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GRAPERUSHThe Power Players in Virginia’s Wine Industry John Kent Cooke, Jean Case, Eric Trump, David Greenhill and Chris Pearmund

John Jordan: The Vintner Changing the Super PAC Game (-2-2+398Iron Chef José Garces wows D.C. EUROPE THIS SUMMER! Off the Grid in Sweden and Greece

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SWIMSUITSTUNNERS on the Potomac River


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SUMMER 2014 EDITOR'SLETTER



Dan Snyder and Matthew McConaughey at Movies with Morris............................................ 

FEATURES

'Oman to East Africa' Exhibition Opening .................

JOHNJORDAN The vintner who is changing the super PAC game .....................................................

INSIDER'SSPOTLIGHT

GRAPERUSHThe power players in Virginia's wine

Newport Jazz Festival Anniversary Party ....................

industry: John Kent Cooke, Jean Case, Eric Trump, David Greenhill and Chris Pearmund ................................

Aniko Schott's Diplomatic Welcome ...........................

Diplomats of Jazz ................................................

COVERSTORY

Embassy Chef Challenge........................................

The Gio Way......................................................

Atlantic Council Leadership Awards ..........................

Children's Hearing and Speech Center Country Barbecue ..............................

LUXURYTRAVELOff the Grid in

ASCAP Foundation Gala .....................................

Lurie Prizes Dinner ..............................................

Sweden and Greece..... .......................................

See Forever Foundation and Maya Angelou's Last Interview.................................

WPAS Gala.......................................................

FYIDC



Marriott Marquis Opening......................................

INSIDER'SGUIDE ..................................... YGLSPOTLIGHTTrevor Frost........................... THEDISHJose Garces of Rural Society ................... THEDISHTom Caulfield of Chubby's....................

LIFESTYLES

E.L. Haynes Toast to Transformation .........................

FASHIONEDITORIALHot Child in the City ... Reed Krakoff Fashion Show at Saks Jandel .................

TRENDREPORTOrange Crush ..................... 

Marina Orth Foundation Benefit..............................

Wydler Brothers' 10th Anniversary............................ Pierre Garcon's "All White" Benefit...........................

Newsbabes Bash with Jill Biden ...............................

WPA Auction .....................................................

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY

Duke Ellington School's Benefit Concert .....................

POLLYWOOD

AROUNDTOWNLadies' Days ......................... 

Parties! Parties! Parties!........................................

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

Newport Preservation Society Reception...................

HOMELIFE

OVERTHEMOONShows and Soirees ...............

INSIDEHOMES Doug Deluca's ode to classic American style ................................ 

Saying 'I Do' to Marriage Equality with Ted Olson ....... DC Vote Three Star Ball ........................................ 

EMBASSYROW

Tudor Place Garden Party .......................................

Diplomatic Gatherings with Austrian Amb. Hans-Peter Manz and more ................. 

Trust for the National Mall Luncheon .......................

FAPE Dinner .....................................................

Zoofari ..............................................................

Elizabeth Drew Book Party .................................... 

JTCC Gala .......................................................

Woodrow Wilson Garden Party ................................

OPENHOUSE Hot Properties ............................  REALESTATENEWS Grande dame of Dupont sells for $20 million ................

MYWASHINGTON Kastles owner Mark Ein.........................................

ONTHECOVER Gio Gonzalez and Lea Moures (Photo by Tony Powell) Gonzalez is wearing a wool sport coat, cotton dress shirt, cotton pocket square and wool pants all from Ike Behar. TOPFROMLEFT "Hot Child in the City" fashion editorial (Photo by Tony Powell. See inside for full crew and shopping credits); Louis and Jill Hengen with Mike Gula at the Woodrow Wilson Garden Party (Photo by Tony Powell); Matthew McConaughey at Movies with Morris (Photo courtesy Washington Redskins); ABOVEREED KRAKOFF"Atlantique" orange mini tote bag ($1,690), www.saksfifthavenue.com.

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T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Nancy Reynolds Bagley EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Anne Kim-Dannibale MANAGINGEDITOR

Alison McLaughlin SENIOREDITOR

Kevin Chaffee ASSISTANTEDITOR

Laura Wainman

COLUMNISTS

Janet Donovan, Roland Flamini,Vicky Moon, Stacey Grazier Pfarr and Donna Shor ART DIRECTOR

Matt Rippetoe CONTRIBUTINGPHOTOGRAPHERS

Tony Brown, Ben Droz, Alfredo Flores, Nick Ghobashi, Vithaya Phongsavan,Tony Powell and Kyle Samperton

PUBLISHER & CEO

Soroush Richard Shehabi ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

John H. Arundel ACCOUNTEXECUTIVES

Kaitlin Froelick and Sheila Menn BOOKKEEPER

Trina Hodges WEBTECHNOLOGIESDEVELOPMENT

Eddie Saleh,Triposs Mihail Iliev LEGAL

Mason Hammond Drake, Greenberg Traurig LLP INTERNS

Alexandra Bayline, Alexandra Decesare, Abby Fricke and Allison Lank

FOUNDER

Vicki Bagley CREATIVE DIRECTOR EMERITUS (*)

J.C. Suarès CHAIRMAN, EXECUTIVE BOARD

Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased


EDITOR’S LETTER

Summer in the City

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here probably isn’t anyone of July-inspired home décor and in Washington who isn’t activities. glad that summer has finally Farther afield, the venerable arrived after a long and harsh winter. Newport Jazz Festival is gearing up Though many have made plans (likely for a new generation of music lovers, during those exceptionally cold just in time to celebrate its 60th year. months) for an early getaway to milder Washington Life music blogger Steve climes, there’s plenty to do right here. Houk talks with festival founder Baseball season is well under way, George Wein and John Hailer (whose and with the Washington Nationals company is a major sponsor) about the leading the National League East enduring cross-generational appeal of division by only half a game (at bebop, jazz and fusion. press time), fans anticipate an intense If you’re experiencing a bad case season. Gio Gonzalez, the team’s of wanderlust this summer, check out star left-handed hurler, graces our our luxury travel guide to off the grid cover this month after just returning hotspots in Sweden and Greece, such Nancy Bagley with the Executive Director of DC Vote, to the starting lineup from his first as Salt & Sill, Sweden’s only floating Kimberly Perry, at the inaugural Three Star Ball, where Nancy was honored with the Democracy All-Star award stint on the disabled list in his sevenhotel, or Fanari Villas set on the cliffs (Photo by Ben Droz) year career. The talented 28-year-old of Ia, a fantastic place to read a book. pitcher spoke movingly about owing much of his success to his Or if you’re feeling local, read up on the newest power players father, who taught him his killer curveball, and the career he in Virginia’s wine country and plan a day trip to any of their would like to pursue when he can no longer deliver a 95-mph picturesque vineyards. fastball. Here’s a hint: his dog is named Stitch after the animated No Washington Life issue would be complete without the best film “Lilo & Stitch.” in party coverage. This month we take you to DC Vote’s inaugural Along with the mercury, the local dining scene is heating up 3 Star Ball, a night of movies with the Redskins’ Alfred Morris with several restaurants on our current “must” list. We’re looking and Matthew McConaughey, Reed Krakoff ’s fashion show at Saks forward to the opening of ” Iron Chef ” Jose Garces’ soon-to- Jandel, the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies gala, open outpost at Loews Madison Hotel. The Philadelphia chef has Tudor Place and Woodrow Wilson House’s garden parties, the already conquered the Latin culinary scene with everything from National Zoo’s Zoofari and many more. authentic Spanish tapas to modern Mexican fare and now adds an Though summer is a quieter time in Washington in terms of Argentine steakhouse to his repertoire with this summer’s opening social gatherings, we look forward to bringing you our in-depth of Rural Society. guide to the upcoming season of balls and galas in our September This issue also takes you inside “Langley Ordinary,” the well- issue. Enjoy summer and stay cool! appointed McLean residence of Doug DeLuca that epitomizes quintessential American charm. The third-generation designer/ builder and founder of Federal Home Co. is a collector of Americana, making our story the perfect inspiration for Fourth Nancy R. Bagley Editor in Chief Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her at nbagley@washingtonlife.com

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FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington

“News for All” Exhibit

NEWSIES

Get Beach Ready at Toka Salon

PEELPOLISHPURIFY

It’s that time of year where weekends are spent lounging at pools, lakes, beaches — anywhere with water to beat the heat. Before you go, just remember that you need to prep, buff and shine your skin. Toka Salon’s “Green Peel” is an herbal take on the chemical peel and contains natural plant ingredients to improve skin texture and treat fine lines, dryness, uneven pigmentation and acne. Those looking for a more luxurious treatment can try the hamam-inspired “Vichy Shower Body Polish” — a full-body exfoliation using a sea-salt scrub combined with essential aromatic oils to hydrate the skin, leaving it smooth and soft. Exfoliation is followed by a Vichy Shower massage treatment, an application of body butter, and a light body massage. Finish your pampering session with a “Purifying Back Facial” designed to remove impurities and restore skin with healing nutrients from the sea. A stimulating mask, brisk exfoliation with a sea-salt scrub and essential oils removes dead skin, cleanses pores, tones, moisturizes and buffs. Locations in Georgetown, Penn Quarter and Alexandria. See website for information on services at various locations. www.tokasalon.com.

PROVISIONSFORFIDO

At the heart of it, the Cheeky Puppy is a love story about a girl who fell head over heels for a boy. Or, should we say head over paws, as this boy happened to be a four-legged, wet-snouted ball of fur. “As a first-time dog owner, I was struck by the lack of fun retail for modern, design-conscious pet lovers,” says Courtney Stamm. She solved the problem herself by opening The Cheeky Puppy as a fun resource for D.C. pet lovers carrying an array of toys, treats, collars and leashes as well as gift, home and lifestyle items. All of Cheeky Puppy’s treats are sourced domestically from small, independent producers and several exclusive lines, including Love Thy Beast, Ware of the Dog, Chloe’s Bakery and Seven Barks, can be found at the store. 1709 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-621-8868, www.thecheekypuppy.com.

Soul Cycle Opening

TOMARKETTOMARKET

FINDYOUR SOUL

Take the idea of a “dinner and a show” to a new level with an exclusive solo piano concert by renowned musician Philip Glass, a Q&A led by author Sam Fromartz and an intimate four-course vegetable-centric dinner by Proof ’s Chef Haidar Karoum. The meal also features favorite wines from Proof owner Mark Kuller’s personal collection and Adam Bernbach of 2 Birds 1 Stone mixing unique cocktails. Proceeds benefit FreshFarm Markets, the nonprofit group that runs 11 producer-only farmers’ markets in Washington, D.C. Sept. 21, 2014, $150 for concert, 6 p.m., First Congregational United Church of Christ, 945 G St. NW. $600 VIP concert and dinner, 8 p.m., Proof, 775 G St. NW. 202-362-8889 Ext 5 for more information

The mere thought of outdoor rides in the sticky, humid weather is enough to make cycling enthusiasts stow their bikes away until September. Enter the indoor cycling craze. This summer, fans of indoor cycling can add the famed Soul Cycle to the list of places to check out as the company opens its first Washington location later this month. The 55-bike studio offers the signature SoulCycle workout and 45-minute full body workout featuring hand weights and core work in a candlelit room, along with a SOUL retail boutique and locker rooms. SoulCycle is also scheduled to open in Bethesda this fall. 2301 M St. NW, 202-659-7685, www.soul-cycle.com

FreshFarm Benefit Concert

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The Cheeky Puppy Opening

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NEWS EUM PHOTO BY JONATHAN THOMPSON/NEWS EUM; CHEEKY PUPPY PHOTO BY CO U RT N E Y STA M M ; F R E S H FA R M A N D SO U LCYC L E P H OTSO CO U RT E SY P H OTOS ;

As the immigration debate wages on, the Newseum and Smithsonian are presenting an exhibit that explores ethnic journalism in America. “One Nation with News for All” combines 60 artifacts from journalists of color struggling to tell their unique stories despite enormous racial challenges. Among the artifacts are Memphis Free Speech publisher Ida B.Wells’ diary, Frederick Douglass’s pocket watch and Benjamin Franklin’s composing stick and lead type used to publish his newspapers. Through Jan. 4, 2015; 555 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.; 202-292-6100; $22.95 adults, $13.95 youth aged 7-18.


FYIDC | YGLSPOTLIGHT

TREVOR FROST Photographer, Eddie Bauer Adventure Guide and National Geographic Young Explorer TEXT AND PHOTOS BY TREVOR FROST

Senior traditional owner Terry Gandadilla walks the Jankawa sisters songline across a floodplain in Arnhem Land, top end, Northern Territory, near Meremba Outstation, on the Murgakhala River. The song explains the journey the three Jankawa sisters took across the earth as they sung it into existence. The songs are not only a way of keeping ancestors and spirits happy; they allow a songman to travel through the country from sacred sites, usually places where where food and water can be found.

Trevor Frost

Washington Life’s 2013 Young & The Guest List cover model travels all over the world for National Geographic. Here is one of his postings from the field. long the monsoon-swept coast of northern Australia is Arnhem Land, a wild piece of earth slightly larger than the state of Indiana. Home to some 17,000 aboriginal people, collectively known as the Yolgnu, it is one of the more culturally and ecologically intact places on the planet. I first visited in July of 2013 and spent my days with aboriginal elders and senior song men who took me on journeys by foot to re-trace their songlines, invisible pathways upon the landscape that connect sacred sites. I wanted to explore whether the songs, like a compass, provide them with clues to find the sacred sites, which are often hidden in dense forests amid rugged, rocky terrain. I found out that the songs do indeed help them find their way, that the words of the song describe the landscape, and the melodic contour of the song corresponds to the topography. With the support of Eddie Bauer, I will to return to Arnhem Land in 2014 for my project, “Dead Reckoning: The Last Navigators.”

A

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Bob Burruwal, senior traditional owner and songman, touches Gungura, or willy willy, the wind dreaming sacred site.

Otto Campion Bulmaniya, senior traditional owner and songman, teaches his son, Levi, how to paint his body with white clay for walking and singing the morning star songline.


FYIDC | THEDISH

IT’S A CHEF’S WORLD Celebrity chef José Garces comes to Washington this summer to open Rural Society. B Y L A U R A WA I N M A N

José Garces (Photo by Daniel Krieger)

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hese days it seems impossible to walk a block without seeing a restaurant attached to the names of José Andrés, Richard Sandoval, Bryan Voltaggio, Spike Mendelsohn or Mike Isabella. While certainly not the only “big name” chefs in town, each owns three or more local restaurants and seems to have achieved a status where everything they touch turns to gold.When news leaks that one of them is opening a Washington outpost, the buzz is often more about the man behind the food than the food itself, thus increasing the chef-driven culture of Washington’s food scene. Last year, Philadelphia’s Stephen Starr made a splash with Le Diplomate, and this summer the District welcomes another celebrity chef from Philly— 2010 Iron Chef winner José Garces who will be opening Rural Society, an Argentine Steakhouse, on July 3 in the Loews Madison Hotel. “There is a bit of a funny back-story as to how this steakhouse came about,” Garces says. “I had been looking to do a concept in the Washington market and had been developing an Argentine steakhouse for quite some time when the Loews Madison team approached me about partnering together on their new restaurant. When we met with Mr. Tisch and I pitched my steakhouse idea, he immediately loved it because in the very first hotel he opened in Miami in the 1950s, there had been an Argentine steakhouse called Gaucho Room. It lined up so well that the concept I pitched was already near and dear to him.” Garces, who already helms more than a dozen Latin restaurants in five cities, spent 10 days eating his way through Argentina in January to prepare for Rural Society. He encountered everything

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It is important to Garces that the majority of his menu be cooked over solid fuels (Photo by Daniel Swartz)

from pickled veal tongue and octopus carpaccio to empanadas, mini asada starters, sweetbreads and Italian-influenced pasta dishes. Many of these dishes will make an appearance at Rural Society, including a classic Argentine pasta section featuring dishes such as sorrentinos — ham and cheese stuffed raviolis. Garces’ found his most memorable dish at a Uruguayan winery where grilled Pamplona pork tenderloin was stuffed with sharp provolone and sweet peppers. “It was probably the most juicy and succulent thing I’d ever eaten,” he recalls. Aware that Washington is already home to a bevy of steakhouses, Garces knows he has to work very hard to make Rural Society stand out in the crowd. Cooking tools are vital to maximize existing flavors, and he’ll be using a 9-foot wood-burning grill placed right in the middle of the dining room. A wood-burning oven will also be part of the kitchen so that most menu items can be cooked on solid fuels. He says he is also importing wood charcoal with red oak from Argentina. Garces admits he has not had ample opportunity to sample current Washington restaurant fare as much as he would like although his current favorites include Bourbon Steak, Le Diplomate and Big Ben’s Chili Bowl. He says he is keeping a close eye on several local chefs for inspiration. “José Andrés blazed a path for a lot of chefs in the Latin free world,” Garces adds. “He has always been an inspiration for me on the Spanish side of things and I respect what he is doing. But I also keep my eye on Michel Richard, Robert Wiedmaier and Mike Isabella. I like to check in to see what those guys are doing from time to time.”

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FYIDC | THEDISH

SUMMERROADTRIP A quest for the best BBQ outside the beltway leads to Chubby’s BY DONNA DREJZA | PHOTOS BY SAM YU

Chubby’s famous baby back ribs

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ith Washington about 60 miles in the rear view mirror, I pulled up to the cobalt blue rambler housing Chubby’s southern-style barbecue, home to one of the high priests of American barbecue. I surveyed the expansive menu of bellybusters: baby back ribs, chicken, beef, pork belly, brisket, pork loin, corned beef and pulled pork. You name it, they’ve smoked it. Combined with offerings of burgers, catfish, chili, fried bologna and honey-fried chicken, it was impossible to decide on anything. My waitress suggested I try a platter of ribs, brisket and pulled pork, at $23.95, which I paired with sides of coleslaw and potato salad. Just as I was about to dive in to the savory mountain before me, I spotted owner Tom Caufield walking in. He looked more like a yachtsman than the owner of a gut-busting barbecue joint named “Chubby’s.”When asked, he laughed. “Actually, my daughter made up the name,” he said. Opened in 2002, Chubby’s won national acclaim as one of the nation’s top 50 barbecue restaurants in 2006, profiled in the book “Killer Ribs” by New York culinary writer Nancy Davidson.Another definitive guide,“Road Food,” praised Chubby’s on a list of “The Nation’s Top

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Chubby’s Barbeque owner Tom Caulfield

100 Barbeque Places.” His restaurant was also singled out as one of “Maryland’s Best” in a publication by the Maryland Municipal League, which chose Chubby’s as their top pick in the barbecue category. The national acclaim piqued the curiosity of more than a few barbecue purists. Caulfield said he once received a standing ovation from 51 medal of honor winners at a function he was catering. A couple once drove from Utah to Emmittsburg, just for the ribs, retuning for lunch the next day before heading back to Utah. Last year, Chubby’s received a visit from Chris Santos, a judge on the Food Network’s “Chopped.” The meal must’ve made quite the impression considering that Santos left a $100 tip on a $133 bill. Santos returned a week later with five executive chefs visiting Washington, including one from The White House where he was cooking the next day. The group ordered plates of beef brisket, fried bologna sandwiches, pulled pork and sides of potatoes, beans and cole slaw. When asked if he was making any plans to change the place, Caulfield responded without hesitation: “I have plans not to change … Like the parking lot, I want everything to look a

little beat up.” Half joking, he added, “Here, the customer is usually wrong.” He clearly wants the focus to be on his food. When asked about the art of barbecue, Caulfield became even more passionate. “It’s all about chemistry and it’s all about internal temperature,” he enthused. All of his meats are top of the line and cooked slowly, allowing the meat to naturally fall off the bone. Caulfield vows never to cut corners for his loyal customers, many from Washington who make the hour-long drive as a kind of pilgrimage. “When I’m on a big case or a prosecution trial, I jump in my car and head to Chubby’s just to clear my head and experience the wonder of the food,” said a Department of Justice prosecutor who asked not to be identified. “Their food is like nirvana. I take cartons of it home.” If not for the drive, I would have chosen from Chubby’s selection of Robert Mondavi wines, served in large Stella Artois beer glasses for $3.75. Beers can be ordered in gigantic 32 oz. Mason jars for $5.75. This summer, look up “15 things to do in Emmitsburg,” and add one more: visit Chubby’s — a great place for day-trippers, or if you fall into a Mason jar, weekenders.

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POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPolitics﹐Hollywood﹐MediaandDiplomacy| DC Vote’s 3 Star Ball, Embassy Chef Challenge and more!

Dan Snyder and Matthew McConaughey at the inaugural “Movies with Morris” fundraiser (Photo courtesy Washington Redskins)

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POLLYWOOD

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

SAYING‘IDO’TO MARRIAGEEQUALITY Legal Eagles Olson and Boies chat about HBO’s ‘The Case Against 8’ B Y J A N E T D O N O VA N

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y goal is to convince everybody in the Republican party, conservatives, liberals, most anybody I can have a chance to communicate with, how important it is to support marriage between people who love one another who want to form a family and want to form a community,” said attorney Ted Olson, the conservative lawyer who partnered with liberal attorney David Boies to argue the landmark Proposition 8 case before the U.S. Supreme Court, in Hollingsworth v. Perry. Olson spoke to Washington Life at the Washington premiere of “The Case Against 8” at The Institute of Peace.The HBO documentary looks inside the legal duo’s groundbreaking efforts to get California’s controversial ban on same-sex marriage overturned by the highest court in the land. On hand was Todd Griffin, a major player on the scene for the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) community. Following Proposition 8, he founded the American Foundation for Equal Rights (AFER) to overturn the law. “I and my colleagues Ted Olson and David Boies filed the case,” he told us.“I was at lunch one day with some friends [Michelle and Rob Reiner] just after the election and someone came over … and said whenever there is another court case, someone should talk to my former brother-inlaw Ted Olson.” “I don’t think it is against anybody,” Olson added. “Marriage is a conservative value and people who want to be in love and be married — that’s something that conservatives should support. A lot of conservatives are libertarians who understand that right away.There are some who have yet to come around but we’re checking them one at a time ... maybe a bunch at a time like this film will do. We’re changing people’s minds, not just me, but everybody.” NBA player Jason Collins was also there to

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Ben Cotner, Perry lawyer Ted Olson, Brooklyn Nets player Jason Collins, Perry plaintiff Paul Katami, Perry plaintiff Jeff Zarillo and Kris Perry. (Photo by Ralph Alswang)

support the film and to tell his own story about coming out as a major athlete. “When I signed on with the Nets in February, everyone — the entire Nets organization, the ownership, the coaches, the players — they had my back 100 percent,” he said, adding that he hoped his actions will encourage other players to do the same. “I’m very proud about my race and my heritage and [my parents] encouraged me to live a life where I am fulfilled and being a true leader,” he continued. “When it came to being vocal about my sexual orientation, some of the older generation preferred to suggest that ‘some things are not discussed in public’ and I was like ‘No, that’s not the person you raised me to be, that’s not the person that I want to be.’ I want to be vocal, and since I’ve come out, I’ve continued to be vocal.” Griffen reminded us that there is no question

that the passage of Proposition 8 really helped galvanize people, first in California and then the rest of the country. “Who would have thought that particular state would have passed something so hateful,” he noted. “When it did, it really brought about attention through the media to the world. Gay and straight people all started marching in the streets and turned a depressing moment into something quite inspiring.” Plaintiffs Kris Perry, Sandy Stier, Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrillo joined the premiere along with filmmakers Ben Cotner and Ryan White. “Very early on in the process, which took five years, we got to know the four plaintiffs in the case and our film eventually transitioned into their stories,” White said. “It’s important to remember,” Cotner added, “that while hearts and minds are changing, we still have a long way to go.”

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Kimberly Perry Rema Zadah and shadow Sen. Paul Strauss

Jeff Hancock, Vinoda Basnayake and Brandon Skall

DC VOTE’S 3 STAR BALL National Association of Realtors | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ

Ed Krauze, Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton and Daniel Soloman

Julia Cohen, Roshan Ameli-Tehrani, Summer Colson and Johnathan Kuhn

RAISING THE BAR: DC Vote welcomed more than 150 guests to its first annual Three Star Ball honoring DC Brau Brewing Company founders Brandon Skall and Jeff Hancock and WL editor-in-chief Nancy Reynolds Bagley. The advocacy organization is commi+ed to engaging a younger demographic in the fight for D.C. voting rights and raised $23,000 to aid those efforts. “If history has taught us anything, it is that these rights were given to us for good reason, “ Skall told the crowd. “When these rights are withheld without due process, we open the door to a very scary reality. It is time to shut that door.” Five of the six members of the host commi+ee were in a+endance along with D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson and D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton and Shadow Sen. Paul Strauss. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Maha Hakki, Sarah Aburdeineh and Dannia Hakki

Bruce Kieloch

Natalie Gewargis, Drew Kizzie and Keri Li Roxana Boyd, Sam Martin and Amy Smith

Ryan and Hillary Tomery

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Kate O’Neill, MacKenzie Babb and Christine Boston

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Donald Sherman and Caitlin Coogan

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POLLYWOOD | EMBASSYROW

Diplomatic Gatherings Communism’s victims, operatic butterflies and a royal succession BY ROLAND FLAMINI

EASTERN APPROACHES: What really “Love in the Time of Cholera” by triggered the collapse of the Soviet Colombian man of letters Gabriel Empire and the end of the Cold War? García Marquéz (hence the ColomIt’s a question that’s likely to get a lot bian embassy connection). Although of attention this fall and winter as the “Florencia” was first performed in world marks the 25th anniversary of 1996, Catan’s non-dissonant musical the collapse of the Soviet Union and style is variously compared to Ravel, “the triumph of liberty.” The latter Puccini and Debussy. The opera phrase was the theme of a lunch setting is a steamer on the Amazon given jointly by the ambassadors of River, and the story has a strong Hungary and Austria at the Library undertow of fantasy: the heroine, of Congress in June, with senators Florencia, turns into a butterfly, and and congressmen among the guests, flutters off into the jungle in search in which the view was advanced that of her missing lover. the Soviet state began to crumble when the Hungarian communist A NEW KING: Hours after Spain’s new regime removed the barbed wire at monarch, King Felipe VI, acceded to the throne on June 19 in Madrid, its borders with Austria, thus opening hundreds of Spanish residents in the floodgates of access to the West greater Washington celebrated at for freedom-seeking East Europeans a vin d’honneur (noonday recepand East Germans. Austria’s ambassation) at the former embassy residor, Hans-Peter Manz, recalled how he was heading his ministry’s Eastern dence on 16th Street NW, now Europe desk in 1989 when the the Spanish Cultural Center. The Spanish Amb. Ramón Gil-Casares welcomes guests at a reception region suddenly went from a sullen, reception hosted by Spanish Amb. honoring the accession of King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia of Spain (Courtesy photo) Ramón Gil-Casares , was limited quiet backwater into a maelstrom of to Spanish nationals in the area activity. In retrospect, the collapse of communism seemed inevitable, he said, but it NOT THE LOVE BOAT: Guests arriving at a recep- in keeping with the rather subdued tone took the courage of the democratic opposi- tion at the Colombian Embassy residence of the succession, reflecting the country’s tion to make it happen. in June were each given a yellow butter- current economic problems. For example, With Ukraine under threat from a fly-shaped lapel sticker. That was because no foreign royals were invited to what was resurgent Russia, the anniversary gains an the event hosted by Ambassador Luis being called a coronation, but was in reality ominous new resonance. Hungarian Amb. Carlos Villega and his wife Carmela was to a swearing-in at the Spanish parliament, the György Szapáry announced the launching of promote the Washington National Opera’s Cortes. According to the Spanish newspaper a campaign to build a victims of communism opening work of the 2014-2015 season El País, King Felipe, a graduate of Georgemuseum in Washington. His government has — and if your mind immediately went to town University’s School of Foreign Service, contributed $1 million to the bricks-and- Puccini’s eponymous Japanese heroine, you is scheduled to make his first major intermortar project. “A museum remembering guessed wrong. The opera is “Florencia en el national speech before the U.N. General the victims of communism is needed and Amazonas” (Florencia in the Amazon) by the Assembly in New York in September. That still missing from the Washington scene,” Mexican-born composer Daniel Catan, with would seem to be a good time to pay a royal Szapáry said. a libretto that relies heavily on the novel visit to his alma mater.

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Jo Carole and Ronald Lauder Julie Mehretu and Secretary of State John F. Kerry

Meryl Streep and Art in Embassies Director Ellen Sussman

WL EXCLUSIVE

FOUNDATION FOR ART AND PRESERVATION IN EMBASSIES DINNER

Rima Al-Sabah

Diplomatic Reception Rooms, U.S. Department of State PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Alice Walton

DIPLOMATIC ARTS: Secretary of State John F. Kerry only stayed briefly at FAPE’s annual dinner but took time to wax rhapsodic about the group’s steadfast efforts to help the state department “use art to conduct American diplomacy.” The “exceptionally diverse” collection of artworks on display in more than 140 U.S. missions, he said, “is one of the ways we incorporate people into the American experience.” HONORED GUEST: Rancher, banker and philanthropist Alice L. Walton impressed the crowd with her so7-spoken account of founding the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, which in the past two and a half years has welcomed more than one million visitors in a rural se+ing that unites the power of art with the beauty of nature. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

French Amb. François Delattre and Shannon Fairbanks Stavros Niarchos

Peggy Cooper Cafritz and Reuben Charles III

Elizabeth Sobieski, Doug Woodham, Dorothy Kosinski and Faya Causey

Capricia Marshall

Don Gummer and Eden Rafshoon Marian Rosenthal and Alma Gildenhorn WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Justice Stephen G. Breyer and Ann Jordan

Judith Martin

Elizabeth Drew (third from left) and hosts Nancy Balz, John Harwood, Dan Balz, Ezra Klein, Molly Ball and Michael Tomasky WL EXCLUSIVE

ELIZABETH DREW BOOK PARTY The Madison Hotel | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Vernon Jordan and Bill Plante

The “new generation” of Washington writers who adopted Elizabeth Drew weren’t about to let publication of a new edition of the veteran scribe’s groundbreaking book about Watergate, “Washington Journal: The Events of 1973-1975” go unheralded as the nation marks the 40th anniversary of its most famous political scandal. PENETRATING INSIGHT: “It’s a masterful book about an existential crisis that gripped our political system,” co-host Molly Ball of the Atlantic noted before the author’s humorous comparison of her own career to the ill-fated Richard Nixon’s: “We were alike,” La Liz told chuckling guests, “we both stuck around for a long time.”

John Culver

Bebe and Bo Jones with David Acheson VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Allie Pisching, Shannon Rotenberg and Jane Rodgers, Nick Sundberg, Matthew McCounaghey, Alfred Morris and Darrel Young, Ryan Kerrigan, Robert Griffin III and Chris Baker

MOVIES WITH MORRIS Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, Ashburn, VA

Nadine Pottinga and Leslie Gialamas

Guests wait for autographs.

PHOTOSCOURTESYWASHINGTONREDSKINS

POPCORN WITH THE STARS: Oscar-winning actor and lifelong Redskins fan (it’s a long story involving Cowboys, Indians, hamburgers and Redskins linebacker Chris Hanburger) Mahew McConaughey was the guest of honor at the inaugural “Movies with Morris.” The evening served the dual purpose of honoring Morris for his selection as 2013 Walter Payton Man of the Year and to raise funds for the “Play 60 for All” and “Just Keep Livin’” foundations. Fans queued for autographs before dispersing into one of six theaters, each showing a favorite movie selected by Morris, Robert Griffin III, Chris Baker, Nick Sundberg and Darrel Young.

Frann Mulholland, Lori Gazelle and Courtney Morey. (Photo by Ed Soloman)

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Liechtenstein Amb. Claudia Fritsche and Michael Olding

Molly and Daniel Fannon with Marie Royce WL SPONSORED

DINNER CELEBRATING “FROM OMAN TO EAST AFRICA” OPENING

Johnetta B. Cole, Oman Amb. Hunaina Al-Mughairy and Phylicia Rashad

National Museum of African Art | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Rohini Talalla

Ray and Shaista Mahmood

CONNECTING THE GEMS: Johnea Betsch Cole may be one of Washington’s best connectors of patrons of the arts, as evidenced by the partnership between the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art, Oman’s Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center and Oman Ambassador Hunaina Sultan Al-Mugharty, to celebrate the National Museum of African Art’s new exhibition, “Connecting the Gems of the Indian Ocean: From Oman to East Africa. The exhibit tells the story of when trade flourished in and around the Indian Ocean, sweeping up the East African coast and across the Arabian peninsula. The evening was full of traditional Omani dance and tales of artistic greatness by African artists, led by Tony Award-winning actress Phylicia Rashad. The Sultanate of Oman recently commi+ed $1.8 million to the museum for a collaborative educational initiative. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

U.S. Amb. to Oman Richard Schmierer Richard and Allyn Kurin

Marcella and Terry Jones with Dr. Christine Warnke WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Dianne Niedner

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Heather Joy Burke and Eddie Burke

Lucia Riddle

Judith Kipper and Terry Dunmire 27


POLLYWOOD

INSIDER’SSPOTLIGHT

DIPLOMATSOFJAZZ Newport Jazz Festival founder George Wein and major supporter Natixis Global Asset Management CEO John Hailer up the tempo for a new jazz age. BY STEVE HOUK

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t was jazz great John Coltrane who once said, “When you begin to see the possibilities of music, you desire to do something really good for people.” Take three of his words — “music,” “possibilities” and “good” — and you know exactly what George Wein and John Hailer are all about as far as keeping jazz alive and kicking in the 21st century are concerned. Wein, 88, is the legendary jazz impresario who founded the groundbreaking Newport Jazz Festival that celebrates its 60th year this August. Hailer, 54, is a lifelong-jazz-fan-cum-CEO whose company Natixis Global Asset Management (NGAM) has been an instrumental supporter and sponsor of the festival for the last several years. Together, they have forged a passionate partnership and a fierce commitment to foster a love of jazz for future generations, not only in a performance setting, but also in the vitally important educational one. Since 1954, Newport has set the standard for live jazz festivals with the likes of Ellington, Brubeck, Fitzgerald, Davis and Marsalis blowing away audiences year after year. For its 60th anniversary this summer, fans will get their current jazz masters for sure,Wynton included. Wein always sees the future where jazz is concerned, which is why he injected a shot of youth into Newport this year by inviting student jazz bands from around New England to show off their chops, giving the festival a younger vibe on opening night that will likely linger throughout the weekend. It’s part of a calculated effort by Wein and Hailer to energize the jazz youth movement on a profound level. “Things have changed. Jazz is a music of music schools now,” Wein says. “Thousands of kids are going to great universities and they come out with degrees in jazz and have creative thinking in their heads. So, there’s a lot of great music out there, and we’re just trying to present as much of it as possible.That is the purpose and

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George Wein (Photo by Ayano Hisa)

John Hailer (Courtesy photo)

the aim of the festival now. It’s all part of reaching out to young people.” Hailer, who as a teen in the 1970s took all of his father’s jazz albums to college and started a big band radio show, is ecstatic that he and Wein’s common vision is coming to bear.“We have a lot of college kids coming to the festival.You could feel the vibe last year,” he notes. “When you get a sold-out crowd and 30 percent to 40 percent of them are under 25, it definitely gives it a different vibe. I’m kinda psyched about that.” That’s a good thing. Not only has NGAM supported the continued success of the Newport festival, Hailer himself has spearheaded the “2014 Jazz Diplomacy Project,” a company initiative that includes support for high-level jazz roundtables including several at the National Archives.There is also a live jazz series with the esteemed Berklee College of Music in Boston and many other events that put the spotlight on jazz as a means of collaboration. But the feature with the most potential for impact are the scholarships awarded to kids who want to play but might not get the opportunity due to financial difficulty and other challenges.

For Hailer, it all starts at the core of someone’s educational experience. “When you learn music, you learn discipline, you learn how to be creative and innovative,” Hailer says. “If you get an opportunity to experience music, it leads you down a lot of different paths, like all good education can do. But I just think affordability is a critical need in this country, and we want to help put affordability at least in the hands of musicians right now. There’s a lot of kids out there who are working their tails off, and an extra few thousand dollars either way can really help them finish up school, or not. So for them to become a musician is important to us.” And for George Wein, seeing more and more young people come out to Newport is what makes him optimistic for the future of the musical genre. “Last year we had over 2,000 young people come,” he says. “This year we should have about 5,000 kids. It’s a tremendous experience for young people, plus we’re destroying the myth that young people don’t like jazz, and that’s the important thing.”

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Andrea Nordell with Dan and Patty Marcus

Harry Schnipper, Frances Hardin and Rusty Hassan

David Ferriero, Soledad O’Brien and Sen. Jack Reed

NEWPORT JAZZ FESTIVAL FÊTE The National Archives | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL JAZZ DIPLOMACY: With the ghosts of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzie Gillespie mingling somewhere about, the Newport Jazz Festival and its principal sponsor, Natixis Global Asset Management, celebrated jazz as an American art form on the eve of the festival’s 60th anniversary in August. A7er a reception in the grand Book Room of the National Archives, moderator Soledad O’Brien led a lively discussion with jazz artists Jonathan Batiste (via Skype from Beirut, where he was performing) and Christian McBride and two jazz visionaries, NEA Jazz Master, jazz librarian and journalist Dan Morgenstern, and festival founder George Wein. “This is about the future of jazz,” said John Hailer, president and CEO of Natixis Global Asset Management. “It’s an honor to know the people who keep jazz alive.”

Marshall Chawla, Jack Siggins and Maureen Sullivan

Genevieve and Vincent Dole

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Steve Houk and Jerry Brown Lynnetta Jones and Kristian Killion

Stephanie Hassinger and Gabriella Angelonic WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Dan Morgenstern and George Wein

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Jim Christy and Caren Leedom 29


POLLYWOOD

Bitsey Folger, Ferdinando Salleo and Aniko Gaal Schott Rep. Jackie Speier, Phil Barkett and Amy Lester

Nash Whitney Schott, Anna Maria Salleo, François Bujon de l’Etang, Anne Bujon de l’Etang and Juergen Chrobog WL EXCLUSIVE

Magda Chrobog, Jane Cafritz, Sophie l’Hélias Delattre and JoAnn Mason

DIPLOMATIC WELCOME Nash and Aniko Schott Residence | PHOTOSBYMICHELLEBELLIVEAU WELCOME BACK: A meeting of the Trilateral Commission in Washington proved the perfect opportunity to sip Champagne, nibble on caviar and renew acquaintances with three prominent former ambassadors and their spouses who have been much missed by le tout Washington since their leavetaking more than 10 years ago: Ferdinando and Anna Maria Salleo of Italy, Juergen and Magda Chrobog of Germany and François and Anne Bujon de l’Estang of France.

Nini Johnson, Ann Hand, Wilma Bernstein and Diane Jones

Karim Chrobog and Renaud de Viel Castel VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Julie Gunderson, Tom Liljenquist, Erin Kilday and Leon Rosenman

Casey Hastings, Greg O’Dell, Chinyere Hubbard and Elliott Ferguson

Susan Lehrman, Timothy Cox and Capricia Marshall WL SPONSORED

EMBASSY CHEF CHALLENGE Ronald Reagan Building | PHOTOSBYNESHANNALTCHAYAN

Mayor Vincent Gray and Shahin Mafi

Iwona Bukowski, Dominika Chyczewska, Chef Andrzej Bielach of the Embassy of Poland, Miroslawa Sobieraj and Olga Langowska-Wrona

GLOBAL GOURMETS: Fi7een embassy chefs flexed their creative culinary muscles while shedding light on their national cuisines at this year’s cooking competition, sponsored by PassportDC. “Let the waistlines go and eat as much as you can!” the event’s chairman (and former chief of protocol) Capricia Marshall urged as guests nibbled on dishes that included Botswana’s pulled goat with sweet onion sauce while bidding on silent auction items to raise funds for Cultural Tourism DC’s many programs. By evening’s end, Russia’s salmon ice cream took home the people’s choice award, while Thailand’s modernist spicy salmon salad won with the judges’ stomachs.

Chef Sherene James of the Embassy of Jamaica

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Andrew Gelfuso and Russian Amb. Sergey Kislyak

Hieu Duong, Chef Djamel Amroune of the Embassy of Iraq and Agathe Riquier

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Frederick Kempe, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel and Jon Huntsman

Stephen Seche with Peter and Marika Nilsson

Ruslana Lyzhychko

WL SPONSORED

ATLANTIC COUNCIL LEADERSHIP AWARDS Ritz-Carlton, Washington, D.C. | PHOTOSBYNICKGHOBASHI

Mary Anne Huntsman, Charles Huntsman and Mary Kay Huntsman

Bob Riley and Gen. Colin Powell

Italian Amb. Claudio Bisogniero and Laura Denise Bisogniero

LIGHT THE NIGHT: An audience of more than 900 foreign policy and business leaders from around the globe gathered at the Atlantic Council’s 2014 Distinguished Leadership Awards to honor Chuck Hagel, Jose Manuel Barroso, Thomas Enders, Ruslana Lyzhychko and Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr. The evening turned emotional when Ukrainian singer/civic activist Lyzhychko appealed for international support of her country’s ba+le for independence. Then, the lights were dimmed and guests were encouraged to switch on the flashlights (as crowds at Maidan did last winter to show support for a free Ukraine) on the tables throughout the ballroom and shine them while Lyzhychko sang Ukraine’s national anthem to a standing ovation.

Sarah Stabile, Jency Schnettler and Kara Schuman

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Susan Blumemthal with Librarian of Congress James Billington and Marjorie Billington

Carly Simon and Jimmy Webb

Dean Kay and Paul Williams WL EXCLUSIVE

ASCAP 100TH

Frank Snellings, Randy Newman and Sen. Mary Landrieu

Carly Simon, Narada Michael Walden, Ann Wilson and Nancy Wilson Ginny Mancini

Library of Congress | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL MUSIC MAKERS: This year’s annual ASCAP Foundation “We Write the Songs” event celebrating the musical organization’s gi7 of original manuscripts, photos and le+ers to the Library of Congress was especially poignant as it marked the foundation’s 100th year. Nearly 40 members of Congress joined ASCAP President and singer/songwriter Paul Williams to toast the milestone highlighted by a performance with musical legends Carly Simon, Randy Newman, and Ann Wilson and Nancy Wilson of rock band Heart in a special concert. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Reps. Shelley Moore Capito and Kristi Noem

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Carla Sims, Kay Kendall and Frederick Yonnet

Allan and Shelley Holt with John Freeman Peter and Kim Leone with David Domenici and Jack Davies

THE MAYA WAY Patti Austin and. Robby Gregg Jr.

Carnegie Institution of Sciences | PHOTOSBYVITHAYAPHONGSAVAN

Brad and Robin Berkeley

James Forman and Stacee Crittenden

THE LIGHT WITHIN: The See Forever Foundation hosted an intimate cocktail reception and dinner to support the Maya Angelou Schools, an educational network serving at-risk youth. “What makes them so special is the unbelievable results they are achieving with kids [whom] others, for the most part, have given up on,” See Forever Foundation board member Jack Davies told the crowd a7er noting that 75 percent of the high school seniors in the program go on to college. Guests enjoyed a special performance by Grammy Award-winning artist Pai Austin and recorded video remarks from Angelou. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Chris Tessone, Geraldine Bolden, Anthony Whittingham, Antwone Dorsey and Heather Wathington

LASTWORDS

21 days before her passing, Dr. Maya Angelou made her last interactive appearance at the See Forever Foundation’s “The Maya Way” dinner, where she was interviewed via satellite feed by J. Robby Gregg Jr. Below is an excerpt from the televised interview that was shown at the event regarding her hopes for future generations. >>

Guests watch Dr. Maya Angelou’s last interactive appearance at “The Maya Way: Celebrating the Light Within” dinner (Photo by Vithaya Phongsavan)

ROBBYGREGGJR What do you hope for [the students in the room] and what do you want them to do? MAYA ANGELOU I would encourage the young men and women, the students, to see who they really are, that you’ve already been paid for, whether their ancestors came from Eastern Europe, Africa or Asia. What you have to do is prepare yourselves so you can pay for someone else who is yet to come. RGWhat can we do to continue the work that you started? MA Well I didn’t start. What I’ve done is try to continue that work which was started before me by your grandfather and your grandmother and great-grandfathers and great-grandmothers—people who dared to 32

dream some dream. Yes, I’ve tried to continue it and this is what you have to do. I would encourage you to see how wonderful you are, and just look around you and see the men and women who really love you. I don’t mean indulge you. I don’t mean anything like romance or consideration. I mean really love you. People who love have courage and courage is the most important of all the virtues because without courage you can’t practice any other virtue with consistency. You can be anything erratically—generous, kind, fair—every now and again, but to be that thing time after time, you have to have courage. And so, I encourage you to just look and see the people who’ve had enough courage to care for you. Continue, men and women, to have an attitude of gratitude. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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JORDANVINEYARDS|

SPECIAL FEATURE

THE POLITICAL VINTNER From his base on a vineyard in Sonoma County, John Jordan is helping to steer the future of winemaking — and conservative politics BY JOHN ARUNDEL

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ashington wags may be all too After Crossroads GPS lost nearly every race in the familiar with Karl Rove and the country that it funded – including most famously Koch Brothers, who since 2012 Mitt Romney’s effort against incumbent Barack have steered more than $650 million into Obama – he decided, “to hell with this.” national, state and local political races, but Jordan has pressed on, recently funding a flight Republican John Jordan of Sonoma County’s of ads in Oregon’s contested Republican Senate Jordan Winery & Vineyards is fed up with PAC primary and is said to be cobbling together $100 spending on political races that he says are million from like-minded friends in the GOP to stacking up little more than losses. create his own super PAC to deploy in the 2014 From his bucolic perch at the majestic mid-term elections and in the 2016 presidential Jordan Vineyards, Jordan watches the game of race. While he’s not sure whom he will back just American politics as intently as he follows his yet, he says that for now he’s leaning towards Sen. beloved Broncos. Single, sandy-haired and built Rand Paul. like a running back, Jordan speaks rapidly, in a The vineyard was established in 1972 by his no-nonsense way, rarely stopping to parse his father and mother, Tom and Sally Jordan, and was John Jordan (Courtesy photo) words. He awakes at dawn, works out, and then inspired by the great wine estates of France. “My spends about three hours in the early morning parents were maverick pioneers,” he says. “They hours reading the Drudge Report, RealClearPolitics, Politico and other wanted to be the first to create a California Cabernet Sauvignon that Washington. publications to sate his political appetite. “I really tend to was young, yet aged gracefully. The vineyard is all about the timeless geek out on this stuff,” he says. connection between food, wine and hospitality.” The former Navy pilot, technology entrepreneur and winemaker John Jordan and winemaker Rob Davis lead up the second has hosted House Speaker John Boehner twice in the past year at his generation of their award winning wines, Cabernet Sauvignon and storied vineyard in Sonoma County, and last year poured $1.4 million Chardonnay. Jordan gained national notoriety after it was served at of his own money into a PAC he created in an attempt to defeat then- a White House state dinner hosted in 1986 by Ronald and Nancy Sen. John F. Kerry for re-election in Massachusetts. His candidate, fellow Reagan for Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Navy Seal Gabiel Gomez, lost by 10 percent, but Jordan says the money “We’ve made big advancements in fruit sourcing, oak aging, was not spent in vain. precision farming and conserving natural resources,” Jordan says. “It’s a “Political campaigns are just so much fun,” Jordan adds, “and I had relentless quest to improve with every vintage.” a great time doing it.” Like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerburg, who raised $45 million last year for his FWD.org to raise awareness of the immigration issue, and investor George Soros (who’s raised millions to prevent the influence of money in American politics), Jordan is at the forefront of the splintering of American superPACs. While he has donated millions to Rove’s American Crossroads group, he says that the giving proved frustrating. “I usually go out of my way to avoid meeting candidates and politicians,” Jordan says with a smirk. “All too often these people are so disappointing that it’s frustrating.” Despite having been a “seven-figure contributor and raiser” to the non-profit American Crossroads GPS, Jordan said he became disillusioned with the “spray and pray advertising” approach to the PAC’s spending, and the secrecy involved with how his money was being spent. He wanted to know who scored commissions on ad buys, how much money was Jordan Vineyards (Courtesy photo) being spent on TV versus online advertising, and “who’s making what.”

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SPECIAL FEATURE | VIRGINIAWINERIES

VIRGINIA’SGRAPERUSH With Virginia now the nation’s fifth biggest producer of wine, some familiar names now own vineyards in Virginia’s lush, fertile Piedmont BY JOHN ARUNDEL

Boxwood Winery

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hile it might not yet be Napa or Sonoma, where tech tycoons pull into their world-renowned vineyards producing 100,000 cases of awardwinning wines, a state that had a handful of vineyards 20 years ago now boasts 150 thriving vineyards. This month Washington Life checks in with five business leaders who decided to get in on Virginia’s maturing wine industry, names like Cooke, Case and Trump. With orders for their recent vintages coming from The White House (namely, Michelle Obama) and The State Department (namely, Hillary Clinton), all share the same passion: To make Virginia wine a contender. >>

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BOXWOODWINERY

Middleburg After a career running the Los Angeles Lakers and Washington Redskins, teams his father owned, John Kent Cooke and his wife Rita teamed up with son Sean and daughter Rachel Martin to re-open the vineyard on their Middleburg farm. Sean now runs Boxwood Estate Tasting Rooms while Rachel runs operations. Hugh Newell Jacobsen designed the modern winery, and French vigneron Stéphane Derenoncourt and eneologist Dick Vine give Cooke lots of advice, such as planting 19thcentury vines from France. Grapes are picked by

John Kent Cooke

hand, then put through gravity flow. “We treat our grapes very gently,” he says. “This produces a premium grape.” Boxwood produces 2,500 bottles of reds each year. In April, first lady Michelle Obama also came here, leaving with a case of reds. Cooke has plans to produce a white varietal in the future, but says he’s in no hurry. “Boxwood works beautifully and has given me great pride and joy,” he says.

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Chris Pearmund and his wife Susan McCorkindale

P H OTOS : B OXWO O D A E R I A L BY JA M E S H A N N A ; J O H N K E N T CO O K E BY C EC I L E O L AU S S E N ; C H R I S P E A R M U N D A N D S U S A N M C C O R K I N DA L E BY C E C I L E O L AU S S E N ; DAV I D G R E E N H I L L BY Y VO N N E R O C K P H OTO ; E R I C T R U M P BY JAC K LO O N E Y; J E A N CA S E BY ST E P H E N VOS S

David Greenhill

Eric Trump

GREENHILLWINERY&VINEYARDS

PEARMUNDCELLARS

Middleburg Satellite executive David Greenhill of Alexandria bought the former Swedenburg Vineyards in 2012 and set about satisfying a lifelong dream to make wine. He hired Burgundian winemaker Sébastien Marquet and his wife Isabelle Truchon to make the wine and run the vineyard. “The ideal is to produce better Virginia wine and have an unforgettable experience for our customers in the countryside, and I think we’re doing that here,” Greenhill says. So far so good. In his first two harvests, Greenhill produced a Vidal blanc, a syrah, a red Bordeaux blend made of merlot, sparkling blanc de blanc from chardonnay grapes, cabernet sauvignon, petit verdot and cabernet franc grapes, winning accolades right out of the gate. In April, the first lady picknicked with friends on the vineyard’s pond-side patio, stopping to admire the Revolutionary War-era manor house with its silver leaf gilded walls, venetian plaster and Edison-era lighting. After she purchased four bottles of her favorite, the Seyal blanc, a White House buyer returned a week later and purchased four more cases of it, Truchon says.

Broad Run Broad Run in bucolic Fauquier County has its own stop sign, cemetery and small post office, housed in a trailer. It also features the oldest vineyard in Virginia. Founded in 1976, Pearmund harvests the most awardwinning wines in Virginia. Located on a farm that dates back to 1743, owner Chris Pearmund is Virginia Wine’s most outspoken advocate and his winery has picked up every award imaginable, including best vineyard in Virginia four times, best cabernet franc and best cabernet sauvignon. As Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton ordered his 2007 Meritage vintage, which won 23 medals in 23 competitions, by the caseload. “When you apply equal standards to our wine in California and Europe, we do well,” he says. “Virginia wineries are doing a really good job in heritage, pedigree and style.”

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

TRUMPWINERY

Charlottesville If there is one thing a Trump cannot resist, it’s the opportunity to compete and be the best at something, whether it’s a hotel, golf course or wine. Donald Trump’s son Eric has taken over where the late billionaire John

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Jean Case

Kluge and wife Patricia left off. With 50,000 cases sold each year, the winery is already the biggest producer on the Eastern Seaboard. Eric says he’d like the vineyard to compete on an international level. “We are a unique real estate company, the largest mom and pop in the world,” Eric says, “but the one consistency is that we have to be the biggest and best, and want the highest-end product in anything we do.” EARLYMOUNTAINVINEYARDS

Madison Jean and Steve Case know more than enough about technology, and building a better Virginia wine is their new task at their new vineyard in Madison County. The co-founder of AOL and Revolution LLC purchased and renovated Early Mountain Vineyards in 2011. On weekends, the billionaire couple often stay in the guest cottage here. “We invested in Early Mountain to serve a broader purpose,” says Jean, president of the Washington-based Case Foundation. “We are wine lovers, and we decided to invest and build a winery in our home state because we truly feel Virginia wine is emerging, and the state has the potential to become one of the world’s leading wine regions.”

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THEGIOWAY WASHINGTONNATIONALSSTARPITCHERGIOGONZALEZKNOWSONLYHOWTO HAVEFUNPLAYINGBASEBALL—ANDHEWOULDN’THAVEITANYOTHERWAY@ B Y  L A U R A  WA I N M A N  |  P H O T O S  B Y  T O N Y  P O W E L L M A K E U P  B Y  F L A M I N I A  G A R I O N I  |  H A I R  B Y  K R I S T I A N  A N D R A DA  |  WA R D R O B E  B Y  I K E  B E H A R  G E O R G E TO W N S H O T  O N  L O C A T I O N  A T  T O R O  T O R O 

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elcome to Toro Toro! Come on in!” says 6-foot, 200pounds-of-muscle Gio Gonzalez. Outfitted in a bespoke navy blue Ike Behar suit, he is perched on the edge of a throne-like leather chair in the restaurant’s foyer, flashing his signature grin to customers. He nods and makes eye contact with two middle-aged women before returning his gaze to the camera flashing in his face and the photographer trying to coax his subject back to attention. No, the Washington Nationals’ star southpaw has not taken on a part-time hosting job at the new steakhouse; he is merely incapable of not being friendly to everyone around him, even in the middle of a photo shoot. That’s just Gio being Gio, on or off the field. Known as the fun-loving, energetic member of a rather introspective starting rotation, Gonzalez has often found himself at the center of things. In his Little League days he was nicknamed “Hollywood” as he was always the kid making dramatic, diving catches and fancy plays. “I was always acting crazy out there,” he says. “It’s just a game after all, and it’s meant to be fun.” But atypical of a man signed to a $42million contract, Gonzalez doesn’t covet or demand the spotlight. He sits back and is who he has always been while fans are drawn to him like moths around a flame he doesn’t even know he possesses. Observing him on set at a photo shoot, the mystery of his super powers becomes less hazy and the Clark Kent part of his Superman is revealed. Gonzalez’s girlfriend, Lea Moures, sums it up when she says, “he just knows how to make everyone in a room feel so special.” More specifically, he has an uncanny ability to intently focus on seemingly abstract conversations around him and translate them into genuine one-on-one moments. Overhearing the makeup artist chatting with the hair stylist about a new Italian restaurant she tried on her recent trip to Miami, Gonzalez chimes in asking what she had eaten that made it memorable, how it compared to another local restaurant and if she had any other recommendations for good Italian in Miami. Sure, he could have made the moment about himself and simply offered the knowledge that he was from South Florida, loved Italian food and knows all the best places to go. But that wouldn’t have been the Gonzalez way, as he is far happier genuinely connecting with others to create non-manufactured connections, however fleeting. “I look forward to the Dream Gala each year,” Moures said, “because it’s one night where he gets to interact with fans, and my favorite thing is to see people really get to know him. Sometimes fans will meet him and be a little star-struck but he just cracks a joke and immediately puts everyone at ease.” Gonzalez attributes the majority of his outlook on life and sunny disposition to his strong family. “I didn’t grow up with a rough childhood. We had our financial struggles and may not have had much at times, but we always had fun

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together and found the positives in life. Baseball was at the core of that. [It] was our church,” the 28-year-old Cuban American says. Though Gonzalez admits to “eating, sleeping and breathing baseball” since the age of four when his dad began passing on his love of the game to his son, he has always approached the sport with an uncomplicated attitude. Indeed, one of his earliest memories of playing baseball with his dad and brother resulted in a humorous mishap after Gonzalez, getting his first hit, headed straight to third base. “I remember my dad cracking up and just saying ‘Gio that’s the wrong way,’ Gonzalez says, laughing as he recalls the vivid childhood memory. “But I kept right on going to second base thinking everything was great. Dad never pushed me too hard. He wanted me to be the best I could be, and put me up against tough competition to develop me as a player, but he kept it fun.” Part of what kept it fun for so long was the fact that Gonzalez’s father didn’t push him to get serious about the sport until high school, and allowed his son to play other sports (everything from soccer to kickball, street hockey and flag football) as well as other positions in baseball. “I didn’t start focusing on pitching until high school,” Gonzalez says. “My dad always said, ‘give me four years of your life in high school and I’ll turn you into something positive.’ I gave him those four years and he didn’t let me down.” Those years, which included back-to-back state championships for Gonzalez at Hialeah High School, led to a full-ride offer to pitch for the University of Miami, which he turned down when he was drafted in the first round in 2004 by the Chicago White Sox. He bounced around the minors for four years with varying success, including being ranked by Baseball America as the number-2 prospect in the Phillies farm system in 2005 and then as the number-1 prospect in the White Sox system at the time of his trade to the Oakland Athletics in 2008. His big league debut came on August 6, 2008 with the A’s, but it wasn’t until 2011 that Gonzalez made a noticeable splash. He ended the year with 16 wins, a .571 win-loss percentage and a 3.12 ERA over 202 innings pitched along with his first of two selections to the MLB All-Star team. In the final game of the season, he went out on top, recording 11 strikeouts over 8 shutout innings against the Mariners. Two days before Christmas, the Washington Nationals acquired him as part of a six-player trade and 23 days later he received a large Christmas gift in the form of his five-year, $42-million extension contract with options for the 2017 and 2018 seasons. “Gio’s ample talents are well known and chronicled,” General Manager Mike Rizzo said of the fast turnaround on the extension contract in a January 2012 interview with MLB.com. “Now, both Gio and our fans can shift their focus and excitement to his debut in D.C. knowing that their relationship won’t be ending in the short term.” Gonzalez joined the Nationals’ starting rotation, which he refers to today as his “band of brothers,” in 2012 for what would be a season of

Baseball was our church

O P P OS I T E PAG E : G o n z a lez i s we a r in g a l i ne n s po r t c o a t, li n e n s p o rt s hi r t , l i n e n p o c ke t square, lapel flowe r, linen herringbone pants and a brown wove n b e l t a ll f ro m Ike Be h a r.

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Gonzalez is wearing a wool suit, cotton dress shirt, silk tie, cotton pocket square, socks and crocodile shoes all from Ike Behar Georgetown. The custom clothier, which recently opened a store in Georgetown, has become one of his go-to brands.

Date nights for Gonzalez and Moures usually consist of eating out, most often at places that will allow their French Bulldog Stitch to attend as well.

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personal firsts (he hit his first career homerun and pitched his first career shutout), league records (the Nats were the National League East division champs and their 98-64 finish gave them the best record in Major League Baseball) and awards (with a career best 21 wins, 2.89 ERA and 207 strikeouts Gonzalez was named the best left-handed pitcher in the bigs and given the Warren Spahn Award). Despite all the accolades and the fanfare of his personal best season, for Gonzalez the excitement stemmed from what the team accomplished and the bonds that were formed. “Being in the playoffs with the Nats in 2012 is definitely my proudest baseball accomplishment to date,” Gonzalez says. “It was almost like a dream, the chemistry we had, with guys always picking each other up when it was needed. If one pitcher had a rough day the next guy would go out and pitch eight shutout innings and just kill it.We didn’t even realize it until the end that we had racked up 98 wins, but it was all around the most impressive season I’ve ever been a part of.” Now after having just been reinstated after his stint on the 15-day disabled list (another career first) due to shoulder inflammation, Gonzalez is ready to get back to work. In his nine starts before the injury, he racked up an ERA slightly higher than his normal at 4.62 over 50.2 innings pitched, but managed to maintain a 53/20 strikeout-to-walk ratio, which keeps him on par with his career norms.The month off gave him more downtime than he’s had in the last few years combined, and though Moures said he was tough on himself in the beginning, he did not rush his recovery and took his time healing. “He has played through pain before, so he really struggled with whether going on the DL was the right move for him,” Moures says, “but he turned to his coaches for advice and listened to his body, and now that he is feeling better he knows it was the right decision.” Moures, a consultant for the World Bank, speaks of Gonzalez as if they have known each other their entire lives. The way she beams when talking about him and the giddy schoolgirl glances in his direction when no

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Gonzalez was taught to throw the pitch that led to his 2012 National League Cy Young Award nomination, his curveball, at age 13 by his father on a makeshift mound (a metal generator) in the narrow strip of grass between his house and his neighbor’s house. (Photo courtesy Washington Nationals)

one is looking reveals their relatively new-couple status. They met a year and a half ago through mutual friends two days before Gonzalez was to pitch for Team USA at the World Baseball Classic in Florida and they’ve been inseparable ever since, sharing not only an apartment in Arlington but also a furry “baby” by the name of Stitch. For a man who describes himself as “a total clown,” it should come as no surprise that Moures and Gonzalez bond over trips to Disney World (they went 10 days in a row as their “first date”), animated movies (their French Bulldog is named for the movie “Lilo & Stitch”) and their kids-atheart outlook. “My favorite memories with Gio are just being next to him in the car,” Moures recalls. “He puts on music and sings and dances and does anything and everything to make me laugh and he always succeeds.” Though the lifestyle of a professional athlete can make developing relationships difficult, Moures and Gonzalez use modern technology such as FaceTime to remain in constant contact with each other when he is on the road. So far Moures has never missed a local game that Gonzalez has pitched and has recruited many of her friends to hop aboard the Nationals bandwagon.The couple makes the most of Gonzalez’s rare off days by exploring the city and enjoying their favorite activities together, namely eating out and going to action movies. Don’t be surprised if you see him dining around town at his favorite restaurants, which he says change often but currently include STK, Le Diplomate, Filomena and Bistro Francais. Gonzalez says many of these restaurants have even offered to stay open late to feed him after games.

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“I’ve had the opportunity to play many places now, and Hialeah will always be home,” Gonzalez says. “But this town has so graciously embraced me as a player and a person; it’s my home now, too, and I’ll forever be grateful to the people of this city.” Judging by the number of 47 jerseys seen on any given night in Nats Park, it seems Washingtonians are more than happy to have adopted him.

LITTLE-KNOWNGIOFACTS 1. He is a righty, but taught himself to pitch left-handed. He does everything else right-handed, including batting. 2. Before every game he gets a haircut, eats pasta at an Italian restaurant and puts on his newest clothing, which lately has included a lot of Ike Behar clothing from their new store in Georgetown. “I like wearing fresh gear before I pitch because if I look good, I feel good and then I’ll play good.” 3. He once received a text message from the Mets’ David Wright after a game where his mother, Yolanda Cid-Gonzalez, heckled Wright from the stands. It said, “Man you come to a game full on ready, with distractions in the crowd even!” 4. If he could he would eat sushi every day and not get sick of it. 5. Gonzalez has attended at least one game of every Washington team except the Redskins. He is dying to go to a game this season. 6. His dream career after baseball would be to make movies for Pixar.

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SPECIAL FEATURE | LUXURYTRAVEL

EUROPEOFFTHEGRID A journey through the islands, coastlines and beaches of Sweden and Greece — places in summer that are at their authentic best STORY AND PHOTOS BY JOHN ARUNDEL

E

urope during summer offers the American traveler rich experiences full of charming cafes, heart-stopping beaches and backroads gloriously empty of traffic. Several unforgettable and off the beaten path places in Sweden and Greece offer affordability as well as unique outdoor experiences in July and August.  STOCKHOLM If there is any time of year to catch the excitement and energy of Sweden, it’s summer. Winter extends a full nine months here. From September through May it’s barren nothingness and sub-zero temperatures, with constant ice and snow during the worst of it. By June the streets come alive with midsummer celebrations, and Stockholm takes its seat at the head of the table of European hip. Sweden is a country long known for its capacity to evolve, from fashion (think H&M) to furniture (Ikea started there) to music (Avicii, the Swedish house DJ). The Swedes tend to absorb new influences and ways of thinking faster than the rest of us, creating a national hive of creativity. For a tourist, catching that energy is not hard to do. In Stockholm, it’s all around you, from live music on the streets to cutting-edge computer games and trend-setting fashion. Volvo, Astra Zeneca, ABB, Absolut, Electrolux and Ericcson have their roots in Sweden, and newer innovative companies like Skype and Spotify were also founded there. Culture abounds with historical sites, museums, art galleries and music venues. Getting off the city grid and into the country’s eco-tourism groove provides even more surprises, from kayaking and canoeing to biking along backroads lined with endless explosions of sunflowers.

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Stockholm’s Grand Hotel which recently underwent $100 million in renovations.

SWEDEN’SARCHIPELAGO

On my first day on Sweden’s western coast, a British journalist and I visited the Nordic Watercolor Museum on Tjorn Island and a field of contemporary outdoor sculptures in Pilane, before spending the night at Sweden’s first and only floating hotel, Salt & Sill, a simple 23-room inn offering sea views over Bohuslän’s outer archipelago. The hotel is built on pontoons (giving you the effect of sleeping on a water bed) and is characterized by trademark Swedish simplicity with functional Scandinavian furnishings, a fivestar waterfront tavern and sun deck. Perhaps the hotel’s coolest characteristic is its sauna boat, the S.S. Silla, a catamaran with two floors of sauna that heat to 104 degrees. After sweating out the toxins of a 10-hour transatlantic flight, in true Swedish tradition I dropped into the chilly, 50-degree waters of the Baltic Sea, sealing up the pores.

Farther up Sweden’s Western coast, 14 miles south of Oslo, lie the Koster Islands, part of an archipelago of barren islands and sheltered swimming coves — and a destination for foodies to experience some of Scandinavia’s freshest and most innovative cooking. A ferry hop from Stromstad drops you onto the island of Sydkoster, a car-free and carefree resort with a few cozy restaurants and a charming waterfront Hotel Ekanass. The island’s only lodgings offer breathtaking views of the port and across Sweden’s jagged coastline, with bright sandy beaches serving as clear signs of the last Ice Age. Part of Sweden’s first Marine National Park opened by King Karl XVI Gustaf, Sydkoster’s population swells to 4,000 during the summer months and dropb back to less than 400 hardy souls during the brutishly cold winter months. “The waters off Sydkoster have some

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The Koster Islands, Western Sweden

of the freshest seafood that you can eat anywhere,” says Christian Sjöö, the chef at Hotel Ekanass. “We get tourists from all over the world here, not just to experience the tranquility of it all, but also to experience the new Nordic cuisine which is food that’s known for promoting healthy living.” The bone-chilling waters of the seafoodpacked Baltic Sea promoted by the embassies of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Iceland and Denmark during Nordic Food Days are the source for some of the best and most creative new Nordic cuisine to appear on Washington’s restaurant scene. “New Nordic cuisine reflects a back-tobasics approach to cooking,” says Swedish chef Tommy Myllmaki, a classically trained chef who has cooked with acclaimed chefs at restaurants such as the world’s highestrated Noma. “It is celebrated for its purity, simplicity, freshness and its original take on traditional dishes,” he says, “and for letting the ingredients shine.” With some of the best cooking in Europe and most picturesque vistas in Scandinavia, Western Sweden’s craggy coastline is the relaxed and unhurried antithesis of the backpacker-jammed city streets of Europe.

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SWEDENATAGLANCE

GETTINGTHEREEight hours from Washington Dulles via SAS, roughly $1,600 R/T in August. GETTINGAROUND Rental cars from Gothenburg Airport probably your best bet EAT Some of Scandinavia’s freshest and most innovative seafood dishes may be found along Sweden’s Western Coast. You simply can’t go wrong with most of the restaurants along the water front, if fresh salmon or pickled herring are your thing. DOBoating or a ferry ride out into the Swedish archipelagos is a must, and some hotels can arrange for ride-alongs with a fishing captain. Kayaking or biking are mainstay activities here; this is how the handsome Swedes stay fit and healthy. STAYIn Stockholm, check in to The Grand Hotel, a renowned world landmark since 1874 and recently remodeled with perhaps the best spa in Sweden. Salt & Sill in Tjorn is Sweden’s first floating hotel and worth the stay. The Hotel Ekanass on the Island of Sydkoster is how to vacation like the Swedes; its drop-dead vistas, sweeping beaches and meals and activities are designed to make you feel alive and healthy.

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SPECIAL FEATURE | LUXURYTRAVEL

GREECE

Sunset from the patio of the Electra Palace Hotel in Athens

ATHENS

Greece’s recent sovereign debt crisis and the ensuing demonstrations in Athens streets from 2008-2011 are nothing more than a bitter memory these days for most Greeks, whose tourist-based economy has largely rebounded. Once one of the world’s top destinations for tourism, the Greek government has taken steps in the past year to woo Americans back to one of the most extraordinarily beautiful, most affordable places to vacation in Europe. “The strikes of 2008 really damaged the perception of Greece; tourism really collapsed there for a while,” says Andreas Fiorentinos, deputy secretary of the Greek National Tourism Organization, who owns a popular seaside resort in Mykonos. “We really have tried to change the negative perception of Greece and convince the Americans and the Europeans that Greece is the safe destination that it is.” While not completely recovered (at its height, American tourism to Greece dropped 38 percent), Greece appears to be thriving

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again, with hotels, restaurants and airports filling up. The Greeks don’t just welcome American tourists, many embrace them with renewed philoxenia, the Greek expression for warm friendship and hospitality. “Greece has clearly suffered but we are resilient and are now renewed,” says Panagiotis N.Tsakos, known as “The Captain,” a legendary Greek shipping tycoon who operates a fleet of 50 oil tankers and cargo vessels worldwide, some as long as the Washington Monument is tall. “Greece is back in business and ready to welcome the world.” A few nights in culturally rich Athens is still the best jumping off point before setting out to experience some of the world’s most breathtaking, relaxed and hospitable islands. Hotel room rates range from as little as $50 to $200 per night, and eating out at even the best dining spots in Athens and on the islands will only set you back $30 per person, ouzo included. Most hoteliers and restaurateurs can denominate the bill in dollars, for better understanding of a wildly fluctuating currency

which made headlines during the European Union bailout. One of the more exciting new developments in Athens is the $100 million renovation of the Museum of the Acropolis, completed two years ago, built into a cavity of the hill opposite the Parthenon. Ten times larger and more stunning than the original built in 1865 and renovated four times since, it greets one million visitors annually. “This museum never accomodated the antiquities of the Acropolis in a satisfactory manor,” says museum President Dimitrios Pandermalis during a recent tour. “It is finally a fitting testament to classical Greece.” While Athens and its famous islands are rich in history, nightlife and broad, expansive beaches, the government is also actively promoting religious tourism as a cultural feature, or “the other face of Greece.” Relig ious tour ism has been around since the Middle Ages, but the thousands of Byzantine temples, chapels, monasteries and religious sites characterizing Orthodoxy over 2,000 years have become a new draw for religious pilgrims. Places where Man meets God like the islands of Patmos, Mount Athos, Meteora and Tinos draw breathless awe. “For the religious inclined, Tinos is like nothing they have ever seen,” says Fr. Evangeline Fosokos of Our Lady of Tinos, the patron saint of the Greek nation. The church on the tiny island of Tinos is the site of a gilded icon widely believed to be the source of numerous miracles. MYKONOSANDSANTORINI

Only about 200 of Greece’s 6,000 islands are inhabited. The cluster of Cyclades Islands occupying the central part of the Aegean Sea are among the most developed for tourism. Within the Cyclades lie Mykonos and Santorini, two of Greece’s most awe-inspiring islands and most popular destinations for Americans. The season here runs from June 20 to August 20 when 80 percent of Greece’s tourism revenues are made with nearly 17

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The cliffs of Santorini

million tourists pouring in during this twomonth sliver. After 30 years of visiting Mykonos, former New York City litigator Jeffrey Siger decided to leave the law and move to Mykonos eight years ago to write novels set in Greece. “I realized I would not live forever, so I moved here,” says Siger, author of five best-selling novels, including “Murder in Mykonos.” “I write on average three pages a day, staring out at the ocean. This island also has some of the world’s most cosmopolitan people coming here, so I’m able to draw great material from the bars and nightclubs.” In addition to its white-sand beaches and crystal blue waters, Mykonos also has perhaps the liveliest nightclub scene of any island in the world, second only to Ibiza. At night the tradewinds come off the Aegean, providing a natural fan for the sweaty European clubbers gathered in a dozen pulsating nightclubs. “Mykonos probably has the most international crowd anywhere,” says Morgan Benjamin, a Los Angeles-based screenwriter (“Modern Family”) who arr ived here from a gay-themed cruise ship for a circuit weekend with 30 other friends from L.A. “Gay travelers take gay friendliness into strong consideration. We tend to specifically select places where we know we will be safe and accepted.”

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Rhenia Hotel in Mykonos

A short island hop away is Santorini, a quieter, more majestic alternative. Everything here is validated by a stroll, either through the narrow streets flooded by white cylcadic houses or to its red-sand volcanic beach. A good place for a billion-dollar view is Fanari Villas, set on the cliffs of Ia. Built into the volcanic rocks, it is a magnificent windswept 4-star hotel with pool, restaurant and 18 rooms with patios to take in the island’s spectacular sunsets. “It’s our small corner of paradise,” owner Alex Darzentas says. “It gives you energy just being here.” Here the sun rises in the morning over vistas of turquoise waters and sails flapping

in the wind. A donkey ride to the port below yields two reliably good restaurants serving grilled octopus and whole fish brought in just hours before and tossed on an open-fire grill. “This is probably the best place in the world to read a book,” says Craig Walser of Memphis, owner of Santorini’s renowned Atlantis Bookstore. “I came here 11 years ago after college and never left. On a clear day, you can see all the way to Crete.” At sunset the red volcanic formations cast shadows over the town of Fira, and crowds gather at Ia, the highest point, to watch the sun kiss the horizon over the Aegean Sea.

GREECEATAGLANCE GETTING AROUND Taxicabs are still your best bet; renting a moped can be a dangerous proposition. EATIn Greece, eating is a way of life. No sauces or complicated recipes; just incredibly great gastronomy. Athens Cooking Lessons at Monastiriki is a good way to learn how it’s done. Daphne’s in Plaka has been favored by Hillary Clinton and the queens of Spain, Norway and Jordan. DOIn Athens, for about $18 you can experience it all in two days with the Athens Open Bus Tour, hopping on and off at major sites without experiencing the city’s notoriously crafty cab drivers. In Mykonos and Santorini, the beaches and nightlife are legendary. STAY In Athens, the Electra Palace Hotel has a rooftop pool and restaurant overlooking the Acropolis. In Mykonos, try the simple, whitewashed Rhenia Hotel high on a hill overlooking the busy port, and in Santorini, try either Fanari Villas in Ia, which are cave rooms set into the cliffs, or the Majestic Hotel in Fira, which Kim Kardashian made famous when she stayed in a six-room villa last summer.

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LIFESTYLES

D L I H C  T O H ECITY H T  N I K ILYPAR NDEM

ER\ 

UGHA DONO C M E E \KAT ASANI OM L I A L OM AGE TALIM ORNWELL @C TEDBY -POWELL @C I S I P S A S C A ESC FOR ONY ELL\ IDGES\ G\WWW@JAM OM YPOW WWW@T R N B O Y T D  @C ER YAN MB S T YLIN GRAPH ISTEDB ORNWELLS AROLYNTHO S S A \ PHOTO Y W@C AWR ORC M HANIL SIMPSON\F TYLING\WW LOUNGE @CO S D N S A E ILL ELL AUTY OOK Y OBEW BYBR FORCORNW W@HAVENBE TISTAGENC WARDR L \ASSISTED OMBS\ CKSON\WW ORTHEAR RNWEL AROLYNTH A RF O C S ME C SHAEJ RATRESSLE  P A E U J R  E U R I K N I BA L E HA MA N A MANIC ELCASAND D M EKI  MOD RANN AWAINMAN O T C E R R I ONT TERFR RIALD EDITORLAU A O FT Y” T W I D N E ’SCRA NT OW E T A H E T S S G I “ R S T AS BOA EGEO NDTH NERSOFTHE U O R IONA OW LOCAT ONANDTHE N O D E S ALMAI G RA P H PHOTO HANKSTOM T PECIAL S H T I W


MELISSA ODABASH “Camilla” kaftan ($506) and LENNY NIEMEYER bathing suit ($235), Sylene, 4407 S Park Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-654-4200; HUBLOT 41mm rose gold and pave diamond chronograph watch ($45,900), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-7491200; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT blue lapis multi-strand necklace ($300), www.ibeautifulmiaelliott. com; Earrings stylist own.


CAITLIN KELLY strapless bandeau bathing suit ($300), Sylene, 4407 S Park Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-654-4200; ALOR triple kai black bracelet with diamond bar ($1,395) and ALOR black and white diamond ring ($1,195), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT silver rhinestone collar necklace ($300), www.ibeautifulmiaelliott.com.


D’MILIKAH “Samantha” monokini ($129), 128 Waterfront St., National Harbor, MD 20745, 301749-1378; ROBERTO COIN 18k serpent bracelet with diamond pave ($8,200) and MARCO BICEGO murano 18k amethyst and tourmaline earrings ($4,500), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT textured gold lariat with Swarovski crystal pearls bracelet ($240), www.ibeautifulmiaelliott.com.


D’MILIKAH “Felicia” bikini ($72), 128 Waterfront St., National Harbor, MD 20745, 301-7491378; BABETTE neon plaid water pocket jacket ($375), 3307 Cady’s Alley NW, 202-339-9885; FENDI heels ($695), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202-342-0202.


D’MILIKAH “Francine” monokini ($120) 128 Waterfront St., National Harbor, MD 20745, 301-749-1378; CALYPSO ST. BARTH “Eugenia Kim Cassidy” fedora ($365), 3307 M St., NW Suite B, 202-337-1371; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT textured gold cable long chain necklace ($235), Keith Lipert Gallery, 2922 M St., NW, 202-965-9736; MEMOIRE diamond pave ring in white 18k gold ($15,700) and ROBERTO COIN 18k yellow and white gold hoop earrings ($1,800), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200.


MELISSA ODABASH bikini ($180), Sylene, 4407 S Park Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-654-4200; CALYPSO ST BARTH “Lourdes” skirt ($295), 3307 M St., NW Suite B, 202-3371371; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT gold cable chain body necklace ($200), www.ibeautifulmiaelliott.com; SYDNEY EVAN rose gold and diamond disc necklace ($8,410) and CHOPARD “Happy Heart” 18k white gold pave earrings ($7,780), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200; ROBERT CLERGERIE FRAK sandals ($550), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202-342-0202.


LIFESTYLES

Leah Gansler, Sally Ein and Lindsay Ellenbogen

Reed Krakoff, Robin Givhan, Mitch Rales and Mark Ein

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Kay Kendall and Ivey Howells

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Catherine Reynolds and Capricia Marshall

Paige Speyer and Laura Gail Smith

SIP AND SHOP: A7er taking the honors at the Phillips Collection Gala, designer Reed Krakoff got the opportunity to showcase his 2014 Fall/Pre-Fall collection at an intimate brunch for 75 sartorially savvy ladies at Saks Jandel. Krakoff, who says he has always been inspired by art — American art in particular — designs for the sensual and strong woman, of whom he sees plenty in Washington. “I’m less inspired by literal things, like a color or the south of France in the ‘30s, than by the design process and how people did what they did,” Krakoff said, adding that he loves “documentaries and biographies about art.” Cochairwomen Sally Ein, whose husband Mark Ein was one of Krakoff’s initial investors, and Lindsay Ellenbogen along with a host commi+ee consisting of eight of the area’s most wellconnected women, ensured a full house for the show, with a portion of the proceeds going to CharityWorks.

Cynthia Steele Vance, Peter Marx and Sally Marx

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Mariella Trager and Grace Bender

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Holidae Hayes and Jocelyn Greenan

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Model wearing Reed Krakoff on runway

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WASHINGTON S O C I A L  D I A R Y Tudorplacegardenparty﹐overthemoon﹐wpasgala﹐marriottmarquisopening﹐zoofariandmore!

Dr. Jill Biden and Rebecca Cooper at the 2014 Newsbabes Bash (Photo by Tony Powell)

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AROUNDTOWN

Ladies’ Days Carol Lascaris honored at the Women’s Museum, the Global Fund for Women celebrates in Potomac, and Hungary celebrates 25 years of freedom from communism BY DONNA SHOR

Lascaris, she has raised over $40 million for

the museum’s endowment. Seen: NMWA founder Wilhelmina Cole Holladay, artist and philanthropist Clarice Smith, Darlene and Pierre Asmar, Laura Roosevelt (FDR’s grand-daughter), Nicolas and Diane Petronas, Carol and Ken Adelman, Phil and Marge Odeen, Gina and Gene Adams, Cam Johnson and Wes King, Wonder Woman Lynda Carter, Elaine and Ken Cole, Connie and Joe Franklin, Debbie Sigmund and Cathy Jones. Alice Rhee and honoree Carol Lascaris at the National Museum of Women in the Arts (Courtesy Photo)

DESIGNINGWOMAN It was a love-in at

the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) when friends feted Carol Lascaris, president of the Lascaris Design Group. Lascaris’ college roommate Grace Nelson, there with her husband, Sen. Bill Nelson (DFla.), told of their University of Georgia days. Her sister Frances Usher and friend Alice Rhee cited milestones in her career. Mary Mochary recounted some of Lascaris’ professional awards and achievements in creating luxurious custom residential and commercial interiors. Her latest stunner, Riverhouse Mansion, was recently showcased in Christie’s Magazine — and so is she! It marked the first time that the prestigious publication has pictured a person on the cover. The party was held in the museum’s Elizabeth A. Kasser wing, named for Mary Mochary’s late mother, an early NMWA supporter. The design was a part of Lascaris’ extensive volunteer work on enhancing the historic building, especially the Great Hall, which in 1987 garnered her a coveted Historic Preservation and Architecture Award from the American Institute of Architects. With her husband and partner, Climis

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WOMENSAVINGWOMEN The Global Fund for Women was honored at a sumptuous dinner for 50 guests hosted by Shahin Mafi under a wide, silky white tent in the garden of her Potomac mansion. Supporters from countries as diverse as South Africa and Fiji, some in native dress, spoke of the group’s mission. The fund fights for the right of women and girls to be free of violence, to gain economic and political empowerment, to secure reproductive health rights and obtain an education. Is it effective? Judge for yourself: In the last 25 years, the fund has raised and invested over $110 million in 4,600 women’s groups in 176 countries. Seen: Harriet Fulbright; Gouri Mirpuri, wife of the ambassador of Singapore; Katherine Wood; Rima and Georges Tannous; Washington Post writer Jonathan Capehart; the State Department’s Nick Schmitt; former president of Bolivia Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozado and his wife Ximena; and Dr. Ludy Green.

importance of this 25th anniversary of Hungary’s rebirth as a democratic republic after the collapse of communism. He and vice-president Andrea Lauer-Rice honored those who had aided this resurgence of Pannonia, to use the name of the old Roman province, which comprised a large swath of present day Hungary. The late California congressman Tom Lantos, Bishop Lázló Tökás and the Hungarian Community of Friends group were all cited for their deep commitment to freedom and to the aid of Hungary and its scattered citizens. The dinner was preceded by a concert given by the world-renowned Hungarian lyric soprano Andrea Rost at the Warner Theatre. Seen: Hungarian Amb. György Szapáry; True “Daughter of Pannonia” Aniko Gaal Schott, who has been decorated by the Hungarian government, with her husband Nash Scott; Annette Lantos, Tom Lantos’ widow, and their daughter Annette Tillemann-Dick; Dr. Milton Corn and Gilan Tocco Corn; Judy and Dr. Ahmad Esfandiary; and Mary Mochary.

PANNONIADELIVERED! Democracy and

Freedom were the themes of the Hungarian American Coalition gala celebrated at the House of Sweden. Maximilian Teleki, the group’s president, emphasized the

Hungarian American Coalition Gala President Maximilian N. Telek and soprano Andrea Rost. (Photo by Kevin Allen)

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Michael Gewirz, Janis Buchanan and Cleo Gewirz Ruth Buchanan and Diana Prince

Sara Grosvenor, Louisa Woodville and Charlene Kings

WL EXCLUSIVE

NEWPORT PRESERVATION SOCIETY RECEPTION Frederick and Diana Prince Residence PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Jaclyn Mason and Sean Randall

Washingtonians who also maintain residences in Newport, R.I. are intensely loyal supporters of the Newport Preservation Society’s mission to protect the landscape, buildings and furnishings in the nation’s most storied summer resort. It was therefore no surprise that an invitation from Freddy Prince (whose family once owned “Marble House”) and his wife Diana would gather the tribe to hear about the group’s recent efforts to build a new welcome center at “The Breakers” and transform the Carriage House at “The Elms” into a residence and research facility for visiting fellows.

Elizabeth Leatherman, John Firestone and Bonnie Matheson

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Marie Ridder

Trudy Coxe and Rusty Powell Alexander Crary, and Richard Burnham

Tom Quinn

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Lynn Roberts, Cynthia Reddick, Louise Schwebel.

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Michael Butler and Bill Nitze

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OVERTHEMOON

Shows and Soirées The Hunt Country crowd trots to the Upperville Horse Show and Middleburg Humane Foundation Dinner Dance BY VICKY MOON

T

he Upperville Horse programs and building fund for Show has kicked off the new headquarters on 23 acres at summer social schedule the former Cunningham Farm. Elizabeth with a full card of sleek hunters, Lisa Ben-Dov and Debbie Sobieski, fast jumpers and cocktail parties Gretz co-chaired the event along The under the old oak trees at Grafton with a very special co-chairman: Farm for the past 161 years. The Pepper, a Chinese Crested who Saturday afternoon event is very put in an appearance with popular with adorable children his adopted owner, Margaret on lead line ponies, elegant ladies Gardner. Barbara Sharp and on sidesaddle, the family class and Bethann Beeman did the floral the Piedmont Foxhounds Silver arrangements. Candy and Gregg Fox Invitational. Fazakerley, Hector Alcalde, This year’s blue ribbon and Mary B. Schwabe, Joanne Swift Plaskitt Trophy winner of the and 200 others enjoyed the cool Silver Fox was Tab Hunter, Juliet, Stephen and Tommy Graham at the Maizemoor Garden Party (Photo by Vicky Moon) elixirs of the night. who flew in from Los Angeles For anyone who would for the horse show. The still dashing actor and Welby” (once owned by his mother, Katharine like to join in the fun, the Italian-inspired devoted horseman spent the week training with Graham, publisher of the Washington Post, and manor house, “Alessio,” up Prince Road from Snowden Clarke, who has returned to Virginia his brother Donald Graham, from whom he “Orange Hill Farm,” offers a fabulous setting after seven years on the West Coast. Clarke is purchased the property), came over with his on 18 acres. It’s perfect for entertaining, with now trainer in residence at “Orange Hill Farm” daughter Juliet and son Tommy. Other guests vaulted ceilings and spacious rooms, a stone on Prince Road (recently purchased by Bryce and supporters included: Lennart Lundh, terrace that runs the length of the house Lingo). Richard Viets, Ginny Hunter, Lisa Abeel overlooking pool and lawns. With a master Clarke also brought home a blue ribbon and Philip Bermingham, Joan and Robert suite, it has three additional bedrooms and five for owner Mimi Abel-Smith with Another Ramsay and Elizabeth Baker Keffer. and a half baths and is offered by Thomas and Man, a thoroughbred bred by her sister, On the same soft June evening, it was off Talbot for $1,695,000. Phyllis Mills Wyeth. to yet another gathering, traveling part of the Just around the corner in a historic district way on dirt roads overlooking vibrant green known as Cromwell’s Run is “Maizemoor,” rises.There were enormous round bales of hay home to Holli and Moses Thompson, who in the fields reminiscent of a Monet painting hosted a garden party to benefit the New York- with a lingering whiff of honeysuckle. based Dutch Kills Theater. As a pair of horses and carriage turned into The evening was orchestrated by Lenah Jacqueline Ohrstrom’s “Berrywick Farm” Scott Lundh, whose daughter, Alley Scott, for the 20th annual Middleburg Humane is a co-founder of the New York based Foundation Dinner Dance, there was a interdisciplinary theater company along momentary traffic hold. Set in the carriage barn with Blake Habermann and Levi Morger. with a theme of “Texas Tuxedo: Boots & Pearls,” Sponsored by Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts the event was produced by Hilleary Bogley, service organization, it included a performance founder and president of the animal shelter. on the back porch framed by old boxwood Festivities included a large silent auction, Joanne Swi with Sandy and Johnny Abbot at the Middleburg Humane Foundation gala (Photo by around the circa 1798 stone house. elegant table-scapes and dancing to the Urban Vicky Moon) Stephen Graham, who now owns “Glen Funk band in support of the foundation’s care

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Ray Clevenger, Carolyn Schafer and Leslie Clevenger

Niente Ingersoll Smith and Leslie Buhler Page Evans, Colman Riddell and Liz Dougherty WL EXCLUSIVE

TUDOR PLACE GARDEN PARTY Tudor Place Historic House and Garden PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES

Keith Carr and Cameron Goodman

Georgetowners turned out in their best summer finery at Tudor Place’s 22nd annual garden party, the one event that unites residents of the upscale enclave’s storied east and west villages. More than $270,000 was raised for site care and educational programs at this year’s fête honoring Niente Ingersoll Smith, who took a bow as a “trusted advisor and dedicated leader of the board” for many years.

Dylan Glenn and Cathie Martin

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Leana Katz and Christine Harrison

Erin DiSerafino andThomas Mark Anthony

Samar and Will Langhorne with Brittany Godoy

Jim Huck and Jeanne Defliese

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Ryuji Ueno, Toshiko Ueno and Timothy Matz

Barbara Crocker and Frank Babb Randolph

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Angie Marriott and National Mall Superintendent Robert Vogel

Junior Women’s Committee Chairwoman Blair Parker Bourne and Sally Akridge

Rep. Aaron Schock

Chip Akridge, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and Caroline Cunningham

TRUST FOR THE NATIONAL MALL LUNCHEON The National Mall | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL MOTIVATION SPELLED OUT: Over 1,000 philanthropists, business leaders and government officials lunched under a tent adorned with massive le+ering suspended from the ceiling that featured the names of the National Mall’s monuments and notable events that have taken place on those hallowed grounds over the years. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, who recently joined the nonprofit group’s fundraising push, spoke to guests about restoring and improving the Mall, which hosts over 25 million visitors a year. The event raised $1.5 million for the group’s efforts.

Tom and Ann Korologos

Christine Rales, JoAnne Morisi, Grace Bender and Erica Moorehead

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Arturo Brillembourg and Isabel Ernst

John and Antonia Gore

Charlotte and Bob Kettler

Lee and Toni Verstandig

Ashley Bronczek, Candace Ourisman and Amanda Polk

Sassy Jacobs and Candice Mulcahy

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Kristin Cecchi and Ginger Pape

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Kelly Holleman, Ashley Gula and Jennifer Paquette Galloway

Ioana Lee, Rhoda Septilici, Portuguese Amb. Nuno Brito and Rosa Brito

Chris Keller

Garrett Peck, Graham Green and Brian Cahill Tisha Jepson

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WOODROW WILSON GARDEN PARTY Woodrow Wilson House | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Lauren Bennitt, Diana Minshall, Charlotte Grassi Aukamp and Brittany Prime

Bill Hatfield and Ryan Strasser

HATS OFF: The 26th annual garden party benefiting the preservation of our 28th president’s historic residence was both lively and colorful. Guests nibbled on bite-sized corn soufflés and sipped on special pink cocktails while showing off their best chapeaux. Tisha Jepson won the ladies’ prize with her grandfather’s antique topper while Chris Keller took home the men’s honors by sprinkling his straw hat with fresh flowers. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Dana Edwards Manatoa and Christian J. Edwards Todd Gray

Timothy Lynch, Bob Lamb and John Ring

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ZOOFARI The National Zoo | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ

Erin Reed and Javier Santiago

Mary Beth Albright and Kelly Collis

LIONS, TIGERS AND PÂTÉ, OH MY!: As part of the Friends of the National Zoo’s most popular fundraiser (which raises $500,000 annually), 3,000 guests tasted samples from more than 100 of Washington’s best restaurants, including newcomers Menu MBK, Del Campo, Pinstripes, Ted’s Bulletin, District Doughnut and Toro Toro. This year, a “Grill Off” was added to the lineup with Equinox’s Todd Gray, Li+le Red Fox’s Anne Alfano, Rogue 24’s RJ Cooper and Table’s Frederik de Pue competing head-to-head by using a mystery ingredient from the zoo’s animal kitchen; Gray and Cooper emerged victorious.

Guests dancing in the Lion Lounge

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Serbian Amb. Vladimir Petrovic and Adela Petrocic

Constant Tiafoe and Mark Ein Swedish Amb. Bjorn Lyrwal, Madeleine Lyrwal and Mats Wilander

JUNIOR TENNIS CHAMPS Swedish Ambassador’s Residence PHOTOSBYVITHAYAPHONGSAVAN

CELEBRATING CHAMPIONS: The Junior Tennis Champions Center celebrated its annual gala once again at the Swedish ambassador’s residence. The beautiful grounds provided the perfect backdrop for an evening that included cocktails, dinner and showcasing the talent of young tennis stars.

Jonathan Schiller and Ray Benton

John Breaux and Tom McMillen VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Grant Schneider, Caitlin Morris and Jeffrey Gullo

Italian Amb. Claudio Bisogniero, Laura Denise Bisogniero and Ian O’Neil

Kate Hawken, Bob Kaplan, Tara Swaminatha and Meg Flood

CHILDREN’S HEARING AND SPEECH CENTER ‘COUNTRY BARBECUE’

Roger Packer, Samantha Corrigan, Kerry Fortune Carlsen and Elizabeth Harless

Villa Firenze | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ RIBS FOR KIDS: A kickoff to the summer social calendar since 1963, this annual barbecue has long been a popular gathering spot for Children’s National Medical Center supporters. The event is the main fundraiser for the Children’s Hearing and Speech Center (which assisted 13,000 children last year) and raised more than $100,000 to continue its work. One of the patients, 6-year-old Molly, was the star a+raction a7er her parents, Bob Kaplan and Tara Swaminatha, played an audio recording of her thanking the doctors who gave her cochlear implants that have allowed her to hear and speak as well as her peers.

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Jason Dixson and Lina Karaoglanova WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Ken Fulton, Jennifer Doudna and Dame Jillian Sackler

NIH Foundation Chairman Dr. Charles A. Sanders and Buffy Cafritz Deeda Blair Ann Jordan and Toni Bush

WL EXCLUSIVE

LURIE PRIZE IN BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES DINNER National Academy of Sciences Building | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL BIOMEDICAL PIONEERS: Prominent guests from the worlds of medicine and philanthropy gathered to honor noted biochemist and biologist Jennifer A. Doudna with the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health’s Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences, a $100,000 award recognizing her work to discover a technique called CRISPR which enables researchers to disable, activate or change genes. The steadfast support of co-chairmen Deeda Blair and Buffy Cafritz and benefactors Ann Lurie and Dame Jillian Sackler ensured that the evening was a spectacular success. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Ann Lurie

Nina Solarz

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Hallie Bilfield and Jenny Bilfield

Irene Roth and Dr. Vicken Poochikian

Reginald Van Lee and Reem Sadik

South African Amb. Ebrahim Rasool

Astri Sorenson and Esther Sorenson

w l spo n sored

Omani Amb. Hunaina Al-Mughairy

Barbara Gordon

WPA Gala Marriott Wardman Park | PHOTOS BY TONY POWELL

A Lesole Dance Project dancer

STEP IT UP: South African Amb. Ebrahim Rasool lent a South African theme as diplomatic chairman of Washington Performing Arts’ annual gala where Barnard Elementary School students dressed in traditional Swahili garb greeted guests before invigorating performances by South Africa’s “Voice,” folk singer Visu Mahlasela, and D.C.’s own StepAfrika! Many of the performances hinted at what might be expected from WPA this year as it celebrates a new outlook and branding. BID IT UP: The ever-popular silent auction helped raise $125,000 for student scholarships, bumping the total for the evening to more than $700,000, giving guests something to celebrate on the dance floor. View all the photos at www.washingtonlife.com

Former Colombian Amb. Carolina Barco

Kathy Jalali and Natasha Watkins

Adrienne Arsht, Maureen Orth and Judy Woodruff Luke Russert and Liz Vasily

w l e x cl u sive

Marina Orth Foundation Benefit

William Hughes, Margaret Cromelin, Ann Compton and Sally Bedell Smith

Maureen Orth Residence | PHOTOS BY TONY POWELL

Tamera Luzzatto, David Leiter, Caroline Croft and Willee Lewis 64

TECH CHAMPS: Friends gathered at journalist Maureen Orth’s residence to toast the second anniversary of her foundation benefiting children in Colombia. Last year’s gathering helped raise enough funds to provide computers, English language instruction and leadership training to primary and secondary children in five schools in Medellín, Colombia, helping to create a “geek squad” of computer experts in that country. View all the photos at www.washingtonlife.com

Susan O’Malley with Lila and Brendan Sullivan WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Pari Bradlee and Dr. Max Oshalim 2014

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Gina Dakouni, Aba Kwawu and Ashley Arias

Elsie Morin and Mathieu Roy

Michelle Schoenfeld and Michael Woestehoff

Kristin Luviano, Justin Ross and Leah Nadeau

MARRIOTT MARQUIS OPENING

TJ Monoyez, Dennis Yee and Maria Trabocchi

Marriott Marquis | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL MAGICAL MARQUIS: A7er a ribbon-cu+ing ceremony marking the official grand opening of Marrio+’s 4,000th hotel, the daylong celebration of the massive structure segued into a swank evening of chic cocktails, music and high-tech, not to mention hors d’oeuvres representing the District’s many colorful neighborhoods and an exhilarating acrobatic act by Les Oiseaux du Paradis. Marrio+ Marquis boasts a whopping 1,175 rooms, 105,000 square feet of function space and an underground concourse connecting the hotel to nearby Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

Lauren Heishusen and Kara Nadeau

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Michele Seiver and Jack Evans

Ryan Cummings and Harry Kline

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Jennie Niles Debora Miles, Elijah Walker and Rashia Walker

Hans Wydler and Steve Wydler S. Joseph Bruno and Michela English WL EXCLUSIVE

E.L. HAYNES ‘TOAST TO TRANSFORMATION’

Donna Byrd, Victor Reinoso and Alexandra Alderman Paula Gordon, Charisse Carney-Nunes and Caroline Hill

Long View Gallery | PHOTOSBYNESHANNALTCHAYAN SCHOOLS FIRST: Leaders in the education gathered in Long View’s sleek space to honor Building Hope founder S. Joseph Bruno for his work to help fund facilities that make E.L. Haynes and other charter schools possible. The cocktail reception celebrated the Haynes school’s many accomplishments since its founding in 2004, including the education of 1,000 diverse students currently served there. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Tucker and Susie Carlson with George Andrews

Vanessa Carlo-Miranda, Richard Pohlman and Joshua Marks

Iris Olsen and Kyna Williams

Gregg Zeiler with Blaire and Brian Massa

Adriana Escalante Calderon and Gustavo Calderon

Hans Wydler and Steve Wydler Nicholas Grubb and Lauren Monds

WYDLER BROTHERS 10TH ANNIVERSARY Newseum | PHOTOSBYNICKGHOBASHI PROPERTY BROTHERS: Hans and Steve Wydler — the fraternal proprietors of the local real estate agency Wydler Brothers — celebrated a milestone in their agency’s history with a roo7op party at the Newseum. Agents and guests sipped specialty martinis and took in spectacular views of the Capitol and the National Gallery of Art while pa+ing themselves on the back for being one of the highestproducing real estate agencies in the District with over $400 million in sales since the agency was founded.

Caroline Coakley and Anne Wydler

Peter Allison and Brittany Barsky

Ignacio Deleon and Marianell Morales

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Kai Forbath and Kyla Felling Paul Alagero, Pierre Garcon and Pandit Wright

Mayor Vincent Gray WL EXCLUSIVE

PIERRE GARCON’S ‘ALL-WHITE CLOTHING’ CHARITY EVENT

John Wall

Jay Gruden

Lauren Cicala, Carl Easton and Noelle Welch

The Millennium Building, 1909 K St. NW | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL WHITE THE NIGHT: The second annual “All-White Clothing” benefit for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Washington (BGCGW), hosted by Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garcon, was a+ended by more than 20 Redskins players, new coach Jay Gruden, Washington Wizard John Wall and Mayor Vincent Gray. Garcon took the stage alongside his coach to kick off the live auction, and the duo were quickly joined by linebacker Brian Orakpo, who spoke to the importance of supporting local charities. Garcon more than exceeded his goal of doubling last year’s proceeds ($30,000) by raising $100,000. “This organization hits home for me, and I’m honored to consider the BGCGW family,” he told the crowd. The evening ended with an entertaining performance from hip-hop legend Biz Markie, singing “Just a Friend” with Garcon.

Amber Uribe, Jonique Holcomb, Joanna Zimmerman, Jalina Porter and Jackie Chiao

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Julie Lee, Vanessa Meccarielli, Callie Nierenberg, Jim Vance and Kristin Cecchi

Hillary Howard, Lesli Foster, and Angie Goff Laura Evans, Jill Biden, Andrea Roane and Monika Samtani

WL EXCLUSIVE

NEWSBABES BASH

Sara Azani and Arash Shirazi

The Powerhouse, 3255 Grace St. NW | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Jim Schleckser and Barry Glassman

Dianna Russini and Andre Roberts

Michelle Schoenfeld, Alex Naini, and Hunter Charles

BREAKING NEWS: Twenty-one female news anchors from local stations pulled together once again to produce the 6h annual Newsbabes Bash for Breast Cancer, which raised more than $30,000 for Survivors Offering Support. Along with the friendly faces Washingtonians see daily on TV, other recognizable personalities made appearances, notably headline speaker Jill Biden, a survivor herself. The vice president’s wife emphasized the importance of standing together in the fight against breast cancer, reminding guests that “the small stuff ma+ers.” She recalled a particularly rough time during her own fight when a friend gave her a Chanel red lipstick that meant the world to her at the time. Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III, a vocal supporter of breast cancer research, had to cancel at the last minute but sent the signed pink cleats he wore in October to be auctioned off. There in his place — one of the newest members of the Burgundy and Gold: wide receiver Andre Roberts. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Deborah Bailey and Kim Ward

Brian Fell, Christopher Boutlier, James Meyer and Robert Shields

Frank Ognibene and Denna Odelle Hyatt Lia Seremetis, Martin Ditto and Amy Wilkinson WL EXCLUSIVE

WPA ART AUCTION GALA Artisphere, 1101 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ ART FOR BID: To kick off Select 2014, the Washington Project for the Arts hosted a contemporary art auction to raise funds to continue its support of the local artist community. The works of 20 artists were showcased followed by a festive dinner and a silent auction that included artist-designed piñatas. Guests signed up to have their own portrait commissioned by Flore de Preneuf using a large format camera with 4x5 film.

Helene and Andrew Felber

Kristin Guiter and Kate Warren

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Mike and Christina Gill with KC and Tom Aiello David Catania and Joseph Perta

Peggy Cooper Cafritz and Sherry Bellany WL EXCLUSIVE

DUKE ELLINGTON SCHOOL BENEFIT CONCERT

Rynthia Rost and Gregory Jackson

Connie Milstein and Count Jehan-Christophe de la Haye Saint Hilaire

Strathmore Music Hall, Bethesda, Md. | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL LEGENDS OF ROCK: Nothing could have kept guests away from Duke Ellington School of the Arts’ “Performance Series of Legends” featuring Sting and Paul Simon — not even a late downpour or partial collapse of a tent. The school’s most successful fundraiser since 1994 raised $1.2 million to support educational programming for the D.C. performing arts high school, which opened in Georgetown in 1974. Students from the Duke Ellington Chorus joined Sting onstage for the encore singing “Desert Rose” and “Every Breath You Take.”

Lori Soto and Tracy Bernstein

Rep. Jim Moran

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PARTIESPARTIESPARTIES

Science stars, free speech, book parties, movies with celebs and unsung heroes VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM!

TAA PUBLIC RELATIONS PARTY

GLOBAL DOWN SYNDROME FOUNDATION’S FASHION SHOW

FIOLAMARE (Photos by Daniel Swartz)

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A7er 12 years in business, The Aba Agency feted its rebrand as TAA Public Relations with an intimate crowd of 50 guests on the Georgetown waterfront at Fabio Trabocchi’s latest retaurant, Fiola Mare. The chef and his team prepared a celebratory meal, including burrata of buffalo mozzarella, Maine lobster ravioli, Spanish branzino, beef tenderloin with Hudson Valley foie gras and bomboloni. 1. Stephen Behar and Lawrence Behar 2. Nancy Miyahira, Andre Wells and Phillipe Lanier 3. Nicole Schade, Isobel Kuchenski, Mia DeSiome, Aba Kwawu, Robyn Dixon, Krystal Yoseph and Ashley Arias

RENAISSANCE MAYFLOWERHOTEL (Photos by Erin Scott)

7 Eighteen models with Down Syndrome proudly stru+ed down the runway at the annual Be Beautiful Be Yourself fashion show with members of Congress and local celebs as their escorts. D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton accompanied her daughter Ka herine Holmes Norton down the runway with emcee Kyra Phillips. British singer/songwriter and philanthropist Leona Lewis performed her chart-topping “Bleeding Love.” 7. Devin Mitchel and Chris Hill

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8. Hannah Hart, Leona Lewis and Ashley Lucas

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‘A LIFE APART’ BOOK LAUNCH LOOKSUPPERCLUB

HUGH M. HEFNER FOUNDATION FIRST AMENDMENT AWARDS

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(Photos by John Conroy)

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NEWSEUM(Photos by Ben Droz)

The 2014 Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Awards marked the first time the event has taken place outside of the Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles since Christie Hefner founded the awards in 1979. This year’s honorees include seven individuals who have made significant contributions to protect and enhance the First Amendment rights of all Americans. 4. Michael Salem, Muneer Awad, Christie Hefner, Shelby Coffey and Gadeir Abbas

As founder of Saving Promise, a national domestic violence prevention organization, author L.Y. Marlow has never shied away from using her own experiences to motivate change. Her second book, “A Life Apart,” was celebrated at a gathering of 120 friends and supporters, including host commi+ee member Kathleen Biden. “I’m not interested in writing for the sake of writing,” Marlow said. “I aspire for my books to move our world to a be+er place. In ‘A Life Apart’ I hope to spark discussion about race relations — a persistent issue in our society.” 9. Kathleen Biden and Robert Hoopes

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10. L.Y. Marlow and Kathleen Guinan

‘A TOURIST OF SAINTS’ BOOK LAUNCH

PENFED FOUNDATION’S ‘NIGHT OF HEROES’ GALA

MALMAISON (Photos by Alfredo Flores)

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Photographer Philip Holsinger spent six years on a spiritual journey through Haiti, meeting a cast of characters whose lives became the focal point for his book, “A Tourist of Saints.” Guests at the Georgetown launch party marveled at the poetic accounts and stunning photographs in the book. Proceeds benefited supermodel Petra Nemcova’s charity, the Happy Hearts Fund, whose mission helps increase educational access for Haitian children. 5. John Doyle and Philip Holsinger 6. Sam Riviello and Olga Nemcova

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NATIONALBUILDINGMUSEUM (Photos c/o Penfed Foundation)

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The 10th annual Night of Heroes Gala honored four individuals who have demonstrated leadership in providing support and services to returning military, veterans and their families. A record-breaking $1 million was raised to continue programs that support military members when they return home and transition back into their daily lives. 11. Lisa and James Schenck

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12. Paul Dwyer, Jane Whitfield and Lt. Brian Thacker

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HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouse|To come RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandMyWashington

7SYP7YVZMZSV Designer/builder Doug DeLuca restores a bit of America’s soul with his reclaimed “Langley Ordinary.” BY ANNE KIM-DANNIBALE PHOTOS BY TONY BROWN


HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

idway through a tour of Doug DeLuca’s mid-1800s McLean residence, you’re struck by the notion that all you want to do is sink into one of the cushy sofas, kick up your heels and take in life at a much slower pace. It may have something to do with John Cougar Mellencamp crooning in the background about little pink houses during simpler times, or the fact that the house is decorated in the understated all-American glamour of a Ralph Lauren catalogue. It could be DeLuca himself, a clean-cut guy with an artist’s eye in jeans and a T-shirt who exudes an easy West Coast vibe, though he was born and raised in Virginia and spent his formative years after military school working for Ralph Lauren in New York City. Then there is the house itself.The designated historic abode was once the Union headquarters for Gen. George A. McCall’s battalion where soldiers were stationed between skirmishes. In another life it was a “drover’s rest,” a stopping point for traveling farmers who paused with their horses and other animals before crossing into the city, perhaps taking a small moment to breathe deep before encountering the bustle of city life. “Things have become so noisy,” DeLuca says. “I try to create spaces where someone’s going to come, put their phone down and be like in a different world.” Though he had just purchased another house, the cofounder of design-build firm Federal Home Co. was drawn to “Langley Ordinary” with its wide porch and promise of longforgotten stories. Despite business partner Matt Bronczek’s reservations about the dilapidated, abandoned property, he

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OPENING PAGE: Doug DeLuca in his office surrounded by salvaged pieces and antiques from his many treasure hunts. PREVIOUS PAGE: Civil War re-enactors often visit Langley Ordinary looking for relics. The library built from an old barn is filled from top to bottom with antiques that reflect America’s history. DeLuca’s own paintings add a personal touch to guest rooms. DeLuca spends most of his time entertaining his many guests in the airy gourmet kitchen. THIS PAGE: The master bedroom and ensuite bath decorated with some of his folk art paintings form a sanctuary that overlooks DeLuca’s organic garden. The nautically themed guest house also houses some of DeLuca’s treasured Americana pieces against a crisp, clean backdrop.

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agreed to purchase the three-story house and its 2.2 acres through the company in 2011, and the two embarked on a two-year renovation with plans for Bronczek to build his own house on the land — before marriage took him in another direction. DeLuca stripped the mold-ridden clapboard structure down to its bones, uncovering snapshots of its varied past in the process — the original receipt for the stairwell for $7.20 with a note asking the builder to leave the money while the owner took care of his lame horse; Margaret English’s signature, circa 1887, scrawled onto the attic wall, the lone woman among male Union soldiers who did the same; old newspapers stuffed into the walls as insulation, all a time capsule from another era. What emerged is a gorgeous example of modern-meetshistoric, a five-bedroom, five-and-a-half-bath house with outdoor living spaces, including a kitchen and dining area, on a sprawling compound that includes a two-story, twobedroom guest house with an antique nautical theme, a carriage house and an organic vegetable garden that figures prominently in a side project teaching sustainability and healthy eating. Inside, the main house boasts a gourmet kitchen with a vaulted ceiling and exposed rafters, anchored by a reclaimed farm table, as well as a wing dedicated to the headquarter offices of Federal Home and a library built from an old barn. Seen throughout are examples of DeLuca’s environmental philosophy, incorporating found objects others might throw out,“reclaimed” and re-imagined into something else, like an old dresser given new life as a bathroom sink, adding character and warmth through all its quirky details. “The goal was to keep as much of the house original and then modernize it,” DeLuca says. Though he spends the most time in the kitchen entertaining his many guests and trying out various recipes with the bounty from his garden, DeLuca admits the library is his favorite room. Rustic with all the appeal of its rough history around the edges, it epitomizes his patriotic tendencies, filled to the brim with bits of America’s revolutionary past like an oil of the Boston tea party mixed in

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with DeLuca’s own folk art paintings, a collection of muskets and rifles, and other Americana. “It tells a story,” he says. “I go in there and I see old rifles, paintings. I see tons of history.” That history is as much a part of McLean’s Langley district, he adds, which is why DeLuca makes it a point to open the house to the community, hosting the McLean Project for the Arts’ annual gala and events for other organizations when he’s not obliging out-of-town guests. “That entertaining component is very important,” he says. “I have friends from New York who are stressed out and they come out here and they think they’re on “Green Acre” or something. McLean is so pastoral but it’s within five minutes of D.C.There aren’t that many places in the country like that.”

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HOME LIFE | OPENHOUSE

Hot Properties The real estate market is rising along with the temperature AVENEL

 NATELLIWOODSLANE\BETHESDA\MD  

ASKING PRICE $2,975,000

This Georgian Colonial residence offers over 8,000 square feet of finished living space in the main house and has been meticulously maintained and updated with the finest finishes. Featuring five bedrooms with four full baths and two additional half baths, this house provides a cohesive room layout that is both warm and inviting. One of its most unique features is a guesthouse that is located next to the pool and includes a laundry room, kitchen and a full and half bath.

LISTING AGENT: Jim Bell and Jan M. Evans, Beasley Real Estate, LLC

SPRINGVALLEY   LOUGHBOROROAD\NW\WASHINGTON\DC  The floor plan of this spectacular Spring Valley Colonial features six bedrooms, six full and two half baths, a custom eat-in kitchen, den, elegant living room, formal dining room, master suite and first floor guest suite. Also included are a finished lower level, beautifully landscaped grounds, a patio with heated pool and hot tub and a circular driveway and two-car garage. Built in 1959, the house features 6,835 square feet of living space. It sits on nearly one-half acre of prime real estate in one of Washington’s most soughtafter neighborhoods.

ASKING PRICE $2,950,000 LISTING AGENT Gary Frey, 202-230-2383; TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

WESLEYHEIGHTS  FORESTLANE\NW\WASHINGTON\DC 

ASKING PRICE $3,250,000

This classic residence exudes the fine architecture and design of the 1930s, while combining the conveniences of a recent addition and renovation with the finest materials and finishes. The expansive main level features a living room, dining room, sun room, cozy library, gourmet kitchen with attached breakfast room and spectacular family room.The remaining levels feature six bedrooms and four full baths.

LISTING AGENTS: Ellen Morrell, Matt McCormick and Ben Roth, 202-728-9500; Washington Fine Properties

POTOMAC RIVERROAD\POTOMAC\MD   Reminiscent of the historic houses of Western Europe, this masterpiece was custom built by and for renowned builder David Niroo and designed by internationally acclaimed Haleh Design. The finest materials and expert craftsmanship distinguish this residence without compromising the integrity of its composition. A private gated entry provides access to a house beautifully sited on a gentle knoll with scenic vistas in the heart of Potomac’s prestigious Golden Horseshoe neighborhood.

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ASKING PRICE $14,000,000 LISTING AGENT Marc Fleisher, 202-438-4880; Long & Foster Real Estate

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

Grande Dame of Dupont TTR Sotheby’s has set the record for the highest residential real estate transaction for 2014 with the $20 million dollar sale of The Patterson Mansion. BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

THE DISTRICT After plans to turn The Patterson Mansion into a boutique hotel fell through, the 112year-old historic landmark has a new future. SB Urban LLC bought the property for a $20 million and will be developing the 26,000square-foot, four-story, white marble residence at DUPONTCIRCLE (plus a 10,000-squarefoot 1956 addition) into luxury apartment rentals.The opulent estate occupies a one-third acre site on Dupont Circle at the corner of P Street NW and has housed The Washington Club since 1951. It was designed by renowned architect Stanford White of the prominent firm McKim, Mead & White, and is the only remaining example of his work in Washington. The mansion was the vision of Robert Patterson, editor of the Chicago Tribune, and his wife, Elinor “Nellie� Medill Patterson. In 1927, President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge resided there while the White House was under renovation and also introduced Charles Lindbergh to the city’s residents from the front balcony following the aviator’s famous solo transatlantic flight. More recently, Washington Life did a fashion shoot and hosted its Young & the Guest List party there. Jonathan Taylor, Christopher Ritzert, and Christie Weiss of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty were the listing agents and also represented the buyer. Kevin Reynolds bought  UPTON STREET NW for $2,875,000 from S. Ross Hechinger. Hechinger is a guitarist with the Upton Blues Band, chairman of the National Children’s Museum and a member of the Hechinger home improvement supplies clan. The sprawling eight-bedroom Georgian was built in 1957 and sits on over a third of an acre near American University. No attention to detail was left unnoticed or expense spared in the upscale residence which features an expansive floor plan overlooking a flagstone terrace, heated swimming pool and pool

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Washington’s historic Patterson Mansion on Dupont Circ;e will soon become a luxury rental apartment complex.

house. Washington Fine Properties’ Matthew McCormick was the listing agent for the transaction; Florence Meers, also of Washington Fine Properties, was the buyer’s agent. Bruce Belliveau sold

 NDSTREET NW  G in the West End for $3,310,000. The condominium unit is filled with sun and spacious — actually it’s one of the largest floor plans in the building — featuring an open living and dining area, floor-to-ceiling windows, a gourmet kitchen and den. Patrick Chauvin of Washington Fine Properties was the listing agent; Matthew McCormick, also of Washington Fine Properties, represented the buyer.

MARYLAND Bethesda’s Burning Tree neighborhood was on fire the past month: Lyn Rales, the former wife of billionaire industrialist and arts patron

Mitchell Rales, sold her mansion at   HILLMEADROAD for $7,350,000. The six-

bedroom Colonial (a custom-built Jim Gibson masterpiece finished in 2000) sits on nearly three acres of land and features an immense sewing and craft room, wood-paneled library, custom indoor tennis facility and spectacular outdoor pool and cabana. Marc Fleisher of Long & Foster was the listing agent while Stephen Carpenter-Israel of Buyers Edge Co. Inc. was the buyer’s agent. Paul Katinas, owner of Annie’s Paramount Steak & Seafood House, sold his Burning Tree home for $4.2 million. Annie’s is one of the District’s oldest restaurants and a local landmark that’s been in business for more than 60 years.   BURNING TREE ROAD, an eight-bedroom 12,000-square-foot fieldstone Colonial built in 2008, features dramatic embassy-sized rooms, two libraries on the main

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level, a top-notch master suite and custom bar. Long & Foster Real Estate’s Marc Fleisher was the listing agent. Washington Fine Properties’ Kara Sheehan was the buyer’s agent.

VIRGINIA Keith Teel sold   DUKE STREET in Alexandria for $3,025,000 to Thomas Dabney. Teel is an attorney for Covington & Burling while Dabney is an attorney with Martindale-Hubbell. The circa-1850s Federal residence in the heart of Old Town has almost 5,000 square feet of classic charm. The stately home features a ballroom-sized double parlor, 13-foot ceilings, an impressive staircase, six fireplaces, and a courtyard swimming pool.

McEnearney Associates’ Sue Goodhart was the listing agent; McEnearney’s Babs Beckwith represented the buyer. Werner Watschke is the first owner of  MACARTHURDRIVE in McLean. He purchased the new custom home from Raf Enterprises LLC for $2,510,000. Watschke is an executive at Oracle. The seven-bedroom residence in Chesterbrook has 8,300 square feet of LEED-certified living space including a gour met kitchen, mammoth master bedroom, wine cellar and walk-out patio. MCM Realty Company’s Babak Madani was the listing agen; Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage’s Mark Goedde was the buyer’s agent.

The 5,000-square-foot Federal-era residence at 414 Duke Street in Alexandria’s Old Town neighborhod sold for just over $3 million.

PROPERTYLINES POSH LIVING: Stephen and Louise Schwebel listed their three-bedroom, four-bathroom property at   RDSTREETNW in Kalorama for $2.7 million. Mr. Schwebel is an independent international arbitrator in Washington and was a member of the International Court of Justice in The Hague from 1981 to 2000. The classic Beaux Arts-style townhouse was meticulously restored and maintained and features modern amenities melded with old world luxury. Opulent moldings, large windows, rich details and finishes deliver elegance throughout the beautifully scaled, sunlit rooms and patio garden. Washington Fine Properties’ Bobbie Brewster and Carroll Chapin are the listing agents.

Beasley’s Kira Epstein is the listing agent. The updated six-bedroom four-bath property sits on a 1.1-acre lot and features an open floor plan with large dining and living rooms and a brand new deck. The spacious kitchen, finished basement with au-pair suite and a two-car garage offer convenience as well as charm.

MEDITERRANEAN MCLEAN: Riaz Spall and Brijpal “Shami� Walia are selling   ORRIS STREET in McLean for $2,990,000 with the help of Beasley’s Kathleen Kennedy who is the listing agent. Lush landscaping and a circular driveway welcome guests to the regal Mediterranean-style estate perched upon a hilltop. The 8,000-square-foot residence features an open floor plan flanked by windows on all sides that highlight the shimmering courtyard pool. Occupying nearly an acre of land, it’s ideally suited for a tennis court or garden. Other amenities include a chef’s kitchen, handsome old world wood-paneled library, impressive great room, second kitchen and completely separate staff quarters.

DESIGNER’S DEN: Interior designer Lori Graham has put her extensively renovated Observatory Circle NW residence on the market for $1,795,000 Interior design darling Lori Graham of Lori Graham Design + Home listed   TH market for a cool $10 million. The magnificent STREET NW for $1,795,000. Graham, a 22-room main house, built in 1925, sits on former lawyer, has been a designer for more 100 acres of verdant pastures, sweeping than 10 years. The listing evokes the same lawns and brilliant gardens (not to mention sophistication and style for which she is an additional 227 acres available if desired). known, with mid-century modern touches. The property, truly one of the finest estates The completely renovated five-bedroom, in Virginia, has been beautifully restored and center hall Colonial near Observatory Circle features superb craftsmanship, a flagstone features new flooring and drywall as well as a terrace surrounding a heated pool, a stone new kitchen and bathrooms. Other amenities courtyard stable, caretakers’ apartments, include rich ebony floors, custom built-ins, riding ring and stocked ponds bordering elegant lighting and a gourmet kitchen with Goose Creek. Listing agents for the property waterfall island. are Mary Ann McGowan of Thomas & Talbot Real Estate. CONGRESSIONAL COUNTRY CLUB FOXHUNTER’S DREAM: “Bolinvar,� DREAM: Nancy Orleans Singer is selling   the historic Georgian manor at   Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr CARLYNNDRIVE in Bethesda for $999,500. MOUNTVILLEROAD in Middleburg is on the at editorial@washingtonlife.com.

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MYWASHINGTON Mark Ein, entrepreneur, investor and owner of theWashington Kastles

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF TENNIS IN WASHINGTON? From the White House court and many storied private clubs to the incredible inner city programs that combine tennis and education, the game is deeply woven into the fabric of our city.The sport is growing here and our region will remain one of the nation’s best tennis communities.

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HOW HAVE YOU CONTRIBUTED TO THE GAME? We have achieved incredible results including three straight championships, four titles in five years, the longest winning streak in U.S. pro sports history, sell-out crowds virtually every night and a million dollars of charitable contributions. Mainly, I hope we created lifelong memories for families that come to the matches, provided experiences to lots of people who wouldn’t have had the opportunity, and inspired kids to reach for their dreams. WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE LANDMARK BEALLWASHINGTON HOUSE WHICH YOU PURCHASED FROM KATHARINE GRAHAM’S ESTATE? We are planning to start our renovation at the end of year and will move in as soon as we can. We plan on raising our family there and making it our home for the rest of our lives. SHOULD DAN SNYDER CHANGE THE NAME OF HIS FOOTBALL TEAM? Yes. I grew up loving the Redskins, singing the fight song and had the name and logo on childhood jackets, jerseys and even my pillowcases! I understand his loyalty to the legions of diehard fans, but, when you have the opportunity to right a

wrong and make the world a better place, we should all seize it. This would be a powerful action and important legacy for Dan.

MY TOP SPOTS 1. Fiola (601 Pennsylvania Ave. NW) and also Fiola Mare (3050 K St. NW), the most beautiful restaurant in Washington. I’m a proud investor in both and have been friends with Fabio Trabocchi since he was the sous chef at Bice. 2. Union Market (1309 5th St. NE) is a glimpse into the future of Washington, D.C. Brooklyn meets Washington. 3. Kastles Stadium (800 Water St. SW). One of our Kastles’ slogans is “Where Memories are Created” and we have made a lot in our stadium. We are 22-1 at home over the last three seasons including two Championship matches which is every boy’s dream to accomplish in his hometown. My greatest thrill is to see families cheering their home team until the last point is played. 4. 9:30 Club (815 V St. NW). Probably the best music venue in the United States. I have seen epic shows I will never forget including Green Day, Pearl Jam, Vampire Weekend and the Foo Fighters. A little known secret: the food is actually really good. 5. Edgemoor Tennis Club (7415 Exeter Rd., Bethesda. Md.) is a storied old neighborhood tennis club where many tennis legends have played. My weekend doubles matches with good friends is one of my great joys. 6. Washington Wizards games at the Verizon Center. The team is looking really good now and into the future. Our group on the floor always has fun and shares a lot of laughs no matter what the score.

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M A R K E I N P H OTO BY TO N Y P OW E L L ; F I O L A M A R E P H OTO BY G R EG P OW E R S ; U N I O N M A R K E T P H OTO BY TO M KO C H E L ; K A ST L E S P H OTO CO U RT E SY M A R K E I N ;WA S H I N GTO N W I Z A R DS P H OTO V I A W I K I M E D I A CO M M O N S U S E R M A K 79 1 2 .

WHO IS YOUR GREATEST INSPIRATION? My parents, who escaped Europe before and after World War II. Especially my mom and her family who survived the Holocaust and gave me a deep appreciation not only for the precariousness of life, but the power of resilience, a positive attitude and grace in the toughest of circumstances.


Washington Life Magazine - Summer 2014 Issue  

GRAPE RUSH : The Power Players in Virginia’s Wine Industry John Kent Cooke, Jean Case, Eric Trump, David Greenhill and Chris Pearmund John...

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