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OLIVERSTONE REVISITS WASHINGTON CHEF FREDERIKDEPUE PREVIEWSHIS NEWRESTAURANT MENUMBK CELEBRITYDESIGNER DAVIDTURTERAON PREVENTINGCANCER

REAL ESTATE NEWS:

Buyers snap up historic properties INSIDE HOMES:

Muted harmony with Bill and Sylvia Chip on Observatory Circle PA RT PAIES! RT PA IE RT S! IE S!

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42 '328)287 MARCH 2014

CASUALELEGANCE WITHVINCENTDEPAUL MENOFSUBSTANCE ANDSTYLE EDITOR'SLETTER



LIFESTYLES Rebel Sophisticates..............................................

TRENDREPORTSunshine Yellow ...................  TRENDREPORTEnglish Rose .......................  TRENDREPORTMenswear Gray ................... 

FYIDC

PERFECTPITCHSoprano Rising .......................

INSIDER'SGUIDE ..................................... THEDISHChef Frederick De Pue......................... SOCIALCALENDARMarch Events ...............

CHARITYSPOTLIGHTCelebrity designer David Tutera on Prevent Cancer Foundation ..................... 

POLLYWOOD Alvin Ailey Opening Night Gala .............................

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

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FASHIONEDITORIAL

HOMELIFE INSIDEHOMES Bill and Sylvia Chip .............

REALESTATENEWS

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY OVERTHEMOON

Pieces of History ................................................... 

Hearts and Flowers ...............................................  Washington Winter Show .......................................

The State of the Union ..........................................

Arianespace Party ................................................. 

Wizards Salon for Sandy Hook Promise.....................

CNMC Dancing After Dark .................................. 

BET Honors.......................................................

GM Auto Show/Rogue 24 Luncheon ....................... 

EMBASSYROW

Washington Ballet's Noche de Pasion......................

Diplomacy and Giving...........................................

Capital City Ball .................................................

NDI Democracy Dinner.........................................

Life with Cancer 25th Anniversary Brunch.................. 

Beatles Tribute Event .............................................

TTR Sotheby's Carroll and Greg's Winter Fest ............ 

Christine Lagarde Dinner .......................................

Russian NewYears Eve Ball ....................................

WPCF 70th Annual Congressional Dinner ................

Beasley Real Estate 2nd Anniversary Party .................

Sundance Film Festival 2014 ..................................

Parties, Parties, Parties ............................................

OPENHOUSE Newly Listed .............................  MYWASHINGTON Arena Stage Artistic Director Molly Smith ...................

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ONTHECOVER Local actor/model Vincent De Paul (photo by Gian Andrea Di Stefao, full crew credits inside) On Vince: ERNEST ALEXANDER raincoat and DOLCEVITA CASHMERE cardigan; TOPFROMLEFT"Rebel Sophisticates" fashion editorial (photo by Violetta Markelou, full crew credits inside); Neil Cohen, Ted Leonsis and Jack Davies at the Sandy Hook Benefit (photo by Alfredo Flores); Kevin Gray, Sim Khan and William Brawner at the Men of Susbtance and Style feature photoshoot (photo by Ben Droz); VALENTINO "The Rockstud" leather clutch ($1,545); saksfifthavenue.com; GIVENCHY floral print leather pumps ($620), saksfifthavenue.com.

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T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

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Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased


EDITOR’S LETTER

He’s Got Style Much attention is paid to Style is also present in the women’s fashion choices in way in which we decorate magazines, countless blogs our homes. Mies van der and by-the-minute social Rohe’s famous expression media tweets and status “less is more” is perfectly updates Some even say you embodied in the Observatory can track economic trends Circle residence of Sylvia by the height of women’s and Bill Chip, where the hemlines. Lately, however, design firm Solis Betancourt we’ve noticed something & Sherrill worked its magic. of a quiet revolution in the The neutral-paletted house sartorial world of our male has been adpated from a counterparts, especially in the bustling family home to an Nancy Reynolds Bagley, Kate Damon, Paul Freedman, Alexandra Migoya, nation’s capital. We touched empty-nester’s oasis and back Pilar O’Leary and Viviana Lopez Green at the Noche de Pasion Gala upon this a few issues ago, to grandchildren central over (Photo by Tony Powell) but would be remiss if we the course of the 28 years in didn’t shine a bigger light on the increasing number of stylish which the Chips have lived there. Washington men. These actors, business consultants, lawyers and As spring gets into full gear, we report on all the best parties. White House worker bees aren’t afraid to mix and match, even Catch up in these pages with the Washington Ballet’s Noche when it comes to the ubiquitous regional uniform, the power de Pasion Gala (where I celebrated my birthday), CNMC’s suit.They’ve definitely got a knack for accessories judging by the Dancing After Dark, a fun-loving 50th tribute to the Beatles patterned pocket squares, argyle socks and denim jackets sprinkled at the Residence of the British Ambassador and Alvin Ailey’s throughout our Men of Substance and Style feature. thrilling opening night, among many others. Stay tuned next While on break from filming a comedy with Gloria Estefan month when we cover the Prevent Cancer Foundation’s annual and Jim Belushi, local actor/model Vincent De Paul chatted with gala, THEARC’s Wacky and Whimsical Tea, Teach for America’s Washington Life about his budding career and his personal style ‘Leadership Changing Lives’ gala and much much more! icon, Gianni Versace. This local boy is one to watch, for sure. Supplementing our coverage of the personalities behind the clothes is a super-sized trend report for both genders, packing enough wardrobe punch to pull you out of a particularly long winter and finally into spring (whether Mother Nature is on the same page or not!). Nancy R. Bagley If that’s not enough to kick-start the season, our fashion story Editor in Chief should inspire plenty of sartorial inspiration. Photographed at the Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her stunning Blind Whino event space that’s filled with art both inside at nbagley@washingtonlife.com and out, don’t be surprised if a jolt of creativity starts coursing through your closet.

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FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington

‘Camp David’

In 1978, President Jimmy Carter gathered Israeli Prime Minister Menachim Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat at historic Camp David for 13 days of negotiations.The result was the historic Camp David Accords, which established a framework for peace in the Middle East and eventually earned Begin and Sadat the Nobel Peace Prize. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lawrence Wright captures that historic time in Arena Stage’s much-anticipated production of “Camp David,” starring Tony Award-winner Ron Rifkin and Emmy Award-winner Richard Thomas, directed by Arena’s Molly Smith. March 21-May 4, 2014, $55-$110, Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW, 202-488-3300, arenastage.org

Environmental Film Festival

LIGHTSCAMERAACTION

Grab some popcorn and take a seat at the 22nd annual Environmental Film Festival (March 1830). With a theme of “Our Cities, Our Planet,” this year’s films examine the challenges posed by the world’s cities as they struggle to balance environmental and economic needs. More than 170 documentary, narrative, animated, archival, experimental and children’s films will be screened over the two-week period, and most will include discussions with filmmakers and environmental experts; many are free to the public. Mayor Vincent Gray is expected to make an appearance to discuss Sustainable DC, a citywide initiative aiming to make Washington the “greenest, healthiest and most livable city in the nation.” For the full schedule visit dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org.

Artini 2014

SHAKESWIRLSIP Belly up to bars around town on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays through March 18 as local mixologists serve up “artinis” — martinis inspired by works in the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s collection from Edward Hopper’s “Ground Swell” to Thomas Hart Benton’s “Martha’s Vineyard.” Then on March 22, head to the Corcoran for an art-inspired cocktail party where these creative mixes will compete for the title of best drink. See the full list of Artini feature nights (locations and dates) at www.corcoran.org/artini.; gala March 22, 8:30 p.m., Corcoran Gallery of Art, creative cocktail attire, $125-200. 10

Verdi’s ‘Il Corsaro’

OPERATICHEIGHTS

Washington Concert Opera brings Giuseppe Verdi’s drama on the high seas to the stage in this production of “Il Corsaro,” based on Lord Byron’s popular 1814 poem. Tenor Michael Fabiano plays Corrado, who is torn between his love for the freedom of a pirate’s life and the alluring Medora, portrayed by lyric soprano Nicole Cabell. The production also stars soprano Tamara Wilson, Washington National Opera’s 2011 Singer of the Year. March 9, 6 p.m., $40-$110, George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium, 21st and H St. NW, 202-364-5826, concertopera.org

(Photo by Gary Erskine)

Ford’s Theatre Walking Tours

HISTORYONFOOT

After an unusually snowy winter, it’s time to venture back outside with the return of Ford’s Theatre’s popular “History on Foot” walking tours, led by costumed actors. Detective McDevitt guides attendees through the events leading up to President Lincoln’s assassination at the theater. Explore the clues that went unnoticed and visit locations where John Wilkes Booth and his co-conspirators plotted to bring down Lincoln and his cabinet. Comfortable shoes are recommended for this eight-stop tour from the theater to the White House. Ford’s Theatre, 1.6 mile walk lasting about two hours, tours run from March 20 through May 28,Wednesdays and Thursdays at 6:45 p.m., Saturdays at 10:15 a.m., $15, 1-800-982-2787, www.fords.org WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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C A M P DAV I D I L LU ST R AT I O N BY A DA M S I M P S O N ; E N V I R O N M E N TA L F I L M F E ST I VA L P H OTO BY M I L E S F I L M S ;WA S H I N GTO N C O N C E RT O P E R A P H OTO BY UR BA N OAS I S ST U D I OS ; F O R D’S T H E AT RE P H OTO BY GARY E RS K I N E

HISTORYREDUX


FYIDC | THEDISH

DIG IN AT MENU What to expect at Chef Frederik De Pue’s new multi-concept restaurant, Menu MBK PHOTOS BY TONY BROWN

I

n the ever expanding culture of celebrity chefdom, chef Frederik De Pue has done the impossible, managing to fly under the radar in Washington for more than 10 years. Between his time as Executive Chef of the European Commission Embassy and running 42˚ Catering, De Pue took his time acquainting himself with Washington’s culinary scene while laying the groundwork for his entrepreneurial future. “I wanted to establish a better client list and professional relationships and be financially ready before I opened my own restaurant,” De Pue says. “I felt no pressure.” Once he was ready, De Pue moved quickly bringing not one but two restaurants to the forefront of the dining landscape: his seasonaldriven Table in Shaw and a seafood restaurant in Penn Quarter, Azur. Table’s success was instantaneous, with lines around the block on opening day, consistent press buzz for months afterward and inclusion in Bon Appetit’s Top 50 New Restaurants list; a year later and it’s still one of the most coveted reservations in town. With the intellectual crowd and heavyweight politicians (from the heads of NSC and World Bank to the First Lady) who have dined at Table, this under-the-radar fine dining experience is like bringing a piece of the West Village from New York to Washington. A year after the successful launch of Table, De Pue has expanded his resume with a new three-fold venture, Menu MBK (Market, BistroBar, Kitchen), combining his talents for both restaurants and catering. Similar to Table, De Pue has created a home away from home atmosphere with hearty farm-to-table food in a living room setting. On the ground floor Market offers local produce, artisinal meats and cheeses, housemade jarred sauces, baked goods, sandwiches, coffee, craft beer and wine and prepared foods; De Pue envisions it as a one-stop neighborhood grocery store.

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On the third and fourth floors BistroBar offers customers a homey place to enjoy their purchases from downstairs and an alternative work environment (yes, they have free wi-fi) during the day and converts to a lounge with bistro fare at night. The caramel popcorn, Coke and nougat ice cream sundae (a playful take on movie theater fare) is a don’t miss and the cheese chariot is a divine end to any meal. Many of the items served in Bistro can be purchased from Market, including cheeses from the chariot and the irresistable bacon and herbs Parker House rolls. The most recently opened letter of MBK, Kitchen, is a six-seat chef ’s table with two nightly seatings offering five-course $65 tasting menus each revolving around five ingredients rotating monthly. First up: Lambic, rabbit, chocolate, flounder and endive. Like at Table, guests can expect the food on all levels of Menu MBK to be fresh, simple and accessible with influences from De Pue’s European heritage. And though De Pue sees similaritiesin his approach to cooking at both restaurants, “it comes down to bringing the natural flavors out,”he says there are distinct differences in the cuisines. “You are never going to see meatballs at Table, because Table is about finesse,” says De Pue. “But [at Menu MBK] you’ll still have beautiful plates of food, just with a little more fun.” He has already seen a large variation from Table in the diners frequenting Menu, from businessmen in suits drinking at the bar, to 20-somethings on laptops sipping coffee all day and professionals conducting meetings in the lounge. “I wanted to constantly have people coming through here all day long and to create a truly inviting atmosphere,” De Pue says. “We have something for everyone.”

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FYIDC | SOCIALCALENDAR

MARCH

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PREVENTCANCER FOUNDATIONGALA More than 900 guests from the business, diplomatic, government, medical, sports, media and social communities gather annually at this benefit to aid the foundation’s mission of saving lives through cancer prevention and early detection. Last year’s gala raised a record $1.3 million and organizers hope to do even better this year. Japanese Amb. Kenichiro Sasae and his wife Nobuko are this year’s honorary patrons. Ellen Noghes will receive the 2014 Cancer Champion award. National Building Museum; 7 p.m.; black-tie; $500; sponsorships start at $7,000; contact Kristen Fagley, 703-519-2103, kristen. fagley@preventcancer.org

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THEARCWACKYAND WHIMSICALTEA Children and adults alike look forward to this fun-filled Sunday at the Ritz, complete with a high tea, silent auction and games galore. Eun Yang of NBC-4 returns as honorary chairwoman and Elizabeth Engel, Jill White, Leah Frelinghuysen and Sonja DeCarlo serve as event chairwomen. Ritz-Carlton Washington, D.C.; 2 p.m.; $85 for children 13 and under, $150 for adults; sponsorships start at $500; contact Janet Stone, jstone@thearcdc.org

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TEACHFORAMERICA ‘LEADERSHIP CHANGINGLIVES’GALA The fourth annual gala celebrates Teach for America’s efforts to give kids across the country access to an excellent education. Local teachers and alumni will be featured along with live performances and cocktails. Omni Shoreham Hotel; 6:30 p.m.; cocktail attire; $500; sponsorships start at $2,500; contact Coury Shadyac, 202-465-7800 ext. 22114, coury.shadyac@teachforamerica.org

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LEUKEMIABALL After 26 years, The Leukemia Society’s ball has raised nearly $48 million for the fight against leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma. This year

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Kristin Rae Cecchi and Mae Haney Grennan at THEARC’s 2013 Wacky and Whimsical Tea (Photo by Kyle Samperton)

Huey Lewis & The News will entertain at the event, which includes 2,000 guests, a reception, silent auction, dinner, MercedesBenz raffle and dancing. Walter E. Washington Convention Center; 6:30 p.m.; black-tie; $1,000; sponsorships start at $75,000; contact Korey Lindesmith, 703-399-2957, korey.lindesmith@lls.org

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SAVE THE DATE :/6321625('(9(176

APRIL 2 VITALVOICESGLOBAL LEADERSHIPAWARDS APRIL 5 AFRICAREGALA

UNCFMASKEDBALL The United Negro College Fund hosts a lively black tie evening of dinner and dance to support minority students in getting to and through college. Debbie and Ernest Jarvis and Steven and Suzanne Canton will serve as chairmen and Julia & Company will provide the entertainment. Andrew Mellon Auditorium; 6:30 pm; $500; contact Meta Willliams, 202-8100332, meta.williams@uncf.org.

APRIL 12 CATHOLICCHARITIES GALA APRIL 25 CORCORANBALL APRIL 25NATIONALMUSEUMOF WOMENINTHEARTSGALA APRIL 30 REFUGEESINT’L TH ANNIVERSARYDINNER APRIL 30 MSWOMENONTHE MOVELUNCHEON

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POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPolitics﹐Hollywood﹐MediaandDiplomacy|BET Honors, Alvin Ailey Opening Night Gala and more!

Twitter Chairman Jack Dorsey and Rep. Nita Lowey at the 2013 NDI Democracy Dinner (Photo by Tony Powell)

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POLLYWOOD

Katharine Weymouth, Liddly Manson and Katharine Boasberg

Gina Adams, Lyndon Boozer and Debra Lee

Rep. Steven Horsford and Dr. Sonya Horsford with Nicole Venable and Will Jawando

Robert Battle Rep. Terri Sewell and Rep. Karen Bass WL SPONSORED

Melissa Maxfield and Terrence Thompson

ALVIN AILEY OPENING NIGHT Kennedy Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Paul Webber, Rep. James Clyburn

THIRTY AND THRIVING: The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, now in its 30th year, certainly knows how to celebrate anniversaries. Two recent premiere productions were on tap for the company’s North American tour. The night also marked the 15th annual Washington gala benefit, a rousing affair that Washington Post publisher Katharine Weymouth (one of the evening’s six vice chairmen) calls a favorite for her on the local social calendar. “Here’s to 30 more,” cheered artistic director Robert Bale, greeting guests at the start. The splendidly bedecked audience, heavy with corporate titles, gave dancers a standing ovation as usual at the end of the iconic “Revelations” piece — enthusiasm that went on late into the night on the Roof Terrace dance floor. — Ann Geracimos

Rep. Lacy Clay and Pat Beauchemin

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Christopher Zunner and Bennett Rink

Rep. Elijah Cummings and Dr. Maya Rockeymoore Cummings

Allison and Julia Haywood

Hope Boykin, Daniel Harder and Alicia Graf Mack

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Robyn and Andre Wells

Sean Carmon, Jacqueline Green and Megan Jakel

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POLLYWOOD

HOLLYWOODONTHEPOTOMAC

THESTATEOFTHEUNION In conversation with filmmaker Oliver Stone B Y J A N E T D O N O VA N

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e’s exacting, difficult, very demanding. He’s tireless and he is a perfectionist,” historian Peter Kuznick replied when we asked him what it was like working with legendary filmmaker Oliver Stone. They met over dinner in late 2007, and after talking about history and politics Stone suggested they collaborate on a documentary. They did, and it took five years to make. Showtime recently aired 10 of the 12-part series “The Untold History of The United States.” “What he brings is a vision and the ability to make something very dramatic,” Kuznick noted. “The way that Stone could bring it all together — my words, his words, the music, the visuals and the content — was staggering.” The series takes a look at events that were under-reported at the time, a classified America we were never meant to see but that crucially shaped our country’s unique and complex history throughout the 20th century. As Showtime describes it: “From the atomic bombing of Japan to the Cold War and the fall of Communism, this in-depth, surprising, and totally riveting series demands to be watched again and again.” Movie junkies, historians, authors, filmmakers and a multilingual audience filled the Goethe Institute Theater to meet the collaborating duo at the behest of John Hanshaw of the Washington Film Institute. Guests were eager participants in a vigorous exchange where Stone gave his views on personality versus character, history repeating itself, the rise and fall of empires and how to reverse a universally destructive worldwide path we and other nations are on. Stone mesmerized his audience. On character versus personality: Referring to Presidents Kennedy and Roosevelt, he maintained that “character takes shape over time. Personality to me seems sometimes more superficial than character. Roosevelt, who had polio, had character. It must have certainly changed his thinking. He was always

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Oliver Stone and Peter Kuznick (Photo by Janet Donovan)

a certain kind of man, but it [polio] deepened his commitment to life. Kennedy was in that horrible PT109 story that we know about and he saved lives. He was under fire, he had responsibilities as a lieutenant. Kennedy as a “young punk,” I think that is what he was called then by his commanding officers, had character. He had problems — the back, the Addison’s disease. That does weather a man, and I think that makes his outlook far more empathetic to others.” These personal exper iences, Stone believes, influenced how they made decisions when they became president. History repeating itself is self explanatory. Where are those empires today? Is there hope? “This whole country has changed over 30 some years,” Stone said lamenting the state of the union. “Once you start to peel back the military state that we have in any form, a lot flows from that. Maybe we’ll still be fighting about domestic spending, but we’ll have a lot more to go around. We’ve given out a lot of suffering and we are suffering.” “But it’s easy, of course,” he continued. “Greed drives power, power says we want control and we want to rule the world and it’s easier to do without boots on the ground. It’s far easier to use drones and the NSA.” Stone added that he feels the pull of

doomsday gravity but plans to stick around. “I like gravity,” he said. Stone grew up in a conservative Republican family, and as happens in many families, it was a kind of back-and-forth generational thing, politically speaking. Personal situations often set the scene for our future. Stone’s “Wall Street” was a tribute to his father Lou Stone, a stockbroker during the Great Depression. He served in the U.S. Army in Vietnam and received the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. He went on to write and direct “Platoon,” a 1986 American war film and the first of a trilogy of Vietnam War films by Stone. We asked the filmmaker to comment on those two apparent paradoxes, Wall Street and war. On Wall Street: “I came from a privileged upbringing in New York City. It takes a while to get away from that.” On war: “You see it up front, you know the price of the war. It didn’t radicalize me, but it certainly put me on the road to changing my thinking.” Oliver Stone probably doesn’t mind whether you love him or hate him or fall somewhere in between. His work speaks for itself. He is a master of controversy and seemingly flourishes in it while bringing us to the table for much-needed conversations about “the state of the union.”

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Bill Eacho and Fredrick Schaufeld

Sheila Casey and Nicole Hockley

Lynn and Ted Leonsis with Billy Campbell and Loree and Rick Allen Earl Stafford, Dara Feldman and Amanda Stafford

Devin Schain WL EXCLUSIVE

ON BEHALF OF SANDY HOOK PROMISE BENEFIT Verizon Center, Owner’s Box | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES MONUMENTAL MOVES: At an intimate gathering in the owner’s box before a Washington Wizards game, guests mingled over cocktails followed by a presentation in Monumental Theater about Sandy Hook Promise’s goals for 2014. Ted Leonsis and Fred Schaufeld played host to an intimate gathering of guests that included Judge William Newman and several SHP parents. SHP’s “Parent Together” campaign was announced by Nicole Hockley, mother of Sandy Hook victim Dylan Hockley, who provided an update on what the group accomplished in 2013 regarding its programs to promote mental health care and gun safety.

Tony Nader and Jacob Garlick

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

John Wood and Leana Katz

Dan and Lisa Jobe with Brien and Amy Biondi Gen. George Casey and Mark Barden

Robert Pollack and Marc Katz

Steve Swad

Sarah Schain and Robert Schain

Rob Cox

Jack Davies and Kay Kendall

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Karen Schaufeld and Wayne Pacelle

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Cristina Pollack

Cherrie Doggell

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POLLYWOOD

Ice Cube and Kimberly Woodruff

Aretha Franklin, Berry Gordy and Smokey Robinson Stephen Hill, Debra Lee and Wayne Brady

Jennifer Hudson

Janelle Monae Ludacris Joe Morton WL EXCLUSIVE

BET HONORS Warner Theater and National Museum of Women in the Arts | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL TRAILBLAZERS: This year’s Black Entertainment Television Honors were all about recognizing those who came before with special tributes paid to Berry Gordy, Aretha Franklin and Nelson Mandela and honors going to American Express Chairman/CEO Kenneth Chenault and visual artist Carrie Mae Weems. As in past years, the performances were top-notch with Janelle Monae, Mariah Carey and Wayne Brady bringing down the house at show time. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Rev. Al Sharpton

Ken Chenault and Carrie Mae Weems Marcella Jones, Tanya Lombard and Jotaka Eaddy Sela Collins, Gwen Ifill and Art Collins

LaVar and Trishia Arrington

Paxton and Rachel Baker with Tamar Braxton and Vincent Herbert 22

Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Mayor Vincent Gray

Wolf and Lynn Blitzer

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POLLYWOOD | EMBASSYROW

Diplomacy and Giving Mr. Hollande comes to Washington BY ROLAND FLAMINI

Maori performance at New Zealand Embassy (Photo by Mike Waller)

CAUSES: Ambassadors new to Washington — in the sense that they haven’t previously served in their embassies here — are often surprised at the demands made on them by philanthropy, yet their generous response in terms of time, effort and expense tends to be taken for granted. So here’s a salute to a few of the benefit receptions and cultural events in February. At the New Zealand Embassy, chargé d’affaires Anthony Smith hosted a reception to promote this month’s Environmental Film Festival, complete with a Maori performance to bring good luck to the festival. Continuing its marathon 2013 Year of Italian Culture program beyond its sell-by date, the Italian Embassy marked Giuseppe Verdi’s bicentenary with “Essential Verdi Week.” On Feb. 25 at Villa Firenze, Ambassador Claudio Bisogniero and wife Laura Denise hosted a conference on Verdi’s music followed by a reception.Two days later, Verdi’s familiar but always catching music echoed through the vast atrium of the Italian chancery on Whitehaven Street NW at a sort of indoor street festival of Italian music, with wines and cuisine from different regions of Italy. The culminating event of the essential week is a concert of Verdi favorites by the Washington Chorus and several soloists on March 2 at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. The month featured a rare double-header in fund-raising events: a reception for the Light

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Giuseppe Verdi’s music was recently featured at an Italian Embassy concert.

of Healing Hope Foundation at the British Embassy residence hosted by Sir Peter and Lady Westmacott at which the main item in the accompanying silent, online auction was lunch for six with Spanish Ambassador Ramon Gil-Casares, at his residence. The foundation is active in bringing comfort to wounded veterans and cancer patients in part through distribution of the published volumes of metaphysical poetry of its founder, Alexandra Villard de Borchgrave. But the evening’s honoree was Hollister (“Holly”) K. Petraeus for her social work among the military.

Stephen Colbert, “star of a satiric program

AS OTHERS SAW IT: When it comes to state dinners, the Obama administration has made history, but not of the desirable kind — gate crashers (at the dinner for Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh), angry cancellations (Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff), and now having to destroy hundreds of already printed invitations to last month’s dinner for French President François Hollande because they included the name of his no-show mistress, Valerie Trierweiler. Some invites must surely have escaped destruction — and will one day appear on Ebay. In the end, even the French media had to admit that it turned out to be a very successful state dinner, although Le Monde pointed out with a raised eyebrow that on First Lady Michelle Obama’s right at the main table sat

HOW TWEET IT IS: Time was when tweeting was for the birds. Now tweeting (along with Facebook) is a widely used diplomatic tool, with the Twitter account prominently displayed on embassy websites (another modern diplomatic tool). It’s a faster way to reach out to the wider public than a press conference, and no questions asked. It’s also a good way to gauge people’s interest. For example, the Twitter account of the European Union mission in Washington registers more than 20,000 followers, and judging from the tweets on view a lot of the traffic focuses on the U.S.-E.U. free trade agreement now under discussion. And that’s not the highest number: The Saudi Arabian Embassy has 32,600 followers, Jordan has 4,084, and Indonesia just over 5,000.

that has abundantly mocked the French president’s scooter excursions.” Meanwhile, Le Monde added, Christine Lagarde, the French managing director of the International Monetary Fund rumored to be a possible “substitute (French) first lady” for the occasion, was seated at another table. The French press also quoted President Obama’s line about how Americans love “all things French — the films, the food, the wine — especially the wine.” That may be, but at the dinner, American wines were served throughout.

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Tom Daschle and Howard Dean Greg Craig, Johnnie Carson and Kenneth Wollack Ray and Shaista Mahmood Madeleine Albright and Jack Dorsey WL EXCLUSIVE

Craig Newman and Rep. Nita Lowey

NDI DEMOCRACY DINNER Ritz-Carlton, Washington, D.C. | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL SOCIALLY CONNECTED: Twenty-one civic innovators from 13 countries were honored at National Democratic Institute’s annual awards dinner, which highlighted those in the democracy and technology fields and celebrated NDI’s 30th anniversary. Twi7er’s Jack Dorsey, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power and Estonian President Toomas Ilves shared their thoughts on harnessing the power of technology to shape democracy. Former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, who recently launched the Thomas Daschle Leadership Initiative in partnership with NDI, concluded the evening by announcing the winner of a new Fiat 500.

Canadian Amb. Gary Doer and Maureen Orth

Khurrum and Candice Hasan

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Kate Graham and Amy English

Lee Satterfield. Ed Moorhouse and Capricia Marshall Lady Westmacott, British Amb. Sir Peter Westmacott and National Security Advisor Susan Rice

WL EXCLUSIVE

BEATLES TRIBUTE

Sen. Ed Markey

Norm Ornstein and Judy Harris

Residence of the British Ambassador | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL COME TOGETHER: A+er a hard day’s night, more than 300 Beatles fanatics gathered at the residence of British Ambassador Sir Peter Westmaco and Lady Westmaco to celebrate the golden anniversary of the Beatles’ first U.S. concert. There was even a “Fab Four” sighting, albeit in the form of the performing band “1964: The Tribute.” Guests donned their best ’60s garb (even the Ambassador grooved out in a mop-top wig) and enjoyed Beatles-themed fare including a “Let it Brie” cheese plate, Sgt. Peppers’ Lonely Hearts Club sandwiches, Strawberry Fields chocolate-covered strawberries and Abbey Road cocktails.

Jennifer and Jake Tapper WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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POLLYWOOD

Jackie Kucinich, Brianna Keilar and Megan Whittemore

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Rep. Donna Edwards House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Jeff Flake

Rep. Darrell Issa

Sen. Bernard Sanders and Nicole Gaudiano

WPCF CONGRESSIONAL DINNER Mandarin Oriental | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ MIDDLE GROUND: Members of Congress and the Washington Press Club Foundation took a break from the business of the day to enjoy non-partisan down time at the foundation’s fun-loving annual dinner that helps raise funds for educational programs. Republican Rep. Jeff Flake of Arizona and Democrat Rep. Donna Edwards of Maryland shared the lighthearted side of Washington politics.

Rep. Howard Coble and Rep. John Conyers

Sen. John Thune

Rep. Debbie Wasserman-Schultz

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Robert Allbritton and Wayne Berman Nicole Chedid, Amb. of Lebanon Antoine Chedid and IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde

Bill Cohen and Doris Reggie WL EXCLUSIVE

CHRISTINE LAGARDE HONORED Lebanese Embassy Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Marie Royce, H.U.D. Secretary Shaun Donovan and Christopher Isham 26

SUPER WOMAN: Christine Lagarde is a “tough lady who controls much of the economy around the world ... but she does it in an elegant, fashionable way,” Lebanese Amb. Antoine Chedid told guests at the A-List dinner he and his wife Nicole hosted for the International Monetary Fund’s managing director just before the Christmas holidays. “An astonishing woman, beautiful and extraordinarlily influential in world affairs,” added former Secretary of Defense Bill Cohen, her first boss in Washington, who jokingly took all the credit for his former protégés’ success.

Jim VandeHei

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POLLYWOOD | SUNDANCE

Sundance 2014 Robert Redford’s storied film festival celebrates its third decade BY JODY ARLINGTON

Elizabeth Banks and Chris Hanson of Stella Artois at the Stella Cidre Lounge

John Cooper, Keri Putnam and Robert Redford

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sk any Washington, D.C. mogul or pol and they will tell you how failure fueled them to greater accomplishments. Some even wear those #MajorFAILs as badges of honor. No second acts? Let me tell you about my fifth. It was in that spirit that the 30th edition of the Sundance Film Festival launched one of its more interesting initiatives, FREE FAIL: A Day in The Life of Failure, a day-long series of panels and events with artists and cultural luminaries designed to embrace failure as essential to risk-taking, innovation and the creative process. Who wouldn’t want to attempt a high kick with the Rockettes, master the art of Instagram with co-founder Mike Krieger and artist Taryn Simon, or otherwise learn to embrace opportunities to fail? This year’s festival was preceeded by the Art House Convergence, where over 50 Film Festival organizers associated with the IFP Festival Forum, a new professional association of film fests, convened with the nation’s art houses. Both IFP Festival Forum and the Art House Convergence have been nurtured by the Sundance Institute over the years, and showcase how the Institute’s cultural reach and values continue to shape the independent film world and wider cultural landscape. Another Sundance Institute program

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to note is it’s Women Filmmaker Initiative in partnership with Women in Film LA, an active collaboration to assess and address the role of women directors and producers within the film industry. Spearheaded by Sundance’s Keri Putnam and Caroline Libresco, they are laser focused on the barriers and opportunities for women in film. Miles to go, but their efforts around training, mentoring, and pipelines to key industry jobs will bear fruit. More than 30,000 cinephiles, studio executives, stars plus 12,000 journalists attended panels, discussed policy initiatives and enjoyed parties at pop-up nightclubs like Tao that rocked into the wee hours. One of the hottest invites this year was the launch party for Stella Cidre, held slopeside at the Stella Artois Lodge. Elizabeth Banks was the life of the party, rocking leather pants and a tuxedo jacket, and cozying up to the bar with fellow actors Lea Thompson, Jorge Garcia and Aaron Paul. Hit L.A. duo Capital Cities provided the soundtrack. Even still, the heart of the festival is the films and the artists who make them. The 2014 program was outstanding, with many delights in store for cineastes in the year to come. For Washingtonians, there was plenty of politically-themed content again this year, like Rory Kennedy’s visceral “Last Days of Vietnam,” which captures the heroic efforts of

service men to evacuate Saigon with neverbefore-seen footage, Ben Cotner and Ryan White’s gripping “The Case Against 8,” a behind-the-scenes look inside the case to overturn California’s ban on same-sex marriage and “We Come As Friends,” Hubert Sauper’s film exploring colonialism, imperialism and holy war over resources in Sudan. Washington filmmaker Cutter Hodeirne, scored another big win at Sundance this year, winning the top prize for directing of a US Dramatic Film for “Fishing Without Nets,”

Cutter Hodeirne, director of “Fishing Without Nets”, on location in Mombasa, Kenya

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AWARD WINNERS

While the Festival’s award winners are not always the most popular films in Park City, they without doubt showcase the rich diversity of voices, characters and places representing the very best in independent filmmaking. You are well served by taking them in:

USGRANDJURYPRIZE Dramatic and Audience Award Dramatic winner “Whiplash” by Damien Chazelle showcases how under the direction of a

WORLD CINEMA GRAND JURY PRIZE Dramatic went to “To Kill a Man” by Alejandro Fernández Almendras is the story of Jorge, a hardworking family man who’s barely making ends meet and gets mugged by Kalule, a neighborhood delinquent. When Jorge’s son decides to confront the attacker, chaos ensues.

presented to Nadav Schirman for “The Green Prince,” a reallife thriller about one of Israel’s prized intelligence sources, recruited to spy on his own

AUDIENCEAWARD U.S. Documentary Presented by Acura, went to “Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory” by Michael Rossato-Bennett. The WORLD CINEMA GRAND film captures the plight of five JURY PRIZE Documentary million Americans who suffer winner “Return to Homs” by from Alzheimer’s disease and Talal Derki follows Basset dementia—many of them alone Sarout , the 19-year-old in nursing homes. The simple national football team goal- idea that songs embedded keeper who becomes a dem- deep in memory can ease pain onstration leader and Ossama, and awaken fading minds results a 24-year-old renowned in renewed joy in life. citizen cameraman and pacifist, detained by the ruling AUDIENCEAWARD regime’s security forces. World Cinema Documentary was

people for more than a decade. Focusing on the complex relationship with his handler, the film is a gripping account of terror, betrayal and a friendship that defies all boundaries.

USGRANDJURYPRIZE ruthless instructor, a talented young drummer begins to pursue perfection at any cost, even his humanity.

Documentary winner “Rich Hill” by Andrew Droz Palermo and Tracy Droz Tragos is a searing look at poverty, taking place in a rural American town where children face heartbreaking choices, find comfort in the most fragile of family bonds and dream of a future of possibility.

based on a short film of the same name that Hodeirne premiered in 2012 at Sundance, winning the Grand Jury Prize in Short Filmmaking. The plot tells the story of struggling Somali fishermen who are lured into piracy. Also-buzzed-about political flicks this year were Jessie Moss’ “The Overnighters” about broken men in North Dakota oil fields, Joe Berlinger’s “Whitey: The United States vs. James J. Bulger,” Brian Knappenberger’s “The Internet’s Own Boy” a biopic on Aaron Swartz that follows the director’s prior look at tech versus government, “We Are Legion: The Story of the Hacktivists,” and“Mitt” directed by Greg Whiteley, a discerning portrait of presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Embibers of film culture had their minds blown while shopping for groceries with Mitt at the Park City grocery.

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Michael Pitt in “I Origins”

AUDIENCEAWARD World Cinema Dramatic went to Zeresenay Berhane Mehari’s “Difret” follows a young lawyer who operates under the government’s radar helping women and children. One young girl’s legal case exposes everything, threatening not only her career but her survival.

WASHINGTONIANSOFNOTEon the ground in Park City include producer Doug Smith, Sundance trustee Sheila Johnson, Katy Chevigny, co-director of Doc Cinematography award winning ETEAM, Doc jurist and Filmmaker, Andrea Nix Fine, Former Hoya and it seems annual Sloan Award Winner Mike Cahill who follows Sundance darling “Another Earth” with “I Origins;” plus Middleburg Film Festival Director Susan Koch, Impact Arts + Film Fund’s Kimball Stroud, Former AFI Docs Festival director Sky Sitney, DC Shorts’ Jon Gann and Melissa Torres, Charles Paret and Clark Seydel.

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TAG HERE TAG HERE

casual elegance H

e may not be a household name just yet, but local actor and T H E model Vincent De Paul is quietly making his way through the ranks in Hollywood with turns in blockbuster hits like “Hitch” and “Poseidon,” not to mention roles in some of the small screen’s biggest shows including “Mad Men,” “Six Feet Under” and iconic Washington favorite “The West Wing.” Recently, he won a best actor award from the Los Angeles Film & TV Awards for his turn in the indie film “Silver Case,” which also stars Eric Roberts and Seymour Cassel. While on break from filming a new movie with Gloria Estefan and James Belushi in sunny Miami, we asked the debonair former model, who was discovered by no less than Gianni Versace while jogging on the beach, to show off a few spring looks and tell us more about his personal style.

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WHATWASTHEDEFININGMOMENTWHENYOUKNEWYOUWANTEDTOBE ANACTORANDPRODUCER? As a youth, I watched classic movies with my mom and dad, Maria and Joseph Zannino, and they encouraged me to enjoy accomplished acting and well-made movies. My parents told me that I reminded them of Errol Flynn and gave me the confidence to be first an actor and eventually the producer I am today. My templates were the great actor-producers of Hollywood’s “Golden Age.” WHATORGANIZATIONSANDPHILANTHROPIESMOVEYOU?I very much enjoy serving at the House of Camillus. Recently my brothers and sisters raised funds for the Kennedy Kreiger Institute to have a playroom for children who have autism. They dedicated it in honor of my mother on January 15, 2014. I also participate in toy drives for the needy and the Hike for the Homeless for the Society of St.Vincent De Paul, my namesake.

WHATACTOR/ACTRESSHASHADTHEMOSTPROFOUNDIMPACTONYOUR CAREER?Throughout my career, I have had the good fortune of working with or meeting many wonderful actors. Ernest Borgnine was always very gracious and such a fine actor. He was in the original “Poseidon Adventure” (1972) and I was in the 2006 remake “Poseidon.” Luise Ranier made a great impression on me. She’s the oldest-living Best Actress Oscar winner. I was invited by the TCM Classic Film Festival to have lunch with Ms. Ranier and her daughter in Beverly Hills. It was a meeting of “Young Hollywood meets Legendary Hollywood.” Ms. Rainer told me that I reminded her of her leading man Paul Muni! Finally, Drew Barrymore was a pleasure to work with in “Riding in Cars with Boys.” Drew had to cry during a big emotional scene and I was to say unkind things to help her. After the scene was over, I said to her, “I’m really sorry, Drew.” She kissed me on the cheek and thanked me for helping her. IF YOU COULD PORTRAY ONE FAMOUS WASHINGTONIAN IN A MOVIE WHOWOULDITBE?Stephen Colbert. His humor and wit is off the charts.

P H OTO G RA P H E R , GI A N A N D R E A D I ST E FA N O ; ST Y L I ST, G I N O TAV E R N A R O ; H A I R / MAKEUP, GABRIEL CRUZ; MODEL , VINCENT DE PAUL FOR T H E ARTIST AGENCY

WHATAREYOUCURRENTLYWORKINGONANDWHATISYOURLATEST FILM?This past year has been very busy. I was so very happy to have acted in and produced the feature film “Fight to the Finish” which is a mixed martial arts film shot in California and directed by Warren Sheppard. “A Place Called Hollywood” directed by Gregori J. Martin in which I portray an agent in L.A. I am currently on set in south Florida working with award-winning director Kenny Ortega in a poignant comedy called, “A Change of Heart” with Gloria Estefan, James Belushi and Kathy Najimy. DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE Casual, real, eclectic, comfortable, well-fitted and contemporary. HOWDOESYOURCAREERAFFECTYOURSTYLE?I am invited to fashion weeks in New York, L.A. and Miami and I am able to see first-hand what direction men’s suiting styles are heading. HOWHASYOURSTYLECHANGEDOVERTHEYEARS?My style has changed quite a bit from when I was studying at Johns Hopkins University back in the day. At college it was all about Bass shoes and khaki trousers, wearing comfortable and functional clothes. Now, it’s more about wearing clothes suited for the occasion. I loved wearing the perfect tuxedo made for me by D.C. designer JBD clothier by Yehuda Estreicher for the Golden Globes. Through the years, my style has become more focused on the place and event. WHOISYOURBIGGESTSTYLEINSPIRATION? Gianni Versace. He celebrated the male and female form with the way he cut his garments, and his color palette and connection with Neoclassical art made him one of the great designers of his time. Sue Wong is a dear friend with exquisite taste who is very creative. She’s very much like Versace. They both channel old-world elegance in their clothes. WHATTRENDWOULDYOUNEVERTRY?WHATTRENDAREYOUDYING TOTRY?I would not try the Miley Cyrus mohawk piercing.The trend that I would liketo try is getting a buzz cut and wearing Army fatigues, playing the role of a military guy.

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FAVORITEMEN’SSTORESINWASHINGTONTOSHOP?Brooks Brothers and Saks Fifth Avenue DOYOUBELIEVETHATCLOTHESMAKETHEMAN?I believe what you wear is a reflection of personality. I also believe the way one grooms oneself is also a reflection of personality and character. WHATISTHESTATEOFMEN’SFASHIONSINWASHINGTON?Hands down, it understands the Ivy League look. It also can be wonderfully individualistic. Some fashion looks have never gone away completely. Bowties and six-button double breasted suits can still be seen regularly in Washington. I feel that we can take more steps in adding more color in clothes, a slimmer silhouette in suits and thinner ties, á la “Mad Men.”. ONVINCEOPPOSITEPAGE SHIPLEY & HALMOS jacket, www.shipley-halmos.com; TODD SNYDER shirt and trousers, www.toddsnyder.com ONVINCETHISPAGE TODD SNYDER sportscoat, cardigan and t-shirt, www.toddsnyder.com; ISAIA trousers, www.isaia.it; CORUM watch, www.corum.ch; FINE AND DANDY lapel pin, www.fineanddandyshop.com

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P H OTO CA PT I O N H E R E

ISAIA perforated suede jacket and jeans, www.isaia.it; TODD SNYDER shirt, www.toddsnyder.com

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P H OTO CAPT I O N H E RE

DOLCE VITA CASHMERE jacket, www.dolcevitacashmere.com

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P H OTO CA PT I O N H E R E

SHIPLEY & HALMOS jacket, w w w.shipley-halmos.com; TODD SNYDER shirt, www. t o d d s n yd e r.co m ; I S A I A trousers, www.isaia.it; FINE AND DANDY pocket square, www.fineanddandyshop.com

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MEN OF

79&78%2') 78=0) These fashionable lads are leading Washington’s sartoral Renaissance

PHOTOSBYBENDROZASSISTEDBYALEXANDRABARAN|HAIRBYKRISTIANANDRADA=DAVIDRIOSSALON=ASSISTEDBYCARMENLECCA MAKEUPBYFLAMINIAGARIONI=FYUBIMAKEUP&BROWSTUDIO=WWW>FYUBI>COM PHOTOGRAPHEDONLOCATIONATTHEPARKHYATT=WASHINGTON=D>C>

James Faeh >> Office of the United States Trade Representative, Executive Office of the President of the United States WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST EXCITING ISSUE YOU HAVE WORKED ON DURINGYOURTIMEINTHEEXECUTIVEOFFICEOFTHEPRESIDENT?The sheer variety on any given day is the most exciting part.The Office of the United States Trade Representative, which is part of the larger Executive Office of the President, negotiates with foreign governments on trade policy on an incredibly diverse set of issues and enforces America’s trade rights. And we also constantly work to convey to the American people the benefits of trade and our work to open markets and grow our economy. Some days I’ve been a speechwriter, some days I’ve put together briefing materials, and some days I’ve staffed my boss as we travel to events and negotiations both domestically and internationally. YOU ALSO MENTOR UP AND COMING PROGRESSIVES AT THE NEW LEADERSCOUNCILWHYDOYOUBELIEVEMENTORSHIPISIMPORTANT ANDWHATDOYOUHOPETHEYLEARNFROMYOU?I hope that they learn that Washington is full of amazing opportunities for relatively young people.You just have to go after them relentlessly, and ask for help in doing so. In life, I believe we all sink or swim together and so I consider myself lucky to be able to provide any sort of advice or guidance that I hope can be helpful DESCRIBEYOURSTYLEI like to think of myself as an old-world guy and fan of classical menswear, but with more flattering modern tailoring and accents. So whenever possible on my salary, I aim to blend classic styles of icons like Sean Connery, J.F.K., or Steve McQueen with the more modern look that Daniel Craig, Justin Timberlake or Tom Brady might sport. HOWDOESYOURCAREERAFFECTYOURSTYLE?It’s pretty much suit and tie at all times. We are frequently on long flights and so the wardrobe needs to be appropriate, durable, multi-purpose, and fit in a carry-on bag while still being able to express a little bit of style. WHOISYOURBIGGESTSTYLEINSPIRATION?Dan Trepanier, creator of tsbmen. com. I read him multiple times per week, because he perfectly captures what my generation of men wants and needs to create a flexible, functional, and stylish complete wardrobe. DOYOUBELIEVETHATCLOTHESMAKETHEMAN?I believe that the clothes can make how the man is perceived. And in Washington D.C. perception is reality. As one of many young professionals operating in an extremely competitive environment, I feel that it’s important that the image you present should be one that conveys “I’m thoughtful, well put-together, and pay attention to details.” Chance encounters and 15minute conversations can lead to first impressions that either open or close important career doors. WHATISTHESTATEOFMEN’SFASHIONINWASHINGTON?It’s improving by leaps and bounds, just in the five years I have lived here. Part of it is a larger cultural consciousness and mainstreaming of style among younger men. But part of that change is also work-related. In D.C. there are lots of smart, talented young people competing for jobs, which means that you need to be presentable, professional, and stand out from the crowd wherever you can in order to be taken seriously at a young age.

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LIFESTYLES | MENOFSUBSTANCE&STYLE

William Brawner

>>

Partner, PUBLIC New York City public relations YOURFAMILYHASBEENINREALESTATEFORGENERATIONSWHATARE THECHALLENGESOFWORKINGFORYOURFAMILY’SCOMPANYTHATARE DIFFERENTFROMWORKINGWITHANYOTHERCOMPANY?Family business, by its very nature, engenders a very unique dynamic.The advantages of working within that type of environment are plentiful as not only is there an immeasurable sense of pride you have in advancing a family legacy, but it provides a certain amount of latitude to create something new and different. On the flip side, whenever you’re in a situation where the dining room and the board room overlap so intimately, there are always going to be hurdles you need to navigate. WHATLEDYOUTOSTRIKEOUTONYOUROWNINTOPUBLICRELATIONS? HOWDIDYOUMAKETHATTRANSITION?I think there is something compelling about taking a company from its infancy and having the ability to watch it evolve. When the opportunity with PUBLIC presented itself, I knew we had a strong core group of talent which, in time, would bear fruit. Turns out I was right! ASASEVENTH-GENERATIONWASHINGTONIANWHATCHANGESHAVE YOUWITNESSEDINWASHINGTON’SSTYLESCENE?HASITCHANGEDFOR THEBETTERORFORTHEWORSE?To be honest, I’m not necessarily certain that there really was much of a defined style scene in our city growing up. Fashion, particularly men’s, was more pedestrian at that time and thus lacked any real inspiration. Over the past 10 to 15 years our city has enjoyed quite a renaissance. People are much more fashion conscious than they were before. I love walking the streets of downtown these days and witnessing the steadily growing change first-hand. WHATDOYOULIKE/NOTLIKEABOUTMEN’SFASHIONINWASHINGTON?I like the changing landscape of men’s fashion in Washington. Admittedly, there is always going to be an element that remains indifferent to style, but by and large it seems that most people are really energized by the idea of looking good. DESCRIBEYOURSTYLEPolished but casual. HOWHASYOURSTYLECHANGEDOVERTHEYEARS?While I’ve always had a penchant for fine clothing, I must admit that I’ve been using more accessories in recent years. I think it adds a nice touch of personality to the ensemble. HOW DOES YOUR CAREER AFFECT YOUR STYLE? Everyone knows the significance of “image” in the world of P.R. and that’s not lost on me. DOYOUBELIEVETHATCLOTHESMAKETHEMAN?Yes, I do.While superficial, clothing enables you to express yourself in a special way and I think there’s something to be said for that. In my opinion, fashion has nothing to do with wealth or status. Instead, it has to do with feeling good about yourself. WHOISYOURBIGGESTSTYLEINSPIRATION?007, of course. Daniel Craig is always so well put together. WHATTRENDWOULDYOUNEVERTRY?I would never try and pull off skin-tight leather pants. Only a few, say Bob Marley or Jim Morrison, could pull that off and I’m not nearly as cool as those two. WHAT TREND ARE YOUDYING TO TRY?I’m really excited about getting a double-breasted suit this spring. They’ve enjoyed a nice revival in recent years and designers seem to be putting a modern spin on the old-school look. FAVORITEMEN’SSTORESINWASHINGTON?Ralph Lauren, Suit Supply and Thomas Pink

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Chadleon Booker >> Senior associate, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP WHATDOYOUFINDMOSTCHALLENGINGABOUTYOURWORK?The everchanging landscape of client engagements. One day you may find yourself providing a client with organizational development expertise and the next, managing a massive project focused around corporate governance. It’s an environment that even the most seasoned professionals struggle with on a daily basis because it requires constant vigilance, meticulous attention to detail, and adaptability to complex situations. Change is the only reliable constant, which then becomes one of the many catalytic reasons I continually do what I can to learn, evolve and adapt not only to drive value for the clients I serve, but also to succeed in my career. YOUAREACTIVEINTHEPHILANTHROPICWORLDWHYISTHISIMPORTANT TOYOUWHATDOYOUHOPETOACCOMPLISH?One of the most important lessons that I learned from my parents was the act of giving back. When I first moved to Washington, I was not able to significantly help others as I was in the process of solidifying my own roots here. However, several friends and family members were instrumental in charting my success.When I was in a position to reciprocate, I wanted to “pay-it-forward” in a big way. I actively support Becky’s Fund, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, So Others May Eat (S.O.M.E), and Chance for Life. Ideally, I hope to encourage my friends and family to support their own local charities and philanthropic organizations to enrich the lives of others less fortunate. WHOHASBEENTHEBIGGESTINFLUENCEINYOURLIFE?HOWHASTHIS PERSONSHAPEDWHOYOUARETODAY?My father is the epitome of what a role model should be. He’s a God-fearing Christian, a husband of 37 years, a brilliant intellectual, and my moral compass when life gets out of equilibrium. My dad is an eternal optimist who always attempts to see the better angels in everyone and do whatever he can to help someone in need — a trait I believe I also share. DOYOUBELIEVETHATCLOTHESMAKETHEMAN?“We act the way we dress. Neglected and untidy clothes reflect a neglected and untidy mind.”This anonymous quote perfectly articulates my belief that clothes do indeed play a major part in “making the man.” I believe that in life we are given a finite number of “game-changing” opportunities to make a difference, enhance our current station in life, or do something remarkable. Unfortunately, many never even get their foot in the door because of the snap judgments that are often made within the first 30 seconds of meeting someone. I’m not insinuating that dressing impeccably is a direct correlation to achieving success; but that it significantly enriches one’s chances of carpe diem. DESCRIBEYOURSTYLE On most days, it’s a hybrid of classic Frank Sinatra meets contemporary James Bond. I’ve always been an aficionado of a well-tailored suit, especially when the ensemble is complete with French cufflinks, pocket square, tie bar, wingtip shoes, and a martini — shaken, not stirred, of course. During the summer, it’s more laid back and relaxed, which could entail anything from Polo shorts and Sperry boat shoes to linen pants, tank top and a fedora. WHOISYOURBIGGESTSTYLEINSPIRATION?Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack, James Bond, Don Draper and Fred Astaire. I’ve always been a fan of classic well-tailored dress.These gentlemen embodied “class.” I wanted to mirror my dress off of their example in hopes of one day conveying a message of confidence and success without uttering a single word. WHATTRENDWOULDYOUNEVERTRY?WHATTRENDAREYOUDYINGTO TRY?I’ve never been a fan of unkempt dress of any kind. When it comes to clothing I enjoy, it’s always tailored. I recently noticed the cardigan sweater trend. I never thought it was a style that would work for my particular body type, but gave it a shot recently; I was hooked.

extremely laid back. Now that I live in Washington, it’s definitely lots of suits and clothing designed to articulate a more corporate-centric message. FAVORITEMEN’SSTORESINWASHINGTON? For business attire I turn to Nordstrom or Neiman Marcus, but when it’s a relaxed weekend, I prefer my tried-and-true staple, Polo Ralph Lauren. WHATISTHESTATEOFMEN’SFASHIONINWASHINGTON? Given the nature of the corporate machine that is Washington, almost every man I know has a penchant for tailored suits and contemporary style.We’re definitely not New York or L.A. by any stretch of the word, but then again, we’re not trying to be either. I believe the District’s aim is being dressed to impress for eventual success. And it’s this state of mind that will put D.C. style on par for fashion longevity.

HOWHASYOURSTYLECHANGEDOVERTHEYEARS?My style has definitely evolved over time and I would attribute much of that to my locale. After graduating from Allegheny College, I moved to Newport Beach in California and the style was

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Kevin Gray

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LIFESTYLES | MENOFSUBSTANCE&STYLE

Industry relations representative for a music rights organization/ Editor, MensStylePoint

WHATEMBARRASSINGITEMINYOURCLOSETCANYOUNOTBEARTOPART WITH?The VIDA Fitness t-shirts I collected while working there. Not because they’re horrible looking, but because they give me the feeling that I’ve worked out a lot more than I have.

WHATISTHEMOSTCHALLENGINGASPECTOFWORKINGWITHBIGNAME MUSICIANS?Making initial contact with the big names. They are a lot busier than you’d imagine, so sometimes it takes a while for them to get back in touch with us.

DOYOUBELIEVETHATCLOTHESMAKETHEMAN? Your clothes are simply a conduit in which others are able to see a side of you that cannot be conveyed through speech or action. They do, however, give a man the ability to tap into a confidence like no other external force can.

IF YOU COULD STYLE ANY MUSICIAN WHO WOULD IT BE AND WHAT WOULDYOUPUTTHEMIN?It would definitely be Prince. I’d love to put him in a regular guy’s outfit. Would you even notice Prince if he were standing in front of you dressed in a shawl sweater and jeans (sans the rhinestones)?

WHOISYOURBIGGESTSTYLEINSPIRATION?These days it’s a “what.”Tumblr is one site where I gain inspiration on a daily basis. I can see photos of menswear greats like Lapo Elkann and Ouigi Theodore, alongside street style shots from around Washington, D.C.

DESCRIBEYOURSTYLEI would say well-dressed, not to be confused with dressing up. One day I’ll be in a double-breasted blazer and wingtips, the next I’ll be in a casual quilted jacket and combat-inspired ankle boots. My main concerns are not underdressing and how well my clothes fit. HOWDOESYOURCAREERAFFECTYOURSTYLE?The wonderful thing about my job is that our dress code is pretty loose, which allows me to experiment with my attire. I’m happier when I have the freedom to express myself liberally through my clothing. Subsequently, when I’m free, my mind can focus more on being creative and I’m in an all-around better mood. HOWHASYOURSTYLECHANGEDOVERTHEYEARS?I was really into playing sports in my college years and my attire reflected that. Throwback jerseys, basketball sneakers and baggy jeans were the main items in my closet. A little over a decade later, the only athletic shoes I own are for exercising. WHATISTHEMOSTCHERISHEDITEMINYOURCLOSET?My Seven for All Mankind jeans. They’re distressed with a few rips. I love throwing them on with blazers, sweaters or overcoats to make my look more casual.

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WHATTRENDWOULDYOUNEVERTRYANDWHATAREYOUDYINGTOTRY?I have never been into sandals.The shearling jacket is the one item I’m excited to get for next winter. Ralph Lauren has one that’s calling my name. FAVORITEMEN’SSTORESINWASHINGTON?The guys at Read Wall are on the comeup and their showroom feels like home. I also love SuitSupply; their shop’s aesthetic is one to be rivaled worldwide. WHATISTHESTATEOFMEN’SFASHIONINWASHINGTON?I feel like it’s in a good place. D.C. is slowly pulling away from taking its sartorial queues from the traditions of Capitol Hill and leaning more towards expressing individuality through more modern looks. Washington is a younger city now and brands like Bonobos and Lost Boys cater to the next generation of leaders of the free world. WITHYOURVARIEDCAREERPATHFROMLAWTOMUSICINDUSTRYRELATIONS TOSTYLEBLOGGINGWHEREDOYOUSEEYOURSELFINFIVEYEARS?Five years from now I see myself consulting companies near and far on their menswear lines, on branding and trends, and later with design. I’ll also be delving deeper into image consulting for musicians.

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Sim Khan >> Founder/CEO, Brimble & Clark Custom Clothiers HOWDIDYOUMAKETHETRANSITIONFROMBEINGANATTORNEYTO STARTINGAMEN’SCUSTOMCLOTHINGBRAND?I took a big risk in leaving my job as an attorney in D.C. to build Brimble & Clark, but that risk has paid off. Brimble & Clark now has clients all over the country, including global celebrities like Diplo, Major Lazer, the cast of the “Twilight Saga” and stars of the new “X-Men” and “Captain America” movies along with a slew of NFL and pro soccer players. I feel like I’m living someone else’s life right now and I hope I don’t have to give it back! YOUNEARLYMADETHECUTFORNBC’S“FASHIONSTAR”WHATWAS THATPROCESSLIKEANDWHATDIDYOUTAKEAWAYFROMIT? The NBC casting process was a marathon. I was proud to beat 20,000 other designers in seven cities to make it as far as I did, but I didn’t get that far without losing sleep, weight and, at times, my sanity. My takeaway? “You gotta pay the cost to be the boss” — James Brown. MANYCUSTOMTAILORSHAVEPOPPEDUPINRECENTYEARSHOWARE YOURSUITSDIFFERENTFROMOTHERS?We use a unique new fitting process to make suits that open doors for you — in the boardroom, in the courtroom and in the bedroom. And we do it all starting at $689 for suits that should normally cost you more than $2,000. WHATISTHEMOSTIMPORTANTITEMINYOURCLOSET?WHY?My midnight blue tuxedo. It’s a James Bond staple and I wear it every second weekend. YOURSUITSCOULDBECATEGORIZEDAS“DAPPER”DOYOUEVERGO CASUAL?Casual isn’t really my speed. For me,“overdressed” is a lifestyle, not a stigma. It’s not about being uptight, I just feel good “dressing-to-dominate” all the time. DOYOUBELIEVETHATCLOTHESMAKETHEMAN?EXPLAINClothes don’t always make the man. But the wrong clothes will help you stay a virgin. Fact. WHOISYOURBIGGESTSTYLEINSPIRATION?It’s a tie between Steve McQueen and Robert Redford.

FAVORITEMEN’SSTORESINWASHINGTONTO SHOP OTHERTHANYOUROWN ?Jack Spade and Billy Reid have great spaces in Georgetown, and I always spend way too much money at Patagonia. Restoration Hardware and the Kellogg Collection are also favorites. WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE STATE OF FASHIONFORMENINWASHINGTON?Evolving. I think ‘fashion’ is a term often associated with fads and trends — what I’m seeing more of is the ability of D.C. men to own their look and to find themselves in their style. I think this comes from another trend: guys appreciating good design and things that are made thoughtfully.

WHATTRENDWOULDYOUNEVERTRY?Fedoras. They look terrible on 90 percent of guys. “But they look awesome on Justin Timberlake” you say? You’re not Justin Timberlake. Retire the fedora. WHATTRENDAREYOUDYINGTOTRY?Fedoras. They look awesome on Justin Timberlake. HOWHASYOURSTYLECHANGEDOVERTHEYEARS?I made some mistakes in the ’90s. I’ve learned a lot since then. DESCRIBEYOURSTYLEHOWDOESYOURCAREERAFFECTYOURSTYLE? As a lawyer, I wore suits to go to war. I wore suits sharp enough to be banned by the TSA. Now I make sure our B&C suits meet that standard for our clients. FAVORITEMEN’SSTORESINWASHINGTON OTHERTHANYOUROWN ? On my down-time, I’m a big outdoor-survival and adrenaline-sports junkie so I gear up for excursions with everything from down coats to crampons at REI Hunting & Fishing Outfitters. WHATISTHESTATEOFMEN’SFASHIONINWASHINGTON?It’s getting better. The oversized Brooks Brothers khakis and blazers are still a raging epidemic on the Hill but there are some prominent guys who are working hard to bring sexy back to menswear in D.C. like celebrity party planner Andre Wells (who throws the Gatsbyinspired Knock-Out-Abuse Gala) and Walid Karim (Owner of Heist Nightclub and promoter of men’s style events).

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<< Brian Jarosinski Chartered financial consultant, Meltzer Group HOWDOYOUBALANCEYOURROLESINTWOVERYDIFFERENTCAREERS ASAFINANCIALPLANNERANDACTOR/MODEL? Time management is the most important thing when balancing those two worlds. One is the career world where I hold multiple degrees, certifications, and licenses and the entertainment industry is a nice escape from the finance world. I find a healthy balance in making sure I fully enjoy both worlds. WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO PARTICIPATE ON “THE BACHELORETTE”? WEREYOULOOKINGFORLOVEANDHAVEYOUFOUNDIT?I was originally put up for the show to see if I would make it to the final 25. I never actually planned on going on nor did I think my firm would ever sign off for me to participate if it got to that point. But with last minute circumstances at work I was given the opportunity and chose to be a part of it. The show did reconnect me to my now girlfriend, Stephanie. It showed us that there is so much love there worth fighting for, so we are seeing where things are going, taking it slow, and are quite happy. HOWDIDYOURTURNONAREALITYSHOWAFFECTSYOURDAYJOBAS AFINANCIALPLANNER? It’s all been very positive. It has actually opened a lot of doors to new business and personal financial planning and group benefit clients for my firm. DESCRIBEYOURSTYLEI really have three outfits: suits for my finance career, gym clothes and casual. My casual style is typically nice jeans, nice pair of shoes and some type of fitted collared shirt with a nice blazer. HOWHASYOURSTYLECHANGEDOVERTHEYEARS?I have just matured my outfits. I have gone from t-shirts and polos to more fitted collared shirts and blazers. WHOISYOURBIGGESTSTYLEINSPIRATION?My girlfriend is big into fashion and typically tells me what clothes to buy and wear for particular occasions. DOYOUBELIEVETHATCLOTHESMAKETHEMAN? Clothes can make the man and the man can also make the clothes. Depending on your style, your clothes certainly can give off an image and perception. The way a man takes care of himself and his hygiene and health is also very important to pulling off different styles and looks. WHATTRENDWOULDYOUNEVERTRYANDWHATAREYOUDYINGTO TRY?I am open to pretty much any trend as long as I am able to pull it off and it looks good. FAVORITEMEN’SSTORESINWASHINGTON?My office is directly across from Montgomery Mall in Bethesda so I typically find myself at Nordstrom, Banana Republic, Macy’s, and various other trendy stores in the mall. WHATISTHESTATEOFMEN’SFASHIONINWASHINGTON?I think fashion here is a bit ahead of many other major cities, outside of New York. You will see pockets in D.C. of people who clearly have a better comfort with current fashion and then other pockets who have no idea or are stuck in the wrong past trends. AS AN ACTIVE PHILANTHROPIST WHAT CAUSES HAVE YOU CHOSEN TOSUPPORT?I am most active in working with Big Brothers Big Sisters, Living Classrooms, American Cancer Society, Lupus Foundation, Leukemia Lymphoma Society, Tigerlilly Foundation, Moveable Feast, and Wounded Warriors. Giving back and helping the community has always been a passion of mine. I have come to know people at several great organizations over the years fighting for amazing causes and anyway I am able to help, I am always eager to do so.

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Read Wall>> Founder/CEO, Read Wall men’s clothing WHATHASBEENTHEBIGGESTCHALLENGEINSTARTINGYOUROWNLINE? “You don’t know what you don’t know.” Being young, I don’t have the experience a lot of industry vets do. I’ve been lucky enough to have a lot of smart and experienced friends, so I’ve relied on them a lot when questions arise. WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO STRIKE OUT ON YOUR OWN AT SUCH A YOUNGAGE?I’ve always been pretty headstrong so when I got to the point where I felt I was ready, I jumped right in. I didn’t want to be the guy who kept talking about his great business idea, I wanted to follow through and execute. HOWDOYOUSETYOURSTOREAPARTFROMOTHERS?Through quality, honestly crafted clothes and a superior experience. We want to be the brand guys can trust — we’re making clothes that will last. WHOORWHATHASINFLUENCEDYOUTHEMOSTINBUSINESS?There are a lot of people who have influenced me greatly — I’d be doing a disservice to name just one. To name a ‘what,’ I’d have to say the idea of building a brand, business or product that people love. HOWDOYOUDEFINESUCCESS?By having a lot of great customer relationships. I love it when happy customers refer their friends. DOYOUBELIEVETHATCLOTHESMAKETHEMAN?I believe the opposite — that the man makes the clothes. Great clothes are the book cover; the man is the book.That being said, you can save a lot of time by judging a book by its cover. DESCRIBEYOURSTYLEClassically inspired modern American WHOISYOURBIGGESTSTYLEINSPIRATION?The best style icons are the people who inspire not only with how they dress, but the way they live their lives. My favorites at the moment are Ralph Lauren and Gianni Agnelli. WHATTRENDWOULDYOUNEVERTRY?WHATTRENDAREYOUDYINGTO TRY?I’m not a big trend guy. I try to keep it pretty classic. Recently, I’ve been inspired a lot by Italian tailoring — very minimal structure and a naturalness to everything. HOWHASYOURSTYLECHANGEDOVERTHEYEARS?It’s always developing, but I’m not sure it has really changed. New things inspire me all the time, but I view it all through my personal lens. HOWDOESYOURCAREERAFFECTYOURSTYLE?A lot. Most people spend more hours with their job than they do with anything else, so you are in those clothes all the time. You need to find how to express yourself within those boundaries while still feeling cool. FAVORITEMEN’SSTORESINWASHINGTON OTHERTHANYOUROWN ? Jack Spade and Billy Reid have great spaces in Georgetown, and I always spend way too much money at Patagonia. Restoration Hardware and the Kellogg Collection are also favorites. WHATISTHESTATEOFMEN’SFASHIONINWASHINGTON?Evolving. Fashion is a term often associated with fads and trends — what I’m seeing more of is the ability of D.C. men to own their look and to find themselves in their style. I think this comes from another trend: guys appreciating good design and things that are made thoughtfully.

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LIFESTYLES

REbeL

SOPHISTICATES Journey through young love with classic pieces juxtaposed with wild art PHOTOGRAPHY: Viole7a Markelou assisted by Dustin C. Lilley, www.viole7amarkelou.com WARDROBE: Will Lawry assisted by Andy Bridges for Capital Image MAKEUP: Carl Ray, www.carlraymakeupartist.com HAIR: Kennisha Ford for Capital Image, www.styleseat.com/kennishaford MANICURE: Shae Jackson and Makeda Janifer, Haven Beauty Lounge, www.havenbeautylounge.com MODELS: Hannah Henry and Justin Kim for T H E Artist Agency EDITORIAL DIRECTOR: Anne Kim-Dannibale ASSISTANT EDITOR: Laura Wainman Photographed on location at Blind Whino event space (blindwhino.org); location by verdeHOUSE.


On Hannah: PARKER knit crop top top ($253), Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 240-744-3700; PETER PILOTTO skirt ($1,175), Hu’s Wear, 2906 M St., NW, 202342-2020; ROBERT CLERGERIE t-strap pumps ($795) and YVES ST LAURENT bag ($1,650), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202342-0202; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Delsa” Swarovski crystal drop earrings ($155), www. ibeautifulmiaelliott.com; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Sea” Swarovski crystal and mother of pearl shell bib necklace ($450), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT Swarovski crystal and silver disc bracelets ($90 each), Betsy Fisher, 1224 Connecticute Ave., NW, 202-785-1975. On Justin: GIMO’S leather jacket ($1,785), VERSACE sweater ($295) and STEFANO PIAZZA belt ($170), DePandi, 5518 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-718-1901; DIESEL jeans ($198) and shoes ($140), 1961 Chain Bridge Rd., Tysons Corner, VA 22102, 703-485-4755; ALEXANDER MCQUEEN skull scarf ($295), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000 Art by Brendan Tierney


On Hannah: CLOVER CANYON multi-color flounce dress ($295), Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 240-744-3700; ST LAURENT heels ($995), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202-342-0202; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT gold filigree and faceted onyx earrings ($115) and “Neema” gold textured cable chain necklace ($235), Keith Lipert Gallery, 2922 M St., NW, 202-9659736; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Egypt” 18k gold hammered link bib necklace ($410), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250. On Justin: DEPANDI trousers ($345) DePandi, 5518 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-718-1901; DIESEL shoes ($195), 1961 Chain Bridge Rd., Tysons Corner, VA 22102, 703-485-4755.


On Hannah: HELMUT LANG leather perforated crop top ($565) and STELLA MCCARTNEY cobalt leggings ($745), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-6579000; CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA heels ($845), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202-342-0202; MONICA RICH KOSANN 18k olive quartz and diamond pendant ($4,925), MARCO BICEGO 18k murano link necklace ($15,440), PHILLIPE CHARRIOL cuff ($4,995), ROBERTO COIN 18k multistone ring ($1,980), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200. On Justin: TACCALITI shirt ($265), DEPANDI blazer ($2,495) and STEFANO PIAZZA belt ($170), DePandi, 5518 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-718-1901; DIESEL jeans ($348), 1961 Chain Bridge Rd., Tysons Corner, VA 22102, 703485-4755; PANERAI LUMINOR MARINA water-proof watch with hand-sewn leather strap ($7,900), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200; shoes stylist’s own. Art by HKS181


ALESSANDRO GHERARDI shirt ($325), VERSACE blazer ($995), DEPANDI pocket square ($60), STEFANO PIAZZA belt ($170) and DEPANDI trousers ($345) DePandi, 5518 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-718-1901; DIESEL shoes ($195), 1961 Chain Bridge Rd., Tysons Corner, VA 22102, 703-485-4755.


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On Hannah: ALEXANDER MCQUEEN blouse ($1,460) and ADAM LIPPES leopard mini skirt ($660), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000; MARCO BICEGO 18k yellow gold hoop earrings ($4,965), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT gold textured cable chain ($235), Keith Lipert Gallery, 2922 M St., NW, 202-965-9736; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT 3 strand gold cable chain toggle bracelet ($210), Bloomingdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 240-744-3700. On Justin: GERLIN Shirt ($445), VERSACE blazer ($995), DOLCEPUNTA pocket square ($60), VIGANO trousers ($410) and STEFANO PIAZZA belt ($170) DePandi, 5518 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301718-1901; DIESEL shoes ($270), 1961 Chain Bridge Rd., Tysons Corner, VA 22102, 703-485-4755; IWC PORTOFINO 18k rose gold watch with silver dial and alligator strap ($20,200), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200. Art by MEGGS, http://www. houseofmeggs.com/

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LIFESTYLES | TRENDREPORT

REED KRAKOFF Mini Atlantique Bionic Tote ($1590); reedkrakoff.com

REBECCA MINKOFF Mini M.A.C. crossbody bag in neon yellow ($195); saksfifthavenue.com

NINA RICCI Silk and cotton-blend sweater $790); saksfifthavenue.com

KATE SPADE NEW YORK Appliqued yellow enamel bezel silicone strap metro watch 36mm ($175); katespade.com

J. CREW Collection neon canvas duffle coat ($595); jcrew.com

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J. CREW Collection neon canvas dress $350); jcrew.com

7YRWLMRI-R Relieve your winter blues with bright and sunny saffron-hued pieces BY ALISON MCLAUGHLIN

VALENTINO Rockstud neon leather pumps ($945); saksfifthavenue.com

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI Neon tweed shorts ($950); saksfifthavenue.com

BRUNO MAGLI Neon patent-leather sandals ($595); shop. brunomagli.com

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STELLA MCCARTNEY Elle earrings in neon yellow ($53); neimanmarcus.com

KATE SPADE NEW YORK 2 park avenue small beau bag ($398); kaatespade.com

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VERSACE Vanitas medium embroidered leather shoulder bag ($1,500); versace.com

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DOLCE & GABBANA Jeweled floral-print sandals ($975); saksfifthavenue.com TORY BURCH Edith floral-print slub-faille shorts ($250); toryburch.com

RED VALENTINO Floral-print sateentwill top ($495); saksfifthavenue.com

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ALEXANDER MCQUEEN The De Manta printed satin clutch ($540); neimanmarcus.com

Spring 2014â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s floral prints envoke an Anglo-esque country garden BY ALISON MCLAUGHLIN

JOIE Debitri silk pants in light smoke ($268); joie.com

PAUL ANDREW Shakti floral-print satin pumps ($540); saksfifthavenue.com

STELLA MCCARTNEY Appliqued REBECCA TAYLOR cotton-jersey Poppy blossom sweatshirt ($540);tee in cream ($195); neimanmarcus.com rebeccataylor.com

MIU MIU Printed stretchcotton dress ($1,445); neimanmarcus.com

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J. CREW Floral-print silkchiffon dress ($190); jcrew.com

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GIVENCHY Antigona shopping bag in floral-print STELLA faux leather ($1,085); MCCARTNEY saksfifthavenue.com Appliqued cotton-jersey sweatshirt ($540); neimanmarcus.com

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LIFESTYLES | TRENDREPORT

LORO PIANA Woven hemp and wool-blend blazer ($2,295); neimanmarcus.com

BRIONI Long-sleeved cottonpique polo shirt ($520); brioni.com

LANVIN Cashmere and cotton-blend scarf ($490); saksfifthavenue.com

OMEGA Seamaster black dial watch ($4,400); liljenquistbeckstead.com

SPERRY TOPSIDERS Burnished leather boat shoes($95); zappos.com

J. CREW 484 slim-fit corduroy trousers ($75); jcrew.com

+3-2+ +6%=

Embrace the newest neutral in menswear this spring BY ALISON MCLAUGHLIN

MARGARET HOWELL Cotton and cashmere-blend sweater ($455); mrporter.com

CUTLER AND GOSS D-frame acetate sunglasses ($500); mrporter.com

NN. 07 Canterbury knitted herringbone woolblend waistcoat ($160); mrporter.com

ZILLI Crocodile skin belt with calf lining ($3,500); Zilli at Tysons Galleria

SAINT LAURENT Slim-fit washeddenim 17.5cm jeans ($550); neimanmarcus.com

JIMMY CHOO Greaves suede ankle boots ($895); saksfifthavenue.com DOLCE & GABBANA Martini silk-satin twill tie ($195); saksfifthavenue.com 52

RAG & BONE Holme quilted herringbone jacket ($535); saksfifthavenue.com WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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SOPRANO RISING BY PAT R I C K D. M C C OY

ith triumphs at major opera houses, including the Metropolitan Opera, Nicole Cabell’s star is on the rise as she prepares to thrill Washington audiences with her turn in Verdi’s rarely seen “Il Corsaro” with Washington Concert Opera. WASHINGTON LIFE: What are the advantages/disadvantages of tackling an unfamiliar repertoire in a concert setting? NICOLECABELL I really enjoy performing opera in concert, particularly because the focus is on the voice and vocal “acting.” There is, in my opinion, a little too much attention paid to the directorial concept of many productions, particularly when it robs the singer of the chance to truly express through vocal colors. I feel it can take the audience back to a time when the music and singer were the focus of opera. Of course you are exposed in a way that can be uncomfortable to some singers. There are no lights, costumes or sets to hide behind or work off of. But I am a singer who loves concert repertoire, recitals and opera in concert, so perhaps I’m a bit biased. WL: Does the lack of costumes and sets present more of a challenge? NC A true singer can express everything they need to through the voice. That’s not to say I can do this perfectly, but I am striving toward this. It helps if you’ve worked out stage movement in your head or even walked through the opera as you would see it. If there is a video recording available of an opera, this might offer some ideas as to where a character may move, but in my case I strive toward expressing this through the voice, and secondarily through facial expression and tasteful gesture. WL: How does Verdi’s music best showcase your voice, as in “La Traviata”? NC I am rather new to Verdi, having just performed my first Violetta at the Michigan Opera Singer in November of 2013. I absolutely fell in love with Verdi’s music. A singer can use his or her entire voice, top to bottom, and

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every technical skill they have learned. This is a thrilling gift if the singer is prepared. What I particularly love about “La Traviata” is the way the music falls in my tessitura. While “Sempre Libera” has many high-flying coloratura passages and high notes, it lies in a lyric/full lyric range, Nicole Cabell (Photo by Devon Cass, courtesy CAMI) and therefore does not tire me out. I believe a true Violetta is forged in the last two WL: A few years back, you performed at your acts, and so I don’t stress out too much about old high school. How were you introduced to “Sempre Libera.” It is a great aria, but should opera and classical music? be a character piece, not just an opportunity to show off. Of course after Violetta, I have not NCI can probably speak for many young singers when I say opera wasn’t first on my sung much Verdi. Only the arias of Gilda and list. I simply wasn’t exposed to it, and in Nannetta. But I look forward to tackling more retrospect would have loved to learn about Verdi opera roles. classical music and opera in school. Some schools do better than others when it comes to WL: In 2005, you won the BBC Cardiff Singer educating students about classical music, but of the World competition. What kind of I didn’t receive much at the time. I joined an pressure does that create for you in terms of organization of my peers that put on a musical audience expectation? medley at my high school. I sang music from NCThere are many people who will hold American musical theater, but it was only when a singer up to an unreasonable standard if I decided to take lessons that I was immediately they have won a competition, but it does me encouraged to pursue classical music. I was no good to worry about them. If someone excited at the prospect of learning a new art has gone through the pressure, I invite them form and having this unusual gift, so I pursued to judge, but otherwise I simply choose to opera. But I discovered the art form exactly do the best job I’m capable of doing and as I was learning the technique. It made for an have a sense of humor regarding any kind interesting path, though a little disorienting! of unrealistic judgment. Giving a heartfelt, honest performance is something a singer WL: If you could choose the performance of a can be proud of, whether or not she has lifetime, what would it be? won a competition, and that is my goal as a NC Singing backup for Stevie Nicks in 1983 on performer. In the years immediately following one of her solo tours. I don’t think I could give a Cardiff I put pressure on myself to “live up to” more nerdy answer, but there you have it! the hype, but in reality, there are simply some people who will never be satisfied no matter how much you put into a performance. This Nicole Cabell sings the role of Medora in is precisely why a wise singer must remove Washington Concert Opera’s production herself from the business of singing and of Verdi’s “Il Corsaro,” March 9 at George commit to the art. Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium.

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LIFESTYLES | CHARITYSPOTLIGHT

Make Cancer Prevention a National Priority B Y D AV I D T U T E R A ; C E L E B R I T Y D E S I G N E R , A U T H O R A N D P R O F E S S I O N A L S P E A K E R

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’ve been deeply affected by honoring and turn the spectacular cancer through the struggles National Building Museum into a and the losses of friends and magical land that makes you feel family members. The more I like you’ve left Washington, D.C. talk to people, the more I realize Every year the gala hosts almost that everyone has been touched 1,000 guests who continue to be by cancer in some way because amazed by the transformation. one in three women and one in This year’s gala takes place on two men will receive a cancer Friday, March 7. We are thrilled to diagnosis in their lifetime. have as our honorary patrons the That is one of the reasons Ambassador of Japan, Kenichiro I’m so proud of my long-lasting Sasae and Mrs. Sasae attending relationship with the Prevent what I guarantee will be one of Cancer Foundation.This national the spring season’s most unique David with 2011 gala honorary patrons Ellen Noghès and Amb. of Monaco Giles Noghès foundation, headquartered in and elegant evenings. If you (photo by Tony Brown) Alexandria, Va., is the only haven’t been to a Prevent Cancer cancer-related nonprofit that is solely devoted involved in helping my mom, aunt, uncle and Foundation Annual Spring Gala yet, I hope to prevention and early detection. As Prevent several close friends when they received their you will come this year or find other ways to Cancer makes plans to celebrate its 30th cancer diagnoses and I am thrilled to report they support this amazing organization. anniversary in 2015-2016, I continue to be are all cancer-free today! To learn more about the Prevent Cancer impressed with the impact the Foundation has I love that the Prevent Cancer Foundation made across the country — and in my own life is exactly what it claims to be. Prevent Cancer Foundation, the Annual Spring Gala and — in the fight to stop this terrible disease. provides information on how you can reduce cancer prevention and early detection, visit www. My relationship with the Prevent your cancer risk by making healthy lifestyle preventcancer.org Cancer Foundation began over 12 years ago choices. The Foundation works with inner city when I was asked by the chairman of the communities to fund preventive services such Foundation’s Annual Spring Gala to design as mammograms, Pap tests and colonoscopies; the event. After working with them, I learned tests that detect cancer early when it can be more about the Foundation’s life-saving more successfully treated. Prevent Cancer funds work; it has invested $134 million in cancer researchers early in their careers. Many of these prevention research, education, community researchers have gone on to make discoveries outreach and advocacy programs nationwide. that have saved hundreds of thousands of lives. In 2007, I was honored to be asked to join One of my biggest contributions as a their board of directors. It was my pleasure to board member is my continued involvement say “yes” to an organization that works every in designing for the Annual Spring Gala. Each day to Stop Cancer Before It Starts. year we work with a different ambassador and In the past 10 years, my professional life base the theme of the event on his or her has become a bicoastal business with event country. What I love about the gala is that it planning, a TV show on WE TV, books and a is truly a celebration. Nations from all over fashion collection as I work to build my brand the world — Italy, Australia, Singapore, France, and business, the Prevent Cancer Foundation has Brazil, Morocco and Turkey, to name just a few, been by my side every step of the way. President have been saluted.We take a color scheme and David Tutera (photo by Maring Visuals) and Founder Carolyn “Bo” Aldigé was actively flowers representative of the country we are

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WASHINGTON S O C I A L  D I A R Y WashingtonWinterShow﹐CNMC’sDancingAfterDark﹐ArianespacePartyandmore!

Colombian Amb. Luis Carlos Villegas, Carmela de Villegas, Pilar O’Leary and Septime Webre at the 2014 Noche de Pasion (Photo by Tony Powell)

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OVERTHEMOON

Hearts and Flowers Middleburg celebrates Valentine’s Day in style and a preview of Garden Week festivities BY VICKY MOON

Malcolm and Gail Matheson share a Valentine’s dinner for two. (Photo by L.H. Lindberg courtesy Fox Chase Farm)

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hat could be more romantic than a Valentine’s dinner for two in a barn stall? Just ask the 150 plus guests who attended a glittering event at “Fox Chase Farm” just outside of Middleburg. With a shimmering snow-covered full moon setting, visitors were treated to a breathtaking winter backdrop as they approached the barn, bathed in red lights designed by Artistic Concepts Group. In a scene reminiscent of “Downton Abbey,” everyone entering was given “Amuse de Amour with a Glass of Sparkling Wine” as solo guitarist Phil McCusker roamed the barn aisle. Guests included Lynn and Jim Wiley, Luciana and Robert Duvall and Gail and Malcolm Matheson. The food by A La Carte Catering included five named courses: Love at First Bite, Second Chance, Cupid’s Intermezzo (with a wonderful lemongrass sorbet “kissed” with ginger), Main Squeeze and Sweet Endings (Hot & Not So Heavy Chocolate Cake, Drunken Cherries, Almond Crunch Passion Fruit Brulée, Caramelized Sugar Tuille, Raspberry and Apricot Hearts, Luscious Lemon Cake, Mangosteen Panna Cotta, Blood Orange Compote). It was all accompanied by local wine from Barrel Oak Winery in Marshall,Va. Owner Maureen Hanley, who purchased

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The barns at Fox Chase Farm were lit up for Valentine’s Day in Middleburg. (Photo by L.H. Lindberg courtesy Fox Chase Farm)

the farm 14 years ago from Jan Neuharth and Joseph Keusch (now neighbors), has recently renovated part of the barn to be used as a rental for parties and weddings. “The tack room and the feed room have been transformed into catering space,” she says. The stalls are now freshly painted and spotless. The possibilities are endless in this corner of the countryside. For garden lovers and city slickers who want to get a peek at life in these parts, consider the “Splendor in the Grass” tour on April 27-28. As part of Historic Garden Week, four farms will swing open their gates. This includes Mimi Abel-Smith’s “Hickory House” with a vast shade garden of groundcovers, perennials, native and unusual trees and shrubs and a small temple with a bronze statue of a peacock. At “Gum Tree Farm,” visitors will learn all about the art of sheep shearing. The interiors of the 1924 stone home at Glenbrook are furnished with antiques and art collected on the owner’s travels. Outside, visitors will appreciate a rock garden of hollies, dogwood and redbud. In Upperville, the 1832 Greek Revival brick home at “Deerfield” features the original heart pine floors and handmade glass windows with an art collection that spans from ancient ceramics to 20-century French works.

The grounds contain English yews, Japanese lilacs, magnolias and American hollies along with the eternally coveted boxwood. Civil War aficionados also should be captivated with the small grave plot behind the kitchen. Confederate soldiers killed in the Battle of Upperville in June, 1863 are buried there. And for anyone who would like to indulge the urge to buy and sell, make note of the Wisdom Gallery located in the brick building at 10 Madison Street, South. This gift emporium has been here for 25-plus years and is now offered for sale for $1.4 million by Rebecca Poston at Thomas and Talbot Real Estate as a turnkey business, including more than $400,000 in inventory plus the circa 1930 building.

Wisdom Gallery is on the market for $1.4 million. (Photo courtesy Thomas and Talbot Real Estate)

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PNC Regional President Michael Harreld and Swiss Amb. Manuel Sager

Fred Ryan and Freeman Jones

Chairwomen Denise Prince, Dory Clark and Puffin Travers

David Decklebaum, Buffy Cafritz, Robert Higdon and Genevieve Ryan

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WASHINGTON WINTER SHOW Katzen Arts Center, American University PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Philip Bermingham and Lisa Abeel

SOUTHERN STYLE: The much-anticipated Washington Winter Show, an annual event showcasing antiques and fine art, took a trip below the Mason-Dixon Line this year, with a “Southern Celebrations: Traditions Handed Down” theme. Pat Conroy, acclaimed Southern author, served as honorary chairman alongside Swiss Amb. Manuel Sager. All proceeds supported health and education programs for at-risk and underserved families and children.

Jana Martin and Susan Harreld

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Thomas Hissinson and Karen Di Saia

Liza Burns, Lexi McKay and Bessie Doffermayre

Bitsey Folger

Amy Porter Stroh and Pamela Wise

Bernard Porter, Monique Parker and Edmund Fleet

Lisa Ager and Leslie Appleget

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Bill Klanke and Travis Langster

Eileen McGowan, Nick Mitsis, Yasmine Almond and Lance Bush

Amy and Eric Stallmer with Tricia Pride Gillian Adams, Warren Ferster and Pamela Meredith

Clay Mowry, Stéphane Israël, Bart Gordon and Robbie Koch Sabathier WL EXCLUSIVE

ARIANESPACE PARTY The Powerhouse Georgetown | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Jacques Breton and Patrick Bonaza

PARIS BY THE POTOMAC: European launch services provider Arianespace hosted its annual Holiday party for clients and good friends, and fellow rocket scientists at the historic Powerhouse in Georgetown. The Paris-based company, the world’s first commercial space transportation company, had lots to celebrate. Last year was a banner year, as Arianespace signed over $2 billion in new business. Nearly all of the satellite industry’s marquee companies swung by the French-themed event, including executives from Intelsat, SES, Eutelsat, EchoStar, Orbital Sciences, Lockheed Martin Commercial Space Systems and Boeing Satellite Services. Arianespace CEO Stephane Israel gave special thanks to the company’s American customer base for decades of support.

Jean-Luc and Sylvette Froeliger with Wiener Kernisan

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Jean-Michel Eid and Susan Irwin

Ted Kronmiller and Gene Mowry

Paul Gurthie, Laura Delgado and Tiffany Chow

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Joy and Eddie Kato

Roncevert Almond and Harper Rose Almond

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Craley Davis, LeeAnn Goheen, Clare Bonsignore, Jim McInerney, John Green and Elizabeth Ballas

Jessi Frend, C. Kyle Russ and Katy Jane Jenevein

Dillon Mark, Morgan Williams and Sean Sullivan

WL SPONSORED

CNMC’S DANCING AFTER DARK Carnegie Library | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL SEVENTH HEAVEN: The seventh annual fundraiser hosted by the Junior Council of CNMC celebrates the organization’s membership, which has swelled to over 650 young professionals from the local area who care about helping sick children. All funds raised from the evening support CNMC’s ongoing commitment to providing the best care to children in need, regardless of their ability to pay, as well as investing in research, technology and facilities to be on the cu7ing-edge of top medical care. The evening included a silent auction, live music, and dancing.

John Blum and Mandi Critchfield

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Joe Langsdale and Sarah Wimsatt

Heath and Allison Bumgardner Amanda Power and Phoebe Kilgour Dr. Bear

Justin Stevens, Elizabeth Harriman, Elizabeth Schiffmann, Casey Tantum and Andrew Snow WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Jim Bell

Alvin Jones, Michelle Harris and Brad Blakeman

Christoper Ambrose, Dave Tafuri and Viviana Hurtado

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GENERAL MOTORS’ AUTO SHOW TOUR AND LUNCHEON Heather Rosenker

Convention Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Nyree Wright and RJ Cooper

CAR TALK: General Motors and Washington Life co-hosted an exclusive pre-opening tour of the 2014 Washington International Car Show, followed by a sumptuous sixcourse lunch at R.J. Cooper’s Rogue 24. Hosted by GM’s head of public policy Heather Rosenker and head of consumer affairs James Bell, guests enjoyed a sneak peek of the massive show and an insider’s briefing on all the new models, including Corve7e, Chevy Onix, Orlando, Spin, Sail, Trax and Cadillac ATS (recently named North American Car of the Year). “Chevrolet, in case you haven’t noticed, is on a roll,” Bell said. “It continues to be a truly American brand, but its global scale grows every day. Chevys are now sold in 140 countries, with 60 percent of sales outside of the United States.”

Clarence Davis and Michele Lucarelli

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Suzanne Deblasio-Adato Ann Davison

Ivory Zorich

Marc Heysion Jana Sedlakova

GM’s exclusive tour and lunch with Rouge 24 62

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Jamie and Dave Dorros

Gregorio Uribe Big Band

Odile and Gavin Wilson

Autumn English and Jimmy Reyes

Colombian Amb. Luis Carlos Villegas, Carmela de Villegas, Pilar O’Leary and Septime Garrick DavisWebre and Christine Best WL SPONSORED

WASHINGTON BALLET’S ‘NOCHE DE PASION’

Matthew Hollamby and James Alefantis

Dr. Irma Frank and Adriana Lucia

Philip Deutch and Marne Levine

Residence of the Columbian Ambassador | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL COLUMBIA TROPICAL: This year’s Latin-themed benefit brought out floral dresses (plus a few floral blazers on the men) and vibrant colors in abundance as guests celebrated Caribbean style — a fruit-laden Carmen Miranda-style headpiece was spo7ed! Guests enjoyed live performances by two of Colombia’s newest stars Gregorio Uribe Big Band and Latin Grammy Award nominee Adriana Lucia as well as dancing and dining inspired by the coastal towns of Colombia, including Cartagena and Barranquilla. The event’s $159,000 proceeds support scholarships abd programs benefi7ing the company’s Latino dancers. .

Ilyse Hogue, Julia Cohen, Kate Damon, Roshanak Ameli-Tehrani and Sarah Ingersoll

M arnie and Howard Owens

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Christine Warnke and Adrienne Szabo

Brian Hepler and Anais Carmona

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Lisa Williams and John Dunford

Rob Layden, Nancy Chabot, Benita Jenkins and Quentin Kelly

Rodolfo Lezma and Esther Gusman with Britt and Al Guzman

CAPITAL CITY BALL City Tavern Club | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT: This annual event is known not only for the fabulous fashion, but also for the lively tunes from the 11-piece band Bi7ersweet that keeps the dance floor packed into the wee hours. Aside from the revelry of the evening, guests raised funds to fight human trafficking — an industry that generates over $32 billion annually and explots men, women and children alike. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Kevin Stockton and Laura Englebrecht

Tanya Sabel and Andrew Heller 63


Anthony Burchard

Bob Hisaoka and Lori Peterson

Lydia Thomas, Sharon Ricciardi and Lori Domenech

Joe Ruzzo and Mark Lowham with their children

WL SPONSORED

Jim Zabora

LIFE WITH CANCER ANNIVERSARY BRUNCH Private residence in Fairfax | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL BRUNCH FOR A CURE: Longtime supporters of Life with Cancer gathered for an intimate brunch to celebrate 25 years of providing emotional support, for families who have lost loved ones to the dreaded disease. Since its founding in 1987, Life with Cancer has expanded its partnership with Inova Health Systems and established a 16,000-square-foot family center.

Fern Bekenstein and Susan Carroll

Marilyn and George Pedersen

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Mari Washington, Christine Lightner, Willie Clark Jr. and Ina Pae

Carroll Dey and Greg Caddy

Eliot, Olivia, Alexis and Sally Battle

WL EXCLUSIVE

Brian Wahrlich, Bobby Uzel and Brian Worsdale

TTR SOTHEBY’S “CARROLL AND GREG’S WINTER FEST’ Chevy Chase Plaza Residences, 5300 43rd St., NW PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES

GOOD WORKS: TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Greg Gaddy and Carroll Dey hosted a late winter gathering supporting the Booker T. Washington Charter School for the Technical Arts with special guest, Principal G. Hope Asterilla. Guests were asked to bring a gently used book to be donated to the school, which trains young people in the construction trade.

David Morey, Shan Luan, Zheng Xie and Jeffrey Reilly

Kristin Bowers and Sara Wollmacher

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Countess Suzanne Tolstoy and Irina du Quenoy

Rhoda Septilici and Paul du Quenoy with Iona and Paul Lee

Prince and Princess Nicholas Obolensky

Prince and Princess Ermias Selassie WL EXCLUSIVE

RUSSIAN NEW YEAR’S BALL

Richard Grondine and Mary Ellen Atkinson with Nick and Nadine Buick

The Cosmos Club | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Oksana Tsykala, Hayley Coles, Jordan Wanamaker Javier and Fernanda Lozano

NEW OLD WORLD: Princess Selene Obolensky did not a7end this year’s festivities, handing off chairmen duties to next-generation standard bearers: her grandson Prince Nicholas Obolensky, his wife Princess (Alexandra) Obolensky and Paul and Irina du Quenoy, who added a youthful element to the annual fête. Also new this year was the venue, shi+ing from the Mayflower Hotel to the gilded Cosmos Club where guests in feathers, fur and finery li+ed their glasses to the Russian New Year and raised funds for Russian American Community Services. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Robert Heggestad and Rose Marie Bogley

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Kira Epstein, Ryan Eve Nester and Hillary Morton

Jim Bell, Eric Tomlinson and Kevin Gray

Andrew Green, Rachel Glicksman and Gene Pecar WL EXCLUSIVE

Nelson Marban, Jan Evans and Dan Bohnett

BEASLEY REAL ESTATE’S ANNIVERSARY PARTY Washington, D.C. Office, 2020 K St., NW | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES SIZZLING SALES: With a quarter of a billion dollars in real estate transactions in 2013 and an increase in sales volume of 150 percent from 2012, Beasley Real Estate had plenty to celebrate at its second anniversary. Founder and Managing Partner Jim Bell raised a glass and toasted the boutique agency’s early success with family and friends.

Candace Asmar and Gregg Busch

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Marlon Crutchfield and Marty Stanton

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PARTIESPARTIESPARTIES

Tech heroines, art philanthropists, shopping mavens, cookie decorating aficionados and equal rights proponents VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM!

HEROINES IN TECHNOLOGY

COOKIES AND CUSTARD PARTY

HILTONHOTEL TYSONSCORNER

SHAREOURSTRENGTH HEADQUARTERS  THSTNW

(Photo by TONY POWELL)

(Photos by TONY POWELL)

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Eight women in the technology sector were honored for their dedication and service to the community at this annual fundraiser for March of Dimes. The five awards distributed were the Rising Heroine, Individual Heroines, AFCEA The International Government Heroine, Corporate Heroines and Lifetime Achievement Heroines. 1. The 2013 honorees

Guests at this a+ernoon cookie decorating party got an opportunity to teach their children about giving back. While the tots decorated cookies and the parents munched on lunch, funds were raised to support Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign.

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7. Alice, Jake, Jennifer and Jack Tapper 8. Pierce Anthony, Peter Connolly, Julia Farr and Cecilia Connolly

ARTS FOR THE AGING

9. Emily Lenzner and Benji Cherukuri

RESIDENCEOFTHESWISSAMBASSADOR (Photos by ALFREDO FLORES) To celebrate AFTA’s “silver anniversary,” Swiss Ambassador Manuel Sager and Mrs. Christine Sager hosted guests at their residence for a multi-cultural interactive performance of works from cabaret, film and stage, including an opera-cabaret group called “Cabaret Sauvignon.” AFTA Founder Lolo Sarnoff and former Ambassador Donald T. Bliss were honored for their philanthropy, community service and engagement in the arts.

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2. Swiss Amb. Manuel Sager and Connie Morella

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3. Joyce Hagel, Lolo Sarnoff, Susan Rosenbaum and Bill Dunlap 4. Rhoda Septilici, Christine Sager, Christine Wamke, Gabriela Coman and Emily Nestler

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CHEFS FOR EQUALITY KEN DOWNING GIFT COLLECTION RECEPTION

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NEIMANMARCUSFRIENDSHIP HEIGHTS(Photos by TONY POWELL) Neiman Marcus partnered with THEARC to celebrate the launch of Ken Downing’s exclusive gi+ collection. Shoppers enjoyed hors d’oeuvres and cocktails while they shopped.

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RITZCARLTONWASHINGTONDC (Photos by NESHAN NALTCHAYAN) Allies in the culinary world lent their support to the LGBTQ community at this festive evening, with Tim Gunn returning to host for a second year in a row. The mixed company, from White House Social Secretary Jeremy Bernard, food writer David Hagedorn and D.C. Council Member Jack Evans, highlighted the expanded reach of the Human Rights Campaign 10. Cathal Armstrong and Vikram Sunderam

5. Becky Wilsusen, Elizabeth Engel, Cathie Martin and Kimberly Shur

11. Chad Griffin, Tim Gunn, David Hagedorn and Jack Evans

6. Lorraine Washington, Edmund Fleet and Monique Parker

12. Hillary Levin, Jeremy Bernard, Hudson Young and Chris Svoboda

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HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandMyWashington RealEstateNewsandOpenHouse|To come

1YXIH,EVQSR] A traditionally muted color scheme creates a relaxed and inviting atmosphere in Bill and Sylvia Chip’s Observatory Circle residence. BY LAURA WAINMAN KITCHEN, DINING ROOM, ART AND PORTRAIT PHOTOS BY TONY BROWN ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY MARCOS GALVANY INTERIOR DESIGN BY SOLIS BETANCOURT & SHERRILL


HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

ill Chip’s life could have been very different had he not decided to put on his dancing shoes one night in 1973 and head to Cambridge University’s Graduate Student Center to take his first ballroom dancing lesson. Studying economics on a fellowship at Cambridge after college, he decided to embrace the fact that no one knew him there and stepped outside his comfort zone. Little did he know, a landlady who was teaching the ballroom dancing was dragging his future wife, Sylvia Chip, to the same class. “It was evident she was the most beautiful girl in the room so I asked her to dance before anyone else could, and the rest is history,” Bill says. Forty-plus years, two grown children and two grandkids later and love is still going strong for the couple, who have even painted a mural montage to the university that brought them together in the dining room of their Observatory Circle home. Though, Sylvia took a little convincing on the mural. “I wasn’t so sure about having a large mural in the house ... ” Sylvia starts to say. “But since I gave in on so many things, she gave me this one,” Bill finishes. In the end, Sylvia came around on the mural, after a glaze with amber specks was added to the finished stenciling to tone down the vibrant green colors. The traditional Colonial residence had been built in 1920, and the Chips wanted the murals to look like they could have been in the original house. Not to mention, Sylvia gravitates toward more muted colors such as their beige, cream, taupe and pale blue color scheme. “My grandson is 4, and he gives everyone colors, like pink for his mother,” Sylvia says. “I’m beige. Everything he brings me is beige.” When Bill and Sylvia first moved from their Georgetown condominium to their current house in 1986 with their then 4- and 7-year-old children, there were only a few minor cosmetic changes they wanted to make.

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PREVIOUS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Bill and Sylvia Chip once dreamed of owning a big house in the country with acres of land, but settled on their house in Observatory Circle for its beautiful azaleas, quiet neighborhood and easy access to Bill’s office. The living room and family room had previously been treated as two separate spaces but designers Jose Solis Betancourt and Paul Sherrill decided to tie them together to create an airy, romantic look with neo-classical furniture. The Chips had not been back to Cambridge University, which is depicted in the dining room mural, since Bill graduated, so they visited last summer to celebrate their 40th anniversary. Sylvia and Bill both count this painting and wall hanging (designed by Jose) among their favorite decor pieces in the house, as it catches the eye of visitors when they enter. The French wine-tasting table in the breakfast nook pulls up to a window banquette that is recessed between two storage cabinets where the family sits for meals.

THIS PAGE, TOP: Though she doesn’t cook often, Sylvia says she spends much of her day in the kitchen with her daughter and two grandchildren. The sunroom is Bill’s favorite room in the house to take a nap, meditate or enjoy a cocktail.

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Primarily they needed to repaint walls that were bright red, green and yellow, not to their taste. A few ceiling cracks were repaired, and more elaborate moldings were added, but there was less restructuring than refinishing. “We made minor repairs over time rather than any large overhauls,” Sylvia says. By 2000 it was time to tackle some bigger projects such as updating the kitchen, adding a verandah to balance the house architecturally and turning the basement maids’ quarters into an entertainment den. With the help of interior designer Jose Solis Betancourt, whose aesthetic the Chips immediately appreciated, they set to work removing cheap cabinetry and Formica floor in the kitchen to create an elegant space with marble counters, a tile backsplash, reclaimed wood above the stove and hardwood floors that run into the dining room. The kitchen went from being what Bill called “the least attractive” space in the house to Sylvia’s favorite room. In the basement, carpeting was replaced with tiled floors and stone walls and a large TV was brought in to create an entertainment room. The wooden steps leading from the kitchen outside were torn down to create a real verandah where the Chips can entertain guests in the warmer months. “Everything just fits together so nicely now, and when I walk in the door after work I feel so at ease and happy to be home,” Bill says. “Of course, [Sylvia’s] the main reason for that, but the house is also so beautiful and relaxing.” Though the Chips admit to entertaining thoughts of downsizing from their current house, they have no immediate plans to vacate. “It is probably bigger than what we need now for the two of us,” Bill says. “But when you’ve invested so much

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of your energy in creating a garden, decorating the way you want and making it just right for you, it’s hard to even imagine walking away from it and turning it over to strangers.”

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

Pieces of History

The historic Henry Cooke House changes hands for $4 million while the famed Friendly Mansion lists for a cool $16.8 million BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

THE DISTRICT Bubes represented the buyer. George and Isabel Hill sold the Elizabeth Polsky and Sam Glass bought   THSTREET HENRY COOKE HOUSE , built by NW from Christianne Ricchi for Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first mayor in 1868, to $2,025,000. Mr. Glass is an investment an undisclosed buyer for $3,975,000. banker with Artis Advisors. Ms. The 8,500-square-foot. bracketed Ricchi is the owner and executive Italianate residence at  QSTREET NW on Cookeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Row in Georgetown chef at Ristorante Ricchi.The threeis next door to Watergate sleuth and bedroom townhouse is a jewel in Washington Post associate editor, Bob the heart of Georgetown renovated Woodward. The residence features grand with a spectacular entertaining space, entertaining rooms, an updated kitchen gourmet kitchen, spacious bedrooms with butlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pantry, 13-foot ceilings and and Carrara marble baths. Other a dramatic foyer with a curved staircase. amenities include a finished basement TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Michael Rankin was the with sitting room, garden terrace listing agent while TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Julia and gated front entrance. The listing DiazAsper was the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent. agent was TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gregory Former Iowa Senator John Culver Gaddy while the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent was and his wife Mary Jane Checchi Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cecelia purchased  KLINGLEPLACENW Leake. Phillip Surprenant purchased for $1,242,500 from Jonathan Sherman, a partner at law firm Boies, Schiller & a five-bedroom Georgetown row Flexner. Ms. Checchi writes books for pet house at   N STREET NW for $2.3 million from DOUGLAS owners.The four-bedroom semi-detached C SALTER. Mr. Surprenant is an Federal-style rowhouse was built in 1975 executive at PricewaterhouseCooper. and boasts views of National Cathedral. The East Village Federal was built Andy Staszak decorated the residence, 3804 Klingle Place NW sold for $1,242,500 to former Iowa Senator John Culver and Mary Jane Checchi. in 1810 and features original floors which has been featured in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spectacular throughout, an arched entryway, five Homes of Greater Washington D.C.â&#x20AC;? McCormick was the listing agent. Daryl Judy, TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawrence Calvert represented also of Washington Fine Properties, was the fireplaces and a chef â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen. Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; James Peva was the listing both sides in the transaction. buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent. Shawn Armbrust and Tim Sparapani bought Craig E. Chason purchased an 1865 agent. TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jean Hanan was the

WYOMINGAVENUENW from Susan townhouse in Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s West Village at buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent. Staudt for $2.5 million. Ms. Armbrust is the NSTREETNW from Heathcote Wales executive director for MidAtlantic Innocence for $2,125,000. Mr. Chason is a partner at the MARYLAND David and Katie Leavy purchased   Project. Mr. Sparapani is an executive at Pillsbury law firm. Mr. Wales is a professor at Applications Developers Alliance and formerly Georgetown University School of Law. The STONINGTON DRIVE in Arnold for $2.9 the public policy advisor for Facebook. The four-bedroom, 3,400-square-foot residence million from Thomas and Wendy Boswell. five-bedroom Federal residence in Kalorama features a lower-level guest suite, landscaped Boswell is a well-known Washington Post was built in 1959. Amenities include a chef â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden, temperature-controlled wine room sports columnist and has written many sports kitchen with breakfast bar, sun-filled front and a two-car garage. Coldwell Bankerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books. Mr. Leavy is chief communications and rear gardens, in-law suite and a two-car Sylvia Bergstrom was the listing agent. officer for The Disccovery Corporation. The garage. Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Matthew Washington Fine Propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Nancy Taylor six-bedroom, custom-built residence was

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home life | real estate news

constructed in 1992 on a high bluff with 180-degree Magothy River views. Outdoor amenities include extensive mature gardens and a waterside pool. Coldwell Banker’s Kathryn Langsner was the listing agent. Long & Foster’s Bradley Kappel was the buyer’s agent. Jason Weinstein and Stephanie Flack bought 8015 ABERDEEN ROAD in Bethesda from Paul and Marci Levine. Mr. Weinstein is a partner at Steptoe & Johnson LLP and concentrates his practice on white-collar criminal defense and privacy and data security matters. Ms. Flack is director of the Potomac River Project. The six-bedroom property, built in 2009, features four levels of luxurious living with a gourmet kitchen, butler’s pantry, library and lower-level guest suite. Coldwell Banker’s Jane Fairweather acted as the listing agent. Fengyu Jian bought 4713 DRUMMOND AVENUE from Barbara Woodall and Scott Kragie for $1.8 million. Ms. Woodall and Mr. Kragie are both attorneys. Timeless elegance abounds in this four-bedroom manor built in 1937 in Chevy Chase Village. The residence blends the architectural gentility of the past with modern conveniences. Long & Foster’s Stacey Sauter was the listing agent while Phyllis Wiesenfelder, also of Long & Foster, was the buyer’s agent.

3023 Q Street NW, Washington, District Of Columbia 20007

VIRGINIA Barry West, chief information officer at Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, sold 209 SAINT ASAPH STREET SOUTH in Old Town for $2.9 million to Matthew Kozlowski. The four-

bedroom historic row house was built in 1835 and features gracious rooms, high ceilings and

meticulously renovated original floors. Additional amenities include a double parlor with plaster moldings, banquet-sized dining room, eight fireplaces and a walled garden. McEnearney Associates’ Barbara Beckwith was the listing agent; Jeffery McGlothlin of McEnearney Associates was the buyer’s agent.

PROPERTY LINES PRICIEST LISTING: The historic former residence of Alfred and Jean Friendly at 1645 31ST STREET NW in Georgetown, which sold for $6.2 million in 2012, has been listed for $16.8 million making it the most expensive house currently on the market in the District. Formerly known as the “Friendly Estate,” the 1817 Second Empire mansion renovated by current owners Capital City Real Estate is now known as the Williams Addison House. Mrs. Friendly was a noted philanthropist and longtime Washington hostess. Her husband was a Pulitzer Prize-winning former managing editor of the Washington Post. The property sits on a three-quarter acre lot and features a grandiose master bedroom suite, octagonal foyer, carriage house and three-car garage.

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PHILANTHROPISTS MOVING: Stephen and Diana Goldberg have listed 4400 GARFIELD STREET NW for $7.5 million The couple is known for their extraordinary $25 million donation to the Children’s National Medical Center in 2001. Mr. Goldberg owns the Stephen A. Goldberg Co., a real estate development firm with a portfolio of office parks and apartment complexes throughout the metro area. Mrs. Goldberg, a volunteer at Children’s since 1983, works on numerous charity committees. The 1930s Wesley Heights Tudor mansion has been completely renovated and boasts nearly 12,500 square feet of interior space with an atrium-like family room, custom library, kitchen with three islands and two attached garages. The main house contains seven bedrooms and seven and a half baths. The guest house includes two

bedrooms and three baths. Long & Foster’s Nancy Itteilag is the listing agent. THINKFOODGROUP COFOUNDER LISTS: Local restaurateur Rob Wilder has listed 4815 DEXTER STREET NW in Wesley Heights for $4.5 million. Wilder, along with acclaimed chef José Andrés, owns several popular local restaurants including Jaleo, Zaytinya, Oyamel and Cafe Atlantico. The 8,000-sq-ft. Victorian was designed by renowned architect, Donald Lococo in 1952. Wilder bought the property in 2007. The residence includes a large main-level wine cellar, a mahogany and rosewood paneled office, play room complete with fire pole and a chef’s kitchen. Long & Foster’s Nancy Itteilag is the listing agent. Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@washingtonlife.com.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| march

2014

| washingtonlife.com


HOME LIFE | OPENHOUSE

Newly Listed Luxurious condos and homes now on the market

FOXHALL

ASKING PRICE $3,190,000

  FOXVIEWCIRCLENW=WASHINGTON=DC This 5,200-square-foot property will be built by Sandy Spring Builders on .28 acres in the sought-after 1801 Foxhall Development. The house will feature a gourmet kitchen, high ceilings, custom millwork, an open double-sided fireplace and more. It’s ready to build, but there’s plenty of time to work with the architects and builders to customize the lot, which backs to wooden open space and has the option to be purchased separately.

LISTING AGENT: Christina Mattar, 202-2555964; Wydler Brothers, Long & Foster

POTOMACFALLS  CRIPPLEGATEROAD=POTOMAC=MD  With its rolling hills and two-plus acre sites, Potomac Falls has been a coveted location since its inception in the late 1960s. Natural beauty forms the backdrop for this charming, Williamsburg-inspired, clapboard Colonial sited on almost three pastoral acres backing to the parkland. Impeccable and exquisitely renovated, this house has been perfectly updated throughout with a floor plan allowing for large scale entertaining or smaller, cozy affairs by the family room fireplace. Relax on the back deck in total privacy and enjoy a chance to daydream.

ASKING PRICE $2,200,000 LISTING AGENT Anne Killeen, 301-706-0067; Washington Fine Properties

WESTEND  PENNSYLVANIAAVE>NW–PHB=WASHINGTON=DC This 16-unit boutique building is one of Washington’s most desirable addresses, with it’s ideal location within walking distance to the shops and fine-dining restaurants of Georgetown, and just steps away from the K Street business district. This 4,300-square-foot, custom penthouse apartment is superbly appointed, and tailored to sophisticated standards. This unit offers 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, large entertaining areas, custom high-end finishes, open living spaces on two levels, city views, balconies and two-car parking.

ROSSLYN

1881 Nash Street #2109, Arlington, VA 22209

ASKING PRICE $3,100,000

A stunning residence in the sky located in the sought-after Turnberry Tower, this sophisticated flat offers two bedrooms, a den and three and one half baths with spectacular views of Georgetown. The property features Snadiero custom cabinetry, imported marble flooring and a private two-car garage with abundant storage space. Building amenities include a full-service concierge, state-of-the-art gym and spa services.

LISTING AGENT Alex Vendi7i, 202-550-8872; TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

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ASKING PRICE $4,850,000 LISTING AGENT: Jim Bell, 202607-4000; Beasley Real Estate

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MYWASHINGTON Molly Smith, Artistic Director, Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater

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WHEN YOU ATTEND THEATER IN OTHER CITIES, ESPECIALLY NEW YORK AND LONDON, WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR? I get to New York much more often than London, but the joy is that we share a lot of projects and artists. I always hope to see great art. Sometimes you find it in the newest play, sometimes you find it in an old favorite — just to see artists performing at their best. HOW DOES WASHINGTON RANK AS A THEATER TOWN? Washington is definitely one of the best theater towns in the country. So many different kinds of theater, so many talented artists. Everywhere I go, people ask me what’s happening here. Part of what we wanted to do, and are doing, was to become a national center to showcase Arena but also smaller local companies and artists, as we do in the Kogod Cradle Series and the Playwrights Arena.We showcase the most distinctive work from around the country through partnerships with the Goodman Theater, Steppenwolf Theatre Company, and Seattle Rep. WHICH PLAYS WOULD YOU LIKE TO PRODUCE MOST? “West Side Story” has long been a favorite of mine. It’s iconic and has

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WHICH WASHINGTON THEATERS ARE DOING IMPRESSIVE THINGS? All of them! I can’t possibly list all the impressive things going on in the city. “Stupid ***** Bird” at Studio was a recent favorite and I’m pleased to be working with the director of that project, Aaron Posner, in Arena’s next season. WHO ARE YOUR FAVORITE UPCOMING PLAYWRIGHTS? We’ve recently brought in two new resident writers: Sam Hunter and Lydia Diamond — both terrific. WHICH ACTOR WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO BRING TO ARENA AND FOR WHICH PLAY? How could I pick just one?

MY TOP SPOTS 1. Tryst Coffeehouse (2459 18th St. NW). It’s near my house and a great spot for breakfast, but really for any time of day. 2. Rasika (633 D St. NW) and its palak chaat: the perfect combination of crunchy and sweet and it melts, literally, in your mouth. 3. The Tidal Basin at Cherry Blossom time. I have been known to make an all-staff announcement to encourage everyone to leave Arena’s building and take the long walk to the Tidal Basin to see the blossoms. It’s such a beautiful, fleeting moment, just like theater. 4. National Portrait Gallery and Kogod Courtyard (8th and F Streets NW) A great spot on many levels. I love to mine the gift shop for creative and lovely items. 5. Adam’s Morgan. It’s my neighborhood, my home. When I first moved here, I had so many choices of where to live. I chose the vibrancy and electricity of Adams Morgan.

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KO G O D C O U R T YA R D B Y N C I N D C / F L I C K R . T R Y S T C O F F E E B Y A L E X B A R T H / F L I C K R . A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y.

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definitely shaped the way we view musical theater. I am longing to do a showcase for Lillian Hellman. Again, her plays have reflected the times and then changed them. She was a woman ahead of her time.

M O L LY S M I T H BY TO N Y P OW E L L . A DA M S M O R G A N BY S . PA K H R I N / W I K I M E D I A CO M M O N S . N AT I O N A L P O RT R A I T G A L L E RY

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO GO INTO THEATER? After high school, I attended the University of Alaska in Fairbanks for a pre-law degree. I froze to death but had a rabbit fur parka that kept me warm. After my first year, I traveled by backpack to Europe for four months, seeing the great sights, running out of money, staying in youth hostels and basically gaining a life. Somehow when I travel, more of myself is revealed, because I am away from what’s familiar. Suddenly I’m left with who I am, instead of who I am in other people’s eyes. I decided I didn’t want to follow my brain, but to follow my passion and heart which was telling me to start a professional theater in Juneau. I was 19.


Washington Life Magazine - March 2014  

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