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Yoga

Totally Fab!

Summer Fashion

Boot Camp with Baron Baptiste

Washington Ballet Beatles Ball

Society on the High Seas

Summer 2006

Wa s h i n g to n ’s P r e m i e r luxu ry L i f e s t y l e M ag a z i n e S i n c e 1 9 9 1

Sex with the

POLLYWOOD Exclusive!

queen?

Inside the

SILVERDOCS

read our summer book guide

Film Festival

Scorsese, Jarmusch,

and Gore ...

Ferragamo, “Nacho” And SALINAS-bentley at the

S U M M E R 2 0 0 6 • $3.9 5

Washington Life

Ambassador’s Cup

GET ACTIVE! WL’s Summer Guide to Health and Wellness Art at Auction

DAYBREAK cracks The world record

PLUS:

exclusive parties, Parties, Parties!


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shift your vision with baron Baptiste in Tulum, Mexico

po lly woo d exclu s ive

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silverdocs/afi discovery channel documentary film festival

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society on the high seas: Decked out in Annapolis

Features LIterature Summer Reads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 health and wellness Health and Wellness Resorts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 D.C.Yoga Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Personal Trainers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Columns hollywood on the potomac

By Janet Donovan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

art at auction by Renee Drake . . . . . . . . . . 58 Around Town by Donna Shor . . . . . . . . . 90 OVER THE MOON by Vicky Moon . . . . . . . . 123 This town by Michael Strange . . . . . . . . . . 130

Departments

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Editor’s letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . international affairs Festivals & Events for the Jet Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FYIDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . power profile Fernando Murias . . . . . . . . . .

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media spotlight

Book Deals and Presidential Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

TREND REPORT Short Shorts and Disco Flash . . . . . what’s hot Cocktail Rings . . . . . . . . . . . . . Travel Rediscovering the Big Easy . . . . . . . . . . . Diplomatic Discourse Dutch on the Delta . . .

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§ snaps From COVER: (Banner) Baron Baptiste, author of 40 Days to Personal Revolution, in Crow Position; Cindy Jones and Martha Whitley at the Washington Ballet Beatles Ball; former Veep Al Gore at the screening for An Inconvenient Truth; (Main photo) Polo players Juan Salinas-Bentley, Ignacio “Nacho” Figueras and Salvatore Ferragamo at the Ambassador’s Cup (Photo: Paul Simkin). SNAPS FROM TOP: Baron Baptiste; Carolyn Middleton, wearing Helen Morely lace gown with portrait neckline ($2,310), NEIMAN MARCUS; Gilan Citrine and Diamond Ring ($8,000), GILAN JEWELRY; Film Director and Silverdocs AFI/Discovery Channel’s Documentary Festival Honoree Martin Scorsese (Photo: Paul Simkin).


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Red shoes

Black/gold handbags

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Tunics

White shirts

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THE TOP1O K N O W I N G FA L L’ S ESSENTIALS IS AS EASY AS C O U N T I N G T O 1O .

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Real estate & Home Design inside homes

Dr.William Haseltine’s Georgetown Home . . . . . . . . 107

design Outdoor Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 real Estate news With Mary Mewborn . . . . . . 115 historical landscapes

The Hay-Adams House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Open House Dream properties ready for buyers . . . . 120

WL Sponsored Events washington ballet beatles ball . . .

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1869 society black-tie gala . . . . . . . . 32 The will awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 SILverdocs parties Al Gore & Scorsese . . . . . 56 NSO under the stars . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

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life of the Party Venetian Masters with Lila Castellaneta . . . . . . . . . . 34 Young Concert Artists Benefit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Dingell 25th Anniversary Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Grace Bender’s 60th Birthday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 The Omni Shoreham Hotel’s 75th Anniversary . . . . . . 40 Peter Beinart Book Signing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Release of “America Back on Track” . . . . . . . . . . . 43 The Release of “Letters to a Young Brother” . . . . . . . . 44 An Inconvenient Truth Screening . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Party on the Potomac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Kawar’s Birthday Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

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Ernst’s Birthday Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 National Museum of Women in the Arts Gala . . . . . . . 96 Strathmore Spring Gala with Lily Tomlin . . . . . . . . . 97 Gore Dean One Year Anniversary Party . . . . . . . . . . 98 Children’s National Medical Center Jazzmatazz . . . . . . 99 National Student Partnerships Spring Celebration . . . . . 100 Friends of the Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 The Helen Hayes Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

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The St. John’s Community Services Spring Party . . . . . 102 The Ambassador’s Cup Polo Match . . . . . . . . . . . 126

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§ snaps From top: Ancient mosaic wall mural in house of Bill Haseltine; Grace Bender and Barbara Harrison at Grace Benders 60th Birthday Celebration (Photo: Robert Williams); Kevin Spacey and Katie Rost at The Will Awards (Photo: Immanuel Jayachandran); Bourbon Street, New Orleans by Night; Cartier Love bracelet in 18 k yellow gold and diamonds ($6,975), CARTIER.


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Wa s h i n gto n ’s P r e m i e r e Luxu ry L i f e st y l e M aga z i n e S i n c e 1 9 9 1

Editor in Chief

Nancy Reynolds Bagley Managing Editor

Michael M. Clements editorial Director

Katie Tarbox

Copy Editor

Claudia Krieger ASSOCIATE Editor

Clay Gaynor

Fashion and style Editors

Alison Lukes, Barbara McConaghy, Lana Orloff and Sonya Pate Editorial Assistants

Christina Livadiotis and Astrid Parker columnists

Deborah Gore Dean, Janet Donovan, Renee Drake, Donna Evers, Carol Joynt,Vicky Moon Mary Mewborn, Donna Shor and Michael Wharton Contributing Writers & Editors

Don Baer, Susan Blumenthal, M.D., Deborah K. Dietsch, Patricia Finneran, Ina Ginsburg, Shela Halper, Eleanor Herman, Kay Kendall, Charlie Koones, Nora Maccoby, Mallory Norton, Lana Orloff, Sonya Pate, Ambassador Boudewijn van Eenennaam and Mel Zuckerman creative DIRECTOR

J.C. Suarès

production Artist

Susan M. Dickey Graphic Artists

Addia Cooper-Henry, Elizabeth Demers and Barton Kelecava Contributing Photographers

Roy Cox, Crowell Hadden,Zaid Hamid, Russell Hirshon, Immanuel Jayachandran, Jonah Koch, Leslie Kossoff, Gary Landsman, Kyle Samperton, Margot L. Schulman, Paul Simkin, Rachel Smith, Robert Williams and Jamie Windon Account Executives

Kelly Ginter, Alexandra Misci and Audrey Weppler Advertising Trafficking and circulation Manager

Elizabeth Kelley

Assistant to the CEO

Addia Cooper-Henry

office manager and Account ASSISTANT

Wesley Crisostomo Controller

Stephanie Matthews web technologies development

Ernesto Gluecksmann, Infamia, Inc. interns

Roxy Angha, Claudia Bahar, Anamika Dugger, Leah Fulner and Michelle Goldblum Publisher

Vicki Bagley

Chairman, Executive Board

Gerry Byrne

Chief Executive Officer

Soroush Richard Shehabi

Washington Life magazine: Celebrating Washington’s Social Scene and Power Elite, publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, October, November and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please-consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $35.99 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place, NW, Washington D.C., 20008 To post or view events on our interactive online social calendar, visit www.washingtonlife.com and click on “social calendar.” To contribute ideas or provide feedback Email us at info@washingtonlife. com with press releases, tips and editorial comments. Copyright ©2006 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. Magazine format by Wayne DeSelle Design / www.deselle.com


Editor’s Letter

A Health and Wellness Revolution

T

here we were, Soroush and I, last month at beautiful Maya Tulum resort in Mexico, intent on finding balance in our busy lives through yoga. Paradise, you say? Think again. Yoga guru Baron Baptiste’s Personal Revolution Bootcamp had us up at sunrise, working through full days of yoga, detoxifying (which consisted of consuming more avocado and tomato than I ever thought humanly possible) and finally – this was perhaps the most challenging part of the trip – trying the keep each other from using our Blackberrys in between (and sometimes during) sessions. It was an experience that left us both transformed physically and mentally. And neither of us have touched a cigarette since! We thought we’d share some of our positive health and wellness energy with you in this, our first ever summer issue! We profile Baron Baptiste this month as well as take you on a tour of the D.C. area’s top personal trainers and yoga studios. We also send you to health and wellness resorts at Canyon Ranch in Lenox, Mass and Sea Island, Ga. Polo lovers get to go to the Ambassador’s Cup where Salvatore Ferragamo and Ralph Lauren model Ignacio “Nacho” Figueras entertained fans on a beautiful Saturday afternoon in The Plains,Va. In the director’s chair As the official magazine sponsor of the SILVERDOCS AFI/Discover y Channel Documentary Festival, WL was in Silver Spring for the festivities from opening to closing night. We rubbed shoulders with Al Gore at our joint party with Current TV at Ceviche and spoke to the former Veep about his new film An Inconvenient Truth along with a number of filmmakers, industry insiders and festival brass. You can read our complete coverage of the festival inside, including a wonderful têteà-tête between legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese and indie icon Jim Jarmusch at the 2006 Guggenheim Symposium.

Keeping with the summer theme, in WHAT’S HOT we match the season’s most refreshing cocktails with the season’s most stunning cocktail rings, while in TREND REPORT we show you short shorts are in! Perhaps the only thing hotter than a mid-Atlantic Summer is the area’s property market. As always, we take you on a guided tour of the area’s top real estate trends, properties and design in RE NEWS, INSIDE HOMES, DESIGN and OPEN HOUSE. Get away! We also take you on a unique summer vacation this issue – Managing Editor Michael Clements asks the question “Is it back?” as he tours post-Katrina New Orleans. Speaking of The Big Easy, a warm thank you to outgoing Dutch Ambassador Boudewijn van Eenennaam for penning “Dutch on the Delta,” which details how the Netherlands is helping the Crescent City rebuild their levee systems. Events, Balls and Galas We have all the hot coverage of Spring’s best events inside, including the much-welcomed return of the Washington Ballet at the WL-sponsored Beatles Ball, the Shakespeare Theatre’s Will Awards honoring Kevin Spacey, and events celebrating the opening of the Venetian Masters at The National Gallery. WL was proud to be a participating magazine sponsor for all three. For you jet-setters out there, WL has compiled a list of the world’s best summer festivals and events. Whether it’s tennis (Wimbledon in July) or Jazz (Newport Jazz Festival in August), we’ve got the lowdown on the festivities in seven different countries. So, stay healthy (and fashionable) this summer and see you in September!

Ahoy, mate WL makes style waves this issue in “Society on the High Seas,” where we travel to Annapolis to provide you with the summer’s finest nautical fashions. A special thanks to Maryland First Lady Kendel Ehrlich, Carolyn Middleton and the midshipmen who helped make our nautical shoot go swimmingly.

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contributors

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Don Baer,

is the senior executive vice president for strategy and development of Discovery Communications, Inc., a leading global real-world media and entertainment company. He has a background as a lawyer, political adviser and journalist.

Enterprises International, a Washington, D.C., publicity firm whose clients include celebrities, authors, politicians and publications. She created and hosted The Beltway Broads radio show and writes the column Hollywood on the Potomac.

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Susan Blumenthal, M.D., a major force in bringing important public health issues to scientific and public attention who has served as a White House advisor, is Clinical Professor at Georgetown University and medical director of the SILVER DOCS Rx global health film series.

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Barnard College.

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Roy Cox, a native of

Baltimore, began his career as a fashion and advertising photographer. Having no formal training in the medium, Cox turned a weekend hobby of photographing friends and local scenes into a full time passion.

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Patricia Finneran

is festival director of SILVERDOCS: AFI/Discovery Channel Documentary Festival, hailed as “non-fiction nirvana” by Variety. The Festival presents nearly 100 films from all over the world at the AFI Silver Theatre. She is a graduate of

Deborah K. Dietsch

writes about architecture, art and design for The Washington Times,The Washington Post and numerous magazines. Trained as an architect, she has authored several books and serves on Baltimore’s Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel.

Ina Ginsburg is a prominent member of the arts community in Washington and worldwide. She served as a long-term member on the Board of Trustees at the American Film Institute and was the Washington editor of Interview magazine for many years.

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Eleanor Herman, author of Sex with Queens, is a lecturer and TV and radio commentator on royal issues. Related to most of the royal families of Europe through her grandmother twenty-eight times removed, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Ms. Herman is married, lives in McLean,VA, and writes history from a woman’s perspective.

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Renee Harrison Drake was a curator for the State 5

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Deparment’s Art in Embassies Program while she lived in Washington. She left to become the managing editor of Sotheby’s Preview magazine and Art at Auction. After eight years, she left Sotheby’s to make the documentary film “The Way Back.”

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Janet Donovan

is the founder and president of Creative

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Carol Joynt, a former producer for Larry King, Charlie Rose and Chris Matthews, is the owner of the popular Georgetown restaurant, Nathans. After 9/11, she began hosting monthly neighborhood power lunches called Q & A Cafe. When she’s not at Nathans, Joynt focuses her time on her number one priority: her son, Spencer.

| summer

2006

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contributors

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Kay Kendall has been

president of The Washington Ballet for the last seven years. Previously she served as president of the Maret School Board, president of Ashoka International’s Washington chapter and as a board member of the Ladies Board of Children’s Hospital.

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Charlie Koones

is president and publisher of The Variety Group, the worldwide leader in entertainment business information. Mr. Koones is responsible for the global business operations of Variety, Daily Variety, Daily Variety Gotham,Variety.com, Variety Careers.com and Variety China.

Nora Maccoby

is an award-winning screenwriter (Buffalo Soldier, Bongwater), director (Dropping the Bomb on My Street), co-founder of Nature’s Partners, a bi-partisan energy literacy initiative, a participant in Energy Consensus, and an advisor to organizations like the International Fund for China’s Environment.

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Barbara McConaghy Washington Life’s 14

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fashion editor, is a nationally recognized stylist, show producer and editor. Her work has appeared in Elle and Detour magazines, and locally in Washingtonian, Baltimore Magazine and DC Style. She has dressed stars such as Lauren Hutton, Brandy and Jennifer Love Hewitt.

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Vicky Moon has chronicled the lives of the rich, the not-so-rich, the famous, and the notso-famous for more than twenty years. She has covered local murders and prominent lives in Middleburg,Virginia for People Magazine and the Washington Post; and written about Middleburg’s hunt balls, steeplechase races and parties for Town and Country, Millionaire,Veranda and Southern Accents magazines.

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Mallory Norton, a native southern Californian, was lured to Washington D.C. to attend Georgetown

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University. She currently works as a freelance writer and yoga instructor.

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Lana Orloff and Sonya Pate, with over 15 years of experience in the high fashion industry, have joined to form PSI (Personal Shoppers Inc.), a nation-wide personal shopping and style consulting company which offers style and image management, gift buying and global shopping tour experiences.

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Donna Shor is an internationalist who has lived in five countries on three continents, climbed the Great Wall of China, tracked tigers in Bangladesh, raised twins in a Provencal mas and a Bordeaux wine chateau, and hobnobbed with greats from Peck (Gregory) to Picasso (Pablo). She has written widely, from the National Geographic to the Paris-based International Herald Tribune.

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Ambassador Boudewijn van Eenennaam has represented the Netherlands in the U.S. since March 2002. He has a law degree from the University of Leyden and has served as advisor to the Netherlands Permanent Mission to NATO in Brussels and director-general for political affairs at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs at The Hague.

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Mel Zuckerman is the founder and CEO of Canyon Ranch health resorts and SpaClubs. He has worked with many research and health organizations including the Arizona Prevention Center, the Arizona Arthritis Center and the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center, among others. (Not Pictured)

Mary Mewborn has written for publications worldwide. With degrees in International Relations and a penchant for travel, she has served as a feature writer, contributing editor and columnist for WL for over six years.

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c a l e n d a r

Visit Washingtonlife.com’s online calendar to view hundreds of galas and events, or post your own event, which will then be considered for our print edition and our annual Balls and Galas Directory.

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RE-Opening OF the National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum After an

extensive renovation of the historic Patent Office Building, the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery and American Art Museum re-open to the public. The collection includes nearly 20,000 paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings and photographs; 11:30 a.m. ribbon cutting; 8th and F Streets, N.W.; (202) 633 -1000.

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Great Meadow Fourth of July Celebration A fun-filled

day with the U.S. Presidential

Helicopter, cavalry charge, rocketry events, polo matches, children’s games, traditional American food and, of course, fireworks. Proceeds benefit The Meadows Outdoors Foundation, which helps to preserve open space for community access; 4-10 p.m.; Great Meadow, Va.; (540) 253-5001 to reserve tickets.

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Bobby Mitchell/ Toyota Hall of Fame Gala

Over 40 Hall of Fame legends head to the fairways to celebrate The Bobby Mitchell/Toyota Hall of Fame Classic’s “Sweet 16,” sponsored by Washington Area Auto Dealers; Lansdowne Resort; call (703) 960-1100 to purchase tickets.

Polo heats up at Great Meadows with Twilight Polo and their annual Fourth of July fireworks.

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Wisdom in the Elements of Devastation exhibition

The Indonesian Embassy sponsors an exhibition of neoclassical art by Indonesian artist Machyar Gleuenta to raise funds for the victims of Hurricane Katrina and the Tsunami; 3:30-6 p.m.; Embassy of Indonesia, 2020 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., (202) 775 -5200.

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Taipei Philharmonic

The Taipei Philharmonic Orchestra presents a diverse program at the Kennedy Center. The performance includes Johann Strauss’ Fruhlingstimmen and Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9, From the New World, the orchestra’s own Far Horizon piano concerto by Dr. Chien-



Ashley Anderson, Jay Walker and Melissa Villemaretten at the Sinatra Soiree

tai Chen, and two traditional Taiwanese folk songs; 8 pm; Concert Hall, John F. Kennedy Center; (202) 467-4600 for tickets.

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Sinatra Summer Soiree The 14th

annual Sinatra Soiree will present an evening of swing, cocktails, and carousing, hosted by the Capital Club. 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Galleria at Lafayette Centre

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Many Hats Challenge Cup

Polo players from Argentina, Canada, Colombia, Mexico and the United Kingdom gather at Summerhill Polo for the Many Hats Challenge cup. Proceeds benefit organizations dedicated to helping needy children and youth worldwide; gates open at 2 p.m., match begins at 3 p.m.; Summerhill Polo field, Poolesville, Md., (301) 972-7288 for tickets.

Save the Date for these Washington Life sponsored and supported events.

Children’s Law Center, September 15 Washington National Opera Opening Night, September 16 Thelonious Monk Jazz Competition, September 16-17 USO Gala, September 28 Charity Works Dream Ball, September 30 National Hispanic Foundation’s Noche de Gala, October 3

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International Affairs Festivals and events for the jet-set

the country’s largest Show Jumping competitions. For more information www.hamptonclassic.com.

Saratoga Springs August 26 Travers Stakes The Travers Stakes, held at Saratoga Race Course near Saratoga Springs, New York, is the oldest major thoroughbred horse race in the United States. For more information on tickets (518) 584-6200.

Rhode Island Newport August 11-13 Newport Jazz Festival The 52-year-old festival still brings out the best names in jazz music. United States Colorado Aspen July 3- 9 Aspen Ideas Festival A premier conference of the Aspen Institute for global leaders across many disciplines to engage in discussion about ideas and issues that both shape our lives and challenge our times. Register at www. aspeninstitute.org.

Aspen June 21 – August 20 Music Festival For 57 summers, music-lovers have come to Aspen to celebrate classical music, to revel in life’s natural wonders and Aspen high life. Tickets range from free to $100. Purchase at www. aspenmusicfestival.com.

Telluride September 1 -4 Telluride Film Festival Each Labor Day, thousands travel to Telluride to see some of the finest films and discuss the media. Passes start $680, purchase at www.telluridefilmfestival.org.

Massachusetts Martha’s Vineyard July 13-15 83rd Annual Edgartown Regatta Hundreds of One-Design Class Boats sail at Edgartown Yacht Club at Tisbury Wharf for a three-day

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race. For more information, www.

Tickets range from $20 - $50, for more information www.festivalproductions.net.

Berkshires September 1 – 3 Tanglewood Jazz Festival Three days of incredible music from today’s most renowned jazz artists.

England Royal Liverpool July 20-23 British Open The world’s oldest golf championship brings together the best golfers from around the world. For tickets and

edgartownyc.org.

Tickets start range from $17 - $45, purchase at www.bso.org.

New York The Hamptons July 13-16 15th Annual Summer Antiques & Garden Show Fine antiques from select dealers.

Contact www.hamptonsqntiques.com

The Hamptons July 8 The Parrish Art Museum Midsummer Gala A celebration to honor the architects of the New Parrish Art Museum, Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron with an evening of dinner and dancing. Tickets start at $1,000, purchase at www.parrishart.org.

The Hamptons July 22 – August 26th Mercedes Benz Polo Challenge Some of the finest polo on six consecutive Saturdays at the Bridgehampton Polo Club. For

more information www.bhpolo.com.

The Hamptons August 27 – September 3 The Hampton Classic Horse Show Over 1,400 horses are featured at

| washingtonlife.com

information www.opengolf.com

June 26 – July 9 Wimbledon The Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon attract an audience of over 450,000 each year. For tickets and information www.wimbledon.org.

May 19 – August 27 Glyndebourne Opera Festival Located 54 miles south of London, Glyndebourne is one of the world’s best known opera houses.Tickets are hard to find and are offered to members first. Prices start around $100, for more information www.glyndebourne.com

Germany Oct 4-8 Frankfurt Book Fair The world’s largest marketplace for publishing focuses on illustrators this year. The works of Indian authors will be featured. For more information www.frankfurtbook-fair.com

Greece Athens June 1 – July 31 Athens Festival This annual festival promises extensive offering of music, dance and theater set in the 2000-year-old Odeion of Herodes Atticus at the foot of the Acropolis. Call +30 210 92 82 900 or email info@greekfestival. gr for more information.

Italy Siena July 2 The annual Palio bareback horse race on Siena’s Piazza del Campo began in 1310. The minute and a half of racing is accompanied by a full day and night of acrobatics and festivities. Entrance is free but expect huge crowds. For more information call the Siena Tourist Office at +39 0577 28 05 51.

Monaco Aug 4 Monte-Carlo Red Cross Ball The Red Cross Ball is held annually at Le Sporting Club under the patronage of H.S.H. Prince Albert. One of Europe’s largest charity events, it attracts celebrities, royalty, artists and musicians. Contact +377 92 16 36 36.

France May-October Deuville Horse Races The glamorous seaside resort on the Channel coast is where European social folk gather to watch the famed horse races. For more information contact the Deauville tourism office at +33 02 31 14 40 00 or www.deauville.org

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f .y. i . d . c . A Presidential Affair }

Enjoy an after-hours candlelight tour and dinner at Mount Vernon, George Washington’s home, on July 31st. The evening begins with a champagne toast and ends with an elegant American dinner in the George Washington Dining Room at the Mount Vernon Inn. Tickets $125; for more information visit www.corcoran.org or call (202) 639-1702.

Gulf Coast Art: Post Katrina Ä

After the Storm, a show and sale at the Foundry Gallery running July 5-30, will feature artwork by Gulf Coast artists dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Those featured are members of The ARTS, a Hancock County, Mississippi, art association which represents over 200 artists who lost their homes, work, studios and equipment in the storm. For more information visit www.hancock-art.com or call (228) 342-8764.

Enjoy a candle light dinner at George Washington’s Mt. Vernon

“Northeast Quadrant” by Lori K. Gordon

Who’s your Marmee? }

Little Women – The Broadway Musical is coming to The Kennedy Center June 27 through July 23. Headlining the show is recording, concert and theater star Maureen McGovern, whose portrayal of Marmee garnered her a Drama Desk Award nomination and shining Broadway reviews. Tickets range from $36 to $94 and are available at the Kennedy Center box office or by calling (202) 467-4600.

National Touring Company, Little Women – The Broadway Musical

For your Viewing Pleasure }

For an insider’s view of the modeling industry, keep your eyes peeled for The Agency, a VH-1 program expected to premiere in early fall. Hosted by D.C. native Paul Wharton, the show follows a Wilhelmina modeling agency search for and the subsequent transformation of three young and unexperienced models into the profession. For additional information visit http://www.evolutionlook.com/newspost.html. 18

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The Studio Theatre presents… ~

Keep an eye on The Studio Theatre in 2006/2007 for performances of works by Neil LaBute, Tom Stoppard, Paula Vogel and others. According to Variety magazine, The Studio Theatre is “fueled by solid artistic and box office successes” and is “one of D.C.’s most successful theater organizations.” For more information visit www.studiotheatre.org.

Rousseau in Washington Ä

The first major retrospective of French artist Henri Rousseau’s work will be on display at the National Gallery of Art from July 16th through October 15th. Henri Rousseau: Jungles in Paris features a range of work from the artist, including the largest grouping ever of his famous “Jungle Paintings.” The National Gallery will be the only U.S. venue for the exhibition and will also feature documents and source material that shed light on Rousseau’s artistic ambitions and working methods. For more information visit www.nga.gov.

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The Cartier Love Charity Bracelet

| Love, Love, Love

It’s all you need, according to Cartier. And with the jewelry company’s new “Love Charity Bracelet,” you can help spread it around. Seven celebrities, including Selma Hayek, Spike Lee and Sarah Jessica Parker, have pledged their support to various charities, each represented by a different colored silk bracelet fastened with a rose gold band. According to Fariba Jahanbani, “Cartier stands for love, commitment, and passion” and in that spirit will donate $100 from the sale of each to its corresponding cause. Available at Cartier at Chevy Chase Collection and Tyson’s Galleria; for more information visit www.love.cartier.com or call (301) 654-5858.

| Digital Opulence at St. Regis

Stop phoning in your Beluga and champagne orders and hop on the web to fill your wishes with this new and improved signature butler service device. Available exclusively at St. Regis hotels, including the one in Washington, this snappy little gadget allows you to e-mail just about any request to your own personal staff member thanks to wireless handheld devices issued to every St. Regis butler. For more information visit www.stregis.com.

| Listen Up

Septime Webre, right, director of The Washington Ballet, with Donna Limerick, managing producer of Out and about with 90.9 in the studio

WETA’s new radio program, Out and About with 90.9, will focus on local arts and entertainment with on-location reporting from theaters, nightclubs, symphony halls and museums. The show will be hosted by WETA TV 26 “Around Town” panelist Joseph Barber and 90.9 FM announcer Nicole Lacroix – both D.C. natives – and will bring regional sounds, voices and stories to the air. “Our goal is to connect people to places,” said Donna Limerick, the program’s managing producer. Out and About will air Saturdays at noon with encore broadcasts on Sundays at 8 p.m.

geared up Pure Digital Point & Shoot Camcorder

Imagine how convenient it would be if your video camcorder had all the cool features of your digital camera (instant photo viewing, photo sharing, digital storage, etc.). Well, get ready to ditch the cassettes, because the Pure Digital Point & Shoot Camcorder does. This handheld camcorder can capture up to 30 minutes of high quality digital video which can be viewed instantly on its 1.4-inch color screen or by plugging it into a TV or PC. Plus, you can take it to one of 8,000 Pure Digital-certified retail locations (which include CVS, Rite-Aid, Ritz Camera and Wolf Camera) and have your footage archived on DVD. Now that’s convenience. Available at Target for $129.99.

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P ow e r

p r o f i l e s

Fernando Murias

Occupation: PricewaterhouseCoopers Washington Metro Managing Partner Washington Life: What piqued your interest in the field you’re in? Fernando Murias: Both my parents were accountants. Also, while attending the University of Maryland, my professors counseled me toward tax consulting — I have been in the industry ever since. WL: PwC has been listed on Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” list.  What’s the secret? FM: At the risk of oversimplifying, what has moved us to the level of “best” is challenging work with diverse teams who listen to one another and support each member’s professional needs and personal obligations. WL: 24/7 Blackberry .... for or against? FM: Against.  I find it disturbing when I am talking to someone who is distracted by incoming Blackberry messages — I know if I carried one I would become that person. WL: How do you escape? FM: I hit the beach here and in Florida whenever I can. WL: You’re a winner of The Washington Post’s “prognosticator” contest. Any new predictions? FM: Due to my predictions regarding the latest housing market and interest rates, I understand I am in the running again this year.  If I could only translate that into personal success in the stock market, maybe I could retire early. WL: Career defining moment? FM: Four years ago; being named to my current position at PwC. My roots are here so I have thoroughly enjoyed reconnecting with the local community. WL: In 2004, the State of Maryland named you “outstanding fundraising volunteer” for your work with so many local organizations (Junior Achievement, Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Washington and the American Red Cross, among others)… what’s the magic forumula? FM: Fundraising is all about building relationships. WL: Do you agree with Gordon Gekko that greed is good? FM: Ambition is a good thing, but greed implies selfishness. I believe strongly that anyone in a position of success has a duty to give back to the community, so to me greed is a negative quality. WL: If you had your own version of The Apprentice, what would your tag line be? FM: “YOU’RE HIRED!” Our local PwC office is the fastest growing in the country. Finding enough qualified people to meet our hiring goals is a constant challenge. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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o f t h e pa r t y

WL sponsored

The Washington Ballet Beatles Ball June 1st • Mellon Auditorium Photos by kyle samperton

B y K ay K e n d a l l The Event: “With A Little Help From Our Friends,” The Washington Ballet had its most successful gala ever. The party featured excerpts from this Spring’s ballet, Always, No Sometimes, choreographed by Trey McIntyre and set to a medley of Beatles’ tunes. The theme, coupled with the desire to show support for The Washington Ballet, attracted an unprecedented 500 guests and raised a record $500,000 plus. The Scene: What sets the Washington Ballet festivities apart from the rest is that everybody dances. Madly. Beatles music, lipsynched by four mop-topped impersonators, got everyone “Moving and Shaking” from the get-go. Many were inspired to jump up between courses and dance to those familiar tunes until they were dripping. Kudos to: “Our Magical Mystery Tour” would have never happened without the amazing energy of the chair, Cindy Jones and generous sponsors, notably the Fannie Mae Foundation and underwriters Arturo and Hilda Brillembourg, Ned Evans, Cindy and Evan Jones and The Jonathan Ledecky Foundation. I’m not sure what was in the punch, but I’ve never seen so much smooching at a Washington event – proving, once again, that “All You Need Is Love…” The Guests: Jim Kimsey, John Cecchi, Jack Davies, Mary and Robert Haft, Mark McFadden, Bill and Betsey Delphos, Netherlands Amb. Boudewijn and Jellie van Eenennaam, Barbara Harrison and Penny Yerks.

Lance Young

Arturo Brillembourg and Kay Kendall

Dancers perform live to the Beatles’ “Blackbird”

Mary Haft, Katherine Bradley and Bobby Haft

Christine and Doug Swanson

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Keri Ann Meslar, John Cecchi and Katherine Kennedy

Sharon and Bruce Bradley

Sharon and Jack Casey

Pamela and Jamie Aparicio and Amb. Jan Eliasson

Bob and Rose Cohen

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Leon Fuerth and Bill McSweeney

Isabel Ernst, George Chopivsky and Clara Brillembourg

Susan and Mike Herreld

Christina de Paul, Mariella Traeger, Septime Webre and Beth Kaczmarek

Cindy Jones and Martha Whitley

Robert and Aimee Lehrman

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Dutch Amb. Boudewijn and Jeltje van Eenennaam 2006

Kathleen and Steven O’Connor

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Martha and Richard Beckler

Beatles cover band before changing into hippie attire

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WL sponsored

Corcoran 1869 Society’s Annual Black-Tie Gala June 3rd • The Corcoran Gallery of Art Photos by Paul Simkin

The Event: The Corcoran’s 1869 Society hosted an intimate “Couture Clash” evening of dancing, fine food and fun times for Washington’s young professional crowd. Proceeds from the glamorous event go to the Corcoran Museum and the Corcoran College of Art + Design. The Scene: The black-tie celebration featured the soulful sound of Starfire and hors d’oeuvres from Main Event Caterers. A three course VIP Vintner Dinner was held before the gala for Sponsoring members, featuring a wine pairing with each course from Prince Michel Vineyards of Virginia. The Guests: William Erb, Caroline Hogan, Liberty Jones, Quentin Ward, Pamela Watson, Melissa Edwards and David Halperin.

Anissa Nabi and Jude Alexander Jeffery Brown and Lauren Shevchik

Emerson Teer and Alison Lukes

Diana and Jonathan Taylor

Tara Engel and Crystal Torchio

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Greg Thomas and David Sprindzunas

Michael and Joanna Crain

Isabela Banach

Kelly Johnston, Joe Morrell, Leonard Monfredo and J.T. Kelley

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WL sponsored

The Will Awards May 13th • Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium Photos by Immanuel Jayachandran

By Janet Donovan It wasn’t The Full Monty, but Kevin Spacey’s mini striptease at The Shakespeare Theatre Company’s 19th annual gala was enough to stimulate bidding at the event’s auction, which raised $32,200, $2,600 of which went for the actor’s cummerbund (the lone item he removed). WJLA’s Kathleen Matthews, the evening’s MC, was responsible for the undressing of Mr. Spacey, who was in town to receive the Will Award for Classical Theatre. Proceeds support this summer’s Free for All, when the Carter Barron Amphitheatre in Rock Creek Park becomes the site of two weeks of free Shakespeare. Spellbinding three-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald entertained gala co-chairs Robert E. Falb and Carolyn W. Falb and the evening’s honorary patrons, British Ambassador Sir David Manning and his wife Catherine as well as Reps. Edward Markey and Martin Sabo, Letitia Baldridge, Judith Light, Sabrina LeBeauf, Chris Matthews, Jack Diamond, David Carmen, Suzanne Farrell, Ali Wentworth and Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Landon Butler.

Bobbi Jo Cecchi, Dr. Robert MacLeod and Jan Rae

Kevin Spacey

Franchelle Stewart Dorn

John Cecchi and friend

Marcy Butler, Landon and Carol Butler

Abbe Lowell and Molly Meegan

Audra McDonald

Judith Light and Michael Kahn

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Natwar and Nalini Gandhi

Rynthia Rost and Katie Rost

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Venetian Masters with Italian Amb. Giovanni and wife Lila Castellaneta Reception on June 13th Opening, Luncheon and Dinner on June 14th Villa Firenze, National Gallery of Art and Teatro Goldoni Photos by Russell Hirshon, Kyle Samperton and paul simkin

Italian Amb. Giovanni Castellaneta and his wife Lila hosted the first few of a series of events to celebrate the opening of the Venetian Masters exhibit at the National Gallery, highlighting the works of Bellini, Giorgione and Titian, began with a cozy reception for major donors at the residence of Italian Ambassador Giovanni Castellaneta. The next morning, First Lady Laura Bush visited the exhibition accompanied by Gallery Director Rusty Powell, Lila Castellaneta and Diana Bracco, chairman and CEO of Bracco Group, which sponsored the exhibit. Mrs. Castellaneta also hosted a lunch with the First Lady as the guest of honor at Villa Firenze. Gallery trustees hosted a special black-tie reception and preview that evening for special guests, including Russian Amb. Yury Ushakov and his wife Svetlana; Justices Samuel Alito, Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg; Sens. John Warner and Patrick Leahy; Chief of Protocol Donald Ensenat; and Lucio Caputo, president of the Italian Wine and Food Institute. Later that night at Teatro Goldoni Chef Fabrizio Aielli prepared a dinner to raise funds for Save Venice’s efforts to preserve that city’s unique culture.

Maureen and Justice Antonin Scalia

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Kathy Card and Anne Johnson

Lila Castellaneta and First Lady Laura Bush

Luma Kawar, Cindy Giambiastiani and Debbie Dingell

Nancy Brinker and Betty Sembler

Barbara Harrison, Suzanne Nicholson and Buffy Cafritz

Anita McBride and Mary Ourisman

Armando Varricchio, head of economic and scientific affairs, Amb. Castellaneta and First Counselor Luca Ferrari, head of the press office

Justice Samuel Alito and Diana Bracco

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Ann Stock and Sharon Rockefeller

Mark Leithauser, Carole Watson and Bruce Cole

Reproduction of Feast of the Gods by Giovanni Bellini and Titian

Reproduction of Lady with Mirror by Giovanni Bellini

Eric Denker and Judith “Ms. Manners� Martin

Bruce and Shelly Ross-Larson

Newt and Callista Gingrich

Rachel Mor and Carlo Melzi

John and Lynn Pohanka

Ingrid and Chef Fabrizio Aielli of Teatro Goldoni

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D. Dodge Thompson, Sylvia Ferimo and Mark Leithauser

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o f t h e pa r t y

Young Concert Artists Benefit April 18th • The Cosmos Club Photos by Rachel Smith

The Event: A tribute to the late Martin Feinstein, the first executive director of the Kennedy Center and general manager of the Washington Opera, who started the Young Concert Artist Series (which has presented the Washington debuts of exceptional young musicians from all over the world since 1979). The Scene: Guests were dazzled by a concert from Young Concert Artists Jennifer Check, (soprano) and DaXun Zhang (double bass), followed by a seated dinner and a live auction initiated by a serenade from the gala chairmen. The Guests: Marcia Feinstein, Gala Chairmen Anthony DiResta and Terrance Mason, Wayne and Beth Gibbens, Kenneth R. Woodcock, Bitsey Folger, Karon Cullen, Roland Celette, Ann Stock, Rolf Graage, Keiko Kaplan, Judith Terra, Dr. Ahmad Esfandiary and his wife Judy, Gilan Tocco Corn, Tunkey and Richard Riley and Renee Robinson.

Kenneth and Dorothy Woodcock, Marcia Feinstein, Dorothy Wexler and Dick Krinn

Bitsey Folger, Tunkey and Richard Riley and Ann Stock

Paula Robinson, Judith Terra and Roland Celette

Wayne Gibbons, Karon Cullen and Wendy Graham

Marcia Feinstein and Gilan Tocco Corn

Rolf Graage and Keiko Kaplan

Anthony DiResta and Terrance Mason

Nada Simonyine Pejak, Norweigan Amb. Knut Vollebaek and Ellen Sofie Vollebaek

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Judy and Ahmad Esfandiary

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2006

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o f the p a r t y

THE DingellS’ 25th Anniversary WEDDING May 21st • Residence of Chris Downey Photos by paul simkin

The Event: Close friends gathered for a Sunday evening celebration of Rep. John and Debbie Dingell’s 25th wedding anniversary. The Scene: The Dingells shared their long-enduring marital bliss with long-time friends over a casual buffet dinner before Rep. Ed Markey toasted them by reading his very own poem entiltled “Love and Marriage.” Toward the end of the night, Rep. Dingell, having just recovered from hip replacement surgery, used his crutches to escape to the kitchen with the rest of the men to watch the Pistons game. The Guests: Abby and Rep. Roy Blunt, Catherine and Sen. Ted Stevens, Alan Greenspan and Andrea Mitchell, The late Phil Merrill and wife Ellie, Judy Woodruff and Al Hunt, and Susan Brophy.

The late Phil Merrill, Rep. John Dingell and Mac McLarty

Aliki and Bill Bryant

Joint Chiefs of Staff General Peter and Lynn Pace

Abigail and Rep. Roy Blunt

Debbie and Rep. John Dingell

Rima Al-Sabah, Ginger Pape, Ginny Grenham and Beth Dozoretz 46

Susan Brophy, Gerry McGowan, Amy and Steve Ricchetti

Mark Shields, Ellie Merrill and Mike Berman

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2006

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o f t h e pa r t y

Grace Bender’s 60th Birthday May 20 • The Mandarin Oriental Hotel Photos by Robert Williams

The Event: Grace Bender celebrated her milestone with “a gift and a taste of a country I love, Cuba,” by recreating the atmosphere of Havana’s Hotel Nacional, where her father was general manager during her teenage years. The Scene: From the invitation to the decor, no detail was overlooked. A replica cake of the hotel by Sylvia Weinstock, a casino and vintage cars made the atmosphere ring true as Marvin Hamlisch belted out “Happy Birthday,” and 300 guests salsa’d the night away. “I haven’t been to Cuba since ’60, but you brought it to me,” Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez noted. The Guests: Rep. John and Debbie Dingell, Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta and wife Deni, Mandy and Mary Ourisman, A. Huda and Samia Farouki.

Getting lucky at the casino

Morton and Grace Bender

Beth and Ron Dozoretz

Ann and Vernon Jordan Replica Cake of the Hotel Nacional

Grace Bender, Barbara Harrison, Mary Haft and Lorraine Wallace

Terre Blair Hamlisch with Kuwaiti Amb. Salem Al-Sabah and wife Rima Al-Sabah

Eric and Pascaline Steiner

Dancing, Havana Style

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2006

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Former Spanish Amb. Javier Ruperez and Marcia Carlucci

The spotlight was on Grace Betsy and Bill Delphos

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o f t h e pa r t y

The Omni ShoreHam Hotel’s 75th Anniversary May 3rd • The Omni Shoreham Hotel Photos by immanuel Jayanchandran

The Event: The Omni Shoreham Hotel gala honored a golden era in Washington and the hotel’s 75th anniversary. “Every person I know today, I met at the Shoreham,” said Mark Russell, who performed his comedy and music routine followed by the legendary Frankie Condon Orchestra (far more punctual than Rudy Vallee, who opened the Shoreham in 1930 and didn’t show until 4 a.m.). The Scene: A video montage sent approximatly 400 guests down Shoreham’s memory lane with views of the many events that took place there including a celebration for Joe DiMaggio’s 56-game winning streak, visits from world leaders, King Saud’s fleet of 32 limousines and the filming of The Pelican Brief. The Guests: Esther Coopersmith, Bill and Betsey Delphos, Debbie Dingell, Knight Kiplinger, Ann Pacious, Lucky Roosevelt and general manager Todd Scartozzi.

Arthur Gardner, Esther Coopersmith and Susan Schieffer

Myra McPherson and Mark Russell

Denis G. Antoine and Pamela Aparicio

Diane Sappenfield and Dianne Kay

Donald Dewey and Jeannine Fletcher

Tandy Dickerson, Bill Delphos and Wyatt Dickerson

Susan Agger and Richard Budson Bess and Tyler Abell and Grace Bender

Jon Van Winkle, Lydia Page and Hugh Newell Jacobsen WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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John Jeppson, Aniko Gaal Schott and Giselle Jeppson

2006

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Roland and Diane Flamini

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o f t h e pa r t y

         

The Sons of Italy Foundation Gala May 25th • Omni Shoreham Hotel Photos by Immanuel Jayachandran

The Event: A Gala honoring, among others, CafĂŠ Milano proprietor Franco Nuschese for excellence in business with friends former President Bill Clinton and wife Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton on hand to sing his praises. The Scene: “I couldn’t figure out if people were drinking because they were sad or celebrating,â€? said Nuschese, who hosted an after party at guess where? CafĂŠ Milano. The Guests: Sens. Christopher Dodd and Frank Lautenberg; Reps. Rosa DeLauro, John Larson, Linda Sanchez, and Loretta Sanchez; Italian Ambassador Giovanni Castellaneta; and NIH AIDS researcher Dr. Anthony Fauci.

Giuseppe and Franco Nuschese

Joe Mantegna, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Former President Bill Clinton

          

Angelo Biancho and Sen. Frank Lautenberg Caroline and Nathan Snelson

Francesco Aiello and Tonino Mellino

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o f t h e p a rt y

The Release of Letters to a Younger Brother May 2nd • The Lofts at Adams Morgan Photos by jonah koch

The Event: A release party for CSI: New York star Hill Harper’s Letters to a Younger Brother, which Harper wrote to encourage and inspire troubled youth. The Scene: A mix of the author’s friends from Brown University and Harvard Law School showed up at Julian Epstein’s sleek PN Hoffman Loft in Adams Morgan to catch up and sip Belvedere Vodka. The Guests: Mayor Anthony Williams, Matt Cooper, Shirley Hall, Kimball Stroud, Tanya Lombard, Jarvis Stewart, Tabitha McQueen and Pamela Sorensen.

James Woodyard, Troy White and Eric Easter

Michael Brown, Julian Epstein, Garnet Woodham

Mayor Anthony Williams

Kajuana Kings and Nurisha Rush

David Payne and Amy Goldsmith

Hill Harper and Julian Epstein

Tracy Woodby and Joelle Myers

David Sutphen, Smita N. Shah and Marland E. Buckner WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Amy Mollenkamp, Jarvis Stewart and Libby Greer

2006

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Matt Cooper and Mandy Grunwald

Kevin Judd and Tabitha McQueen

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of t h e p ar t y

RELEASE OF AMERICA BACK ON TRACK May 1st • IBEW Buidling Photos by janie windon

The Event: Friends of Senator Edward Kennedy including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Wade Henderson, Ed Hill, John Podesta, Joe Solmonese and John Sweeney got together for the release of Kennedy’s America Back on Track. Already a bestseller, the book describes an America gone astray, further from its’ fundamental ideals and values than ever before, and includes Kennedy’s proposed reforms for national security, defense, education, health care, and civil rights. The SCENE: A gorgeous spring night with cocktails and bites along with a passionate speech from the guest of honor. The Guests: Friends from the left side of the aisle included Senators Hilary Rodham Clinton, Paul Sarbanes and Robert Byrd; Sandy Berger, Mark Brody and Lynda Vento.

Rep. John Lewis and Terry Lynch

Sandy Berger

Sen. Robert Byrd and Sen. Ted Kennedy

Paul Sarbanes

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Ancelia Lee and Mark Brody

Harold Ickes

Dana Singiser, Natalie Ravitz and Laura Capps

Victoria Reggie Kennedy

Paul Begala

Susan O’Neill, Dan Crane and Terri Robinson

Charise Nichols and Tom Quinn

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

General Bill Nash

| SUMMER

2006

| washingtonlife.com


media spotlight

Book Deals and Presidential Seals “off limits” to the press. Mary Matalin, former assistant to President George W. Bush, heads up the new conservative imprint for Simon & Schuster. No sign of hubby James Carville that we know of, but hey, he’s press.

Lebanese Amb. Farid Abboud, Mary Ourisman, Mandy Ourisman, Jen and sam Donaldson at the Helen Thomas signing

By Ja n e t D o n ova n

T

he Annual Booksellers convention descended on Washington on May 17th with all the creative force of Dorothy en route to Oz. The five day publishing extravaganza included congressional hearings, book signings and more agents than the C.I.A.

The Lynn & Dick Show Mom worked the crowd, Dad held court. It was a family affair for Vice President Dick Cheney and wife Lynn, who did their best not to upstage their daughter Mary at her book launch for Now It’s My Turn in the back room of The Palm. The ‘multimedia’ crowd consumed most of the square footage: MSNBC’s Tammy Haddad, CQ’s Chris Lehmann, Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe, NBC’s Betsy Fischer and Slate’s John Dickerson. It was an interesting crowd since the event was

NAB President David Rehr and Miss America Jennifer Berry, who presented President Bill Clinton with NAB’s Leadeship Award

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Now hear this! Ann Coulter has not ... repeat ... not ... lost any of her 100 plus newspaper outlets despite the controversy surrounding her remarks about 9/11 widows. Judging by all the air & ink sucking going on, it’s gotta be true. “Ann Coulter Wows Leno,” screams NewsMax. “Latest Ann Coulter Outrage,” prints Editor & Publisher. “Want to Really Get Back at Ann Coulter? Then Shut Up About Her,” advises Blogcritics. Too late. The edgy right-wing conservative’s Godless: The Church of Liberalism features her trademark blasting liberals. She’s got the gig down pat.

around as much as the conversation. Party goers included Wyatt and Tandy Dickerson, Clearchannel’s Marilyn Thompson, CQ’s Jodi Schneider, Katherine Wood and 300 other fans, publishers and out-of-towners. Thicker than water Lebanese Ambassador Farid Abboud and his wife Rim hosted a lavish NAB Leadership Award book party for Helen recipient Bill Clinton Thomas, despite any political differences. While she may not be a popular figure at The White House, the Hearst columnist commanded a formidable crowd for Watchdog of Democracy? Colleague Sam Donaldson took over: “During the Carter administration, they planted trees. Helen was there. After Carter left, we said ‘Oh, come on Helen’, take the shovel and throw in a little dirt. It was then that I thought I heard the ghosts of Presidents past, present and future whispering ‘Shove her in!’” Thomas shot back, “It’s really nice to hear your obituary. After looking at my book, I’m sure the ambassador thought I’d be looking for asylum.”

History repeats itself At first glance you’d think that Pulitzer nominated (Long Time Passing) author and political writer Myra MacPherson was taking her cue from Good Night and Good Luck! Not true. Her upcoming book has been in the works for 13 years! All Governments Lie: The Life and Times of Rebel Journalist I. F. Stone wades through the life of a man driven, according to the author, by insecurity Bill “NABs” the and curiosity. “Stone spotlight Jennifer remains enor mously Berry, Miss America 2006, Jodi Schneider and Tandy relevant today, in an era presented the Leadership Dickerson at Beach Road of too much journalistic Award at the America party at Teatro Goldoni acquiescence.” Publisher’s Awards Gala on June 12th Weekly notes. Personally, at The Ritz Carlton. While MacPherson thinks this the Oklahoma beauty is no administration is definitely smoking something, stranger to D.C., we suspect the draw may have as well as dispensing it to the press corps. been the recipient: Former President William Jefferson Clinton. The event, sponsored Play ball Mystery author James Patterson by Bonneville Int’l Corp. and the National had a ball, literally, at his book launch for Association of Broadcasters featured Deborah Beach Road. Set in the Hamptons, the perfect Norville, host of Inside Edition, and honored summer thriller got the perfect thriller party at Broadcasters for outstanding courage in the wake Teatro Goldoni, where beach balls were tossed of Hurricane Katrina.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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l i t e r at u r e

Book a Date this Summer It’s Summer. It’s time to relax and read. Maybe it’s the latest “chick novel” from bestselling author Plum Sykes, or maybe it’s Helen Thomas’ critique of the press coverage of The White House in Watchdogs of Democracy?: The Waning Washington Press Corps and How It Has Failed the Public that might perk your reading appetite for the summer. Here are some choices to engage for that long beach read. the UK. I was a fashion writer at British Vogue, and then I was offered a job at American Vogue. But you don’t set out to write social comedies about New York rich girls. You may be suited to it without knowing it, and that’s probably what happened to me. When I was doing the fashion writing, I was always actually writing about that girl in the dress, not the dress itself. WL: How true to life do you

Novelist, fashionista and Vogue editor Plum Sykes

The Debutante Divorce By Plum Sykes

After sharing secrets about how to find an ideal husband in Bergdorf Blondes, Sykes dishes on how to lose one in her follow-up novel, The Debutante Divorcée. Washington Life sat down with Sykes to discuss the book and the growing trend of young women divorcées. Washington Life: After graduating from Oxford –

how did you end up in New York, and at Vogue? Plum Sykes: My mom is a fashion stylist and my dad is from a writerly family, though he wasn’t actually a writer himself. When I came out of [university], I thought, what am I going to do? My two great loves were fashion from my mom, and the writing from my dad – my grandfather was a quite well-known writer in

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think this story is? PS: Well, the story is made up, but the fact is I wrote the story because the girls exist. Obviously I can’t say who they are, but I thought it was like a social phenomenon that these girls were getting divorced very young, at 27 or 28 and instead of going home and moping they were partying harder than Lindsay Lohan and very much not looking for a husband. WL: There is a NY/LA socialite (who shall

remain nameless) who had a big, wonderful wedding in a castle in Europe and on her wedding night, her sister-in-law walked in as she was sleeping with a guest. PS: In the old days, if you married at 23 and it wasn’t working, you would have just sucked it up. There’s no shame in [divorcing] anymore. In London, it’s much worse and that’s why I’ve always thought that it is so nice for American girls, because in America and particularly in New York, you can reinvent yourself.You can be the lewd divorcée one minute and the “it girl” the next minute. You can transform yourself.

WL: The Husband Hunters you write about in

The Debutante Divorcée, do you run across a lot of them? PS: One husband hunter.Well, I can’t remember who she was, but I came across one girl and someone said about her, “Oh, she only dates people’s husbands. She’s not interested in a man who isn’t already taken.” WL: You give lots of little fashion tips, in places

to go shopping or have drinks around the world. In addition, there are some wonderful details and astute social observations in this book. PS: I think in a way I am different than most of the other girl novelists who are out there right now. I’m definitely coming at it from a Vogue angle, if you know what I mean. I’ve always been able to make a fashion detail turn into a great story. WL: What makes someone fun and interesting

in New York? In Washington, people are very worldly, active and interested in actually doing something for other people. PS: Even the odd characters who don’t have a job, they are always doing something – raising money for charity, or they’ve seen every Broadway play, they’re very up on everything. The thing is you can’t get away in New York with being a dumb blonde. WL: Have you ever tried the illegal vitamin drip

that you write about? PS: I was feeling run down and my friend said to me, “Oh you’ve got to get the illegal vitamin drip.” I went and the nutritionist put a Japanese concoction drip into my arm. The weird thing is that it does make you feel much better, but it’s probably dangerous. I mentioned him in the book and he’s very cool – he’s like Warren Beatty from Shampoo, in these amazing jeans and a white shirt. He goes to hotels around the world with bags and bags of syringes, it’s very weird.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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2006

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Sex with the Queen By Eleanor Herman

In the follow-up to the bestselling Sex with Kings, Eleanor Herman reveals the scintillating secrets of the queen’s boudoir. Full of wellresearched and detailed storytelling, Sex with the Queen offers an enlightening twist on royal politics. She will follow up with her next book, Sex with Popes.

Non-Fiction

Insatiable: Tales from a life of Delicious Excess By Gale Greene

The Worst Job in History, The Queen

F

or anyone who loves food, former New York magazine columnist Greene tells stories of her passion for haute cuisine and fine wines, breathless sexual trysts with lovers such as Elvis, Clint Eastwood and Burt Reynolds, and exotic travel. A delicious beach read.

My research for Sex with the Queen led me to a shocking conclusion. Historically speaking, the worst job in any given country, in any given century, was not chamberpot emptier, as I had thought. Almost always, the worst job was to be the queen.The king rarely loved his wife, whom he had married for political reasons, and his bedtime duties were not romantic so much as dynastic. The court usually rallied around the king’s influential mistress – or mister – and not the unwanted, powerless queen. Many princesses – including Diana, Princess of Wales – plunged from starry-eyed optimism to bleak despair within months of the royal wedding and took lovers to assuage the pain. In her 1995 television interview, Diana solemnly intoned, “There were three of us in the marriage, so it was a bit crowded,” a pointed reference to Prince Charles’ long-time mistress Camilla Parker-Bowles. Yet if Diana had included her own lovers, the list would have been closer to fifteen. Diana is only the latest in a string of unfaithful royal women stretching back centuries. Surprisingly, some kings didn’t care if their wives took lovers, such as King Carlos IV of Spain (1788-1808) who obligingly named his wife’s lover prime minister, thereby freeing himself from government duties so he could hunt rabbits. Two of the king’s children were the spitting image of the prime minister, which makes me think that royal bloodlines might not be so royal after all. Other monarchs cared very much indeed about the queen’s fidelity, such as Henry VIII, who beheaded Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard for adultery. Many other queens were divorced, exiled, and imprisoned for taking lovers, though it was considered an admirable show of virility for the king to flaunt his mistresses. Writing this book changed my outlook on life. Many women, living at the pinnacle of luxury, are trapped in abject misery. Empress Josephine Bonaparte said, “Believe me, ladies, do not envy a splendor that does not constitute happiness.” She was right. I will never be jealous of a queen again. – Eleanor Herman Princess Diana

Identity Crisis: How Identification is Overused and Misunderstood By Jim Harper

C

ato Institute Fellow Jim Harper explores identification technology, including biometrics, identity cards, surveillance databases and dossiers, and the threat they pose to personal privacy and liberties. Harper takes a look at whether identification can protect us from terrorist attacks and the effects of this technology.

Fiction

Everyman

By Phillip Roth

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ailed by some reviewers as a “masterpiece,” Roth’s newest work is a portrait of a man struggling at the end of his life and reflecting on failed marriages, unfulfilled dreams, and missed opportunities. Everyman is a book that should be included in that summer night reading.

The Man of My Dreams By Curtis Sittenfeld

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rep author and St. Alban’s teacher Sittenfield shares the poignant story of Hannah Gavener’s development from a teenager, to finding her own identity as a college student at Tufts, to a young woman who trying to make it in her early 20s.

Lost and Found

By Carolyn Parkhurst

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ashington writer Parkhurst brings the story of seven couples trotting the globe in “Lost and Found”, a reality television show. Surprisingly fun, Lost and Found is a witty book written with a lot of heart.

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P o l ly w o o d

Martin Sco

rsese

Rebekah Welsh, Murray Horwitz and Sky Sitney

Patrick M

Docuwood

orell and

Na n c y H

iggins

lives up to its name

Martin Scorsese, Jim Jarmusch, Al Gore ... over 500 filmmakers, film and television executives and media professionals along with countless fans screening 100 films from 22 countries over the course of a week ... L.A., you say. New York? Cannes? Try Silverdocs Afi/discovery Channel Documentary Festival in Silver Spring, Md.

I n and A Katie Brow 42

nnie Sund

b e rg

n a town dominated by politics and news (mostly revolving around politics), the growth of the SILVERDOCS: A F I / D i s c ove r y Channel Documentary Festival has been a reminder that the greater Washington area is also home to one of America’s most impor tant centers for documentary film. This year’s festival only served to enhance that image. The festival is a marriage of two Silver Spring neighbors. Discovery, which has lead the resurgence of documentaries, opened its world headquarters in Silver

Spring in 2003, a few weeks before the AFI–which is headquartered in Hollywood–opened the AFI Silver Theatre just across the street. Starting from the kick-off screening The off Heart of the Game with special guest Sheila Johnson, the week-long festival entertained and informed through film screenings and symposiums, including the fourday International Documentary Conference, for which Al Gore delivered the key note address. The hot button issue at the conference this year was definitely trends in distribution and the impact of digital

media.The festival also shed a spotlight on the films of South Africa. But, the biggest splash at this year’s festival came in the form of the health-focused documentary segment, aptly named: DOCS Rx: A World of Documentaries on Global Health. SILVERDOCS organized an interesting take on the idea of “audience participation” by videotaping interviews with breastcancer survivors throughout the length of the festival. A montage of the testimonies was then previewed before the screening of Linda Pattillo’s film Breast Cancer Diaries.

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Al Gore and Don

Baer

Discovering Silverdocs By Don Baer, Senior Executive Vice President, Strategy and Development Discovery Communications

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hen Discover y Communications and the Amer ican Film Institute launched the SILVERDOCS Documentary Festival four years ago, our goal was simple: To create the most important documentary festival in the world. Our two organizations are based in the Washington area in Silver Spring, Md., and we wanted to bring together independent non-fiction filmmakers with people in this area who focus on policy, politics and media. This year, we had an amazing array of special guests. Martin Scorsese, one of the greatest filmmakers of our times, came to SILVERDOCS to be recognized for the body of his documentary work as part of the annual Symposium that honors the life

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and work of the late Washington-based, Academy Award-winning documentary maker Charles Guggenheim. Director Jim Jarmusch engaged Scorsese in a riveting conversation about his career and the nature of filmmaking. Afterwards, SILVERDOCS held an outdoor screening in Silver Spring of Scorsese’s 1978 film, The Last Waltz, about the final performance by The Band. SILVERDOCS also hosted former Vice President Al Gore, who spoke to a packed house at the Silver Theater as part of the documentary conference. Building on his new film, An Inconvenient Truth, about the potential catastrophe of global warming, Gore provided a provocative and inspirational presence for the filmmaking community.We were also pleased to have Thomas Friedman, award-winning New York Times columnist, who premiered his latest documentary for the Discovery Channel – Addicted To Oil, a look at America’s dependence on fossil fuels and constructive steps we can take to end that addiction. Having this caliber of celebrities at SILVERDOCS definitely helped to raise our profile. But even more important were the extraordinary films from all over the world, the intense discussions among filmmakers, and the crowds of people from all over the world who flocked to Silver Spring to be part of the festival. All of us who have been a part of making this festival a reality are very proud, because, in its fourth year, we believe it is clear that SILVERDOCS has really arrived.”

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Lights, Camera ...

Growth By Patricia Finneran, SILVERDOCS Festival Director

More than ever, both professionals in the film and television industry and Washington area film aficionados are designating SILVERDOCS a mustattend event. For me, the most inspiring aspect of the Festival is the variety of ways in which the films and accompanying discussion touch peoples’ lives. Our Community Diary Project, which was inspired by the documentary The Breast Cancer Diaries, involved audiences in a whole new way. Making them not only part of the Festival but adding their personal stories to a permanent record which will live on, on our website and at other screenings. Air Guitar Nation brought audiences young and old out and on to the stages of the SILVERDOCS Cinema Lounge to rock out.And Word Play drew out the crossword fanatics for some serious, though light-heated competition. Someone asked me last week if it is was hard to get Washington audiences involved and excited. I answered ‘absolutely not.’ Washington is full of highly educated and engaged individuals hungry for authentic entertainment, great storytelling and an opportunity to have fun at the same time. At SILVERDOCS, we talk a lot about bringing diverse constituencies together. Just prior to the Guggenheim Symposium I found myself standing in the same room with Former Vice President Al Gore, legendary director Martin Scorsese and the independent director Jim Jarmusch all talking about documentaries. These leaders draw new audiences to the festival and help create an open environment that adds freshness and excitement to the national dialogue.

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MS: Hold a camera on a person and they talk; they tell a story. It goes back to a person sitting around a camp fire telling a story. All the great camera moves in the world are unnecessary in a way.

Martin Scorsese and Jim Jarmush at the 2006 Guggenheim Symposium.

Filmmaker to Filmmaker

Martin Scorsese and Jim Jarmush discuss the art of documentary The 2006 Guggenheim Symposium, named for four-time Academy Award-winner and Washington-area filmmaker Charles Guggenheim, honored Martin Scorsese for his contributions to documentary film. The on-stage tête-à-tête was led by independent filmmaker director Jim Jarmush (Broken Flowers, Coffee and Cigarettes) and included visual outtakes from Scorsese’s documentary oeuvre, including The Last Waltz; No Direction Home: Bob Dylan; Il Mio Viaggio in Italia and the ‘70s exploration of his family in Italianamerican.

J

im Jarmush: Italianamerican is a portrait of your family, but other themes in the film include: parents, immigration, relationships, clubs, Sicily, resentment, meatballs, marriage, work, class, money, history, survival and homemade vinegar. There is so much in this film; I love this film. Martin Scorsese: It was part of a series called “Nation of Immigrants” for the U.S. bicentennial. There were films being made on different ethnic groups, and I was asked if I could do one on Italian Americans. I said that I’d do it if I could do something different. I figured the best thing would be to film an afternoon with my mother and father. It took three hours on a Saturday and three on a Sunday, but during that time, I began

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to see a relationship between the two of them and the life they had before me. I saw a love story of practically 60 years of marriage. I learned that I could ask one question and they’d go on and on [laughter]. I began to see this point counterpoint argument – how one perceived what actually happened, and the other perceived another thing. I really got a sense of two people in love. JJ: There is a really beautiful moment in the film that I think influences some of your narrative work. Your father is talking about his father and his mother, and he says she was “a real whip.” The camera turns on you and your mother and father – you’re not looking at each other – and it just sort of hangs there. It’s a very emotional moment.

JJ: It’s a matter of style, right? Can you talk a little about your style? MS: I struggle between American and European styles sometimes. I want to keep the camera flat and straight, but I can’t help moving it a little bit. In one film in particular, King of Comedy, I felt like I was just hiding out; there was this constant battle in my mind between movement and staying static. Style these days? … I try not to watch modern films as much as possible. I don’t know if there is any more “style” left now that we have the capabilities of digital imaging. A kid told me the other day that he had just watched this film on his computer. I said, ‘Well, what was it?’ He says, “Secret of My Success.” And I said, ‘And you saw that on a computer?’ Now they’re talking about putting films on IPODs … that’s cinema? It’s frightening to think of the influence of that on style. JJ: When you’re making a feature film, you have a lot of control over style; how does that work when you’re making a documentary? MS: The material definitely leads me. It’s usually the music that takes me – particularly in Dylan. It’s an obsession with music really; the music begins to tell the story. For Dylan we [editor David Tedeschi and Scorsese] went through years of footage – it was a huge investment of time. We had to find the story in the footage, but eventually the music led us to the style; just as it led us to the artist. JJ: It seems like you got everything that you needed for that documentary; you really found the “boxer” in Dylan, didn’t you? MS: Yes. His manager Jeff Rosen shot about 10 hours of Dylan talking. Bob did it because, he told Jeff, that it would be his last interview ever. Jeff had known Dylan for 26 years, so he could get away with a lot. Dylan could even say things to Jeff like, “People like you bother me.” In the film, watch Dylan’s face, watch his eyes, and he’s saying one thing, but he’s

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thinking something else. Is he saying what he thinks you want to hear? He says at one point that he may be telling the truth ... or maybe not. The whole picture pulled together on that close-up.

NM: What about domestic fuel alternatives like coal-to-gas? TF: The good thing about coal-to-gas is that you get the mercury and the sulphur out.The bad thing is that you’re still left with CO2 emissions when it goes up the smoke stack. So, you get rid of a lot of pollution but you’re still left with the impact on the climate.This is where you get into the issue of sequestration. Can you take that CO2 and sequester it? Coal-to-liquids, coal-to-gas they’re all better than coal.

JJ: The film you executive-produced in the Blues sequence I loved it. It goes back to Africa and to Maui for an all-star jam with Clapton, and a couple other places. When you’re working, do you listen to music that is going to inspire you or connect you to the project? Who are you listening to now? MS: I keep going back to Dylan and [Van] Morrison. JJ: I read somewhere that you said that the news, now, is pure entertainment. Can you talk about that in terms of “recording” verses “interpreting.” MS: It’s interesting because, when you get a camera, you have an immediate impulse to capture something that’s moving. Let’s go to 14th street and record the cars going back and forth, etc. What’s the impulse? The impulse is to record or to create something dramatic that is interpreted. As soon as you put the camera down, you’re interpreting what the audience is going to see – the image of the car going by. That impulse is what’s fun for me. At a certain point, as far as being moved and using discretion, there is no difference to me in what they call a documentary and a film. Once that camera starts, the first impulse is to record, but then someone says “let’s record an explosion on Mount Etna.” Then all of a sudden, they desire to interpret, to involve theatrical interpretation. So, for me, that’s where the lines get blurred. There is no doubt, for me, that news now, in terms of television, is pure entertainment. JJ: Now there is a corporate media that seems to suppress or deny ideas and information I mean I can’t distinguish corporate media from corporate government. MS: You’re right. You’re right. [applause from the audience] JJ: I’ll end with a quote from one of your films, which is, “As with heroin, the antidote to films is more film.”

Addicted to Oil: Thomas L. Friedman Reporting

NM: What about China? TF: China is keenly aware that it’s growing at 10 percent but giving 2 percent back a year to pollution. So, it has to go green. It already has higher mileage standards [than the U.S.]. In the documentary, we show a Chinese village being designed by William McDonough [a green architect, who is designing a number of renewable energy cities in China]. My hope is that China will do for the cost of solar power what it did for the cost of tennis shoes.

Pulitzer Prize-winning NewYork Times columnist brought globalization to the masses with his NM: Can we find the will to act as a nation book The World is Flat. In his new documentary, on this? Addicted to Oil he hopes do to the same for TF: We’ve said all along that it will take a crisis. petropolitics. Enviro-babe Nora Maccoby found Well, the argument of our film is that the crisis out more about that is here – we’ve in an exclusive Q&A even had the “My hope is that China interview for WL. President define will do for the cost it as a crisis – of solar power what Nora Maccoby: What and, yet, people it did for the cost of steps do you see to cure don’t seem to be America’s oil addiction? concerned. tennis shoes.” Thomas Friedman: –Thomas friedman The conclusions from NM: What the research we did for about the the film are that we have to push everything. Defense Department focusing on better energy There is no magic bullet. You have to push efficiency and conservation? solar. You have to push re-design and design, TF: Yes, that’s all a start, but it has to be with a because when you design with the mass much greater sense of urgency. energy of a building in mind that saves more energy over time than anything else.You have NM: How can that happen? to push hybrids.You have to push ethanol.You TF: Well, there’s nothing like the bully pulpit have to push sugar ethanol, not just ethanol of the Presidency. It’s great to give a State of in this country, and I think you have to push the Union on “addicted to oil,” but you need nuclear.You have to push everything. There is to give that speech every day and everywhere no single solution that is going to eliminate before it really starts to take hold. our dependence on fossil fuels.


Silverdocs Fesitival Winners Exploring Universal Truths Through Film

The 2006 SILVERDOCS award-winning films are a testament to diversity in filmmaking, in the variety of films chosen for the awards and their explorative and engaging content. Patricia Finneran, festival director, said of the winners, “SILVERDOCS honors films that exhibit a singular approach to subjects that matter, films that alter our perspective on the world, by showing the deep complexities of the human experience, often from the inside out.”

president and Charlie Koones, Va riety Group publisher of The

Behind the SceneS The Making of “Boffo! Tinseltown’s Bombs and Blockbusters” Peter Bart and I had been developing concepts for TV to commemorate Variety’s 100th anniversary when Peter met one afternoon with Sheila Nevins and John Hoffman of HBO. As a producer and one of the savviest guys in the business, Peter might have intimated that other networks were interested in doing a show with us. Sheila’s extremely competitive and within no time we came to an agreement to make a documentary for HBO. We never wanted to make a doc on Variety’s history. Instead, we wanted to use Variety as a prism through which to view the art and the business we cover. Boffo! is about that strange alchemy that results in great commercial cinema – and what sometimes happens when that alchemy is wrong. Director Bill Couturié did a terrific job of illustrating that natural tension. Boffo! was an official selection at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival and we were really heartened by the response. It was a real treat as a kid born and raised in D.C. to have our film selected as the opener for this year’s AFI Silverdocs Festival. The crowd in Silver Spring was even warmer than that in Cannes, but then again, none of my family was in Cannes.

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JESUS CAMP

SEEDS

Winner: Sterling Feature Jury Award Directors Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady present a probing documentary about the youth of the Christian evangelical movement, immersed from birth in their parents’ fervent fundamentalist beliefs. The film reveals the pervasiveness of this “fringe” religious culture in our society.

Winner: Sterling Short Jury Award A Siberian family struggles through their heartaches with their patient and wise father’s support. Directed by Wojciech Kasperski.

Jesus Camp

MCLAREN’S NEGATIVES Honorable Mention, Sterling Short Award Director Marie-Josee Saint-Pierre utilizes Canadian animator Norman McLaren’s creative techniques in this unusual, personal documentary.

Mclaren’s Negatives CHAIRMAN GEORGE

THE ALUMINUM FOWL

Winner: Special Feature Jury mention Chaiman George follows George Sapoudinis, a Greek-Canadian statistician, to Beijing before the Olympics, where he intends to fulfill his passion for singing in Mandarin. Directors Daniel Cross and Mila Aung-Thwin present this fairytale-like story as a bridge between two very different cultures.

Honorable Mention, Sterling Short Award Director James Clauer presents a disturbing yet beautiful portrait of four brothers with too much time on their hands on a chicken farm in rural Louisiana.

Aluminum Fowl

A GIRL LIKE ME Winner: Short Audience Award Special Short Jury mention

Seeds

A young black woman examines her peers’ attitudes on blackness. Directed by Kiri Davis.

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P o l ly w o o d

ROLLING LIKE A STONE

BEFORE FLYING BACK TO EARTH

Winner: Music Documentary Award This thoughtful documentary from Sweden revisits an episode from the youth of the Rolling Stones and examines its repercussions on those who experienced it.

Special DOCS Rx Jury mention Arunas Matelis’ film is a poetic glimpse into the lives of children living with leukemia at a pediatric hospital in Lithuania. Despite the mundane daily routine of the hospital, the film captures the hope and innocence of the children in the clinic.

AFI CEO and Director Jean Picker Firstenberg and AFI Achievement Award recipient Sir Sean Connery

CAN MR. SMITH GET TO WASHINGTON ANYMORE? Winner: SILVERDOCS Audience Award Feature

Rolling Like a Stone

By Ina Ginsburg

THE BLOOD OF YINGZHOU DISTRICT Winner: DOCS Rx Global Documentary Award Director Ruby Yang follows young Gao Jun, abandoned because of the contamination of Chinese blood banks with HIV/AIDS, as he strives to find a home and become accepted in the rural district of Yingzhou. The boy’s long silence in the film offers a touching symbol of the voiceless victims of the disease.

Can Mr. Smith Get to Washington Anymore? Director Frank Popper follows the upstart campaign of political newcomer Jeff Smith in Missouri.

THE SHERIFF OF GAY WASHINGTON Winner: Short Audience Award Sargeant Brett Parson battles stereotypes while commanding the Washington Metropolitan Police Department’s Gay and Lesbian Liaison Unit, dedicated to solving crimes by and against the gay community, directed by John W. Poole.

The Blood of the Yingzhou District

The Sheriff of Gay Washington

COUGARS ON THE EDGE Before Flying Back to Earth

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AFI: 2006 Life Achievement Award

Winner: Animal Content in Entertainment (ACE) Grant Director Janice Jensen explores the habitat encroachment on the cougar in the Santa Monica Mountains.

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The brainchild of George Stevens, Jr., when he was director of the American Film Institute, the annual AFI Life Achievement Award gala began in 1973.This year, Sean Connery, an action hero of more modern times, especially in the guise of “Bond, James Bond,” received the 34th AFI Achievement Award. Unlike at the Academy Awards, where, if you’re not nominated you’re largely ignored, the parties leading up to and following the AFI Life Achievement Awards are much more celebratory and light-hearted. On the evening prior to the black-tie gala there’s a small private reception where the honoree is entirely accessible. Sean Connery, a powerful presence at this year’s party at Morton’s in Beverly Hills, was happy to pose for photographs and mingle with the guests. On the other side of the room, his petite French wife, Micheline, was like an exotic bird and had gathered her own group around her. The party following the gala took place at the Highlands night club, in the Kodak Theater complex, and was attended by Connery and his family, George Lucas, Harrison Ford (with Calista Flockhart), Tom Jones, and many others from the entertainment industry who came to pay tribute to the 2006 honoree. In the end it was Tippie Hedren, who co-starred with Connery in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Marnie,” who really stood out among the highpowered Hollywood crowd that evening. Dressed in a long white gown covered entirely by tiny white pearls, she spoke to the gathering about Connery’s famous sex-appeal. Hitchcock had groomed the delicate beauty to replace Grace Kelly as his leading lady after Kelly had left Hollywood for Ranier and Monaco. Hedren seemed untouched by time. Hitch had chosen well.

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P o l ly w o o d

The Blood of Yingzhou District SILVERDOCS DOCS Rx Award Winning Director Ruby Yang’s Film is an Intimate Portrait of AIDS Orphans in Rural China

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he fourteen-hour train ride from Beijing to the villages of Anhui, in rural China, is a journey back in time: fields fallow in the winter cold, earthen gravesites visible through the stubble, fishermen at the riverbanks. If you turn away from the telephone poles, you could imagine yourself a century back – a time when disease had the power to strike uncomprehending terror into farming families’ lives. This is where three Huang children, orphaned by AIDS, led filmmaker Ruby Yang to their family home where they found empty medicine bottles, old toys,

The Blood of the Yingzhou Di

children’s scribbles on the wall, and the smell of death. Neighbors and classmates, scared of infection, shunned them. Here a filmmaker could lend a hand – dispel some of the unneeded fears, ease the stigma. With the help of collaborator/producer Thomas Lennon, that’s exactly what Yang did.

“we had to find that balance where you don’t overwhelm the audience or drive them away...”

strict

Washington Life: Did you plan to make this particular film – or did it just happen? Ruby Yang: We were determined to do documentary work on AIDS in China and try different avenues. A key advisor was a scholar named Jing Jun, a professor at Tsinghua University. He made us aware of the existence of a private charity group in Anhui and that was the key introduction that opened the first doors. WL: How did this challenge differ from your previous films? RY: In the Chinese culture, it is difficult to talk openly about one’s personal life. I’ve encountered this during the making of my other documentaries and Blood is even harder because of the subject matter and all the stigma associated with AIDS. WL: How much power do documentary films have to raise awareness of health issues? RY: Among Chinese audiences, there is a hunger for information. Good stories told with information are in great demand. Last year, Thomas and I made a documentary called Julia’s Story, about a young woman who contracted AIDS through sex, and after much hesitation decided to go public with her disease and talk about how she got it and what to do about it. We got the film on the air in China last World AIDS day. To give you an idea of interest level: a college heard about the film and organized a screening – I heard later that close to a thousand students showed up and at the end they wanted to roll the film back and watch it again.

Producer Thomas Lennon and Director Ruby Yang 48

WL: How did the making of this film affect you personally?

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RY: The experience of going to Anhui, meeting the children and their extended families, seeing for myself their desolate living conditions, their helplessness and hearing their stories – about selling and receiving tainted blood, the stigma against them. It all affected me greatly and motivated me even more to work on the AIDS awareness campaigns. WL: What will be the fate of the children in the film? RY: Conditions have improved a lot since we started to film in August of 2004. Gao Jun, the boy who is centrally featured, is on medication and his health has improved significantly. He has been moved to the home of an elderly couple who lost their two sons and one daughter-in-law to AIDS, and the couple seems to be taking very good care of him. He will start kindergarten in the fall. But nobody can be sure what the future will be for Gao Jun, or for Nan Nan, the other central character, who also has AIDS. All we know is that they are no longer facing stigma from the villagers and Nan Nan’s relatives are no longer afraid to be with her. WL: What was the film’s biggest challenge? RY: The stories of the children were heartbreakingly sad. We had to find that balance where you don’t overwhelm the audience or drive them away, yet at the same time keep the power of the narrative. Also, maintaining emotional distance was difficult. For months, I wouldn’t give up certain stories even though I kind of knew they slowed the film down. Tom [Lennon] would fly in and we’d have terrible screaming matches over cutting the film down. WL: Was it hard to separate making this film with “wanting to help?” RY: When we first met Gao Jun in August 2004, he wouldn’t speak a word. His friends were his pigs and chickens. It was hard to resist intervening, trying to help him directly. What we could do as filmmakers is lend a hand in dispelling some of the unneeded fear associated with the disease. That is what we tried to do.

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A Prescription for Improving Global Health By Susan J. Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.A. Medical Director, SILVERDOCS DOCS Rx: A World of Documentaries on Global Health

raised by the documentaries and challenged audiences to take action. The films illuminated that nations today face a double jeopardy from both infectious and chronic diseases which have tremendous humanitarian, economic, and national security implications. Annually, one in four deaths worldwide are due to infectious illnesses: three million people die of AIDS, two million from tuberculosis, and one million each die of malaria and measles. Furthermore, since 1972, more than 32 new illnesses such as AIDS, Lyme’s disease, SARS,West Nile virus, and H5N1 avian influenza have appeared. A staggering one billion people do not have access to safe drinking water. In an interconnected global society – 2 million people cross national borders every day – the spread of an infectious illness like avian flu, the safety of our food and water supply, the impact of tobacco and obesity-related diseases, and the threat of bioterrorism do not respect national boundaries. The good news is that solutions cross national borders, too. Prevention and public health preparedness are cornerstones to improving global health and decreasing health care costs. For example, simple, affordable interventions –

The power of cinema can educate and activate people to respond to health problems we face in the United States and around the world. The The films illuminated SILVERDOCS DOCS Rx program that nations today face did just that by shining a spotlight on a double jeopardy significant global health concerns and serving as a catalyst for public discussion from both infectious and social change. By bringing together and chronic diseases inspiring and thought-provoking documentary movies from around the world, SILVERDOCS DOCS Rx exposed audiences to international health vaccines, antibiotics, vitamins, safe birthing kits, problems as different as water contamination rehydration solutions, and mosquito bed nets – in Bangladesh and India, Alzheimer’s disease are available to prevent over 80 percent of the in Canada, childhood leukemia in Lithuania, 10 million children’s deaths that occur annually tuberculosis in Afghanistan, paraplegia in Chile, worldwide if we committed the political will HIV/AIDS in China, and breast cancer and and resources to deliver them. multiple sclerosis in the United States. National The SILVERDOCS DOCS Rx program health experts, many from Washington, D.C. area served as a call to action to improve global health. organizations including the National Institutes We are the first generation that has the scientific, of Health, the National Rehabilitation Hospital, technological, and public health advances to the Global Health Council, George Washington look health disparities and preventable diseases University, and the Children’s National Medical in the eye and put an end to needless suffering Center, served as panelists to explore the issues worldwide. It’s the moonshot of our time.

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o f t h e pa r t y

WL sponsored

Silverdocs parties for Al Gore & Martin Scorsese June 15th Ceviche Restaurant/Discovery World Headquarters Photos by Paul Simkin

The Event: Current TV and WL hosted a happy hour in honor of Al Gore and his film, “An Inconvenient Truth.” A few hours later, Discovery Channel and WL host an after-after party for Martin Scorsese who ws been honored at the Guggenheim Symposium. THE SCENE: Budding young film directors and producers mixed with established producer and distributor types during a laid back couple of hours at Ceviche’s spacious bar and lounge, sipping on passion fruit tequila martinis with jalapeño garnish. At the late night reception, young, hip “social smokers” mingled on the outdoor patio, while more serious patrons found solace, intelligent conversation and air-conditioning in the colorfully lit and minimally decorated interior. THE GUESTS: Al Gore, Current’s Anne Kallin Zehren, Mark Halperin, Ceviche owner Mauricio Fraga-Rosenfeld, Director Jim Jarmusch, Grace Guggenheim, Kate Taylor and Murray Horwitz.

Douglas M. Duncan, Judith McHale, Al Gore, Jean Picker Firstenberg, Patricia Finneran and Terry Lierman

Anne Kallin Zehren and Ceviche owner Mauricio Fraga-Rosenfeld

Patrick Barnes and Susan Dyner

Mark Halperin and Karen Avrich

Stay TuneD WL ‘s September issue will include more on former Vice President Al Gore’s passionate key note address regarding a subject he believes is just as urgent as global warming: media and the state of democracy today, and what he’s doing about it with Current TV www.current.tv.com Jim Jarmusch

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Al Gore and Don Baer

David Leavy

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By janet donovan

Hollywood on the Potomac Mr. Inconvenient saves the day, bloody good fun and … what’s in word? Who’s sorry now? When legendary White

House Correspondent Sarah McClendon screamed “Mr. President, Mr. President” at the daily press briefings, it got their attention. It was no surprise then that it worked on former Vice-President Al Gore at the crowded SILVERDOCS reception for his Inconvenient Truth documentary on global warming. So, would the almost but not quite President prefer at this time to be doing what he’s doing now or what he might have been doing? “That’s a low bar to clear,” said Gore. You have to give him credit: Everyone’s talking about the environment. While going to the movies to watch graphs and charts is not everyone’s idea of fun, there’s plenty of food for thought. The politician turned professor / turned film maker / turned actor is a great educator and can most certainly keep this day job. Give that man a hanky. Everyone loves Richard Dreyfuss, what’s not

to love? He’s been a writer, producer, narrator, actor and director. He’s been in American Graffiti, The Goodbye Girl, Postcards from The Edge and Mr. Holland’s Opus. He’s the consummate actor with an Oscar. So why is this man sporting a dirty, bloody face in Boffo! Tinseltown’s Bombs and Blockbusters? Aye, there’s the rub.

Play it again, Sams. It’s been said that doing crossword puzzles can slow down

the onset of Alzheimer’s.Whether that’s what Will Shortz had in mind when he took it up, we’ll never know ‘cause we didn’t ask. One thing’s for sure though, the NewYork Times’ crossword guru has made this nerdy pastime a winner. Not that anyone would go this far, but Ziegfeld star Eddie Cantor said: “Words fascinate me. They always have. For me, browsing in a dictionary is like being turned loose in a bank.” The June 19th Monday night private showing at the E Street Theatre featured director Patrick Creadon. Although 50 percent of the guests never made it in the hurricane-like downpour, those that could didn’t mind a bad hair day. Guests included NPR’s Neal Conan, Greg Hamilton (who, by marriage, is related to Creadon) and Keith White, The Hill’s Stephanie Merry and Jackie Kucinich, and Media Bistro columnist Patrick Gavin. The ‘take out’ puzzle would be a fun way to follow up on whether reporters can do without spell check; we’d best check them before we forget. Women of a certain age. Diane Ladd, who played the hash-slinging, trash-

talking waitress ‘Flo’ in Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, mesmerized guests at a Washington Harbour party thrown in her honor by the law firm of Foley and Lardmen. The thrice Oscar-nominated actress, with more credits than needed for a PhD, was in town to promote both a new movie and book: The World’s Fastest Indian, co-starring Sir Anthony Hopkins, and Spiraling Through the School of Life, respectively. She loves D.C.: “Flying into Washington gives me a feeling of freedom, especially when I see the monuments.”

In honor of Variety’s 100th Anniversary, Editor-in-Chief Peter Bart’s just released book was adapted by Bill Couturie to take viewers behind the scenes of Hollywood’s’ biggest blockbusters with the hindsight of six degrees of separation. Who’s who of Hollywood heavyweights, from Jodie Foster to Morgan Freeman, provide their amusing takes on what makes a box office hit. More often than not, they agree: it’s the fickle finger of fate which belies all wisdom.

The book, while autobiographical, is also metaphysical, spiritual and meant to “help another person find the miracles that surround them.” “I did my first play in NewYork when I was 16 with Tennessee Williams. I have spent my life as an actress, but the point in the book is that for the last 30 years I have also spent my time working with doctors and am on the Board of Advisors for The National Foundation for Alternative Medicine.” With more energy than a case of vitamins, her earthy personality is what makes her a favorite among her peers as pointed out by Hollywood heavyweight Jack Valenti, filmmaker Catherine Wyler (The Highland Falls artistic director) and former House Speaker Tom Foley.

The celebrity takes woven into the documentary, although fascinating, could have been clipped a bit and most of all, whether to remind us of the highly successful Jaws or the Poseidon bomb, we could have done without Dreyfuss’ make-up. We got the point. Even Miss Daisy didn’t need a hanky as much as he did.

Above, left to right– “Variety editor-in-chief Peter Bart, Danny Devito and Bill Couturié / Al and Tipper Gore at the screening of “An Inconvenient Truth”: Photo credit: Jamie Windon / Mr. & Mrs. Neal Conan (NPR) and “Wordplay” director Patrick Creadon. Photo credit: Joyce Naltchayan / Elizabeth Cromwell, Katherine Wood, Ann Kenkel and Melanie Corcoran at “Wordplay” screening. Photo credit: Joyce Naltchayan

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art at auction

EXTRAORDINARY PRICES, NOT SEEN IN YEARS Maxfield Parrish’s Monumental Landscape, Daybreak, Garners Top Dollar By R e n e e H a rr i s o n D r a k e

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n 1920, House of Art, an American art publishing firm, commissioned illustrator Maxfield Parrish to paint Daybreak solely for the purpose of reproducing the work as a color lithographic print. The success of the image was staggering, and it became one of the most widely reproduced prints in history.

At that time, the American public was so taken with the print that it was estimated that one in every four households owned a copy. In post-World War I America, Parrish was without doubt one of the most popular American illustrators. The release of Daybreak into the marketplace as an affordable print catapulted the artist to national fame and made him an overnight sensation. The epic popularity of Daybreak lies in Parrish’s ability to create an exotic, mystical canvas that would appeal to the general public. Through his signature glazing technique, he was able to create a dramatic landscape, fused with

that is a symphony of texture and pattern. In the left corner behind the foliage, a vibrant blue sky compliments the luminous landscape. Known as “Parrish Blue” by his colleagues, this saturated color produced from layers of pure pigment and varnish was a trademark of the

This past May 25th, Maxfield Parrish once again captivated collectors of American paintings when the original canvas commissioned for the popular print was offered at Christie’s auction house in New York. Christie’s estimated that it would achieve between $5,000,000

“The American public was so taken with the print THat it was estimated that one in every

four households owned a copy of the lithograph. In post-World War I America, Parrish was without doubt one of the most popular American illustrators.”

soft, early morning light while at the same time infusing the composition with the bold colors that represented his signature style. The figures bathed in dawn’s muted light heighten Parrish’s romanticized interpretation of a utopian scene. The rich purple shadows created by the sun’s early morning movement creep masterfully over the mountains depicted on the canvas creating a complexity of depth and contrast of illumination for the viewer. Parrish’s close attention to detail can be seen in the sharply defined architectural elements and the foliage

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artist and can be seen in many of his most celebrated works. Serious collectors know Daybreak as an American icon, and it is acknowledged by curators and dealers as Parrish’s most celebrated masterwork. Parrish referred to the painting as his “magnum opus” and, indeed, he would captivate the American public with the work for decades to come. “His art print Daybreak (1922) is still the most reproduced art image of all time, exceeding even the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper.”(Parrish: A Retrospective, p.44)

and $7,000,000. The painting was met with exuberance by collectors and bidding catapulted up an astounding $7,632,000. Eric Widing, senior vice president and head of Christie’s American Paintings department commented after the sale that the strength of the American Paintings market is reflected in what now stands as the new world record price for Maxfield Parrish achieved by the sale of Daybreak.

Above– Maxfield Parrish’s Daybreak, 1922, courtesy of Christie’s.

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H e a lt h & w e l l n e s s

On the Road to

well~being A luxury guide to health and wellness resorts: Sea Island, Canyon Ranch and Palmetto Bluff

Health, fitness and wellness don’t always start at home. This summer, treat yourself to a vacation and kick start that “healthy lifestyle” you’ve been talking about since New Year’s. To be sure, it’s going to take dedication and commitment – both of which become a whole lot more manageable when enveloped in luxury. If only staying in shape could be like this all year round ... Sea Island, Ga. Exclusivity and tradition meet modern luxury From blueblood American families to presidents, Sea Island has hosted discerning visitors for generations.They’ve come – and continue to come – for many reasons:The Cloister Hotel, world-class golf courses, undisturbed beaches, or just to get away. Part of the lure is the Spa at Sea Island, which will move into a new 65,000 square foot facility in the fall. Whether you’re looking for traditional spa treatments or want help getting ready for your

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first 10K, the spa offers everything you need for a complete health and wellness experience. Intentions into actions. The name of the wellness program at the Spa at Sea Island says it all. Whatever your intentions may be, the staff is intent on helping you wade through the static to find the action that is right for you. “The spirit of the spa extends outside the walls of the building and over the whole resort,” says Jim Root, Sea Island’s general manager of spa operations.“The power is people connecting. Our approach is high touch and low tech.”

According to Sea Island CEO David Everett, the resort is taking a holistic approach to health and wellness, incorporating aspects from across the board to give visitors the best of everything during their stay. “It’s our intention to be the finest resort in the world,” Everett says. “The health and wellness aspect is a central part of being a complete destination. It’s not just about one area; it’s a complete line of services and amenities.” Root believes that a health, fitness and wellness experience isn’t always about the hottest treatment or newest exercise trend, but finding what’s right for you. This is why his staff – from masseuse to track coach to wellness chef – concentrate on building personalized programs that focus on optimal individual performance. “It’s not ‘bikini boot camp,’” says Root, it’s about identifying your goals and creating a foundation you can build upon after leaving Sea Island.

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“We’re not chasing the cosmetic or veneer; we’re getting down to some real values.” For some visitors, those values include making a change to a healthier diet; others want to develop a fitness program they can stick with; some just want to relax at the spa. And that, says Root, is the beauty of the Spa at Sea Island: you can do as much or as little as you want. If it’s a healthy diet you’re after, wellness chef Laurie Erickson can set you on the right path. Erickson is aware of how often life can interrupt the cooking process, Root says, so she focuses on simple fare that is easy to prepare and delicious to eat. Erickson will walk you through the entire culinary process: she’ll take you shopping and teach you how to make healthy choices while in the store, give you recipes, and show you how to cook meals that fit your lifestyle. Root added that many guests call Erickson for food tips once they’ve returned home; so remember, if you run into a food crisis help is only a phone call away. Of course, health and wellness extend beyond one’s diet.With this in mind, the Spa at Sea Island offers a myriad of fitness options. Sea Island’s approach to fitness is about “optimal performance and optimal aging. Aging is natural, how we age is up to us,” Root says. Again, it’s all about finding what’s right for each individual and creating a program to help you “be the best you can be.”

“Fitness is about optimal performance and optimal aging. Aging is natural, how we age is up to us.” – Jim Root

The fitness facility offers classes of all types, and the new spa (with its 30,000 square feet of dedicated fitness space) will feature studios for yoga, Pilates and other disciplines. But, as Root said earlier, the spirit of the spa extends beyond the building’s walls, and that means taking advantage of the beautiful natural surroundings on Sea Island.

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(1) The iconic Cloister Hotel, which hosted world leaders when President George W. Bush hosted the 2004 G8 Summit at Sea Island. (2) Wine Cellar dinner . (3) The Avenue of the Oaks, just part of the natural beauty that the Sea Island Company has worked to preserve. (4) Guests practice Yoga on Sea Island’s 5-mile-long private beach, part of the resort’s philosophy that the spa experience extends over the whole island. (5) Hole #11 on the Seaside Course, where guests can learn from three top 50 golf instructors.

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Whether it’s running on the beach with Sea Island track coach Bruce Kritzler, learning from one of the resort’s three top-50 golf instructors or taking aim at the shooting school (where the philosophy is to “let your senses guide you and you’ll hit the target every time”), the island allows for plenty of opportunities to turn your intentions into actions, au natural. Don’t forget, Sea Island is about relaxing as well,and the spa offers more ways to kick back (and be pampered) than you can imagine. Treatments like the Georgia Mud Pie Wrap and Soak (a deep cleanse with detoxifying oils and warm mud) and Sea Island Special (a botanical scrub, hydrobath and full-body massage) make it easy to turn your intentions into actions. The new Spa at Sea Island’s design will make it easy to relax as well. Its vaulted ceilings and wideopen layout will help you make the transition from your harried world into a relaxation process that will leave you renewed and re-energized. And that’s how Root wants guests to feel when upon leaving the spa. “For 78 years people have been coming to Sea Island to recharge,” Root says, “and we’re today’s stewards of that 78-year-old tradition.” ~ Mick Richards

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For more information visit www.seaisland.com or call (800) SEA ISLAND

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(1)A guest cottage at Palmetto Bluff with a porch perfect for watching the sunset. (2) A private veranda and tub at the spa, which is located on an island in a freshwater estuary and accessed by footbridge. (3) The River House, where southern staples are served up with Lowcountry flair.

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The Inn at Palmetto Bluff, S.C. Southern charm, worldly living Tucked away on 20,000 acres along the banks of South Carolina’s May River, the Inn at Palmetto Bluff is home to a world-class spa, Jack Nicklaus signature golf course and nature preserve. As you head down the Inn’s private road, lined with mossy-oaks, palmetto trees and alligator-filled lagoons, the seductive smell of pine and bayberry will make you want to turn off your Blackberry and tune in to the pace of the Lowcountry. The Inn at Palmetto Bluff ’s 50 waterfront cottages and cottage suites were designed with relaxation and privacy in mind. Each 1,100

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square foot bungalow features water views and such amenities as oversized marble bathrooms, king beds with luxurious linens, fireplaces, wet bars and WiFi. Recently ranked the 11th Top Golf Community in America by Travel + Leisure Golf and one of Golfweek’s 2006 Top 100 Modern Courses, the May River Golf Club features an 18-hole Jack Nicklaus signature course that lies within the May River Forest. After hitting the links, relieve muscle tension at Palmetto Bluff ’s 9,500-square-foot spa. Therapeutic offerings like the Palmetto Pluff Mud Wrap and High Cotton Body Dust Massage utilize local ingredients like cotton, wild rice and red river clay.To help awaken the senses, guests are invited to relax with scented, heated neck pillows and homemade pecan cookies before being led to private treatment rooms with outdoor verandas and claw-foot tubs. After nourishing your mind and body at the spa, there’s no better way to feed your soul than with Chef Scott Pikey’s regional creations. Enjoy breathtaking views and pre-dinner cocktails on the River House terrace before feasting on fresh seafood and seasonal dishes. Locals rave about the fried green tomato salad and May River fried oysters with creamed collards, bacon and

“The Bluff” is a 20,000-acre paradise for nature enthusiasts and adventurers alike.

lobster butter. If you want to work off all that southern food, you’re in luck, because “the Bluff ” is a 20,000-acre paradise for nature enthusiasts and adventurers alike. Complimentary bikes and canoes are a perfect way to spot bald eagles and explore the trails and coastal salt marshes; for water lovers, the May River offers more than tasty oysters discover the surrounding islands and rich wildlife by kayak with a naturalist guide. If that sounds too strenuous, simply spend an afternoon sampling wines and watching bottle-nosed dolphins on the inn’s historic yacht, the GRACE. ~ Shela Halper

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For more information visit www.palmettobluffresort.com or call (866) 706-6565

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(1) Canyon Ranch’s Bellefontaine Mansion, where you’ll dine, attend workshops and meet with health experts. (2) Guests practice Tai chai surrounded by the Berkshire’s natural beauty. (3) Ayurvedic foot treatments are one of the many massages available on property.

Canyon Ranch, Lenox, Mass. Leave the real world behind It’s 4 o’clock in the afternoon, the real world is careening off the rails, loud with traffic and hassles, and you feel trapped. But know this: there’s a quiet room up in the Berkshire Mountains where 10 to 15 people are about to be handed the antidote. They are in the first deep inhalations of an hour of very good yoga. Their teacher is Blaise, a benevolent (and hunky) professional fitness instructor, who knows that his job, in addition to expertly guiding the class through postures, is to keep the real world barred at the door. This is one small slice of the pleasure at Canyon Ranch, the venerable health and wellness resort in Lenox, Mass. There are more than 12,000 “spas” currently operating in the U.S. They come in as many styles and personalities as the needs of their patrons. Canyon Ranch distinguishes itself by being grounded and balanced. It has as much to offer the Type-A stress-junkie who needs to learn to unwind as it has for the out-of-shape blubber butt who wants to get fit. It is equally comfortable for singles or couples, for parent/ child combos, girlfriends on a getaway, retirees, and the young and buff who want a challenge. Its emphasis on sports — particularly outdoor sports — and the vast self-contained “campus,” make it more like camp for anyone over age 14 who can afford the time and cost of getting off

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the merry-go-round for a long weekend, week, or maybe more. In addition to yoga, there are more than 50 classes each day under the roof of the 120,000square-foot complex to keep everyone entertained: stretching, belly dancing, Tai Chi,

Canyon Ranch… has as much to offer the Type-A stress junkie who needs to learn to unwind as it has for the out-of-shape blubber butt who wants to get fit. cycling, tennis strokes, basketball and all manner of aerobics. For the outdoor sports buff there are well-organized and expertly guided hikes in rolling pastures, deep forests and up and over mountains; canoe trips, kayaking, bicycle treks and, in the winter, skiing, snow-shoe and cross country. The first Canyon Ranch spa opened in Tucson, Ariz., in 1979, the brainchild of a self-proclaimed former stressed-out type-A, Mel Zuckerman, who, having had a life-changing experience at

a spa, opted to make a career of healthy living, and to share it with the world. Today there are several outposts of Canyon Ranch: on the ocean liner Queen Mary 2, at the Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas and at the Gaylord Palms in Kissimmee, Florida. There are also three Canyon Ranch Living properties under construction in Miami Beach, Chicago and Bethesda, Maryland. Each guest can design his or her own schedule from a list of more than 40 fitness class options — including lectures and workshops — that run through the day. No reservations are required for the classes, almost all of them complimentary. There are other special services that come with a fee, including most of the specialized medical services, body treatments and beauty offerings. However, almost all the packages come with an allowance for some of the services, making it easy for a visit to include some massage or to get a complete medical health evaluation from the doctors on premises. What’s fun is using the allowance to explore alternative treatments like acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, polarity, or some of the trends in self-awareness, like having a genomics consultation, handwriting analysis or having your Tarot cards read. The rooms are spacious, well-decorated and on a par with the quality of a Ritz Carlton or Four Seasons. The dining room and café offer interesting and extensive menus that strive to make healthy and nutritious food compelling.

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The man who started it all – Mel Zuckerman

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hen my wife Enid and I founded Canyon Ranch in 1979, we had a personal mission of improving our health by living a healthy lifestyle and thought we could teach a few other people how to live it, too. Some people thought we were crazy opening a resort like Canyon Ranch. But we stuck with it because our goal was about much more than merely selling vacations – it was, is and always will be about helping our guests live healthier for a lifetime. I’ve long been inspired by a quote from the 1930s by Jesse F. Williams, M.D., whose words are at the core of the Canyon Ranch Mel Zuckerman philosophy:

The salad bar at lunch and dinner is particularly good, the daily soup special is a must, and the homemade sorbets and ice creams are a treat (and there always are chocolate chip cookies). A Canyon Ranch experience works best if you go with a known goal, whether it is to unwind for a few days, work out like an insaniac and lose a few pounds or try to combine a little of both. While it is largely an adult environment, families with teenage children would benefit from trying it out as a healthy family holiday. But no matter what you do, it’s worth it, even if you can only keep the real world at bay for a little while. ~ Pilgrim Behn

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For more information visit www.canyonranch.com or call (800) 742-9000

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It’s of value to think of health as that condition of the individual that makes possible the highest enjoyment of life. Health, when thought of simply as the absence of disease, is a standard of mediocrity, but when thought of as a quality of life is a standard of inspiration and everincreasing achievement. Coming Soon… Canyon Ranch Living, Bethesda Earmarked for completion in 2008, Canyon Ranch Living Center in Bethesda will give busy metro area residents a chance to continue their health and wellness regimes every day. For those lucky enough to purchase one of the 434 luxury condo residences, a 90,000-square-foot on-site health and wellness center will provide worldclass fitness amenities, diet and nutrition consultation and access to the community’s first-rate medical team. The campus will also house a 157-room Canyon Ranch Hotel, and 350,000 square feet of luxury retail space.

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or me, our heartfelt intention to help every guest find greater joy in living is what makes us different from all other resorts. We want to connect this intention our steadfast desire to inspire and motivate people to live well - with everyone’s goal of feeling great and living long. Even with all the growth we’ve had after more than a quarter-century, we are more determined than ever to motivate our guests to create a sincere personal intention to place health and well-being higher on their list of priorities for everyday living - and we will do whatever it takes to make that happen. That’s why Canyon Ranch exists.

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h e a lt h & w e l l n e s s

Shift Your Vision Surviving and thriving at Baron Baptiste’s Personal Revolution Bootcamp in Tulum, Mexico

By NAncy Reynolds Bagley

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heard the questions… “Are you ready to unlock your body’s limitless potential, balance your emotions and master your diet?” …Well, yes. “Are you committed to reaching a new altitude of physical and spiritual strength?” … Sure. There I was in the back corner of class, holding on to whatever it is inside that gets you through something like this. My thighs were shaking, as I wavered on one leg in a pool of my own sweat — what am I doing here? And how am I going to make it through the rest of this week? ... It was 9:30 a.m. and I was only thirty minutes into my first class of bootcamp.Yes, yoga bootcamp. That was four years ago. Then, I could barely get through a 90 minute class, but something happened on the third day. I felt lighter, younger and happier than I had in years. 66

And now, having finished my third bootcamp, I can say that the experience is magical—I’m hooked—and the changes I have seen in myself and in others are incredible. To some, a week-long yoga retreat at an exotic beachfront location brings visions of breathing exercises, gentle stretching, and perhaps sitting cross-legged chanting om. But modern yogi Baron Baptiste sees his Personal Revolution Bootcamp in a different light: an opportunity to transform, reject old habits and start anew. I quit smoking. Others gave up coffee and alcohol. My husband, Soroush lost 15 pounds and lowered his blood pressure and cholesterol dramatically. A father and his daughter we met repaired their broken relationship. Insomnia was cured. Relationships were strengthened and selfworth replenished. Although the bootcamp does take place in the paradisiacal Maya Tulum eco-resort in Tulum, Mexico, don’t let images of a Caribbean sanctuary deceive you. With Baptiste leading the way, this “Eden” becomes the land of sweat.

Baptiste, a best-selling author, father, educator, and entrepreneur is not afraid of hard work and neither are the people who flock to his bootcamps and yoga studios. As the week went on, I came to discover that I was swapping stories with CEOs, entertainment personalities, attorneys, bankers, publishers, — all eager to put their frenetic lives aside for a week of renewal. Whether you’re a “Type A” looking to decompress or a devoted student looking to strengthen your practice, it doesn’t matter. There are no labels or castes; the focus is only on the transformational benefits for those willing to open-up and suspend doubts. Just as I was ready to admit defeat and beg mercy from master teacher and bootcamp facilitator Gregor Singleton, Baptiste walks into the steam-filled yoga bungalow whistling, “don’t worry be happy.” It’s hard not to notice his taut surfer/martial arts/yogi physique as he tells us to hold the pose longer! “Shift your vision and use your breath to quiet the negative self-chatter.” He was right; the battle was indeed in my head. Therein lies Baptiste’s philosophy. Engaging

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Title page: Baron Baptiste in crow position. Clockwise from top left: A beach-side Maya Tulum cabana; Participants in dancer’s pose at the 8-day Personal Revolution Bootcamp; A view from the main lodge at Maya Tulum; Baron teaching.

your physical body allows you to tap into your mental, emotional side — your spiritual self. The physical challenge of his form of yoga focuses on the present and inspires personal transformation. Basically he short-circuits your nervous system and then rebuilds it. “When I can get you out of your own way, then I can do what I need to do to access new thresholds of growth…. Drop what you know and allow your old self to come apart. Your body and mind will create balance and a new way of being.” In eight days the Personal Revolution Bootcamp does just that. It brings your mind, body, and spirit into harmony using aerobic power yoga sessions to awaken and internally rinse the body, meditation and discussion to level emotional imbalances and a healthful organic diet to further detoxify and purify. “We try to expose the selfdefeating system that is ingrained in every one of us,” says Singleton, “you can’t entirely get rid of it, but you can be aware as you take it with you.” With Baptiste, a challenging yoga practice is the spark which can ignite personal transformation.

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The heat of Bikram, the discipline of Ashtanga, the alignment of Iyengar, and the strength-building asanas (postures) of all three inform his own unique tradition: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga.“He created his own style of yoga in order to make it more accessible and beneficial to westerners,” explains Siga Bielkus, program director for the Baptiste Power Yoga Institute (“BPYI”). Born into a yoga dynasty, his father Walt Baptiste was one of the first to promote a holistic type of “Integral” yoga in the United States, pioneering fitness training and nutrition. Together with Baron’s mother, Magana (niece of a former president of El Salvador), they opened the first yoga studio in San Francisco in 1955. Baron basically grew up at the knees of several legendary yogis — B.K.S. Iyengar, K. Pattabhi Jois, and Bikram Choudhury.Their traditional and

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sometimes rigid approach helped him realize that the practice of yoga needed to be de-mystified and tailored to the American mind and body. Back then yoga could be a bit cultish. “Even in California, I was teased a lot and called a ‘Hare Krishna … But it’s funny how life finds you … the last thing I wanted to do is teach,” explains Baptiste, who started teaching at his parents studio at age fifteen. In his early twenties, he worked as one of two teachers at Bikram’s Beverly Hills studio where he helped design a teacher-training program and became somewhat of a yogi to the stars, teaching Raquel Welch, Quincy Jones, Kareem Abdul Jabar, Martin Sheen and Herbie Hancock. Since then, his celebrity students have included quarterback Randall Cunningham, actresses Elizabeth Shue and Helen Hunt, and singer Chynna Phillips.

“Drop what you know and allow your old self to come apart. Your body and mind will create balance and a new way of being.” –Baron baptiste

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Maya Tulum Eco-resort is located on a 70-mile stretch along the Yucatan Peninsula; Baron guiding his students.

Baptiste also witnessed his father unmask the hypocrisy of certain other self-proclaimed Eastern gurus who frequented his family’s home.“At some point, I realized that I needed to pursue my own path,” says Baptiste, 42, who has spent the past two decades introducing his own revolutionary style to many who might never have been naturally drawn to yoga. His approach makes the benefits of yoga available to everyone: young, old, the athlete, the yoga virgin, or the master instructor. His system is based on the fundamentals of sound sequencing, sound biomechanics, and specific alignments which are safe and healthy for the body’s design. “Westerners aren’t really used to sitting on the floor cross-legged from birth,” Baptiste explains. “Since our hips are tighter we benefit from a more tailored approach adapted to meet the needs of each individual’s level of strength, coordination, flexibility, and agility.” “The camps are always filled to capacity, with students ranging in age from 14 to 70, many coming by themselves others with partners or family,” says Vyda Bielkus, director of BPYI. As I can attest, the process supports people at all fitness and health levels (I could barely touch my toes at

my first camp). “For some, yoga is viewed as the exclusive realm of crunchy-granola hippies but what has attracted people to Baptiste’s style is the physical challenge and feeling of empowerment,” says Patty Ivey, owner of Baptiste’s only D.C. affiliate studio, Down Dog Yoga, in Georgetown. A marathoner and bootcamp veteran, Ivey fell into yoga as a result of knee injuries. “Yoga dramatically helped my physical recovery,” she says. “The Baptiste practice is a dynamic combination of sweat, strength and intuitive self discovery with opportunities for anyone willing to take on physical and emotional barriers.” A lot of people say, “I’ve tried yoga, and I don’t like it,” but to me that is like saying, I’ve tried bananas and I don’t like fruit. I had heard about the rehabilitative effects of yoga from acquaintances such as publisher Mort Zuckerman who told me that he visited some of the best specialists in the world for severe back pain until yoga finally relieved him. My husband and I started practicing Jivamukti yoga in New York in the ‘90s and thought it was the only yoga we would ever love. Since then we have practiced Bikram and Ashtanga, but it was the Baptiste flow which really fired our

everyone has a system That is resistant to change and transformation We are not really open to change if we go through life simply looking to reaffirm our existing beliefs. And we are not really listening if we hear and categorize every comment based on whether we “agree or don’t agree.” That’s just our “system” trying to maintain the status quo.

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spirits again. Like us, many are drawn to yoga for its remarkable physical health benefits or perhaps the ability to make your bottom look perky in a bikini. But most become hooked because of the effect on their overall quality of life. “Yoga is not something that gets done to you,” says Singleton, “it takes commitment to glean the benefits.” But a Baptiste bootcamp is probably the only vacation you will take where you won’t need another upon return. South of Cancun, bordered by the blue-green ocean on one side and tropical rainforest on the other, the Maya Tulum eco-resort isn’t the “camp” we knew as kids. Quaint, thatched-roof bungalows dot the endless white sand beach. The beachfront huts offer spectacular views, calm ocean breezes, and an audible murmur from the glassy waves.The spa/ massage staff is incredible, (and I am very picky). Our morning regimen begins with 6:30 a.m. meditation followed by a brisk hour-long walk or jog down the beach. After a healthy light breakfast it’s time to hit the mat… A group of 80 strangers quickly forms a community as we fill the yoga bungalow, lining up our mats.The unified hum of ujjayi breath parallels the sound of rolling ocean waves. Our bodies pulse with energy as we flow from one posture to the next pushing ourselves to the physical edge determined to live and feel more fully. Cultivating a sense of “authenticity” is what Baptiste is all about.“You cannot do wrong in one aspect of your life and expect to do right in any

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of the others. They are all interconnected, integral,” he says.” But Baptiste doesn’t preach or claim to be a guru or a grand master. He admits that he is a “flawed man,” yet he is real, very real. Humor seeps from his pores. He tells story after story and enjoys quoting his favorite mentors, including Gandhi, Shakespeare and Jesus. He simply shares his philosophy on yoga and life, and lets you decide what to take from it. “Mixing up the physical practice with dialogue sessions is not therapy,” he explains, but rather a forum for encouraging us to re-evaluate selfdestructive behaviors. “First we make our habits and then our habits make us,” says Baron. The notion that “you know who you are, but not what you could be” is another key “Baronsim,” explains Georgetowner, repeat bootcamper and Down Dog instructor Ronnie Jersky. “I find it liberating, and with liberation comes the rise to full potential,” she says. I was hesitant to participate at first. I am not one who likes speaking in public. But as others opened up to share, I, too, realized how liberating it could be. According to Baptiste, stress and bottled-up feelings of betrayal, anger, jealousy, hatred or neglect can create acidity and disease. The lie cages us. “Life is full of problems,” he says, “if you don’t have any, it is because you are dead. The key is how you choose to react. Be grateful for your problems and shift your vision.” Baptiste can speak from personal experience. He credits yoga with helping him overcoming a life-crippling back injury sustained when he was crushed on the sidelines while serving as peak performance coach for the Philadelphia Eagles as well as with helping him amicably settle a divorce with his wife of 8 years, essentially without attorneys. Yoga focuses an active professional life, that requires him to spend hundreds of days per year on the road, writing and touring for his books, teaching at studios, workshops and bootcamps and “balancing that with a rock-solid commitment to my three kids,” says Baptiste. “Bring yoga into your everyday life,” Baptiste says.“You can’t expect stress and chaos to go away, but yoga is a way to manage it” It’s the physical push which helps peel away the layers enveloping

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your true self. With physical and emotional changes already well underway by mid-week, Baptiste Baron Baptiste introduces the The master suite final aspect of the Personal Revolution Bootcamp — detoxification from the inside out. The first time, I was terrified. I love my food and a glass of wine at night. Wednesday through Friday we ate only low-sugar fruit: avocado, tomato, melon, The Location: mango, papaya,— the three-day fruit fast wrung Located just a half-hour drive south of Cancun out my organs like a sponge. I expected to drag, International Airport, along the 70-mile stretch of considering that we were on our mats six hours a Yucatan peninsula. day and consuming only fruit and water, but to my

Maya Tulum Eco-Resort

surprise, my energy soared. It was so easy. Baptiste describes his yoga practice as an “unlearning process.”The bootcamp — the asana practice, the meditations and discussions, and the detox diet — are all about letting go he says. “If you can let go of the excess, you are naturally healthy, you can get rid of the toxins, whether they are physical or emotional, the body is naturally strong. “No matter how long and how far you walk down the wrong path, turn back.” My husband, his brother, and cousin, and I enrolled in the bootcamp to share healthy time together and take a holiday from our hectic lives. I’ve seen some couples show up with a wall between them and leave with a much deeper connection. Others send a partner to share a life experience, hoping to develop a common language of growth. Marylanders Heather and Sid McNairy have attended two bootcamps.“The first was our honeymoon and we had no idea that we would be building our marriage,” said Sid, who now runs the “I Do Yoga” studio in Maryland with his wife. Regardless of the reason that any of us each initially enrolled, we all had one thing in common — intention.We were all seekers.We all wanted to live more fully, to be whole. “What’s next?” Baron inquired, grinning on the last day of camp. “And what good is your transformation if you’re not willing to share it?” “Be the change you want to see in the world,” he says quoting Gandhi. What an incredible gift to give yourself — and others.

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The Draw: This 25-acre seaside yoga retreat invites you to trade in your usual gin and tonic for tequila and tamarind juice, your tired dance moves for a full lotus, and your flip-flops for, well, nothing. Oh, and topless sunbathing, of course. The Rooms: Round cabanas with thatched roofs and marble floors come with an open shower, a personalized sitting area, and bottled water.The yoga room’s open roof offers reprieve from even the most challenging of poses with a soothing view of Mexico’s turquoise sky. What to do: Yoga classes are offered twice daily, from beginner to advanced, for only $10 per class. Eco-adventure tours explore the “Tulum Ruins,” the only Mayan site found along the sea. At the spa, your most stressful moments will be deciding between a Swedish or a hot stone massage. Dive the Cenotes, amazing freshwater caverns.Over the past 20 years, divers have discovered more than 300 miles of interconnected passageways and caves. Where to Eat: After you play, re-fuel at the retreats open air restaurant, with dishes such as grouper filet Mayan style wrapped in a banana leaf for the gastronomically curious, to fish and papaya tacos, for those who prefer the more familiar.

Cabana Rates winter (Nov 4th-June 2nd) - summer (june 3rd-Nov 3rd) Garden View $145 $105 Ocean View

$145-$155

$105-$115

Beachfront

$185-$200

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h e a lt h & w e l l n e s s

Turn up your

downward dog A review of the the area’s best yoga studios The younger set practices their poses at Budding Yogis

by Mallory Norton

In a go-go-go city where long hours and tension headaches are an understatement, finding the right yoga studio can be the difference between burning the midnight oil and just plain burning out. But, with an abundance of studios and so many variations of yoga available, just choosing a place to put down your mat can be exhausting.Vinyasa, Bikram or Ashtanga? Cardio blast or meditative? The choices are endless. To reap the full benefits of yoga it is important to choose the right tradition, atmosphere and level, and this guide to the city’s premier studios will help you to make that choice.

Workout Worthy Down Dog Yoga (Georgetown) Challenging and invigorating classes are held in a hot studio and rooted in Baptiste Power Vinyasa style, which encourages cardiovascular fitness and flexibility through a flowing series of strength-building poses. www.downdogyoga.com (202) 965-yoga

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Ashtanga Yoga Center (Tenleytown) Be prepared to sweat at this studio, where the vigorous path of Ashtanga Yoga is followed. Ashtanga involves synching your breath with a series of postures which produce intense internal heat and a purifying sweat.

www.ashtangayogadc.com (202) 342-6029

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The Flow Yoga Center studio

Hot Yoga (Tenleytown) In a room heated to your body temperature (approximately 97.8 degrees), these Vinyasa style classes challenge you both physically and mentally. Practicing yoga in a heated environment helps open the muscular and skeletal systems and eliminate toxins.

www.hotyogausa.com (202) hot-yoga Mindfully Meditative Stretching it out at Down Dog Yoga

Workout Worthy cont’d. Flow Yoga Center (Dupont) This eco-friendly studio serves as a refuge for those who seek a nurturing and harmonious environment.With three traditions of flowing yoga— Ashtanga,Vinyasa and Jivamukti—each class is a “celebration of life.” www.flowyogacenter.com (202) 462-flow

Spiral Flight (Upper Georgetown) Spiral Flights’ classes emphasize mindfulness and an intimate connection with the body. Relaxed and welcoming, this studio features classes for moms-to-be, kids and teens, meditation and chanting, and massage.

www.spiralflightyoga.com (202) 965-1645 Dahn Yoga (D.C., Maryland and Virginia)

With 14 centers spanning the area and regular 60 min. classes based on 5,000-year-old Korean exercises, dahn yoga is gentle and encourages stress relief and happiness.

www.dahnyoga.com (202) 965-1645

Inspired Yoga (Adams-Morgan and U Street)

Unity Woods (Arlington, Bethesda and a few D.C. locations)

Features high energy “flow” style classes in which breath is used as a transition from one pose to the next. Offers specialty classes such as yoga for runners, belly-dancing and relaxing candlelight classes.

This studio features classes in asana (posture) and pranayama (breathing) in the vigorous Iyengar method of Hatha Yoga, which emphasizes a balance between strength and flexibility, builds endurance and develops self-awareness.

www.inspiredyoga.com (202) 462-1800

www.unitywoods.com (301) 656-8992

Some Like it Hot

Bikram Yoga Dupont (Dupont) Classes consist of a 90-minute sequence of 26 demanding postures in a highly heated room. Each pose is described step-by-step so beginners can catch on. Get ready to sweat…

www.bikramyogadc.com (202) 332-8680

Yoga Chic

Tranquil Space (Dupont, Penn Quarter and Bethesda) This colorful and upbeat studio features a tea lounge, spa and tranquiliT boutique filled with its private line of custom yoga-gear. Aromatherapy is offered after each vinyasa yoga class.

www.tranquilspace.com (202) 223-yoga Soma Fit (Upper Georgetown)

Everyone needs to be pampered occasionally. This deluxe fitness center and day spa offers yoga classes in several different traditions—Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Iyengar and Power.

www.somafit.com (202) 965-2121 For the Kids

Budding Yogis (Chevy Chase) Many studios offer classes for kids, this one caters specifically to a younger crowd, encouraging physical and mental well-being in a noncompetitive and playful atmosphere. Summer camp, yoga birthday parties and therapeutic yoga for children with special needs are also offered.

In class at Inspired Yoga

www.buddingyogis.com (202) 686-1104

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h e a lt h & w e l l n e s s

Make it Personal Top trainers at the area’s most exclusive clubs share summer fitness tips You’ve taken out your swimsuit for the season and realized it doesn’t hide additional pounds. A good place to start is with a trainer who can assess your physical condition and help you develop a personal fitness program. Tommy Tomlo, personal trainer to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, says that all of his clients follow a unique exercise routine to target certain areas and make work outs more efficient. Here are tips from other leading fitness pros: Health Club Who works out there Trainer

Tips for losing some extra weight for summer from fitness experts.

Features

Fees

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Four Seasons Wolf Blitzer Sally Quinn George Clooney (when he’s in town)

Mandarin Oriental The Haney Family Numorous Senators and U.S. Representatives

Mint Mint just opened it’s doors but is quickly attracting a leading clientele due to its enviro-chic boutique, flair and products.

Micahel Lin

Sidney Aquino

Lance Berger

• Do cardio in the morning to burn off stored fat reserves. • For more energy during strength training, Michael suggests taking a long run or doing cardio before. • While losing weight, it’s important to balance burning fat and gaining muscle. • Continue workouts at home with a balancing ball.The ball helps to tone core muscles while at the same time can work butt, leg, thighs, and upper body.

• Walk wherever you can, especially at night when your metabolism slows down and needs and extra boost. • Join a sports team that you enjoy such as baseball, basketball or kickball. • Forget white food – substitute your bad carbs (starches) with good carbs. Sugar, white rice, pasta and white bread should go out the door. • Dance during your summer fiesta.The more you dance, the more calories you will burn.

• Take advantage of the summer weather and make physical activity a large part of your day whether that be tennis, swimming, hiking, golfing (sans cart) or biking. • Avoid resting more than 30 seconds during strength training session. • Exercise multiple muscles simultaneously by pairing your favorite leg and arm exercises together. • Integrate cardio between your strength training sessions such as step-ups, jumping jacks, or jumping rope.

With over three levels and 12,000 square feet, the Four Seasons Fitness Club is a state-ofthe-art fitness facility. Each machine comes equipped with a television, DVD and CD player, radio and individual headset. The club also features a lap pool, eucalyptus-scented steam room and studios for yoga, spinning and aerobics.

A full range of TechnoGym training equipment with both cardiovascular and resistance machines. A 50-foot indoor lap pool with a kite suspended from the ceiling as a reference to the Smithsonian Kite festival.

Private televisions for most cardio equipment by LifeFitness.The gym also has extensive freeweights and nautilus machines and rooms for massage, facial treatments, spinning, bikram yoga and aerobics. Before you leave, make sure to take a steam or sauna or try a mint and eucalyptus infused towel.

Initial fees start at $6,000 for membership with $250 monthly fee. Training is handled by Verve Health and Fitness and starts at about $100 an hour.

Use of the gym for non-hotel guests is only through training sessions, which start at $110 an hour.

$245 enrollment fee About $100 monthly fees depending on membership type. Private training starts at $69 per session.

Hours

5:30 a.m. – 10 p.m. daily.

6:00 am – 11 p.m. daily.

Weekdays: 5:30 a.m. – 10:30 p.m. Saturday: 7 a.m. – 9 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Contact

2800 Pennsylvania Ave, N.W. (202) 342-0444 www.fourseasons.com

1330 Maryland Avenue, S.W. (202) 554 – 8588 www.mandarinoriental.com

1724 California St, N.W. (202) 328 – 6468 www.mintfitness.com

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Cocktail dresses, swimsuits and shorts are not forgiving attire. Here are a few suggestions for helping maintain a trim figure on the beach. • Most Americans eat the same 10-15 foods. Try experimenting with new fruits and vegetables, as a greater variety is available during the summer. • While mixed cocktails taste great on a hot summer evening, just one can easily contain 400 calories. Pina coladas, strawberry daiquiris and even margaritas are blended with high-calorie juices. Stick to vodka, wine or light beer. • Dipping sauces add flavor, but they also add calories. Ask for salad dressings on the side, eat the chicken satay without the peanut sauce and stick to veggies without the dip. • Replace burgers with grilled portobello mushrooms and vegetable kebabs.

The Sports Club/LA Jenna Bush John Mason Mark Ein Katie Couric (when she’s in town) Tommy Tomlo • Do a minimum of three cardio days and two strength training days per week. • Tone hips and thighs by power walking. Target love handles with swimming or tennis. • Eat three square meals a day with healthy carbs and proteins along with two small snacks. • Be consistent with your eating and your workout intensity. The Sports Club/LA is not just a 10,000 square foot gym with hundreds of cardio and weight machines, but a social meeting spot for Washington tastemakers.The gym offers full-service salon, dry cleaner, café and even a bar (though Tomlo doesn’t recommend alcohol).The facilities are top of the line: steam showers, saunas, swimming pool, basketball and squash courts.

four seasons

mandarin oriental

mint

About a $500 enrollment fee, though at times deals are offered. Membership rates start at $142 a month and training sessions run $85 for one or $67 per if you purchase 30. Weekdays: 5:30 a.m. – 10:30 p.m. Weekends: 8 a.m.- 8 p.m. 1170 M St., N.W. (202) 974-6600 www.thesportsclubla.com the sports club/LA

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SUMMER FASHIONS

Society on the High Seas

Decked OUt By Barbara McConaghy Photographed by Roy Cox Hair styled by Tammey Laws Make-up by Anita Bahramy

Lesly Brown Sajak, Wife of “Wheel of Fortune” host Pat Sajak, mother of two, photographer and vice chair of Anne Arundel Medical Center Foundation Board, wearing navy and white chiffon striped halter with shells ($398), linen pinstripe pants ($798), all Chevy Chase Collections for RALPH LAUREN.

in annapolis


1. WATCH with Stripe Sweater Girard Perregaux rubber strap sailing watch ($11,500) at LILJENQUIST & BECKSTEAD. 2. Carolyn Middleton,

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Philanthropist who has chaired 11 galas for the Heart Association and Anne Arundel Medical Center; art historian and former Annapolis art gallery owner; chair of the Republican women of Anne Arundel PAC, wearing Vicky Tiel red draped jersey dress ($4,140) and crystal chandelier earrings ($244), both NEIMAN MARCUS.

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Summer 2006 fashion has a distinctly nautical inspiration, so WL took a maritime cruise to the historic Maryland capital, Annapolis, where sea-faring is not just a trend, it’s a lifestyle. These super sailors make waves in government, philanthropy, entertainment and at the U.S. Naval Academy. Stirring up the tricky social waters, the navigators are proudly dressed in their all-American red, white and blue best; ships and stripes, ahoy!


Kendel Ehrlich, Wife of Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., First Lady of Maryland, mother of 6year-old Drew and 2-year-old Joshua; active member of the Women’s Heritage Museum Wellness Program, and involved with her husband’s re-election campaign, wearing Pamella Roland white A-strap chiffon gown ($2,200), SAKS JANDEL; Carrera y Carrera 18KW and diamond earrings (Taj Mahal) ($11,000), LILJENQUIST & BECKSTEAD. Introducing Left to Right: ENS Justin Kai Ossola ‘06, Berkeley, Calif., U.S. Navy pilot posted to Pensacola, Fla., flight school. ENS Hayes Magnuson ‘06, Arnold, Md. posted to San Diego, Calif., Surface Warfare. ENS Josh Angichiodo ‘06, North Olmsted, Ohio, posted to Mayport, Fla., for Surface Warfare.

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1. WATCH with Yellow Slicker Daytona gold sport watch by Rolex ($16,900) at LILJENQUIST & BECKSTEAD.

(opposite page) Megan McCarthy, Student at University of Maryland majoring in American Studies; champion equestrian on “A” show circuit; sailor, wearing Cynthia Steffe white on white pinstripe jacket ($330) with Cynthia Steffe white ruffled tank ($175), Tahari white linen pants ($228), and Stuart Weitzman white straw ankle strap wedges ($199), Jose and Maria Barrera gold and white pearls chandelier earrings ($211), long gold chain charm necklace ($412), all NEIMAN MARCUS; signature gold and white sunglasses ($250), RALPH LAUREN. Megan McCarthy on board “SEASCAPE,” Lincolnton, Ga. owned by Robert. J and Diane Agurkis and Mike and Bev Schutt.


Dr. William G. Armiger M.D. F.A.C.S., Philanthropist, yachtsman, and past chief surgeon of Chesapeake Plastic Surgery; presently medical director of Chesapeake Aesthetics and Cenegenics Age Management, wearing classic navy blazer ($995), navy stripe sweater ($495), white linen trousers ($245), ivory bucks ($145), white pocket square ($35), all RALPH LAUREN. Below: yellow foul weather jacket ($1,295) and black barrel overnight bag ($1,695), both RALPH LAUREN. On board Captain Michael Sundquist’s 85-foot Hatteras motor yacht, “DELITE”; Ft. Lauderdale.

Special thanks to Carolyn and Doug Middleton for their gracious sponsorship at the Annapolis Yacht Club and assistance in Annapolis. Produced and styled by Barbara McConaghy; Fashion Assistant and Editorial Credit by Elizabeth Moon; Fashion Intern Leila Wozniak. Photographed by Roy Cox, Studio Manager, Mandy Strong, Photo Assistant, Andy Robinson and Summer Intern, Olesha Haskett. Roy Cox Photography, www.4-optic.com, 410-633-4540. PR At Partners in Old Town, Alexandria for Hair Stylist, Tammey Laws and make-up by Anita Bahramy, Armani Make-up Artist at Saks Fifth Avenue, Chevy Chase. Introducing Eye Mania #2, Fluid Sheer, Luminous SUK Foundation, Sheer Blush, and Lip Shimmers, on all models.


trend report

SUMMER SHORT SHORTS

ETRO - Satin pink shorts with side stich ($420).

ETRO: (left) Light gray short, ($265), (right) charcoal gray shorts (265). ETRO: Peony

multi-patterned jumper long-shorts with suspenders ($1,180).

BEYOND WEEKEND WEAR: Etro (above), Carolina Herrera, Bottega Veneta, Roberto Cavalli and Emanuel Ungaro (Right, top to bottom).

FENDI FLORAL SPY BAG: A woman’s primal instinct to indulge in gorgeous leather handbags is evident when everyone who’s anyone carries the same Fendi Spy status symbol. Coated Crepe de Chine with floral print and striped and woven leather detail ($2,070). Available at select Saks Fifth Avenue locations (877) 551-SAKS

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DISCO FLASH

By M i c h e lle H a n e y

FaShion HEAT Luxe summer looks for a day under the sun or a moonlit night

STEPHEN BURROWS, who dressed Cher and partied with Andy Warhol, was the designer of the decade during the druggy disco days at Studio 54. The first internationally acclaimed African-American name in the fashion industry, Burrows has made a huge comeback in the twenty-first century. He even created a more watered down version of his line for the Home Shopping Network. More sultry, vibrant, and comfortable than ever, a model from his show put it best: “wearing Burrows makes me feel like I am walking into a room naked!”

LOve charity: Declare LOVE for one of eight important causes like Liv Tyler’s Hot Pink commitment to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. (right) LOVE rose gold charity bracelet on a silk cord ($475, with $100 donated to slected charity). Available at Cartier, Chevy Chase, (301) 654-5858 www.cartier.com

MIU MIU: Silver Glitter Peeptoe Jane with natural grosgrain ribbon detail ($385). Available at select

StePHen Burrows & LANVIN Sexy ready-to-wear designs maintain their disco-era appeal. Gucci: Luxury pours from the bell flower of the tiny (yet Blackberrycompatible) ‘Bloom’ bag ($1,595)

Saks Fifth Avenue locations (877) 551-SAKS

CARTIER: In the 1970’s Cartier created a symbolic bracelet that requires closure using a tiny little screw. Cartier Love bracelet in 18k yellow gold and diamonds ($6975) Available at Cartier Boutiques. www.cartier.com (800) CARTIER

Adrienne Landau: Beaded Hollywood glamour Creatures of the garden creep into style in the form of Caplet ($895). Available

sparkling chrystals and precious stones adorning hair, shoes, at Select Saks Fifth Avenue bags, amd bodies with dragonflies and frogs, butterflieslocations, and (877) 551-SAKS beatles. On the six intimate floors of the Tiny Jewel Box, 1147 W A S H I N G TConn. O N L IAve. F E | NW, M ay these 2 0 0 6tiny | washingtonlife.com beasts flutter and leap.

Gucci: Evening Bag in Gold Glitter Patent Leather with GG Detail and Wristlet ($1,195). Available at Gucci, Chevy Chase, (301) 986-8902 www.gucci.com

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W H at ’s H ot

SUMMER Essentials Cock (confident man) +Tail (woman worth chasing) = Cocktail (beverage consumed while men and women meet and mingle) By Sonya Pate & lana Orloff

Cocktails became popular during the time of Prohibition to mask the taste of bootlegged alcohol. The word was first used in 1806 as an “excellent electioneering potion of great use to a democratic candidate: because a person, having swallowed a glass of it, is ready to swallow anything else.” Cocktail rings became popular after World War II, when women wanted to display their wealth with extravagant jewelry.

Tequila Sunrise: Ingredients: 2 oz. Patrón Reposado 4 oz. freshly squeezed orange juice 2 dashes grenadine syrup (choose one made from pomegranates)

Cartier Le Baiser du Dragon Cartier Le Baiser du Dragon Ring in 18K White Gold, Diamonds and Black Jade ($12,500) Available at Cariter Boutiques. For further information, please visit www. cartier.com or call (800) CARTIER.

Fancy Yellow Diamond 5-carat fancy yellow diamond ring in a platinumm micro-pavé daimond setting. Price Upon Request Available at Boone & Sons Jewlers, 5550 The Hills Plaza, Chevy Chase (202) 785-4653 PATRóN REPOSADO Excellent as a sipping tequila or as a key ingredient in a summer cocktail, Patrón is produced by a small family owned and operated distillery high in the mountains of Jalisco, Mexico. Reposado is aged in oak barrels for an average of six months.

Reposado Pacifico: 1 1/2 oz. Patron Reposado Juice of one lime (approx 1 oz.) 1 oz. passion fruit puree



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Spiral Ring Piero Milano “spiral ring” in white gold. Diamond weight is 0.80 carats ($1,890) Available at Mervis, 1900 Mervis Way Tysons Corner

Citrine and Diamond ring Gilan citrine and diamond ring ($8,000) Available at Gilan Jewelry, 743 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY (212) 743-4950

Absolut ruby red R&R: 2 part ABSOLUT RUBY RED Pink Grapefruit (peeled & sliced) 2 tsp. Sugar

“I like to have a martini, Two at the very most. After three I’m under the table, After four I’m under the Host.” –Dorothy Parker

Soho Sunset: 1 oz. Martin Millers Gin 1 oz. white peach liquer 1 oz. orange juice 1 oz. cranberry juice Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange wedge.

Lavender Star Sapphire This beautiful one-of-a-kind 1950s lavender Star Sapphire and Diamond cocktail ring is a true testament to the glamour of the era ($16,000) Available at Tiny Jewel Box, 1147 Connecticut Ave., NW. www.tinyjewelbox.com

Violent Violet Martini: (Shake 2 oz. Belvedere Vodka 1/2 oz. Cointreau 1/2 oz. Grand Marnier A dash violet liqueur A dash cranberry juice and a drop of fresh lime with ice. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with an edible flower.

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BACK? Rediscovering the food, music, art and culture of New Orleans

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Beignets, done that

by Michael Clements

Is the “Big Easy” back? It’s a question travelers to New Orleans will be asking for some time. Memories of floodwaters and scenes of survival linger like the high-water marks, which stain the region’s estimated 276,000 abandoned homes.Yes, the devastation is real; yes, it is tragic.Yet, through its music, food, and rich cultural heritage, the Crescent City is slowly regaining its mojo. When the tourists come marching back My driver “Brother Rolls” got his name because, as he asserts, “he can roll with anyone” – lately, that’s included rolling with adversity. At 62, he is trying to put the pieces of his life back post-Katrina. His ten children and extended family of 36 are either living in FEMA-supplied trailers, or have been displaced across the South from Texas to Atlanta. Brother Rolls tells of wading in murky chest-deep waters as he struggled to evacuate his home, but as we pass the Superdome, his voice strikes an optimistic 58

note. Below the dozen or so men repairing the stadium’s roof hangs a massive banner: “Coming Soon,” it proclaims, “September 24, 2006 New Orleans Saints vs. Atlanta Falcons.” “The Saints are coming back,” he says, “and we got a new quarterback, and that Reggie Bush, he’s gonna be great.” Football is back, 20,000 of the city’s 25,000 hotel rooms are full (there were 80,000 rooms before the storm), and tourists are again flocking to the French Quarter and Garden District ... there is life at the mouth of the Mississippi.

Eating entirely too much is a time-honored New Orleans tradition. Within an hour of being dropped at Marriott’s Renaissance Arts Hotel in the middle of the Warehouse/Arts District on 700 Tchoupitoulas Street, I’m standing in a line outside the famed Poydras Street institution, Mother’s.The red brick walls of the soul food restaurant’s unassuming exterior are covered with “Help Wanted” signs: busboys, waiters, cooks, etc. Like Mother’s, the city of “NOLA��� seems be getting back on its feet. The oyster po’ boy and jambalaya, both rich and filling are well worth the wait. Cafe Du Monde on Jefferson Park at Decatur Street is the perfect spot for a cup of iced Cafe’ au lait and a beignet to get the blood flowing before a humid stroll through the French Quarter. Canal Street was flooded after Katrina, but the Central Business District, downtown and French Quarter are back. Bourbon Street is still one step away from resembling spring break in Daytona. The Quarter’s eclectic boutiques are stocked with fashion, and the art galleries remain tucked away between the 18th

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(1) Night descends on Bourbon Street. (2) The theme for Jazz Fest this year was “rebirth.” (3) Quintessential French Quarter alley. (4) Secondline parade at Jazz Festival. (5) Commander’s Palace Jazz Brunch. (6) Beignets and Cafe’ au lait – a Big Easy tradition. (7) Iron awnings await in the French Quarter.

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and 19th century Spanish and French-influenced balconied three-story buildings.At night, the rhythms of zydeco and blues continue to mix with the sounds of revelers partying until dawn.

business to open up in downtown since Katrina. Another New Orleans staple, Jacques-Imo’s (8324 Oak St.) is back as well – and getting a table is as difficult as ever.

Where for art thou...

Heart of New Orleans

Along with food, drink and music, art is the fourth pillar of Crescent City culture. Exploring the Quarter and up-and-coming Warehouse/Arts District holds the promise of discovering a vibrant, unknown artist. Located west of Canal Street, the district is the future of the New Orleans creative scene. The neighborhood is now home to stylish and trendy loft apartments and a number of galleries, including The Ogden Museum of Southern Art (925 Camp St.); Ariodante (535 Julia St.); Arthur Roger Gallery (432 Julia St.), and Steve Martin Studio (624 Julia St.).

It’s Sunday 11 a.m. and I’m on the corner of what used to be Derbigny and Deslande in the 9th Ward. The road dead-ends at a cream-colored 20-foot high cement levee, which is being built to protect the neighborhood from another devastating flood. To think that the number of homes destroyed in Louisiana and Mississippi is nearly equal to the total amount of homes in the D.C. area is sobering. The houses (that are still standing) have been stripped of all dry wall and contents, leaving them to stand as mere shells of their former selves. Driving through these ghost neighborhoods, I wonder if the city, like the endless stretch of empty houses passing before me, can ever be rebuilt? By 2 p.m. of the same day, any doubts I have about New Orleans losing its spirit are stripped away as I wander through the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival’s ten stages of blues, jazz, zydeco, salsa, gospel, bluegrass and folk music. Resurrecting the soul of the Big Easy was the theme of this year’s Fest. With each note of music, the soul heals a little bit more.There is a spirit in New Orleans that refuses to go quietly, if at all. The resilience is exemplified by legendary blues musician Fats Domino, who was scheduled to end this year’s festival on its penultimate Sunday. Unfortunately, Domino fell ill on his way to the festival. But on his trip to the hospital, he dutifully stopped by the main stage and thanked everyone for coming. New Orleans, like its native son, might be hurting, but it is not down. Both are on their way to recovery and thoughtful enough to thank those who still believe in this city’s unique place in the American experience.

Creole Cuisine

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Dinner at LaCote Brassiere in the Renaissance Arts Hotel brings a promise of (even more) food as well as a visit by chef Chuck Subra Jr. – a Louisiana native, who mixes the French influences from Aux Saint Loraine with Creole favorites. His wasabi crusted quail served over baby bok choy and Japanese eggplant ($23) is a perfect example. Down the block at Emeril’s on the corner of Julia and Tchoupitoulas, the Food Network’s biggest star, Emeril Lagasse, is hard at work in one of his two New Orleans restaurants. For a more traditional French-inspired upscale dining experience, Restaurant August (301 Tchoupitoulas St.) is always a safe bet. Other musttrys are Brennan’s (417 Royal St.), Commander’s Palace (1403 Washington Ave.) and K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen (416 Chartres St.). Back on Canal Street over a seriously tender filet mignon and fresh lobster tail, Shula’s Restaurant President Dave Shula is explaining the merits of corn-fed beef as well as the fact that Shula’s is the first new

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D i p l o m a t i c

Dutch on the Delta Louisiana looks to The Netherlands to fortify its levee system post-Katrina

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(1) The Maeslant barrier near Rotterdam is almost as long as the Eiffel tower and weighs about four times as much. It is the only storm surge barrier in the world with such large moveable parts. (2) The Ambassador (far right) and Senator Mary Landrieu (in brown jacket facing the camera) with New Orleans homeowners on a hurricane damaged street.

B y D u t c h A m b a s s a d o r A m b a s s a d o r B o u d e w i j n va n E e n e n n a a m

When Senator Mary Landrieu and I crossed paths just after Hurricane Katrina hit the U.S. Gulf Coast, we talked about how the Netherlands endured a similar flood in 1953, and subsequently emerged stronger and better-protected against flooding. Some two-thirds of the Netherlands – like much of southern Louisiana – sits at or below sea-level, and thus the two regions have longcooperated on flood control issues. Sending Dutch pumps and engineers to remove flood water from New Orleans last September was simply returning the favor that Louisiana granted Netherlands after our 1953 flood. However, it was also derived from a desire to see if and how my country’s world-class water management expertise could help New Orleans, and the U.S. Gulf Coast, return to prosperity.      I was privileged enough to tour New Orleans in late November with Senator Mary Landrieu, a number of local officials, and senior officials from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  What I saw overwhelmed me – unimaginable devastation, the emptiness of previously thriving communities, a loss of hope and a looming sense

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of despair. But when I pressed a bit further, dug a bit deeper, I saw an inherent pride in many of the officials and residents who had returned or were planning to return.  That pride and resiliency, the love people have for their Crescent City, leaves me with no doubt that New Orleans and the Gulf Coast will be rebuilt, and emerge even more dynamic than before.     Dutch public and private sector officials travel regularly to New Orleans and Baton Rouge, and are always received with the warmest welcome possible. Indeed, in early May the Dutch Foreign Trade Minister visited Louisiana, and met with the Governor, numerous state and local officials, and many leading water policy experts. By chance, she was also in the Louisiana State House and Senate, and was overwhelmed by the reception she received there. She told the legislators that

one image indelibly etched into the collective memory of the Netherlands, is that of the U.S. Army helicopters rescuing survivors from their rooftops during the country’s 1953 floods. In 1953, the U.S. helped an old friend in Europe, and in 2005, the Netherlands helped an old friend in Louisiana.   We in the Netherlands produce much of our wealth in low-lying areas, and thus, protecting ourselves and our economy is not a choice, but an obligation. So, too, with the Gulf Coast. The question is no longer whether to rebuild, but how to do it wisely.  My country has adopted an integrated approach to water management; one that incorporates a deep respect for Mother Nature, while also encouraging government to maximize the synergy between land-use, economic, environmental and other important goals.  We have made some mistakes in our water policy, but we have also learned to innovate and adapt with new technology and methods.  It is my hope that decision-makers in New Orleans and Louisiana will learn from these mistakes.  And it is my firm belief that New Orleans – whose lively culture is derived from the assimilation of so many influences – may even begin to acquire a little bit of Dutch “flavor” as it rebuilds itself into one of the world’s great cities.  

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t h i s m o n t h : LI G HT YE A R S A HE A D / F IN A LLY F R I DA /A T R I B U TE W ELL D E S E R V E D / D I V INE MOMENT

with donna shor

Around Town Ä

Cherie Roberts and Leonade Jones at the Washington Area Women’s Foundation’s fourth Philanthropy Forum, held May 17 at The Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, where Fannie Mae President and CEO Stacy D. Stewart was honored with the foundation’s entrepreneurial philanthropy award.

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Global Rights Executive Director Gay McDougall, pictured with Global Rights Board Chair James Fitzpatrick, was honored on April 25 by the organization for her 12 years of leadership at the Textile Museum.

By Appointment Only

Mary Ourisman, caught off guard at the Opera Ball by all the congratulations at rumors of her pending ambassadorial appointment, was still explaining the next day at the NRH Polo Classic at The Plains that, “It hasn’t happened until it happens.”

with150 diplomats and staff it will be her job to oversee. Mary can do it. Blonde, beautiful and looking as if she doesn’t need to manage anything more challenging than a cream puff, Mary has repeatedly shown her administrative ability on all the projects she has headed since coming to Washington.

Now the Ourismans are off to the State Department’s protocol school; think training wheels for future ambassadors and their mates. The appointment, doubtless official by the time you read this, will be to Barbados, the acting administrative center of a whole archipelago, including St. Kitts and Nevis,

The Land Rover-sponsored polo match, the National Rehabilitation Hospital’s benefit under the patronage of Argentine Ambassador Jose Borden and his wife Monique, was attended by several ambassadors, including Portugal’s Pedro Catarino and wife Cheryl, who support so many Washington charities.

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Committee onlookers included former Rep. James and Sylvia Symington; Tandy Dickerson, there with husband Wyatt; Barbara McConaghy; Jamie Bowersox; Finlay and Willee Lewis; Gen. Lawrence and Patricia Skantze; Annie Totah; and from the NRH board of directors, Candy Somerville, with husband Jack, and the board’s treasurer, Robert Ourisman.

award-winning players. Their parents, the Stephen Seagers, own the handsome estate Chetwood Park, the scene of the match, where they raise Black Angus cattle and polo ponies. Dr. Seager, who emceed the event, directs the NRH Fertility Research Program, and is an internationally-known pioneer in the field of fertility for men with spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders.

Team Argentine won against the U.S.A, with a female rider on both teams: Maria Fenoglio for Argentina, Fiona Seager for the Americans. Fiona and her brother Adair, who also rode, are both

Nini Ferguson and Carole Randolph chaired the polo match-auction-and-tango party combo, which drew as its honorary chair man an Oscar-winning neighbor, polo and tango enthusiast

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Ann Kenkel helped Carolyn Boutte celebrate her birthday during a surprise party held May 15 at Boutte’s Watergate apartment.

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Lizette Corro and Miguel Corro were also in attendance

~ Kay Unger, who was honored at Marymount University’s Portfolio in Motion fashion show as designer of the year, with Lola Reinsch Pierce, CEO of E.G. Reinsch Companies and Marymount University Board of Trustees member. }

Allen Wolfe models a design by Marymount student LeeAnn Johnson.

Robert Duvall, with his Argentineborn wife Luciana Pedraza. One couple who did not pass unnoticed were magazine-coverchic Timothy and PJ Trudeau, he in a polo-perfect white suit, and PJ clad head-to-toe in black and white Chanel, (even to her sunglasses), and a swooping, sculptured black straw topper. With them were Larry and Pat Skantze — she of the hundred hats — whose cartwheel white straw swooped even wider than PJ’s. PRELUDES TO THE BALL

The embassy dinners preceding the grand Washington balls are

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a large part of the evening’s fun, with everyone comparing notes on menus and table companions once the 10 p.m. ball site is reached. Here’s a sampling from the Opera Ball: at the Liechtenstein embassy, Brad Stoddard was pleased to find that his table partner was Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg; at the Portuguese embassy, the Giorgio Vias were charmed by beautifully served fish in a pastry basket, followed by quail in red wine; newlyweds Gerhard and Monique Mally, both Vienneseborn, were delighted that their invitation, a kind of homecoming, was to the Embassy of Austria.

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Admired at Villa Firenze, scene of the ball: the star-studded, gauzy tent; the clever maroon-feathered shoulder epaulettes — detachable when she danced — on the gown of Lila Castellaneta, host of the evening with her husband, Italian Ambassador Giovanni Castellaneta; 2,000 magnificent roses massed in huge silver bowls; all presided over by smashingly successful chairman—$16 million in her 7-year span — Betty Knight Scripps, in bright red Scaasi with lotsa, lotsa diamonds. CAREFREE AT THE CARE BALL:

Singapore Ambassador Heng-Chee Chan, whose embassy was one of

the 40 that gave pre-ball dinners for CARE, got her guests off to a break-the-ice start by asking a fun question and going around the table to get everyone’s answer. CARE’s 60th Anniversary was celebrated at the OAS, where the Radio King Orchestra kept the crowd flocking to the dance floor. Seen: Sheila Johnson, owner of the Washington Mystics, serving as a CARE “Ambassador” spokesperson; Sen. Pat Roberts; Debby and Rep. John Dingell; Mickey Nedelkovich; Nicole d’Amecourt; Andre Willieme; and among the ambassadors present, Sorin Ducaru of Romania and his wife Carmen, two of the liveliest dancers.

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Friends of Carol Lascaris gathered in the Senate Dining Room to celebrate her birthday on May 10. Seated from left: Co-host Frances Luessenhop, Julie Connors, Carol Lascaris and co-host Grace Nelson; Standing from left: Nancy Stevenson, Jamie McCampbell, Penny Durenberger, co-h0st Judy Esfandiary, Lynda Webster, Karna Bodman and Marcia Carlucci.

| Colombian Ambassador AndrÈs Pastrana and his wife Nohra Pastrana, with daughter Valentina, at the surprise dinner they threw for two dozen friends at their Dupont Circle residence in honor of Nohra’s birthday.

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Tom Wolfe and National Endowment for the Humanities Chairman Bruce Cole at the Warner Theatre, where Wolfe gave the 2006 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities on May 10.

Nicole’s mother, the very active Gertie d’Amecourt, grande dame and patron of the arts, was recently given a 96th birthday party by another grande dame, Lolo Sarnoff, also an arts patron, who has done much to enrich life for D.C.’s elderly through her Arts for the Aging program. More than two hundred of their very best friends showed up for the birthday girl’s evening. THE GILDED GATHERINGS

Along with the Opera Ball, two other events, though very different, are also super-charged A-List happenings, and also have guests flying in from near and far. These are the State Department Diplomatic Reception Rooms, and the glamorous Mosaic Foundation dinner, headed this year by Queen 96

Rania of Jordan, which you have seen covered in these pages. At the State Department, the annual reception honoring donors to the art-and-antique-filled rooms is always notable, as are the guests who come each year to check out the latest beautiful American furnishings or decorative art of the 17th and 18th century given to beautify the topfloor suite. Many of the large givers attending have donated items or funds for years, such as Brad and Denise Alexander, and his mother Sandra Alexander, of Toledo, Ohio, and Palm Beach; Esther Coopersmith; Monica and Herman Greenberg; Leonard and Elaine Silverstein; and the William Tolds, who arrived from Palm Beach for the event. Colin

Powell remains another generous giver.He especially enjoyed these rooms when he was in charge; it is now Condoleeza Rice who welcomes and addresses the crowd. Other long-timers there were Bill and Buffy Cafritz, Jane Lingo and John Irelan, and Roberta McCain. The Daniel Sheppards, who were there from Lutherville Md., gave a magnificent silk damask sofa from the turn of the 18th century — one more handsome adornment for rooms that in 1961 were brown-walled and concrete-floored, with office-type carpeting, and which now proudly receive foreign heads of state. If you have an upcoming event Around Town should know about, send advance word to Donnashor@aol.com. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Hilary Duff performs at the National Children’s Museums’ third annual Kids’ Extravalooza, held June 10 at the museum’s future site at L’Enfant Plaza.

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o f t h e pa r t y

Party On the Potomac June 2nd • The Cherry Blossom Riverboat Photos by Rachel Smith

The Event: A fundraiser for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Man of the Year Award hosted by Josh Thomas. The Scene: The mini-cruisers bon voyaged in Old Town Alexandria before sailing down the Potomac to enjoy stunning views of the city’s landmarks and monuments. The young and beautiful rubbed elbows and more on the warm and crowded roof deck, nibbled jerk chicken and listened to a live steel drum band. The fourhour open bar served up frozen margaritas and strawberry daiquiris that complemented the ladies’ bright printed sundresses and the pastel jackets and shirts of the gentlemen. The Guests: Ray Regan, Will Trohanis, George Vincent, Lizanna Garrett and Brody McMurty.

Quentin Ward, Kate Stilwill and Josh Thomas

Julie Zielonick and Eva Jurkuvics

DJ Todd

Heather Guay Courtaney White, Pamela Watson and Gillian Market

Brody McMurtry, Christiana Gallagher, Eva Jurkuvics, Davey Young and Chris Jackson

The Cherry Blossom Riverboat

Sam Somack and Matt Gunther

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Georgia Gerstim and Alexandria Slowinska

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Lizanna Gounett and Joe Reger

Pat Judge, Adam Stifel, Justin Magazine and Trennis Jones

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Isabel Ernst’s Birthday Party May 12th • Jordanian Residence Photos by Kyle Samperton

The Event: Jordanian Amb. Karim and wife Luma Kawar hosted a birthday party for close friend Isabel Ernst at their residence in Mclean. The Scene: After a sumptuous Middle Eastern dinner, 40 guests re-located to the private salon and revealed some hidden vocal talents during Karaoke. Latin and Arabic beats kept guests moving until 1 in the morning. The Guests: A dozen ambassadors, their spouses and friends. Amb. of Morroco Aziz Mekouar, Amb. of Argentina Jose Octavio Bordon and Mr. and Mrs. Michael Sonnenreich.

Pascaline Steiner, Mariella Trager and Mary Ourisman

Luma Kawar, Isabel Ernst and Amb. Karim Kawar

Sedi Flugelman and Mariella Trager

Amb. Jose Octavio Bordon and Pamela Aparicio

Isabel Ernst with “the boys”

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Lila Castellaneta, Willee Lewis, John Mason, Prince Idris Abdallah Al-Senussi and Ricardo Ernst

Corrine Bensahel

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Jordanian Amb. Karim Kawar’s 40th Birthday Party June 3rd • Hillandale Mansion, Georgetown Photos by Kyle Samperton

The Event: Isabel and Ricardo Ernst and A. Huda and Samia Forouki returned a favor by hosting an elaborate 40th birthday party for friend Karim Kawar. The Scene: 200 guests made an extra effort to look extra spiffy, especially Karim, who lost 40 lbs. for the big day. Marvin Hamlisch composed a birthday song incorporating the party’s theme, “spiffy and sporty and finally turning forty.” Guests stayed until 2 a.m., sipping blue drinks on the lawn and dancing to a DJ, who, along with the dance floor, was imported from New York, while the live band hailed from Mexico. The Guests: Chief of Protocol Donald Ensenat, Sen. John Sununu, Wolf Blitzer, George Tennent, and Prince Turki al-Faisal.

Anthony Lanier, Isabel Ernst, Davis and Lynda Camalier

Kitty and Sen. John Sununu

Amb. Boudewijn and Jellie van Eenennaam

Ian Boyer and George Tennent

Marie-Therese Lowell, Amb. John Lowell and Reem Halason-Masri

Wilma Bernstein, Amb. Stuart Bernstein and Anita McBride

Lynn Blitzer, Luma Kawar and Wolf Blitzer

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HRH Princess Nouf Bint Fahad and Maria Felice Mekouar

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Maria Abdenur and Jane Cafritz

Amb. Karim and Luma Kawar

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National Museum of Women in the Arts Spring Gala April 28th National Museum of Women in the Arts Photos by Kyle Samperton

The Event: The museum’s annual black-tie gala and a private viewing of “Divine and Human: Women in Ancient Mexio and Peru,” a rare collection of 400 archaeological treasures featuring women from the Aztec, Mayan, Zapotec, Moche, Mixtec and Inca tribes. The Scene: Designer dresses and cocktails for 400 in the museum located steps away from the White House. The Guests: Wilhelmina Holladay, Nancy Stevenson, Carol Matthews, Caroline Boutté, Darcy Honker, Veronica Ferrero and Susan Fisher Sterling.

Devieka Bhojwani , Chanel Suoz and Sunita Kohli

Shigeko Bork

Tom Rossi and Debbie Sigmund

Mexican Amb. Carlos de Icaza and Luisa de Icaza

Jill Martin, Charlotte Buxton and Darcy Honker

Cindy and Evan Jones with Arturo and Hilda Brillembourg

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Ahmad and Judy Esfandiary

Peruvian Amb. Eduardo Ferrero and Veronica Ferrero

Martha Buchanan and Mary Mochary

Heather and Tony Podesta and Susan Fisher Sterling

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Strathmore Spring Gala with Lily Tomlin April 29th • Music Center at Strathmore Photos Courtesy of Margot i. schulman

The Event: Hugh Panero, president and CEO of XM Satellite Radio, and his wife Mary Beth Durkin hosted Strathmore’s signature fundraising event. Proceeds from the gala support the center’s arts education and programming. The Scene: After cocktails and dinner, guests took in an Evening of Classic Lily Tomlin, in which the comedienne brought to life more than a dozen of her famous characters – from aging beauty advisor Madame Lupe to schizophrenic street lady Trudy. The Guests: Annie Totah, Carole Randolph, best-selling author Deborah Tannen and husband Michael Macovski, Rep. Ben Cardin, Prince Reza and Princess Yasmine Pahlavi.

H.I.H. Princess Yasmine Pahlavi, H.I.H Prince Reza Pahlavi, Lily Tomlin and AnnieTotah

Hugh Panero, president and CEO of XM radio and Mary Beth Durkin, Gala co-chairs

Lily Tomlin

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Gore Dean First Anniversary Party May 18th • Gore Dean Antiques Photos by jonah Koch

The Event: Deborah Gore Dean celebrated the first anniversary of her Georgetown store, Gore Dean Antiques, by showcasing “Life is But a Dream,” a whimsical exhibition of local painter Abigail Adams Greenway’s latest works. The Scene: The eclectic crowd of artists and socialites was entertained by a troupe of elaborately garbed African stilt dancers and bongo drummers while enjoying non-stop Veuve Cliquot and Design Cuisine hors d’oeuvres The Guests: Designers Thomas Pheasant, Barry Dixon and Frank Randolph; Cady’s Alley developer Anthony Lanier, Carmen Petrowitz, Diana McLellan, Nina Straight, Gail Percy, Tim Dickinson and Sarah Tanguy.

Tara Eddy, Britton and Darienn Gore

Barry Dixon and Deborah Gore Dean

Andre Willieme, Nicole d’Amecourt and Ed Emes

Dan Oelke and Kenneth Rascher

Deborah Gore Dean and stilt walker

Gore Dean store in Cady’s Alley

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Fabiola Martens and Rudy Djabbarzadeh

Timothy Dickinson

Abigail Adams Greenway, Evan Everhart and Lilly Greenway

Shirin Sheybani and Kristen Peterson

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“An Inconvenient Truth” May 17th • National Geographic Society Photos by janie windon

The Event: The East Coast premiere of Al Gore’s feature length multimedia slide show assembled by and starring himself. With the help of director Davis Guggenheim, the film presents the latest scientific evidence of carbon dioxide leading to global warming and catastrophic sea level rises. The Scene: The premiere seemed as much a political homecoming as it was an opportunity for Gore’s Washington buddies to view his signature work. Applause was heavy throughout the film, and Gore continued to receive praise over a glass (or two) of red wine at the post-film cocktail party. The Guests: Recording Artist Moby, producer Lawrence Bender, Tipper Gore, Lynda Carter, Democratic Sens. Harry Reid and Christopher Dodd, Valerie Plame and Queen Noor.

Sen. Frank Lautenberg

Sen. Harry Reid

Al and Tipper Gore

Lynda Carter

Davis Guggenheim

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Moby

Queen Noor

Joe Wilson and Valerie Plame

Lawrence Bender

Sen. Tom Harkin

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Friends of the Earth April 28th • Center for International Environmental Law Photos by immanuel Jayachandran

The Event: Friends of the Earth and The Center for International Environmental Law hosted a reception honoring the six recipients of the 2006 Goldman Prizes, which are awarded for sustained and important efforts to preserve the natural environment. The WINNERS: American Craig Williams, Yu Xiaogang of China, Silas Kpanan’Ayoung Siakor of Liberia, Tarcísio Feitosa Da Silva of Brazil, Olya Melen of Ukraine and Anne Kajir of Papua New Guinea were honored for their efforts to halt blatant violations of international agreements and illegal logging. The Guests: Edith Brown Weiss, Daniel Magraw, Jr., author Evagelos Vallianatos, Dana Wong and Paola Geangeli.

Chris Pabon and Lani Alo Jackie Siakor and Silas Siakor

Sarah Cristina and Tarcisio Feitosa da Silva

Olya Melen and Brent Blackwelder

Daniel Magraw, Paola de Angeli and Dana Wong

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THE Helen Hayes Awards April 17th • The Warner Theatre Photos by Celeste James

The Event: The Helen Hayes Awards, honoring excellence in professional theater. The Scene: The 22nd annual event boasted a sold-out crowd of 2,000 practicing thespians, directors, producers and backstage types. Broadway star and host Brad Oscar kicked the festivities up a few notches with music, dancing and silly but spectacular parodies of nominated musicals with the help of sidekicks Vanessa Vaughn and Kristi Ambrosetti. The celebration continued at the J.W. Marriott with The Ovation Gala, Washington’s largest cast party. The Guests: Canadian Ambassador Michael Wilson, Dr. Tina Alster, Hayes Awards nominee Montego Glover and family, Arlene Kogod, musical director George Fulginiti-Shakar.

Helen Hayes Award nominee Montego Glover and family

Washington Post President Stephen Hills and wife Jocelyn

Meg Gillentine, Brad Oscar and Diego Prieto

Bobby Ourisman, Deborah Middlesworth, Stu Fain and Michele Graves

Canadian Ambassador Michael Wilson flanked by Glen Howard, Tina Alster, Terry Colli, and Kurt Crowl and Robyn Redfield WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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The St. John’s Community Services Spring Party May 9th • Brazilian Ambassadors’ Residence Photos by janie windon

The Event: A spring cocktail party at the Brazilian Ambassador’s residence for The Founders Board of St. John’s Community Services, the oldest children’s charity in Washington. The Scene: Madrigal singers from St. Albans School and National Cathedral School performed under the direction of Ben Hutto, the organist at St. John’s Church. The Guests: Maria Izabel Abdenur wife of Brazilian ambassador, President of the Founders Board Ellen O’Bannon, Merrielou Symes, Susan A. Hamberger, Nancy Hellmuth, Carol B. Sommerville, Angie Leith, Anne Baldwin, benefit co-chairs Gigi Rasmussen and Marjorie Miller, Ambassador Catarino of Portugal and his wife Cheryl.

Ellie Grassi, Marjorie Miller and Ellen O’Bannon Mary and Ed Bartlett

Maria Elena Fisher and Larry Fisher

Leonard Bickwit Jr., Susan Colby and Michael Miller

Robin Stiner, Carter Cafritz, Dev Phelps and Lisa Cafritz

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sponsored

Quartet Under the Stars May 25th • Kennedy Center Photos by immanuel jayachandran

The Event: Young patrons of the National Symphony Orchestra hosted an outdoor evening concert on the Kennedy Center’s Roof to meet, greet and treat current and potential members. The Scene: Guests listened to viola, violin and cello music played by D.C. Youth Fellows on the outdoor terrace. Hors d’oeuvres and cocktails circulated during this sunset reception overlooking the Washington skyline and $5,000 was raised for the cause. The after party was at Spank nightclub. The Guests: Alex Robart, Skip Yeats, Arianne Gregory, Erik Gaull, Lauren Drayer and Kris Hammod.

Alex Robart, Torrey Shallcross and Lauren Force Arianne Gregory and Lori Trautwine

David and Kaori Inoue and Erik Gaull

Stacey Hinton and Yogi Hehra

Christian Moritz, Lauren Drayer, Kristin Knoblach and Kris Hammod WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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inside homes

Scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, Dr. William Haseltine hardly seems the type of homeowner who spends time fussing over paint colors and furnishings. But, on a recent tour of his remodeled 1870s Georgetown house, this leader in genetic research makes it clear that he has done all the decorating himself.

House Call Human Genome Doctor William Haseltine opens his Georgetown Doors by Deborah K. Dietsch

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enjoy it,” Haseltine says, pointing out the subtle blend of pink, golden and cream tones in his high-ceilinged, front parlor. “It’s relaxing for me. I’ve tried to make the home a warm and calming place.” At the forefront of research into the genome, the sum total of an organism’s genetic material, the Harvard Ph.D. has a distinctive record of achievement in both cancer and AIDS research. Over his career, he has founded numerous biotechnical companies, including Rockville, Md.based Human Genome Sciences, Inc., serving as its CEO from 1993 to 2004. Currently, the scientist-businessman is chairman of Haseltine Global Health LLC and president of the Haseltine Foundation for Medical Sciences and the Arts. “Both organizations are aimed at enabling some of the world’s poorest people to receive new medical treatment that most of us in developed countries take for granted,” he explains.

scientist colleagues and politicians in small, informal parties. “It’s a home open to both Republicans and Democrats,” the self-described “Independent” says with a smile. “I use it as a salon where people can come together and exchange ideas.” In the formal living and sitting rooms at the front of the house, velvet-upholstered club chairs and sofas are grouped around glass-topped coffee tables to provide cozy places for conversation. Finishes and fabrics in pale peach, yellow and neutral shades are intentionally skin-flattering and subdued. “I love subtle color,” says Haseltine, glancing at the butterand-cream-glazed living room walls. Inspiration for his palette, he explains, came from visiting the Amber Palace in Jaipur, India. Dinner parties are held in the dining room, where a round mahogany table with peripheral leaves can be expanded to seat 16 and still allow for “one conversation with many people,” notes Haseltine. On the walls of the long room, leafgreen paint was substituted for the silk damask coverings installed by the previous owners to add life-affirming vibrancy reminiscent of nature. During warmer weather, guests move outdoors

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“Elegantly restrained, the décor inside the home could have ended up looking like any other traditional Georgetown mansion. Haseltine, however, took it up a notch by filling the rooms with rare treasures picked up during his frequent travels to Asia, Africa and Europe.” His Italianate-style brick home, with its threestories of art-filled rooms, provides a retreat from a hectic schedule of activities on numerous boards, think tanks and international organizations. Part museum, part salon, it continues to serve as a laboratory for aesthetic experiments. Haseltine purchased the corner-lot property 13 years ago, soon after founding Human Genome Sciences, Inc., and slowly began renovating. “The interiors had been over-decorated,” he says. “The first thing I did was take out the carpets and chandeliers. The theme was to simplify and make it more comfortable.” The 61-year-old bachelor shares the sixbedroom home with younger brother Eric and often hosts family gatherings that include his two grown children, Mara and Alexander, and sister Florence. He also frequently entertains friends,

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to a large brick patio at the side of the property bordered by magnolias and evergreens. At one end, a raised flagstone terrace with a table used for informal entertaining overlooks a swimming pool tucked into the patio corner. Haseltine, who swims nearly every day, had the heated, 42-foot-long pool built with a gurgling fountain shaped like a frog. Other improvements include an exercise room and wine cellar in the basement, and an apartment for a live-in handyman. Elegantly restrained, the décor inside the home could have ended up looking like any other traditional Georgetown mansion. Haseltine, however, took it up a notch by filling the rooms with rare treasures picked up during his frequent travels to Asia, Africa and Europe. The juxtapositions of these ancient and modern objects against the historic architecture make for interesting

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4 Title page: Even Dr. Haseltine’s poolside reflects his eclectic taste. (1) A poolside statue purchased in Bali. (2) The original staircase in the center hall dates back to the 1870’s. (3) Leaded windows frame the second floor study. (4) Colorful pillows, throws, and a rug from India enliven the tv room. (5) A Balinese stone Madonna sits in a corner of the garden. (6) An ancient mosaic wall mural and chinese horse accent the comfortably furnished living room.

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1 (1) The Georgetown house is entered through a decorative wrought-iron front gate. (2) In the center of the dining room a round mahogany table can be extended with peripheral leaves to seat sixteen. (3) Dr. William Haseltine poses next to his portrait by New York artist Eric Fischl (4) The secondfloor study incorporates built-in bookshelves for Haseltine’s extensive library.

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visual and cultural contrasts -- and plenty of conversation pieces for guests. “The house represents my interest in human culture from all over the world, from ancient to modern times,” says Haseltine. “It reflects my curiosity of mind.” A walk through the home confirms his eclectic approach to collecting. Beckoning from the reaches of nearly every room are serene Chinese Buddhas, gesturing Indian goddesses and heroic Hellenistic statuary, testifying to the scientist’s humanistic, multi-cultural outlook. In the dining room, an ancient Byzantine mosaic extends over an antique Biedermeier sideboard set with Chinese jewelry and Moghul Indian candlesticks. At the center of the room, the circular table is arranged with colorfully patterned ceramic plates from Morocco, each one a different design. Brightening up the sitting room fireplace mantel is a scarlet fragment of a Pompeian fresco from about 79 AD. Nearby, a classical Greek marble torso rests on a table opposite from a wooden Ming goddess from China. Across the hall in the living room, “Man Sinking,” a painting by British painter Francis Bacon, flanks a Chinese wooden horse and camel carved around 600 AD. Visible on the terrace outside the windows are painted wooden figures from Orissa, India. At the back of the garden, a large sculpture, coated in glossy automotive paint, was created by daughter Mara, an up-and-coming New York artist. Its shape, based on a protein-producing sub cellular structure called a ribosome, pays homage to her father’s groundbreaking work. A voracious reader, Haseltine maintains two libraries on the second floor of his home. One resembles a Tudor-style study hall with leaded glass windows, wood paneling and wing chairs arranged around a fireplace. The other, used as an office, was remodeled by the scientist with cherry book shelves placed around the periphery. Behind the customdesigned, wrap-around desk, a plant-filled terrarium sprouts orchids and other exotic species. “It’s nice to work in a garden all year round,” he says. Inspiration comes from a Chinese drawing of a contemplative scholar and a carved Indian Shiva. Over the fireplace next to his desk, a framed blackand-white image shows two different cell types of the immune system key to the transmission of the AIDS virus. It is a picture that Haseltine says reminds him of his continuing commitment to fighting disease and extending human life.


DESIGN

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Patio perfection Get outside and sunbathe in style! 2

G R E AT F U R N I T U R E FO R E X T E R I O R D E S I G N

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1. Wogg pavilion by Design Within Reach ($1,900), (202) 265-5640, www.dwr.com. 2. Lolah daybed by MulĂŠh ($8,820), (202) 667-3440, www.muleh.com. 3. New Zealand chaise longue ($2,945) and Bahamas sofa by Artefacto ( $8,813), (202) 338-3337, www.artefacto.com.



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THE DISTRICT • MARYLAND • VIRGINIA The District David Goodhand and Vincent Griski have basked in the glory of Camelot. Beneath the glow of the chandeliers in their double drawing room, President Kennedy reviewed his inaugural address one last time before departing for the U.S. Capitol to take the oath of office. They also basked in dappled sunlight under the wisteria-draped pergola on their poolside flagstone terrace. Not surprisingly then, they wanted almost $5 million to part with their historic (circa 1885) property located at 2903 P Street, N.W., in Georgetown’s picturesque East Village. Griski, a former Wall Street VP and financial analyst, and Goodhand, a retired Microsoft engineer, are expected to settle for approximately $4.3 million in exchange for the six-bedroom home with four and a half baths, six fireplaces and gated on-site parking. The sellers are perhaps best known for donating millions to the University of Pennsylvania where they met in 1983 as undergraduates. Julius Boniface Rauch IV’s Kalorama

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“The location is truly like living on top of the world – a one-of-a-kind spot.” – Agent Richard Oder on 2810 Adams Mill Road, N.W.

B y M ary K . M ewb o rn residence has sold for $3,450,000. Completely renovated, the elegant brick Georgian-style home at 2411 Tracy Place, N.W., features outstanding craftsmanship and conveniences. Its formal living and dining rooms, master bedroom suite and family room boast custom paneling and meticulously restored decorative wall moldings and fireplace mantels. The chef ’s kitchen has

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a six-burner stove, double oven and marbletopped breakfast bar. Two sets of French doors lead from the kitchen and family room to the garden terrace and swimming pool. Additional highlights include an elevator and three-car garage. The listing agents were Washington Fine Properties’ Matthew McCormick, L. Patrick Chauvin and Ellen Morrell. The new owners are Raj and Emily Madan. Thanks to Long and Foster’s Richard Oder, 3612 Reservoir Road, N.W., sold for the list price of $1,260,000. The four-level, fourbedroom townhouse located in the Cloisters in Georgetown has cathedral ceilings, Palladian windows, rich wood floors, two fireplaces and a

Clockwise from left– David Goodhand and Vincent Griski are expected to part with 2903 P St., N.W. for approximately $4.3 million / Julius Boniface Rauch, IV has sold 2411 Tracy Place N.W., for $3,450,000 / 2810 Adams Mill Rd. N.W., which boasts views of the National Zoo and Rock Creek Park, was purchased by Jon Cooper and his wife Julia Nord for $1,635,000.

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Beneath the glow of the chandeliers in their double drawing room, President Kennedy reviewed his inaugural address one last time before departing for the U.S. Capitol to take the oath of office. detached garage. The seller, Lucy Mallan, lived there for twenty years. The new owner prefers not to be identified. Carmen and Dennis Perkins, Jr., have sold 2810 Adams Mill Road, N.W., a charming, early 1900’s Georgian Colonial perched atop a cliff overlooking the National Zoo and Rock Creek Park. The main and lower levels have glass-enclosed porches from which to enjoy the views year-round while the master bedroom suite and upper level family room boast verandahs with even more extensive vistas. The listing agent, Richard Oder, who specializes in unique downtown properties, says the location is “truly like living on top of the world – a one-of-a-kind spot.” The hot tub clinging to the cliff ’s edge in the backyard is perfect for watching the sunset. Because of the property’s proximity to the zoo, one can listen to lions roar and monkeys chatter.The home has four bedrooms, three full baths, two half baths and an attached garage. The new owners, Jon Cooper and his wife Julia Nord, had admired the property for years. As soon as it went on the market they offered $1,635,000, $40,000 more than the asking price. The property settled on May 19th with Long and Foster agent Linda Low representing the buyers.

Maryland In Potomac, 9712 Holloway Hill Court has sold for $1,450,000. The sellers of the fourbedroom home with four and a half baths were Dr. Mark and Naomi Klein. Dr. Klein, a

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neurosurgeon, and his wife were represented by Nancy Itteilag with Long and Foster. Also in Potomac’s Avenel area, Nancy Itteilag listed 6 Sandalfoot Court for $1,695,000. The five-bedroom home with five and a half baths sold for $1,550,000.The sellers were Sheila Ainbinder, a commercial real estate broker, and her husband Harvey, a chemist.

Virginia Devereux Socas and congressional hopeful James Socas, a Democratic challenger for Republican Frank Wolf ’s 10th District seat in Virginia, have purchased 6471 Kedleston Court in McLean. The seven-bedroom house with six baths had belonged to Lynda Erkiletian, founder and CEO of THE Artist Agency, a D.C. modeling agency. The home was listed by Weichert’s Penny Yerks for $2.799 million and has a sunroom and swimming pool. Socas is a multimillionaire software entrepreneur and former investment banker who currently serves as vice president of corporate development for Symantec. He also sits on the board of directors of ClearPoint Metrics. Last July, then-Governor Mark Warner appointed him to the State Board of Corrections for a four-year term. Another would-be Congressman, Republican Brian M. F. Kennedy of Iowa and his wife Beth, have sold 8816 Surrey Court in Alexandria near Mount Vernon. Arthur N. and Josephine B. McCormick paid $1.1 million for the property. In Great Falls, the brick Colonial situated on almost two acres at 9401 Fairpine Lane has

changed hands. The three-level home has five bedrooms and five and a half baths, including a large master bedroom suite with his and her baths. There is a library and a private study off the marble entrance foyer, and the family room has a brick fireplace and access to a deck through sliding glass doors. The lower level has a recreation room with a large bar plus plenty of space for a media center and pool table. The sellers, Charles B. Lieman and Jeanne Mullaney, were asking $1,295,000. Ravindra Bhatia paid $1.2 million for the property. Patrick A. Trueman, who served as chief of the Justice Department’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section under Presidents Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and his wife Laura, have purchased 10350 Southam Lane in Oakton from Nancy S. Dillinger. Trueman is currently the senior legal counsel for the Family Research Council in Washington and a consultant and law enforcement coordinator with Capital City Partners working to prevent sex trafficking. Laura is the executive director of The Coalition for Affordable Health Coverage, which lobbies Congress to increase access to private sector healthcare. Please Send Real Estate News Items to: Mary_Mewborn@Yahoo.com Left to Right– Dr. Mark Klein and his wife Naomi have purchased 9712 Holloway Hill Court in Potomac for $1,450,000 / Harvey and Sheila Ainbinder received $1,550,000 for 6 Sandalfoot Court in Potomac – it was listed for $1,695,000.

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DRAMATIC CONTEMPORARY IN FALCONHURST 3520 Springland Lane, N.W.

h o u s e

62 Dune RoAd Middlesex Beach Bethany Beach, Delaware

A rare opportunity to acquire one of Washington’s great residences in Cleveland Park. This historic property is nearly 8,000 square feet and is situated on over an acre of land with beautiful trees and mature gardens. The interior has elegant formal rooms for entertaining, a spacious family kitchen, nine plus bedrooms, an elevator, wonderful outdoor terraces and a tennis court. Asking: $3,800,000 Listing: Michael Rankin (202) 271-3344 and Jonathan Taylor (202) 276-3344 Tutt, Taylor & Rankin Sotheby’s International Realty

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Located in a private beach community, this ocean front five-bedroom, four-and-a-half-bath home has its own private walkway to the beach. Beautifully designed with a second floor living/media room and an elevator shaft in place, the house has ample room to entertain or to simply relax and enjoy the breathtaking views of the Atlantic. The new furnishings will be a wonderful start up to allow you to personalize the final touches and the expansive decks provide additional space to lounge and play enveloped by the scent of the ocean air and the sound of waves hitting the shore. Asking: $3,450,000 Listing: Leslie Kopp, (800) 851-8997, (302) 542-3917 Long and Foster Real Estate, Inc.

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Bethany Beach, Delaware

OCEANFRONT • NORTH BETHANY Elegant New England style residence with six bedrooms, and six-and-one half baths is the perfect balance between grand tradition and today’s casual beach front lifestyle. This perfectly appointed home with fine finishes and furnishings in addition to a community pool and tennis court is being offered for $5,590,000

CANALFRONT • SOUTH BETHANY Perfectly situated on a navigable waterway, this stunning new home with nautical flair will please any boating or beach enthusiast. This four bedroom plus loft has an open floor plan, is only two-and-one-half blocks to the beach and will offer any family a leisurely getaway. $1,189,000

OCEANFRONT NORTH BETHANY Perfect for luxurious oceanfront living, this exceptional eight bedroom, seven-and-onehalf bath home includes every conceivable amenity and enhanced with exquisite taste and furnishings. Situated in a serene setting yet only a short distance into town. $5,850,000

ALMOST OCEANFRONT • BETHANY BEACH One of the few true original beach cottages in the town of Bethany with only a few steps to the ocean. For those who want to hear, smell and see the sea, this four bedroom restored gem has been meticulously cared for with love. $1,895,000 IN TOWN BETHANY BEACH Quietly nestled on a quaint street in the town of Bethany sits this newly built four bedroom, three bath home with a grand great room and an additional cozy family room with fireplace. This home is perfect for a gathering of generations. $939,000

OCEAN BLOCK • NORTH BETHANY Sited only three lots off the oceanfront in a private gated community, this delightful five bedroom, four-and-one-half bath home exemplifies the best of beach living. The high ceilings and abundance of windows in the great room provide stunning vistas and the shimmering waters in the distance. $1,995,000

Feel The Difference

800.851.8997

Direct 302.541.5207 • 302.542.3917 Cell 302.539.9040 x 207 Office email: leslie@bestofbethany.com

www.BestofBethany.com


TWO ACRE OCEANFRONT ESTATE NORTH BETHANY BEACH, DELAWARE

Truly impressive 15,500 sq ft residence with more than 6,000 sq ft of Brazilian hardwood decks and verandas offers optimal privacy and unsurpassed views of your own reserved beach. Finished in 2004 to withstand the strongest storms, this steel-encased structure, with its hurricane shuttered frontage and terracotta tile roof, stands protected by the highest dune in North Bethany. Superbly designed with 7 bedrooms, 7.5 bathrooms, and an elevator reaching all four levels, the 50’ Great Room, bar, and oceanfront deck provides the ultimate in grand entertaining and glorious ocean views. The Billiard Room with its private entertainment area, Den with home theatre, Playroom, & the uniquely private roof-top Sun Deck & hot tub add pleasure after a day at the beach. An additional 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath guest cottage is connected by walkway to the main home. Your own private entrance off Route One passes ample land for a pool and tennis court.

Offered at $11,000,000 Contact: clc@snip.net


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Creative Trailblazing By V i c k y M o o n

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here’s more to life in Middleburg than horses and hunt balls. There’s also a strong community of writers. During the 1930’s, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe stayed at the historic estate of Welbourne, and both wrote a story using the mansion as a setting. For aspiring writers looking for inspiration, the circa 1770 house is now a bed and breakfast. Herman Wouk (The Winds of War and War and Remembrance) once owned a home in Middleburg. Broad Run resident and Pulitzer Prize winner Nick Kotz’s most recent book, Judgment Day: Lyndon Baines Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and the Laws That Changed America recently came out in paperback. Marc Leepson, who lives at Chilton (the estate once owned by Washington attorney Hobart Taylor), has written Saving Monticello: The Levy Family’s Epic Quest to Rescue the House that Jefferson Built and Flag: An American Biography. He’s now working on a book about General Jubal Early’s role in the July 9, 1894 Civil War battle of Monocacy (near Frederick, Md.) There are also several past and present Washington Post writers-Joel Garreau, Paul Hodge and Leonard Shapiro (husband of this writer) who live in the area, not to mention Donald Graham, who inherited the exquisite country home Glen Welby from his mother Katharine Graham. Paul Cronin, director of riding at Sweet Briar College for more than thirty years, lives and rides from his home in Rectortown. He’s penned an academic approach to horsemanship with Schooling And Riding The Sport Horse: A Modern American Hunter/Jumper System. The Thrill of The Chase

Attorney and author Jan Neuharth started Paper Chase Farms twenty years ago with her Swiss-born husband, Joseph Keusch. Together they managed the operation, which included a



boarding stable, lessons and horse shows. In the past few years, the focus of the business has turned to the development and sale of horse products and book publishing. Jan’s new mystery, The Chase, takes place in familiar Virginia horse country. The plot swirls around the suspicious vehicle accident of a good looking, well-to-do attorney and horseman. Jan signed lots of books at a pre-release book party at The Red Fox Inn in late May and is now on tour at various bookshops and horse events. Portrait painter and sporting artist Sandra Massie Forbush and her husband Gus Forbush, a joint master of the Old Dominion Hounds, were at the reception. Sportsman Randy Rouse and wife Michelle Rouse stopped in to get a book signed. Dr. Nat White, director of the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, also was there. Part of The Chase is set at the very high tech horse hospital over in Leesburg. “I have fictitious characters, but real places and hopefully

authentic situations,” says Jan, who is also on the board of the center. In the book, a horse is injured in a car and trailer accident and taken by horse ambulance for surgery at the center. “I Top- Hunt Country resident Robert Duvall’s latest film, Broken Trail premiered on AMC in June. Above- Writer Jan Neuharth at her book signing party with her father, Al Neuharth.

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Word on the street Allison Tripp and Derrick Maloney were married in May at a ceremony and reception for 150 guests at the Middleburg Tennis Club.The bride is the daughter of Bruce Tripp. Her mother, Linda Tripp, runs a shop in the village called The Christmas Sleigh with her current husband, German architect Dieter Rausch. The groom is a native of Warrenton and is a tennis instructor at the family owned Chestnut Forks Tennis Club.

Mr. and Mrs. Derrick Maloney with their daughter, Peyton.

HUNT COUNTRY DATES July 11-14-Virginia Bloodhound Search and Rescue Seminar, Glenwood Park, (703) 771-5749. July 11- Backyard BBQ Cooking Class, Market Salamander, www. marketsalamander.com, (540) 687-8011. July 15- Two-Year Anniversary Celebration at All the King¹s Horses Gift Shop in Leesburg will include Arabian stallion KKoi holding court on the premises. www. AllKingsHorses.com , (703) 777-7989. July 22-Key West Fest, Change of Latitude and Attitude, Breaux Vineyards in Hillsboro, www.breauxvineyards.com, (800) 492-9961. August 26-27- 4th Annual Dog Days Sunflower and Peach Fest, features peach pies and peach slushies, Great Country Farms in Bluemont, www. greatcountryfarms.com, (540) 554-2073. August 31-Septmber 3 - The 107th Annual Warrenton Horse Show, Labor Day weekend tradition, www. warrentonhorseshow.com, (540) 788-4806, (540) 347-9442.



interviewed Nat White when plotting the book and he helped come up with the scenario with the injured horse and the rescue and treatment from a veterinary point of view.” Jan comes by her writing ways quite naturally. Her father, Al Neuharth, flew in from Florida for the book signing to wish her good luck. He was the founder of USA Today newspaper and is chairman of the Freedom Foundation. After the signing, he went on to Ethel Kennedy’s McLean home for a dinner in honor of John Seigenthaler, retired editor, publisher and CEO of The Tennessean newspaper, who served as administrative assistant to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.

Locals consider the “Piedmont Invitational Hack Class” for the “Silver Foxes” one of the highlights at the Upperville Colt and Horse Show each year. own herd of striking Longhorn cattle, has said: “Broken Trail completes a personal trilogy for me on Lonesome Dove and Open Range.” Riders Up

A Long And Winding Trail

Writer Alan Geoffrion spent five years doing research for his book, Broken Trail. He found inspiration through his travels in the West and discovered his neighbor, Academy Award winning actor Robert Duvall, shared his enthusiasm for his story. The plot follows two cowboys as they journey west herding horses. A twist conveys five Chinese womenoriginally headed to a life of prostitution- into their expedition. There’s murder and mayhem along the trail. And in the end, it also leads to second chances at life, love, and salvation. Now there’s a new life for Alan, as screenwriter for the AMC cable television production of his story. The film, scheduled for a two-day debut in late June, was produced and directed by Walter Hill, with Duvall and Thomas Haden Church as co-stars. On a quiet Sunday afternoon in early June, Duvall and his wife, the lovely Luciana Pedraza, ventured into Washington with a group of pals for a preview party at The White House. Writer Geoffrion and his wife Danielle Geoffrion, who is a superb dressage rider and instructor, were there, of course. Thomas Haden Church, attorney Betty Thompson, President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush and about fifty friends watched the movie. (One who was there described the film as “great.”) After the screening, guests had a buffet supper in the Blue Room. The president stayed through dessert and coffee before excusing himself to return to work. Then, the first lady gave an impromptu tour of the Green and Red rooms. Duvall, who has a farm in the area with his

Locals consider the “Piedmont Invitational Hack Class” for the “Silver Foxes” one of the highlights at the Upperville Colt and Horse Show each year. This year’s class included such equestrians as Marion Smoak, Mary Swift and Charlsie Cantey. Charlsie enjoyed many successful years on the horse show circuit before going on to bigger and better things in the racehorse world. (Her sister was the well-known Washington television hostess, Barbara Howar.) For many years, Charlsie was a racing analyst for ABC sports. She frequently rode a lead pony to interview the winning jockey on horseback. In other words… she knows how to ride a horse. For the event in Upperville, Charlsie had a big bay horse she’d never ridden. When he cantered down to the first of two jumps, he stopped to look at the bright red flowers and Charlsie made an ever-so-elegant “dismount.” Like all good riders, she re-mounted and finished the class… although they did avoid the red flowers. Gen. Crosbie Saint, former Commanderin-Chief U.S. Army Europe, won the event on his big brown horse Ravell. The general was coached by none other than the handsome horseman, Snowden Clarke. Another of Snowden’s clients was the late Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. He also once taught a Saudi prince how to ride in three days. But folks are a bit sad around Middleburg with the news that Snowden is heading west to Los Angeles, where he will run a stable in Sullivan Canyon. Then again, with his striking good looks and dashing personality, one always knew he’d end up in Hollywood.

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ambassador’s CUP POLO Match June 17th • The Plains, Virginia Photos by Crowell Hadden and paul simkin

By V i c k y M o o n Unlike others out riding in the Virginia horse country on a sweltering Saturday afternoon, Euripides L. Evriviades, ambassador of Cyprus, was mounted on the back of his Harley Davidson motorcycle. He stopped by Great Meadow in The Plains to catch a few chukkers of the Ambassador’s Cup Polo Match. U.S. Chief of Protocol Donald Ensenat, an avid polo player, was on hand to host more than 400 guests, including numerous members of the diplomatic corps and some illustrious ambassadors of polo. Ignacio “Nacho” Figueras divides his time among polo hot spots in Argentina, Palm Beach and the Hamptons. He also embodies the image of Ralph Lauren in the countless magazine advertisements he does part-time. But, he says, “Polo is my life.” Unfortunately, Mathias Guerrand-Hermes had to send regrets. He broke his femur playing polo in Morocco. Meanwhile, in the luncheon marquee, Aicha A. Afifi, the Moroccan minister counselor for political affairs, was set to watch her first polo match. Luckily for her, Outback founder and team captain Tim Gannon said, “I think we have ourselves a good match today,” as he prepared to mount up. Salvatore Ferragamo learned to play polo while in prep school in England. He has just completed three weeks of world travel as ambassador for his family’s wine from their 700-acre Tuscan estate — bottles of El Borro were passed at the victory celebration. Oh, the final score? A very diplomatic, 8-8.

Players eye the ball during the action

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Emily House, Anna Kimsey, Ashlee Reid, Lauren Jacob and Rachael Berbeza

Amb. Marion Smoak and Nick Arundel

Trophies for all

John Fields, Trina Sams-Manning and Nobuhide Torii

Salvatore Ferragamo

Ambassador Euripides L. Evriviades of Cyprus with U.S. Chief of Protocol, Ambassador Donald Ensenat

Tirrani Vicary and Lauren Vicary

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Nelson Gunnell, Susan Hensley, Bill Fannon and Louise Rothery

Joe and Susan Mayer

Lynne Hershey Griffen and Tara Piver

Russel Gard and Athena Reizakis

Mel Lewis and William A. Clarkson

Ignacio “Nacho� Figueras

Juan Salinas-Bentley pops a bottle of champagne

British Amb. Sir David Manning, Mark J.A. Cann and Lady Catherine Manning

Helen Bodron and Martin Baxter

Kate Roberts, Rick Rickerson and Nadia Manuel

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Saudi Arabian Amb. Prince Turki al-Faisal

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Rosane Cross, Elina Pavlova and Julie Cross

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Summer Strategy By Michael Strange

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part from the pre-nup, when I married Mr. Strange I made two secret pacts: One, with his three grown children, was that should the dreadful day come, I wouldn’t challenge their chunk of his estate and they wouldn’t challenge mine. The other involved those same sweet offspring. “Please,” he demanded,“don’t leave me alone with them. Not for a minute. Not ever.” I may shamelessly parade around this town in stilettos and pearls and too much Clive Christian, but I’m all about trust: I’ve kept my word with both sides, which brings us to the subject of summer. In The Stepmother’s Handbook, summer has its own chapter. There is no more complicated span of time in my year than the period from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The drama centers on a lovely weathered Nantucket house on a bluff in S’conset, with bedrooms for all, verandas, marvelous nooks for reading and napping, huge windows we keep open to the breezes, a gorgeous lawn, discreet hideouts for guests and staff, and a general air of summertime serenity. That is until the entire Strange clan descends: children, grandchildren, friends of same, plus dogs and, for a spell in early August, the first Mrs. Strange, who arrives from Paris or Tel Aviv with her latest boyfriend, an erstwhile Israeli commando, now all-purpose Mideast mercenary. My secretary, Miranda, devotes March to scheduling arrivals and departures, who eats what, who gets which room, how many each can invite to the July 4th clambake, who is on the jet and who flies commercial. But she doesn’t have to be there for the actual bombardment. That’s my job. On a typical summer morning my dear husband kisses me sweetly, says, “Cupcake, you take care of it,” and heads to either the nouveau or the old fart golf club. That leaves me to field all the conflicting agendas of two prickly stepdaughters and one socially aggressive stepson. If only I had a referee’s whistle. But this summer is different.The Hotel Strange has relocated.Why? For one thing, the gossip one hears is true; Nantucket has become the new



“Nantucket has become the new Hamptons. and at the rate the old money and new money are dueling over surf and turf, soon we’ll be tipping for a table at Downyflake.” Hamptons. And at the rate the old money and new money are dueling over surf and turf, soon we’ll be tipping for a table at Downyflake. There has been subtle social unrest ever since the New York Times outed the very discreet Steve Rales as a man who would pay $1 million per acre for 15 acres of sand.The catty “them” and “us” divide is dreary and creates all kinds of self-consciousness about jets at the airport and diamonds at lunch at the Beach Club. Really, did I need all that, plus family drama? n a brief conference call I informed all of them that this is the year we inject some heart and soul into our summer idyll. “I’ve rented the Nantucket house to a resurgent 90s Master of the Universe who needs a perch while his Quidnet McMansion is completed,” I said, gently. “And for all of us I’ve rented a large, splendid townhouse with full staff in the French Quarter of New Orleans.” Silence.“And Miranda has set up interesting projects for everyone with Habitat for Humanity and Women of the Storm.” Deeper silence, though I swear the first Mrs. muttered something about this having to do with my hailing from Santa Monica.

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ere’s the upside of my clever plan. A chance to give back, of course, but a chance, also, to enjoy intimate dinners with bright lights like Julia Reed, Lindy Boggs and Doug Brinkley, to name but a few. And remember how Ellen Barkin and Dennis Quaid melted the celluloid in The Big Easy? That’s my kind of summer heat. Then there’s this good news I delivered to Mr. Strange: the Nantucket house rented for a very sweet six figures. He liked the sound of that. Oh, and, God forbid, but if a hurricane should come to New Orleans, the jet is parked safely at MSY. He liked that, too. But, what he liked best of all was this: the children have opted out. They, their mother and her boyfriend, have rented in East Hampton. Score, and boo hoo.

Readers wishing to get in touch with Michael can email her at:MichaelStrangeDC@aol.com

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| summer

2006

| washingtonlife.com


Washington Life Magazine - Summer 2006