance with funny faces and silly poses, setting the tone for the evening. Guest roared when Tony- and Grammy Awardwinning artist Billy Porter premiered his new song “All That Matters.”

Stacey Griffith and Frankie Grande VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

62

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Marianne Malizia and Daniel McGibney

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Writers Charles Bock and Andre Dubus III Event Co-chairwoman Mary Haft with Darryl Carter and Kirsten Pollin

James Alefantis, Pilar O’Leary, Jessica Springsteen, Willee Lewis, Septime Webre and Marc Cipullo WL SPONSORED

PEN/FAULKNER CELEBRATION Folger Shakespeare Library | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL UNEXPECTEDCONFLICT The PEN/Faulkner Foundation’s annual celebration at the Folger Shakespeare Library had unexpected competition this year when organizers learned that their long-scheduled event would take place on the same night as the first presidential debate of the 2016 election. Half the guests stayed for the cocktail reception and readings only — 11 prominent writers delivered short original works on the subject of “Risk” — before heading out to watch Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton clash on TV. Those who stayed put had the distinct advantage of being able to digest their buffet-style dinner in relative peace.

David and Katherine Bradley

Michael Gewirz, Nancy Sidamon-Eristoff, Cleo Gewirz and Simon Sidamon-Eristoff

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Edward and Merasi Dudlik

Ron Jarvis and Robert Rowan

Bayan Sami Abdul Rahman and Mozaffar Shafeie

NATIONAL ORGANIZATION ON FETAL ALCOHOL SYNDROME GALA Ritz-Carlton, Washington | PHOTOSBYTONYBROWN HEALTHYFUTURES Qatari Amb. Jaham Al Kuwari hosted the annual NOFAS International Gala, where guests dined, danced and bid on silent and live auctions to help support those affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Reps. Hal Rogers and Be y McCollum were honored for their bipartisan approach to improve the health, education and economic circumstances of families and reduce the chances of substance-exposed pregnancies. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Anita and Artin Afsharjavan WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

Sariah and Farzad Najam 63


Agatha Aurbach, Michele Oshman, Phyllis Greenberger and Trish Vradenburg

George Vradenburg

Marcia Carlucci and Marlene Malek Gurteen Taylor-Schiavo and Malcolm Ian Cross

OUT OF THE SHADOWS DINNER Ronald Reagan Building | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL INTOTHELIGHTDozens of congressmen, researchers, caregivers and patients gathered at UsAgainstAlzheimer’s third annual dinner to focus on the often-overlooked perspective of caregivers who have to deal with the devastating effects of the disease. In a conversation with NPR’s Diane Rehm, former first lady Laura Bush recounted her mother’s experience acting as caregiver for her father who died from the disease. Rep. Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Kelly Ayo e were presented with the Congressional Champion Award while author Greg O’Brien received the inaugural Bea Lerner Valor Award for his hard-fought battle against Alzheimer’s. The event used the hashtag #WeWontWait to emphasize the urgent need for advanced research. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Diane Rehm and John Hagedorn

Maria Trabocchi and Kimball Stroud

Daniel Lippman and Marissa Mitrovich

Peet’s Coffee & Tea

WL SPONSORED

PEET’S COFFEE & TEA OPENING M and 33rd St. NW | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ

Gerald Baldwin and Elizabeth Ricardo

COFFEECORNER Peet’s Coffee hosted a launch party for the craft company’s newest Washington area location in Georgetown. Guests got a sneak peek of the café on the corner of M and 33rd St. NW and enjoyed Peet’s handcrafted beverages, sampled hors d’oeuvres, and indulged in desserts graciously provided by the brand’s popular neighbor, Georgetown cupcakes. CEO, Dave Burwick, mingled with guests, including Mayor Muriel Bowser, walking them through the perks of the designed space and introducing them to the location’s slow bar where manual brew methods were on display.

Andrea Fernandes , Dave Burwick and Greg Brening VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

64

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


Rep. Robert Aderholt, Joel Wood and Sen. Roger Wicker

Sen. Susan Collins and Amanda Lincoln

Jose Andres and David Guas

Tommy McFly with Dana and James Wood

Rep. Adam Kinzinger, Amy Forester Roberti and Julia Tishman

DINING AWAY DUCHENNE Eastern Market | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ FINDINGTHECURE Members of Congress, chefs and philanthropists gathered at Eastern Market for the 16th annual “Dining Away Duchenne” fundraiser to support research into the world’s leading lethal childhood genetic disease. Event chairman Sen. Roger Wicker joined guests including Sen. Susan Collins and Reps. Tom Emmer, Robert Aderholt and Adam Kinzinger to enjoy a night of delicious cuisine from top chefs who included Jose Andres and David Guas. The Foundation to Eradicate Duchenne was established in 2002 by Joel and Dana Wood with the goal of finding treatments and an ultimate cure for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. The event raised $500,000.

Alex Gleason, Alex Rosen and Maddie Yocum

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Jack and Barbara Nicklaus

Joe Deitch, Lisa Genova and Bob Denson

CREIGHTON FARMS INVITATIONAL BENEFIT

Nick Guyton and Roger Clemens

Salamander Resort & Spa | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Gretta Guyton and Sue Fitzgerald

GOLFFORGOOD Golf legend Jack Nicklaus came to Middleburg for the annual two-day Creighton Farms Invitational, with a benefit held at nearby Salamander Resort & Spa. Esteemed guests from sports and philanthropy including Sheila Johnson, Roger and Debbie Clemens, Vince Coleman, Rollie Fingers and Barbara Nicklaus gathered for cocktails, dinner, a live auction offering spectacular trips and sports memorabilia and an intimate fireside chat with Nicklaus. Proceeds support the Nicklaus Children’s Health Care Foundation and Children’s National Health System.

Vince and Denise Coleman with Rollie Fingers

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

|

N OV E M B E R    

| washingtonlife.com

65


PARTIESPARTIESPARTIES

Exercise Mavens, Civil Rights Activists and Fans of Local Literature VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM!

1

2

6

7

LETELIER-MOFFITT 40TH ANNIVERSARY

XTEND BARRE GRAND OPENING

CARNEGIEINSTITUTEFORSCIENCE(Photos by Kaz Sasahara)

XTENDBARREARLINGTON(Photos by Erin Schaff)

In 1976, an a^ack orchestrated by agents of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet took the lives of activists Orlando Letelier and Ronni Karpen Moffi^ in Washington. Forty years later, their namesake organization celebrated the pursuit of justice for their untimely murders while enshrining their memory as “a symbol of hope for victims of tyranny everywhere.”

The rapidly expanding exercise empire added a third location in the Washington area with the opening of its Arlington studio. The founder of the high-intensity workout, Andrea Rogers, was on hand to teach a class and meet some of her biggest fans. 6. Studio owner Kelly Wilkinson and Xtend Barre founder Andrea Rogers

1. Steven Lapham and Emmanuel Awohouedji

7. A group stretches during an Xtend Barre session.

2. John Cavanagh and Sarita Gupta

3

4

5

9

8

VICKY MOON BOOK PARTY

LAURA GUNN ART SHOW

MARTHACHAPMANRESIDENCE(Photos by Tony Powell)

HIGHERLOGICGROUP(Photos by Erin Schaff)

Friends celebrating Washington Life columnist Vicky Moon’s recent book, “EQUAL Parts: A Tale of Ambition, Politics and Passion Inspired by Actual Events” just couldn’t help trying to guess the identities of the rich, not-so-rich, famous and not-so-famous characters from Richmond, Charlo^esville and Middleburg who populate its pages.

Artist Laura Gunn had the opportunity to show her paintings in the corporate offices of Higher Logic Group, a space uniquely designed by Barbara Hawthorn to host rotating local art exhibits every three-to-four months. In addition to offering employees a refreshing workspace, the installations support Washington’s art community.

3. Martha Chapman, Frank Randolph and Ellen Morrell

8. Renato Miracco and Marta Franche i

4. Vicky Moon 5. Donna Evers3

66

9. Tom Noll, Laura Gunn, Barbara Hawthorn and José Alberto Uclés WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


PARTIESPARTIESPARTIES

Line Dancers, Edible Artists and Tech Entreprenuers VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM!

1

6

2

7

CUISINE DES ARTISTES TECH DAY BY THE BAY

MERIDIANHOUSE(Photos by Erin Schaff)

THEBOWLINGLYESTATE(Photos by Tony Powell) Sean and Kellee Glass hosted their third annual company picnic of sorts for the local tech community at their historic Queenstown estate. Investors, founders and tech executives donned bathing suits to swim, play “placidly competitive” sports like bocce and kickball, jump on a bouncy house and chow down on BBQ fare as they watched the sun set over the Chesapeake.

Local chefs joined forces with 28 artists to create a gastronomical, visual and theatrical “feast for the senses.” Besides inventive cuisine, an old-fashioned cakewalk had guests dancing to ‘80s music as they tromped through the gardens of Meridian House. During the presentation of the 2016 Herb White Award, Abel López was visibly moved as his contributions to the Washington arts community were enumerated by longtime friend and colleague Rebecca Medrano of GALA Hispanic Theatre. 6. Kate Montague Perry, B. Stanley and Abigail Adams Greenway

1. Susanna Quinn, Mark Modica and Elizabeth Thorp 7. Francesca Chilcote 2. John and Anna Mason

3

4

8

5

9

DINE ’N’ DASH

STROUD FOUNDATION HOEDOWN

LEDIPLOMATE(Photos by Joy Asico)

PRIVATEGEORGETOWNRESIDENCE(Photos by Alfredo Flores) Wide-brim hats and cowboy boots were perfect accessories at the third annual Stroud Foundation Hoedown, a lively event that featured bluegrass music from Only Lonesome and a barbecue feast. Proceeds supported local children with learning differences.

Imagine sampling five to eight dishes and four drinks at 30 restaurants in one night. José Andrés’ fourth annual Dine ’n’ Dash delivered exactly that with unlimited food and drink from some of the District’s top chefs and restaurants. The evening raised more than $300,000 for Andrés’ nonprofit, World Central Kitchen.

3. Stephane Carnot, Brooke Stroud Carnot, Shannon Stroud and Lindsay Stroud

8. Chloë Fedyna and Theo Rutherford

4. Barbara Harrison, Alexandra Corriea and Laura Vazquez 5. Neil and Amy Patel

9. José Andrés

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

67


HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandMyWashington

4EVMWMRXLI'SYRXV] Joe Perta fills his ecletic Fauquier County estate with Art Deco Paris flea market finds and a collection of family and friends. BY VIRGINIA COYNE PHOTOGRAPHS BY TONY BROWN


HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

ealth management advisor Joe Perta has some free advice to anyone embarking on a home renovation: buy the furniture first, because if you wait until the work is done you may not have the money left to do so. “It’s crazy, but it’s true,” he laughs, recalling how at the end of a significant overhaul of his hilltop house in Virginia’s hunt country, he felt tapped out. “I was about to move in. I wanted blackout shades in the bedrooms and the woman who came to give me an estimate said it was going to cost $11,000.” d out. I thought, ‘I can’t spend $11, no less “I flipped $11,000.’ So, no shades.” Instead, Perta went online and ordered sleep masks for every bedroom, instructing future guests, “if you can’t sleep, put a mask on.” The story is indeed true – there are no window coverings in the house and a mask is on every bedside table – but the notion that Perta skimped in any way when it came to appointing his weekend escape could not be further from the truth. Adhering to his own counsel, Perta began acquiring items for the house before he moved in, starting with a treasure trove of Art Deco finds he and designer Joe Ireland of J.D. Ireland Interior Architecture + Design purchased at Paris’ Saint-Ouen flea market, and at ateliers outside of the city. Their first acquisition was a set of 16 beautifully restored dining chairs, which Ireland had upholstered in a rich caramel leather. A sideboard, a pair of lamps and an original Jules Leleu chandelier, similar to one Perta had seen and coveted in a Victoria Hagan design book, were also purchased on that trip. What they didn’t find in France was was a dining table that could seat 16 (a Perta must, as he frequently entertains). A more than fitting solution would be found back home, where Perta enlisted French furniture maker Mickael Fonteneau, who is based in Fredericksburg,Va. to

70

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


sheee

PREVIOUS PAGE: (clockwise from top left): The square mirror above the mantel in the living room, as well as the matching chairs flanking the fireplace are from Tone on Tone in Bethesda, Md. The gold leaf bench is a Nancy Corzine piece; Joe Perta’s weekend house in Marshall, Va. sits atop a hill on nearly 50 acres of land; designer Joe Ireland and Perta chat in the kitchen, which features custom white-washed maple cabinetry made by Frenchman Mickael Fonteneau, a furniture maker based in Fredericksburg, Va.; the free standing tub in the master bathroom is a Victor + Albert; a sideboard purchased from 1stdibs.com is topped with a pair of Czech crystal Moser Glass lamps found at GoodWood in the District; Matisse lithographs from the artist’s “Jazz” series hang on the wall. THIS PAGE: (clockwise from top left); The chandelier in the sprawling living room is an authentic Jules Leleu, a renowned Art Deco furniture designer. It was found in the storage room of an atelier outside of Paris; a four poster bed from Dessin Fournir makes a statement in the master bedroom; a sitting area on the second floor offers guests another place to relax; the bedrooms are all numbered to make them easier to find; wood from fallen local oak trees was used to panel the library; dining chairs from a Paris flea market surround a custom table by Mickael Fonteneau, which expands to seat 16.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

make a custom table for him modeled afer a circa 1928 Macassar ebony wood Ruhlman design. The stunning table has several leaves that seamlessly transform it from an eight-seater to one double its size. It’s important to Perta that he be able to accommodate large groups of family and friends, and his home reflects that. Every guest room but one has the same upholstered Charles P. Rogers queen size bed, the same TempurPedic mattress, an en-suite or across the hall bath, and an abundance of towels and toiletries. He’s even marked rooms with red house numbers to make them easier for visitors to find. Half the kitchen has glass cabinet doors to ensure no one every needs to ask where the bowls are, and a full size freezer is stocked with enough food to make breakfast and dinner for nearly two dozen people at any given time. Perta, who lost his partner of 27 years not long before he bought the property, says that prior to moving in he reflected on how he wanted to spend the rest of his life. “When you lose someone, you become very well aware of your own mortality. You don’t live forever. And I figure I have 20 more years,” he says. How do I want to spend those 20 years?” The answer was to be surrounded by people he cares about, not just for 3-hour-dinners, but for long, leisurely weekends where they can go for walks or bike rides together, or simply “bump into each other in the kitchen” after an afternoon of solo reading. When this reporter prepares to leave after touring Perta’s house, he is sitting at his grandfather’s table in the center of the living room, flipping through a book of family photos. He looks up, glances around as the midday sun streams in through the french doors behind him and says with a smile, “ This house makes me happy. Who wouldn’t be happy here?” .

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

71


HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

Pedigreed Architecture Former diplomat Nancy Rubin parts with her residence of 35 years in Kent, a longtime family home in Rosedale changes hands for more than $3 million in Cleveland Park and the classic Georgian Edmund Jennings Lee House sells in Old Town for more than $2.6 million.

Nancy and Miles Rubin sold  CHAINBRIDGEROADNW, their home of 35 years, for $5.7 million to an undisclosed buyer. Mrs. Rubin served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights and worked domestically and internationally with government, the U.N., NGOs and public-private partnerships for more than three decades. Mr. Rubin is an attorney and the founder of Miles Electric Vehicles. The seven-bedroom 1940s Italianate mansion in Kent features beautifully landscaped gardens that are perfect for al fresco entertaining, a large swimming pool and views of Battery Kemble Park. The property was listed by William F. X. Moody, Robert Hryniewicki, Adam Rackliffe and Christopher Leary.

THE DISTRICT The McBride’s sold their former residence,

 ND STREET NW , a crown jewel of the American University Park, for $2.52 million to The Lawrence J. Gianinno Trust with the help of listing agent Anne-Marie Finnell. The iconic 1936 Georgian Colonial

retains the classic grandeur of years past while offering all modern amenities. The six-bedroom house sits on a lush 1/3-acre lot with a luxe outdoor slate terrace. The property also features a gourmet kitchen with a butler’s pantry, a lower-level recreation room and an au pair suite. Washington Fine

Properties’ Kerry Fortune represented the buyer. Washington, D.C. restaurateur and Thievery Cor poration co-founder Eric Hilton purchased CALIFORNIASTREETNW in Kalorama for $2.85 million from Michael

Celia Faulkner Crawford sold  THSTREETNW to to Dr. Lucy and Thaddeus McBride for $3,295,000. Mr. McBride is a partner in the international trade department of the Bass, Berry & Sims law firm while Dr. McBride is on the clinical staff at Sibley Memorial Hospital and a physician with Foxhall Internists. Crawford shared the home with her late husband, Bill Crawford, a retired American career diplomat and expert on the Middle East and Cyprus. The iconic Cleveland Park house is a unique and architecturally significant property that was designed in 1940 by noted Washington architect Waldron Faulkner (Mrs. Crawford’s father), whose family occupied the original Rosedale property. It was enlarged in 1992 by Waldron’s son, Winthrop Faulkner, also an accomplished architect. Its older section is both elegant and charming, boasting three en suite bedrooms, a sitting room, a kitchen and a sweeping great room with two sets of tall French doors opening to a covered loggia and sheltered rear terrace and garden. Washington Fine Properties’ Heidi Hatfield and Anne Hatfield Weir were the listing agents; TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Anne-Marie Finnell was the buyer’s agent.

74

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


A five-bedroom semi-detached 1912 Kalorama townhouse fetched $2.75 million when Daniel and Rachel Kanter purchased  WYOMINGAVENUE NW from Sandra Flickner and Scott Binder. The four-level residence boasts beautiful rear gardens, a luxurious master suite with a walk-in closet and a dressing area with an oversized bath as well as an upper level porch. Jim Bell of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty was the listing agent. DCRE Residential’s Darrell Allison represented the buyer. Sohn and Sylvia Kaser. Sohn is a former Federal

Trade Commission general counsel who now works as a litigator at the Davis Polk law firm; Kaser is a trial attorney with the Department of Justice’s counterterrorism section. The exquisite three-bedroom Beaux Arts residence was built in 1923 and carefully renovated to retain elements of its original grandeur including soaring ceilings, Palladian windows and ornate moldings. It also contains a superb kitchen with granite countertops and custom cherry cabinets, a 780-bottle wine cellar and a private terraced garden. Compass’ Sheila Mooney was the listing agent. Washington Fine Properties’ Roberta Ward was the buyer’s agent. Underwater photographer Wolcott Henry sold VOLTAPLACENW for $2,795,000 to Grace and Peter Baughan with the help of Michael Rankin of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty (who represented both sides of the transaction). The Victorian-era

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

The Edmund Jennings Lee House, a classic four-bedroom Georgian in Old Town Alexandria, sold for $2,675,000. NWASHINGTONSTREET was built in 1801 and has been owned by at least six members of the Lee family. Gen. Robert E. Lee is said to have announced his decision to join the Confederate Army in its massive drawing room when it was owned by his cousin Cassius Lee. Dr. Charles Engh, an orthopedic surgeon, sold the house to Coble LLC. The property features a swimming pool in a walled courtyard garden with a wisteria-covered colonnade. Its original features include ornate 18th-century lock-plates and hand-blown, etched light fixtures that hang from hand-plastered tobacco leaves. Shirley Mattam-Male and Ann McClure of McEnearney Associates Inc. were the listing agents; Karen and Wetherly Barker of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty were the buyer’s agents.

Georgetown residence was built during the last quarter of the 19th century and first served as an officers’ club and later as the District’s 7th precinct police station. Architect Robert Bell led the restoration and construction, converting the original structure into two townhouses but retaining the original façade. This unique property includes a third floor master suite with a cathedral ceiling and spiral staircase leading to a rooftop terrace with panoramic views of Georgetown, a lower level media room and a connecting two-level guesthouse.

a formal study and an additional wing with a mud room, laundry room and game room. The property also features a landscaped patio with a covered porch and swimming pool. Washington Fine Properties’ Susie Maguire was the listing agent. Long & Foster Real Estate’s Hans Wydler was the buyer’s agent.

VIRGINIA Ashley and Alan Dabbiere sold  DOGWOOD DRIVE in McLean to a private trust for $3,114,000. Mr. Dabbiere is a cofounder of AirWatch, a mobile application MARYLAND: company acquired by VMware for $225 million Constance and Hugh Tompkins purchased   in 2014. The 10,000-square-foot Georgian FALMOUTHROAD in Bethesda from Courtney Colonial in Walter Heights boasts five bedrooms and Scott Pastrick for $2.9 million. Mr. Pastrick and six full bathrooms, a gourmet kitchen is president and CEO of Prime Policy Group with seven pairs of french doors, six fireplaces at Burson-Marsteller public relations firm. and elaborate woodwork. The 2001 estate’s The four-level Colonial built in 1967 features exterior features a terrace for al fresco dining, a more than 6,700 square feet of living space that swimming pool, a generous rear garden and a includes a gourmet kitchen and breakfast room, circular driveway.

|  N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

75


HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

PROPERTYLINES JACKIE’S GEORGETOWN ABODE: The former residence of Jacqueline Kennedy at  N STREET NW is now listed at $8,995,000 — down from $10 million earlier this year. The widow of President John F. Kennedy purchased the circa 1794 residence a few weeks after her husband’s assassination in 1963. Former residents include Whitney oil and banking heir, New Republic publisher and onetime KGB spy Michael Straight and his wife Nina Gore Auchincloss Steers Straight (coincidentally Jackie’s stepsister) and its most recent owner the late Yolande Fox, a longtime local socialite who was Miss America 1951. The six-bedroom brick Federal was intended to be Mrs. Kennedy’s permanent home, but she soon relocated to New York City in 1964 with her children in an attempt to live a more anonymous life. Washington Fine Properties’ Nancy Taylor Bubes is the listing agent.

SUPREME COURT JUSTICE’S HOUSE ON MARKET: The former residence of longtime Associate Justice Hugo Black, at  NQUAKER LANE, is listed for $2.3 million in Alexandria. Black served on the Court from 1937 until his death in 1971. The circa-1870 house sits on part of a former defense complex that protected the capital during the Civil War. The historic five-bedroom Colonial features more than an acre of grounds, an underground brick gunpowder magazine, a charming garden terrace, stables and a garage. Donnan C. Wintermute of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage is the listing agent.

HIRSHHORN HOUSE: The former eightbedroom home of Joe and Olga Hirshhorn in Kalorama, just across the street from Mitchell Park at BANCROFTPLACE NW, is on the market for $6,250,000. The 8,000-square-foot residence once housed the couple’s massive collection of 19thand 20th-century paintings and sculptures that eventually formed the nucleus of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Stephen and Alison Adkins last purchased the 1923 neo-Georgian property, whose former owners also include former longtime George Washington University President Stephen Trachtenberg and his wife Francine. Stan Kelly of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty is the listing agent.

76

MCLEAN MANSE: Salvo Beach LLC is selling the 16,500-square-foot mansion at  LANGLEY RIDGE ROAD for $6.95 million. The LLC purchased the eight-bedroom property in 2011 for $4.25 million. Another former owner was Mehmet Gobuluk, president of Tamex, a Great Falls-based restaurant services company. The Italianate residence sits on a very private five acres just off Georgetown Pike and borders a nature preserve. The property boasts two master suites, a great room with a two-sided fireplace, a wine cellar and almost 3,000 square feet of outdoor entertaining space. Grace Albritton of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage is the listing agent. Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@washingtonlife.com.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com


HOME LIFE | OPENHOUSE

Open House Act fast on a custom residence, an historic property and a horse country retreat. EDGEMOOR/BATTERYPARK

FAIRFAXROAD/BETHESDA/MD 

ASKING PRICE: $3,000,000

LISTING AGENTS: This custom residence within walking distance to Metro William F. X. Moody, Robert has wonderful curb appeal, from the crepe myrtle trees Hryniewicki, Adam T. Racklining the front of the property to the motor court with liffe, and Christopher R. two entrances and parking for multiple cars. A spacious Leary, 202.243.1620, marble foyer is a gateway to the 7,950-plus-square-foot WilliamFX.Moody@wfp.com, house. The five-bedroom and five-full-bath beauty also Washington Fine Properties has three half baths and includes an owner’s suite with his and hers baths. There is a library, a central gallery with elevator and a beautiful fold-back staircase, a formal dining room, morning room with fireplace, butler’s pantry, Sub-Zero/ Viking gourmet kitchen with cathedral ceiling and exposed beams plus a screened porch. Multiple doorways from the main level open to a rear garden with a heated swimming pool.The fully-finished lower level has a recreation room, media room and wine cellar.

GEORGETOWN  STSTREETNW/WASHINGTON/DC

This Victorian residence in the East Village of Georgetown, on the coveted upper 31st Street block near Tudor Place and Dumbarton Oaks, has almost 4,000 square feet of remodeled living space featuring careful attention to classic Victorian architectural details. There are four large master suites, a gourmet kitchen, garden and an au-pair suite with a separate entrance. Other touches include painted hardwood floors, 11-foot ceilings, crown moldings and two wood burning fireplaces.

ASKING PRICE: $2,795,000 LISTING AGENT: Adrienne Sazbo, 202.445.0206, Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.

MIDDLETOWNVA  CRESTRIVERDRIVE MIDDLETOWN/VA 

ASKING PRICE: $2,400,000

This Shenandoah retreat includes a residence and LISTING AGENT: detached guest house set on 23 acres overlooking the Ron Mangas Jr., Blue Ridge Mountains and the Shenandoah River. 703.298.2564, Among its many impressive features are a soaring TTR Sotheby’s butterfly roofline and a distinctive central tower that International acts as both a vertical art gallery and a commanding Realty perch offering dramatic views. Surrounded by charming neighboring towns in Virginia’s horse and wine country, this property delivers private tranquility while still providing immediate access to fine dining options and a number of eclectic shops.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

77


MY WASHINGTON Judy Woodruff, Co-Anchor, ‘PBS NewsHour’ BY KEVIN CHAFEE

HOW DOES THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL RACE DIFFER FROM OTHER CAMPAIGNS YOU HAVE COVERED SINCE YOU STARTED DOING THEM IN 1976? There’s nothing like it, not even close. I’m sad to say that the venom, the personal charges, the minimal discussion of real issues are unlike anything we have ever seen before.

2

3

4

82

MY TOP SPOTS The U.S. Capitol For all the dysfunction, I never get tired of visiting that grand building and thinking about what it represents.

DOES THE INCREASING POPULARITY OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND REALITY TV IMPROVE OR MERELY DUMB DOWN AND COARSEN THE WAY POLITICAL NEWS IS EXPERIENCED TODAY? I don’t watch much reality TV and haven’t seen how it adds value to public discourse. Social media is a mixed bag: it gives credence to wild, unsubstantiated charges but also democratizes the process so that more people participate. On balance, the benefits of social media outweigh the negatives.

The Lincoln Memorial and Arlington Memorial Bridge that connects it to Arlington National Cemetery: I see them almost every day on my drive to/from work and am reminded as I cross the Potomac River of what our 16th president meant, his leadership through the Civil War, and the sacrifices made for our Union before then and since by brave men and women who loved this country.

HOW DID GROWING UP AS AN “ARMY BRAT” LIVING IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES INFLUENCE YOUR WORLD VIEW? It opened my eyes, made me more aware that we don’t live in isolation. It made me appreciate how lucky we are to live in the United States, but taught me how important it is that we understand the rest of the world. WHAT STORY OR SCOOP HIGHLIGHTS THE PROUDEST MOMENT OF YOUR CAREER? I’ll name two from the early years: Breaking the story of racial discrimination in public housing in Atlanta in the early 1970’s and covering the 12 days of secret negotiations in 1978 that led to the Camp David Accords between Israel and Egypt: my reporting kept NBC on top of the story. WHO IS THE MOST FASCINATING PERSON YOU HAVE INTERVIEWED OR COVERED AS A JOURNALIST? I have to say how lucky I am to be at the “NewsHour,” where the premium is on giving every interview time, and staying substantive. I’ve interviewed six presidents — all fascinating in their different ways. Probably Presidents Obama and Reagan were most memorable. Two of the most intellectually stimulating people I’ve interviewed were

The National Archives (1) How can you not feel a thrill every time you look at those documents, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution? The National Museum of American History (2) From the Star Spangled Banner that inspired the national anthem, to the history of disabilities in the U.S., I learn something new every time I go. The Newseum helps everyone understand journalism and the essential role of a free press. Seasons restaurant at the Four Seasons Hotel (2800 Pennsylvania Ave. NW) for breakfast meetings. Georgetown Salon and Spa (3) (2715 M St. NW) for a hair blow dry. Dalton Brody (3412 Idaho Ave. NW) for gifts. Best Buns Bread Company (4) (4010 Campbell Ave., Arlington, Va.) for yummy baked goods and perfect coffee. The Kennedy Center all the time but especially when it highlights artists with disabilities.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

PHOTO COURTE SY OF PB S NEWSHOUR; ( 1) PHOTO COURTE SY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS; (2) PHOTO COURTE SY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, (3) PHOTO COURTE SY O F G EO R G E TOW N SALO N ; (4) P H OTO CO U RT E SY O FB E ST BU N S BR E A D CO M PAN Y

1

William F. Buckley Jr. and German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt. Parochially, as a Duke Blue Devil, I loved interviewing Coach K.


Profile for Washington Life Magazine

Washington Life Magazine - November 2016  

Washington Life Magazine - November 2016