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WASHINGTON LIFE

FEATURES

CONTENTS

INSIDEHOMES Saved by the Bell . . . . . . . . . . 

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SOCIETY75 Years of the Green Book . . . . . . . . . .

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DESIGN Spectacular Sofas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  OPENHOUSEA Peek at What’s on the Market . . . .

REALESTATEROUNDTABLE. . . . . . . . . . .

COLUMNS COVERSTORY

STUARTWEITZMAN’SBest Foot Forward . . . . . . . 



SALLYQUINN& BENBRADLEE WL’SNOVEMBERPOWERCOUPLE

Q&ACAFÉ Carol Joynt Grills Michael Isikoff. . . . . .

SOCIETY Kathy Kemper’s Bipartisian Breakfast’s . . . . 

At the top of everyone’s A-list, these Washington insiders have brains, charm, and clout.

WHAT’SHOT Men’s Watches . . . . . . . . . . . . . CULTURE Importing Alaska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TENTHINGS To Do in November . . . . . . . . . . .

POLLYWOOD with Clooney, Hanks, and Rooney . . . 

F A S H I O N  S P E C TAC U L A R HORSECOUNTRYSTYLE INMIDDLEBURG

WLSPONSOREDEVENTS The Corcoran’s Warhol Bash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Washington Nationals’ Diamond Gala . . . . . . . . . .

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Govinda Gallery’s Mellow Yellow 30th . . . . . . . . . . Washington Life on the U.S.S. Sequoia . . . . . . . . . .

GENERATIONENGAGE ATRALPHLAUREN

Thelonious Monk Jazz Competition . . . . . . . . . . .  Washington National Opera’s Opening Night . . . . . . . 

RENALANGEFASHION SHOWATSAKSJANDEL

USO Gala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

WASHINGTONBALLETDANCERS MODELEVENINGATTIRE

Ferragamo Opening at Tysons Galleria . . . . . . . . . . 

EVENTS&PARTIES National Symphony Orchestra’s Opening Night . . . . . . 

TOMMYHILFIGERSHOWATTHE TYSONSCORNERCENTEROPENING

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Welcome Party at Neyla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

Refugees International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Children’s Law Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Alexandra de Borchgrave’s Book Party . . . . . . . . . . . 

DEPARTMENTS EDITOR’SLETTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  FYIDC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  AROUNDTOWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  REALESTATENEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

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CALENDAROFEVENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

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SNAPSFROMLEFTBey Scripps, Placido Domingo and Bey Casey at the Opera’s Opening Night Gala; Indian Amb. Ronen Sen and Alexandra de Borchgrave at Ms. de Borchgrave’s book party for “Healing Light�; and Nichelle, Frank and Barbara Ann Robinson at the Nationals’ Diamond Gala

COV ER A ND TOC BRA DL EE /QU I NN PH OTO: ZA ID HAM ID F OR WA SHI NGTON L IF E ; M IDDL E B U RG PH OTO BY Z AID HAM ID; C LOT H E S : SA L A H I, IN A BL AC K ONE S H O U L D E R E D R I D I N G D R E S S BY M I C H A E L KO R S , M I N K H AT BY A N D R I A N A , V E LV E T T H R OW AVA I L A B L E AT LO R D A N D TAY LO R .

TRAVEL By the Bay:The Inn at Perry Cabin . . . . . .


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Nancy Reynolds Bagley MANAGINGEDITOR

Melissa Nolan COPYEDITOR

Claudia Krieger STYLEEDITOR

Alison Lukes

Vera Wang

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Zac Posen

Barbara McConaghy

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Mary Mewborn, Donna Shor CONTRIBUTINGWRITERS&EDITORS

Theo Adamstein, Olvia Demetriou, Janet Donovan, Carol Joynt, Kathy Kemper, Stephanie Mansfield, Alice Rogoff Rubenstein EDITORIALINTERN

Kathryn Hinden ARTDIRECTOR

Wayne M. DeSelle GRAPHICDESIGNER

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Zaid Hamid, Immanuel Jayachandran, Jonah Koch,Vicky Pombo, Tony Powell, Kyle Samperton, Douglas Sonders CONTRIBUTINGGRAPHICARTISTS

James Huckenpahler, Dawn Kamper, Kathy Prisco DIRECTOROFADVERTISING

Audrey Weppler ACCOUNTEXECUTIVE

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Jennifer Haber PUBLICRELATIONS&ASSISTANTEDITOR

Katie Tarbox MARKETING&CIRCULATIONASSOCIATE

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Washington Life magazine: Celebrating Washington’s Social Scene and Power Elite, publishes nine times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, September, October, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 120,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please-consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $24 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place, NW, Washington D.C., 20008 To post or view events on our interactive online social calendar, visit www.washingtonlife.com and click on “social calendar.” To contribute ideas or provide feedback Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips and editorial comments. Copyright ©2005 by Washington Life . All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. Magazine format by Wayne DeSelle Design / www.deselle.com

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Editor’s Letter

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e were on the edge of our seats at a riveting and oversold Q & A Café with Matt Cooper, waiting for special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald to announce the anticipated White House indictments, but we may as well have been extras in “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” when Nicole Kidman walked by filming a remake of the alien thriller— she plays the Washington psychiatrist.That’s when it hit me, what I love about Washington is the juxtaposition of culture and access, intrigue and intimacy, energy and ambition, where the pace never slows and the powerful never doze. Here in the power center of the world, media is celebrity; and who said what to whom and when can make all the difference.

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nd talk about busy . . . this month Washington Life served as the exclusive magazine media sponsor for a host of A-list parties and benefits.With the assistance of generous WL readers who donated over $20,000, we showed our support for our troops at the USO Gala honoring General Richard Myers and his wife Mary Jo.We also sponsored the Washington National Opera’s golden season opening night gala, the Corcoran’s 1869 Society’s Andy Warhol fête, the Washington Nationals’ Diamond Gala, the Thelonious Monk Jazz Competition at the Kennedy Center, the Best Buddies Ball at Eunice and Sargent Shriver’s house, the Capital Baron’s Ball at the Ritz Carlton, the Generation Engage fundraiser at Ralph Lauren in New York City with President Clinton, and the Washington International Horse Show featuring the world’s top equestrians.

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ollowing on the hooves of the horse show, we travel to Middleburg for a horse country-inspired fashion shoot with Tareq and Michaele Salahi of Oasis Winery as well as other top Washington area equestrians who modeled our favorite tweed blazers and warm sweaters from Hermes and Burberry.To commemorate the opening of the newly expanded Tysons Corner Center, WL sponsored a party and fashion show with Tommy Hilfiger. We then followed up with coverage of the Saks Jandel fashion show benefiting the Salvation Army which featured evening wear from designer Rena Lange.We round out our fashion spectacular with an exclusive interview with designer Stuart Weitzman, coverage of the Ferragamo and Ralph Lauren store openings, and a WL sponsored fashion show with the Washington Ballet at Saks Fifth Avenue modeled by Ballet dancers, Board and Women’s Committee members along with Septime Webre and Kay Kendall showing the best of evening attire from Oscar de la Renta, Chanel and Vera Wang.

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This month, we also unveil our expanded real estate and home design section, bringing you our inaugural REAL ESTATE ROUNDTABLE with Mark Bisnow leading an insiders discussion with prominent realtors, Jane Fairweather (MD), Casey Margenau (VA) and Jim Bell (DC) on today’s housing market. Architects Theo Adamstein and Olvia Demetriou kick off our DESIGN feature with tips on how to choose your perfect sofa.We close the section with our staple INSIDE HOMES, a tour of some distinguished properties ON THE BLOCK, and leave you sated with the latest REAL ESTATE NEWS. In our cover story, one of Washington’s favorite power couples, Sally Quinn and Ben Bradlee, discuss Deep Throat, “Leak Throat,” politics and the Washington social scene. Also in this issue, Stephanie Mansfield revisits the Green Book after 75 years, Kathy Kemper discusses her bipartisan power breakfasts, Alice Rogoff Rubenstein shares her passion for Alaska’s environment and native arts, and in our regular Q & A Café, Carol Joynt puts Michael Isikoff back into the hot seat to discuss Monica, Abu Gharib, and prospective White House indictments in the Valerie Plame CIA disclosure case. (Stay tuned for the follow-up with Matt Cooper in our December holiday issue.) This month Washington Life will also be available for purchase at many area newsstands including locations at Union Station, National, BWI, Dulles and select international airport lounges in addition to your local Whole Foods. Or, just log on to our website to download our new Digital Edition. Autumn in Washington is truly spectacular as the colors turn; so before the winter chill sets in make sure you get out to Rock Creek Park, one of the few urban National Parks in the country with water running through it, and enjoy the change of season. Sincerely, Nancy Reynolds Bagley

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CONTRIBUTORS

THEODORE ADAMSTEIN & OLVIA DEMETRIOU During 24 years of practice as of one of Washington’s preeminent design firms, Adamstein & Demetriou has been awarded over thirty international, national, and regional Design and AIA awards for projects that include restaurants, galleries, offices, retail, and residential spaces. With over 60 built works, mostly in public assembly type spaces, Adamstein and Demetriou’s work has had a significant impact in the design world. Their work has been distinguished by publication in over eighty books and magazines including Rizzoli’s “Private Washington,” The Washington Post,The New York Times, Business Week magazine, Architectural Record, Architecture,Washingtonian Magazine, Metropolitan Home, Interior Design and Elle Decor magazines, as well as featured on Fox Television and the Corcoran Gallery of Art lectures series.

clients in government and industry. In 1987, the National Association of Women recognized her as one of the top ten women in business.

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ALISON LUKES After four and a half years in New York and Paris and landing her dream job at Michael Kors, Alison Lukes, WL’s Style editor, returned to Washington ready to dress some of the city’s power players. As a personal stylist she helps many of the city’s best dressed women find the perfectly appropriate and effortlessly chic wardrobe. She heads up her own company, Alison Lukes et Cie. www.alisonlukes.com.

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STEPHANIE MANSFIELD Stephanie Mansfield is a veteran of the Washington Post’s Style Section. She is the author of The Richest Girl in The World, a biography of the late Doris Duke, and has been a contributing editor for Vogue and GQ. Her work has appeared in many national publications, including Sports Illustrated, Elle, The New York Times and Reader’s Digest. She is married to Tsotne Bakuria, a former member of the Parliament of Georgia and is currently a national reporter for The Washington Times. She has never appeared in The Green Book.

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JANET DONOVAN Janet Donovan (shown with Matt Drudge) is the Founder and President of Creative Enterprises International, a Washington, D.C. publicity firm whose clients include celebrities, authors, politicians and publications. She created and hosted The Beltway Broads radio show and writes the column Hollywood on the Potomac.

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CAROL JOYNT Carol Joynt, a former producer for Larry King, Charlie Rose and Chris Matthews, is the owner of the popular Georgetown restaurant, Nathans. After 9/11 Joynt began hosting monthly neighborhood power lunches at her restaurant, which soon became the ultimate insiders’ insider lunches. With guests such as Tom Brokaw, Dan Snyder, Tim Russert, Leslie Cockburn and Fred Smith, the lunches feature the city’s best known leaders speaking candidly in an intimate atmosphere. When not at Nathans, Joynt focuses her time on her priorities: family; raising her son, Spencer, their dog, Leo, and Ozzy, the bird; and writing her memoir, “Innocent Spouse.”

BARBARA MCCONAGHY

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KATHY KEMPER Kathy Kemper is the Founder and President of INFO, the public affairs breakfast series that since 1990 has become a much talked-about forum for the exchange of ideas between world and national leaders. Ms. Kemper is also a fellow and founder of the Institute for Education (IFE) and established the annual IFE Service Leadership Award. She serves a Secretary of the Board of Trustees of Washington International School and was recently appointed by Mayor Anthony Williams to serve on the Mayor’s Taskforce for Making Neighborhood Schools Work. Involved in sports, competition, and gender equity issues since 1982, she is President of Kathy Kemper and Company, a firm providing tennis club management, tournament organization, instruction, and consulting to

ALICE ROGOFF RUBENSTEIN

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Barbara McConaghy, fashion editor for Washington Life, is a nationally recognized stylist, show producer and editor. In upcoming issues she’ll share her take on Washington men’s and women’s fashion, and the city’s celebrity style. Her work has appeared in Elle and Detour magazines, and locally in the Washingtonian, Baltimore Magazine, DC Style, for Special Sections of The Washington Post and Fashion Editor for the now defunct Capital Style. She has produced national tours for YM and Seventeen magazines; and dressed stars such as Lauren Hutton, Brandy and Jennifer Love Hewitt.

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Alice Rogoff Rubenstein is co–founder and chair of Alaska Native Arts Foundation, an Alaska non-profit corporation. She is chairman of the board of Scene7, a digital imaging software company. Ms. Rogoff also created and manages The Artist Impressions, a company which licenses original work of art for interior design use. Ms. Rogoff was chief financial officer of U.S News and World Report, and as assistant to the publisher, Donald Graham, of The Washington Post. In addition, Ms.Rogoff was the creator of National Weekly Edition of The Washington Post. She has served on the boards of, among others, The Potomac School, The National Child Research Center, and Center for Excellence in Government. She holds MBA from Harvard Business School.

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ince the inception of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, top shoe designer Stuart Weitzman and others in his industry have raised millions to beat the disease. In 2000, Weitzman began “Bid for the Cure,” a celebrity-designed shoe auction to benefit breast cancer research. Noted celebrities begin with a signature pair of Weitzman’s stiletto heels, then embellish and decorate the shoes before the signature pieces are then auctioned. The American Cancer Society estimates that 200,000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed this year, resulting in 40,000 deaths. Recently, Neiman Marcus Mazza Gallerie and anchor Andrea Roane hosted a luncheon on October 7 to unveil the designer’s fall line while raising awareness for the Judith A. Lese Breast Cancer Foundation. Lese, an elementary school teacher in Montgomery County for over 30 years, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2002. Her grassroots organization has donated over $15,000 to Sibley Center for Breast Health. “The first year [of Bid For the Cure] the theme was women so celebrities such as Nicole Kidman and Tina Turner made art out of shoes. The next year we wanted men, so actors such as Michael Douglas and Tom Hanks became involved, and then the theme was athletes,” Weitzman explained. “The rest of the industry picked it up and this year we’ve paired with chefs and in five years we’ve raised over $10 million.” This year, Weitzman paired with the Food Network to decorate and design his shoes, which were auctioned off on their respective websites. Celebrity chefs Paula Deen, Mario Batali and Sandra Lee, among others, created distinctive designs, some using candy bars, toffee, and cherries to adorn their stilettos. At press time, chef Rachel Ray’s baby blue heels inspired by her recipe for “You won’t be single for long vodka cream pasta” had the highest bid at just over $3,000. When asked which pair of “shoe art” got the highest bid ever, Weitzman

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reports “Tina Turner at $16,000. She signed her name 500 times.” What shoe trends to expect this season? “Boots, boots, boots,”Weitzman says.“The denim jean generation are influencing shoes—Western boots and slouch boots with jeans tucked inside. Since day shoes are so casual, evening shoes are more formal. Peep-toes like the ones your grandmother wore are also in for the evening.” In the spring Weitzman says we should expect to see variety of sandals and platform shoes but not the painful-to-wear platform shoes of the past. The new platform materials are “spongy and comfortable,” he reports. Whew!

A Party to Boot Stuart Weitzman (above) was joined by Judith Lese, Andrea Roane (at right) and others at a Neiman Marcus-hosted lunch to unveil the designer’s fall line.

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Q & A

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Journalists Dish

Newsweek reporter MICHAEL ISIKOFF on the record B Y  C A R O L  J O Y N T THE HOT SEAT Carol Joynt (left) grilled Michael Isikoff on unnamed sources, Monica Lewinsky, and that infamous Koran flushing story. MI: I want to talk about sources, which I think is

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t her inaugural Q & A Café on September 20th, for the 2005-2006 season, Nathans’ owner and former Larry King and Charlie Rose producer, Carol Joynt, put Newsweek investigative reporter Michael Isikoff in the hot seat to explain why he published reports about Abu Gharib, the Koran and how the White House responded. After breaking the Monica Lewinsky story in 1998, Isikoff has built a reputation for digging in the trenches to uncover and reveal major stories. His on-line column, “Terror Watch” is considered a must read for senior U.S. intelligence officials, congressional staffers and other media organizations. Carol Joynt: Were you always an investigative reporter? Micahel Isikoff: No. I was in college during the

days of Watergate and I vividly remember reading the Woodward and Bernstein stories before it all unraveled and being quite excited about these two young punks from The Washington Post

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who were kicking ass and getting denounced. I liked the whole aura of that, and that’s when I decided to be a journalist for my college paper. CJ: You have confessed your pulse increases when you are running on a story. MI: Yes. Something happens. It’s something

chemical. CJ: How does that compare to when you met Monica Lewinsky for the first time? MI: I never imagined Monica was ever going to

be the story that she was. I remember we had a debate at Newsweek about whether to put it in. One of the senior editors said, “Can we really publish a story like this that might lead to a President’s impeachment?” I then looked to my colleague and thought, ‘What the hell is he talking about? Impeachment? That’s crazy.’ CJ: Well that brings me to, how did you get yourself into that mess?

a big story in Washington these days. How you deal with them? Some of them are not the most savory people and some of them don’t always level with you. Dealing with sources is a very complicated business.We have to protect sources in order to get stories but our ultimate obligation as a journalist is not to our sources but to our readers. And what do you do when protecting your sources gets in the way of telling the truth to your readers about matters of current public controversy? I happen to be the reporter who got the internal Time magazine email that Matt Copper wrote to his editors in which it was made clear that the source he was protecting was Karl Rove, the most powerful man in the White House. And the White House when asked about Rove’s involvement issued these blithe and sweeping denials in outing [undercover CIA operative] Valerie Plame. Here we had an ongoing, criminal investigation of people in the White House for possibly violating the law. Karl Rove was a central figure but was not known to readers of Time or Newsweek. How do you deal with that? We were stunned that it was so clearly and unequivocally Rove that was Cooper’s source. My question is to what extent has Time magazine and the NewYork Times gone back to those sources, pressed them and aggressively reported on what their role was? Why didn’t Matt Cooper go back to Karl Rove and say, “Okay, Karl I know you spoke to me off the record before but now I have some questions for you on the record. The White House has just denied that you were in any way involved and you and I know that’s a lie.” It’s that type of aggressive questioning that I think should have been done in this case. Same goes for Judy Miller. [But] I have complete solidarity with her being in jail and the predicament she’s in.

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CJ: Have you been to jail to see Judy Miller? MI: I have not. Though it’s been interesting to

dry.What happened? MI: Not quite the case, the source, a senior U.S.

see who has.

Government official misread a document.There was in fact an FBI report about a Koran being flushed down the toilet, it had been flagged for investigation, and it was in the possession of the people at Southern Command.They had not yet confirmed it though. He simply had misremembered the document that he read. Amazing that a senior U.S. Government officials would get something wrong.

CJ: Let’s take this whole source thing to another story, in which you found yourself in the hot seat. That’s Abu Gharib, and the Koran in the toilet.You had a source who gave you this story, and it turned out this source didn’t tell you the truth, or only a version of the truth, or basically hung you out to

“DEALING WITH SOURCES IS A VERY COMPLICATED BUSINESS. WE HAVE TO PROTECT SOURCES IN ORDER TO GET STORIES BUT OUR ULTIMATE OBLIGATION AS A JOURNALIST IS NOT TO OUR SOURCES BUT TO OUR READERS. AND WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN PROTECTING YOUR SOURCES GETS IN THE WAY OF TELLING THE TRUTH TO YOUR READERS ABOUT MATTERS OF CURRENT PUBLIC CONTROVERSY.” —MICHAELISIKOFF

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CJ: Why wasn’t there a bigger house cleaning after Katrina? How did Chertoff keep his job? MI: Chertoff, that’s much higher stakes, that’s a

member of the Cabinet. But it certainly did raise a lot of questions.You had state emergency management people focused completely on a terrorist attack but what about natural disasters? The Alabama guy I interviewed said he gets [only] $1.8 million dollars for planning for natural disasters, and $40 million dollars planning for terrorist attacks. Alabama hasn’t had a terrorist attack.

CJ: It was a source you have used before? MI: Yes.

CJ: How many stories will come out of New Orleans? MI: One of the fascinating stories is the Federal

CJ: Was it Karl Rove?

procurement cards, or Federal credit cards. They started distributing hundreds of thousands of procurement card, and guess what? People were abusing them. There are actually a whole series of GAO studies on what Government employees were spending their dollars on: trips to Vegas, escort services, expensive jewelry and my favorite, the DOD worker who bought breast enhancements for his girlfriend who worked as a waitress at Hooters. By the way, they just upped the limit, from $2,500 that they can spend on their procurement cards, to, and I kid you not, $250,000.

MI: Can’t say. We retracted what amounted to a half of a sentence. The White House acted like we had committed some major journalistic sin and that there were no instances of Koranic abuse at Guántanamo. Weeks later we learned that there were multiple instances of Koranic abuse. I think it was obviously unfortunate and we regretted it. Much more was made of it than it deserved. CJ: What was it like for you? Elements of the Right Wing had people believing that you caused deaths [from riot outbreaks in Afghanistan.] MI: It was obviously intense because the White

House made an issue of it even though four days earlier General Myers had said the riots in Afghanistan have nothing to do with this story.They [The White House] chose to change the focus of the story. Fortunately, I think most people saw through it relatively quickly and we moved on. CJ: How much has Katrina weakened this Presidency? MI: Clearly, it came along at the worst possible time.

They see Americans still getting killed in Iraq, and then this.All the optimism that people felt after the election in January just seemed to go away. Second terms are always tough for Presidents. They get tired, they get sloppy, and they get caught up in scandals.You have the Iraq War, you have Katrina, and you have this Congressional election.The midterms hold a lot of trouble for the Republicans, just imagine if we didn’t have loyal republican’s [in the majority] with supeoena power. Just imagine what would open up then. How did they sell this war? What did they really know?

CJ: Why did former President Clinton break ranks with the President? MI: Hilary is running for president, and he can’t

be too close to Bush. He’s very smooth, and attacked just enough so there is a little greater distance then there was before. CJ: Is it Hilary [Clinton] all the way now? MI: Right now she looks like the prohibitive

favorite for the Democrats.There are some issues that she is going to have to deal with. Principally her support for the Iraq War and how that plays out. That has almost become the signature issue for the Democrats. I would expect there will be a pure anti-war candidate in ’08 and the principal issue in the primaries for that candidate will be that she was the one who voted for this war. She’s not the person to get us out of this mess. For upcoming Q & A Café’s, please visit www. nathansgeorgetown.com. In November, Nathan’s will welcome MSNBC President Rick Kaplan and author Carol Radziwill.

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Society’s Green Guard

THE GREEN BOOK turns seventy five BYS T E P H A N I EM A N S F I E L D

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t 75, the old gal in green is exceedingly well-preserved and still veddy veddy proper. And still—like Caesar at the ancient Coliseum—declaring thumbs up or down on those hoping to be included in the official Society List for Washington. Begging, bribing or bartering to get listed is simply not done. In the old days, if you were known as an “F.P.” (Fanny Pincher) or B.D. (Bad Drunk) you could be ousted on your white-tailed tushy. Better known as “The Green Book” for it’s emerald felt cover, the list includes members of Congress and the administration, appointees, Supreme Court Justices, ambassadors, and hundreds of socially connected gentlefolk. It all began in 1930 when an enterprising Helen Ray Hagner—herself a well-connected debutant—began collecting guest lists for other party-goers. She set up a small desk at the Shoreham Hotel, dubbed it The Social Bureau of Washington, and sold the book for $12, only to those whose names were included. This was the original swell set; pedigrees, gowns by Patou, family jewels, and memberships in all the right clubs (Metropolitan, Sulgrave, Chevy Chase). If you were not included you were simply in Social Siberia. Quelle horreur! Death by shrimp fork. Of course all that has changed. Or has it? “People killed to be in the Green Book,” former White House social secretary Letitia Baldridge says. They planned and plotted and persuaded their friends to write the all-important letters of recommendation. Then, each October, the book arrived in a brown cardboard box. It took the listees days to page through it, looking to see who was in, and who was out. Famous names could be dropped for various reasons: blabbing too much about a White House wedding (socialite and author Barbara Howar), coarse behavior

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(White House aide Hamilton Jordan) murdering your lover (former Madeira School headmistress Jean Harris) and of course, going through a messy split from one’s spouse. “I was in twice,” says former gossip columnist Diana McLellan. “Then I got banned after my divorce.”

still run by relatives of Mrs. Hagner. Her daughter Carolyn Hagner Shaw took over editing duties in 1943 and gradually added telephone numbers and glossy advertisements to the book. A more flamboyant type, “Callie” Shaw was a divorcee herself, who enjoyed a martini or two. Strapped for cash, she would often put out two or three editions a year of the Green

THIS WAS THE ORIGINAL SWELL SET; PEDIGREES, GOWNS BY PATOU, FAMILY JEWELS, AND MEMBERSHIPS IN ALL THE RIGHT CLUBS (METROPOLITAN, SULGRAVE, CHEVY CHASE). IF YOU WERE NOT INCLUDED YOU WERE SIMPLY IN SOCIAL SIBERIA. After The Washington Post’s Ben Bradlee was dropped following his divorce, he tongue-incheek declared it a “cruel, cruel blow.” Supreme Court justice Abe Fortas was dropped for bad behavior. So was his colleague, Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, when he married a woman his granddaughter’s age. A notation on his file card reading “O.F.” (Old Fool). The Green Book—now much less exclusive and mostly used as a private telephone directory—is assembled in a small basement office adjacent to a garage in Kensington, Maryland, is

Book whenever bills were overdue. Now the book costs $75, and is still privately published by Thomas J. Murray, Jr., Callie’s 81-year-old son-in-law. Never mind that some members had gone to that great ballroom in the sky. Like the prominent Washingtonian whose dying wish was to be buried in white-tie-and-tails.There was only one problem; the funeral was at 2 p.m., hours before any sane patrician would ever don such apparel. A call to the Green Book assured his widow that indeed, it would be quite all right.

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Ignoramuses from the sticks could look up various crucial laws of protocol, including the “social call” where you were expected to pay a personal 15-minute visit to complete strangers to introduce yourself as a member of “society.” Monday was for the wives of the Supreme Court justices, Tuesday for Congressional wives, Wednesday the wives of the Cabinet, Thursday the Senate and Friday the wives of foreign diplomats. The Green Book still provides guidance for this ancient ritual. Then there were the big names. When James Earl Carter was elected president, The White House social staff insisted that he be listed as “Jimmy” Carter. The Green Book obliged, with a listing that read, “Carter, the President of the United States and Mrs. Jimmy.” The Old Guard was once restricted to WASPS and a few other denominations. Jews were blackballed, and nouveau types dismissed as arrivistes. Now the Green Book has many Jewish names. The first blacks were included in 1971, when the diplomatic Mrs. Shaw declared that “time moves on.”

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IT’s All About the Green Tandy and Wyatt Dickerson with Tom Murray at the first celebration for “The Green Book.”

TODAY, DOT-COMMERS, INVESTMENT BANKERS AND COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE DEVELOPERS ARE PROMINENT IN WHAT USED TO BE KNOWN AS SOCIAL WASHINGTON.

Last month to celebrate the 75th anniversary, The Green Book hosted a staid but proper affair at the City Museum. A number of longtime listees were there, mostly white haired and nostalgic. It was the first official party the Green Book has ever hosted. Perhaps every 75 years is enough. Today, dot-commers, investment bankers and commercial real estate developers are prominent in what used to be known as Social Washington. “Ladies Who Lunch” have gone the way of seamed stockings. Still, looking through Mr. Murray’s scrapbooks and old copies of the Green Book is a fascinating time trip. It all seems so quaint: when women actually dressed for dinner and were segregated from their cigar-smoking husbands, when social icons Alice Longworth Roosevelt,Virginia Bacon, Marie Beale, Mildred Bliss, Cissy Patterson, and later Marjorie Meriweather Post, Evangeline Bruce, Pam Harriman, Polly Guggenheim Logan and Katharine Graham reigned.When hats were de rigueur, calling cards engraved and no one would have dared sit next to a “F.P.” at dinner.

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By the Bay The Inn at PERRY CABIN

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fter just an hour’s drive over the Bay Bridge and down Route 50, you find yourself in the unspoiled Eastern Shore of Maryland, filled with cornfields, breathtaking water views and towns without traffic lights or fast food chains, but plenty of mom and pop shops. It’s seems that the Eastern Shore has an even more cachet today then ever before. There are rumors that Lynne Cheney has been shopping at Pottery Barn to furnish their new Eastern Shore home. Over the summer, Sarah Jessica Parker was spotted in Easton filming her new

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movie, and Wedding Crashers starring Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn was filmed at The Inn at Perry Cabin in St. Michael’s. Built in 1812, The Inn at Perry Cabin once served as a captain’s house for Purser Samuel Hambleton on the Cheasapeake Bay. It wasn’t until the 1980’s that it was transformed into a small luxury inn, eventually landing in the hands of Sir Bernard Ashley of the Laura Ashley Company. Under his ownership, it developed into a 41-room luxury hotel with five-star service. For years, however, guests frequently

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complained about the small, dark rooms, which many thought were overpriced. This is certainly not the case today.

ROOMS Seventeen million dollars later and with The Orient Express Group as the new owners, The Inn at Perry Cabin is a much-changed property, and transformed into a true relaxation oasis away from the city. Half of the rooms are located in a newly expanded wing with the look of a contemporary Maryland seaside inn. At first

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Sherwood’s Landing’s signature crabcakes

This Eastern Shore twist on a classic Parisian bistro is an ideal spot for an intimate dinner. Steak frites, onion soup, mussels in a buttery sauce, are all delicious 403 S. Talbot Street, St. Michael’s, MD (410) 745-9111 www.bistrostmichaels.com

MASON’S Don’t let the casual décor fool you, Mason’s offers some of the best fine dining in the area. From trendy dishes such as seared Hudson valley foie gras to the more traditional options, New York strip steak. 22 South Harrison Street, Easton, MD (410) 822-3204 www.masonsgourmet.com

SONEATCAFÉ This hole in the wall joint on Tighlman Island is worth the thirty minute drive for the best pancakes, hands down, on the Eastern Shore, if not the Eastern Seaboard. The large griddle and homemade recipe turn out the stacks of pancakes that make it a local favorite. Only open in the summer. 5772 Tilghman Island Road, Tilghman Island, MD (410) 886-2143

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EASTERNSHOREDININGSPOTS

BISTROSTMICHAEL’S

glance it appears simplistic, clean lines with solid colored furniture.Then you discover the carefully chosen antique drawings depicting the anatomy of shells. After pressing a button to cause the television to rise from a small box at the end of the bed, you realize that every detail in the room is carefully planned. Rooms boast elegant working fireplaces and overstuffed couches ideal for curling up to read. Each bathroom is spacious with oversized bathtubs and marble showers. The other accommodations are located in the historic wing where Lord Ashley’s English Country influences are still seen in the floral fabrics and pastel colors.These rooms are smaller but still offer many of the same luxuries: large beds, sitting areas and impressive views of the Chesapeake Bay. They feature many of the original Early American antiques that past owners collected throughout the years.

DINING The award-winning Sherwood’s Landing restaurant offers the best of Eastern Shore fare, including blue crab, mussels and oysters. On select days, chef Michael Salter walks down to the farmer’s market for local, organically grown produce to create a “market menu,” ranging from fresh ahi-tuna with corn, zucchini and squash to free-range chicken and new potatoes. Salter’s approach is modern classical, with a light emphasis on quantity, so that you can enjoy three courses without guilt. The minimalist décor directs your attention to the harbor where large sailboats glide by the large yachts moored at the pier. The restaurant has earned many accolades from Wine Spectator and four diamonds from the Mobil Travel Guide. They are well deserved. For those seeking more casual fare, the Purser’s Pub serves burgers, fish and chips and afternoon snacks. The rich hardwood floors and openhearth fireplace make it a perfect spot for a card game or a round of backgammon or chess. The chef makes sure to welcome each guest, including their furry-legged friends, with welcome pet packs stuffed with gourmet dog biscuits.

ACTIVITIES In 2006, the hotel will open a state-of-the-art full service spa featuring facials, massages and customized treatments. This will complement the Inn’s Nautilus exercise facility and outdoor

infinity edge pool. Every sport you can possibly play in animal embroidered pants is also available: bocce ball, croquet and badminton, in addition to nearby facilities for golf and sailing. In winter, the inn offers local hunting and jazz weekends. The town of St. Michaels and Easton are also ideal for antiquing. The Inn at Perry Cabin, 308 Watkins Lane, St. Michaels, Md., (410) 745-2200, www.perrycabin.com. Rooms range from $295 to $745.

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The Politics of Common Ground The Institute for Education’s BI-PARTISAN BREAKFASTS BYK AT H YK E M P E R

ABOVE: Coach Kathy Kemper and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg; BELOW (left to right): Bob Woodward, Coach Kathy Kemper and Andrea Mitchell; George Vradenburg, Sen. Hilary Clinton and Morty Davis

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“AT A TIME WHEN PARTISANSHIP IS DRIVING TOO MANY WASHINGTONIANS APART, KATHY KEMPER’S INFO GATHERINGS HAVE PERFORMED A REAL AND INCREASINGLY RARE SERVICE: THEY’VE BROUGHT REPUBLICANS, DEMOCRATS AND THE PRESS TOGETHER FOR CIVILIZED CONVERSATION ABOUT THE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUES OF THE DAY,” —JUDYWOODRUFF

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n Washington, it is vitally important to bring together diverse groups of people from various political backgrounds and professions to exchange ideas. That’s why I launched the Institute for Education and our INFO Policy Roundtables 15 years ago. The roundtables are educational, bipartisan breakfasts held once a month by invitation only. These small forums bring together politicians, journalists, Supreme Court justices, Cabinet Secretaries, Nobel laureates and senators to talk policy and politics. Always off-the-record and filled with candid banter, the breakfasts provide an opportunity to set aside differences and discuss the important issues of the day. In July, New York Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke to an INFO gathering that included media VIP’s Tim Russert, Bob Woodward and Andrea Mitchell. On September 13, we celebrated our 160th speaker with Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg. Our guests included journalist Judy Woodruff and Kuwaiti Ambassador Salem Al-Sabah. Today, we’re working on a new initiative called “The Politics of Common Ground,” designed to bring Republicans and Democrats together to help build personal friendships and (we hope) begin a much-needed change in the tone of discourse in Washington.

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CHRONOGRAPHWATCH $8,600 from Cartier; www.cartier.com

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FALLING THROUGH THE ICE B Y  A L I C E  R O G O F F  R U B E N S T E I N

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n March 2002, Barbara Overstreet and I were fortunate enough to be invited to fly one thousand miles from Anchorage to Nome along the Iditarod Trail. While there we saw the impact of climate change and how Native residents are dependent on the land and sea for their livelihood.We heard firsthand stories of how fishermen are literally falling through the melting ice and listened to their impassioned pleas to protect

their environment and way of life. From the Athabascan Indians of the vast Interior and Yukon river delta, to the Inupiat (Eskimo) villagers along the shores of Bering Sea, we were also welcomed and overwhelmed by the talent and works of art we encountered for sale—seemingly without a way to reach an appreciative market. That was the seed that ultimately spawned our non-profit foundation. The Alaska Native Arts Foundation was founded in 2002 by a dedicated group of Alaskan Native leaders, prominent Washingtonians and mothers from the Potomac School. What drew us together was a shared love for the great people and talent that Native artists represent. On behalf of the Alaska Native Arts Foundation and with the collaboration of the Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center, we are delighted to welcome visitors to this first-ever “Alaska Native Arts and Culture Festival,” from November 4th through November 7th. This event encompasses many aspects of Alaskan Native life that are not usually experienced at the same time: exhibits of historic artifacts, art shows, live music, dance performances, documentary and IMAX films, a panel discussion on Arctic climate change as documented by out of the wilderness Potomac School mothers bring Alaskan Native Art to the lower 48.

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Siberian Yupik residents, and a presentation on restoring the historic King Island village in the Bering Strait. Thanks to Willie Hensley, founder and president emeritus of the Alaska Federation of Natives, Catherine Stevens, Veronica Slajer and Jack Ferguson—all Alaska supporters now living in Washington—we created an organization that operates simultaneously in the two vastly different worlds of Alaska and the East Coast.With our staff in Anchorage, we travel regularly to remote villages to meet artists and post their works for sale on our website, alskanativearts.org. Most importantly, we strive to make “Lower 48” Americans aware of their Native co-citizens whose ancestors date back tens of thousands of years to the Bering Land Bridge; who still possess vast stores of knowledge from times past, that should be treasured by our modern society; who live and walk in places of unmatched beauty and majesty; and who—through Congressionally mandated ownership of a total of 44 million acres of their ancestral hunting and fishing grounds—are the custodians of a vast, rich and magnificent stretch of wilderness and tundra. These are the people who feel the brunt of the melting Arctic ice cap. Residents of St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea (closer to Siberia than to Nome, Alaska), will be at the Smithsonian to share first-hand observations of how thinner and smaller ice floes causes a growing scarcity of marine mammals whose meat is relied upon to feed entire villages. We hope to share these and other exciting discoveries of Alaskan Native experiences with you will be the beginning of your own excitement about the rich cultural experiences we so want to share with you.

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10 THINGS TO DO

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Q&ACAFÉATNATHANS RESTAURANTGEORGETOWN

“PORGYANDBESS” Watch the Washington National Opera’s new production of the Gershwin classic, “Porgy and Bess,” under the direction of Placido Domingo, www.dc-opera.org. November 18

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Hear MSNBC president, Rick Kaplan, answer questions about the competitive cable news business while enjoying a Nathans lunch, www.nathansgeorgetown. com. November 2

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MARCUSYou know you can’t resist the temptation to shop on the biggest shopping day of the year. Make it easier on yourself, head to Neiman Marcus where you can pick up a cashmere sweater for your sister or a Ferragamo tie for dad, www.neimanmarcus.com.

THEWASHINGTONBALLET OPENINGNIGHT Septime Webre and

the extraordinary dancers of The Washington Ballet will perform “Carmen,” “Nine Sinatra Songs,” and “Serenade,” www.washingtonballet.com. November 3

November 25

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ICESKATINGATTHENATIONALGALLERY

The National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden ice-skating opens in mid-November, weather permitting.View magnificent works of sculpture while skating in the open air and enjoying music from the state-of-the-art sound system, www.nga.gov. November 15

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DEVILS The Capitals are back in town for all of you hockey-starved fans. Watch them take on the New Jersey Devils at the MCI Center, www.washingtoncaps.com.

CLUBWatch the sex bomb himself croon his classic “It’s Not Unusual” at the trendy 9:30 club, www.930.com.

November 11

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COOKINGCLASSWITHMICHELRICHARD

The holidays are around the corner and home cooking will be in high demand. Learn from one of the best chefs, Citronelle’s Michel Richard, www.citronelledc.com. November 17

THANKSGIVINGAT  Don’t feel like

cooking for Thanksgiving? Try 1789 Restaurant’s traditional turkey dinner, www.1789restaurant.com.

“THECOMEDYOFERRORS”The Washington

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Post hails this production “lively and fun,” and not to be missed at The Shakespeare Theatre, www.shakespearedc.org. November 21

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F .Y. I . D.C . FASHION

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n 1955, Coco Chanel revolutionized fashion with the launch of the Chanel 2-55 Bag. With their chain shoulder strap, these chic accessories were the first bags worn on the shoulder, finally liberating women’s hands. For its fiftieth anniversary, Chanel has

produced an exact copy of the first model (shown above) in quilted leather with same rectangular fastener of the original. It is now also available in three different colors and five sizes. Chanel handbags are sold at Neiman Marcus and Saks Fifth Avenue.

DESIGN

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eveloper Anthony Lanier has already enticed Gore Dean Antiques, Contemporaria, Design Within Reach and Baker Furniture to move into the Georgetown design district Cady’s Alley, and esteemed Brazilian furniture manufacturer Artefacto is the latest addition. The company is well-known for sleek, streamlined pieces designed with Italian, French and Asian influences made with imported leather, suede, raw silks, linen and other natural materials. The hip showroom brings a fashion element to design and features a collection of artwork from 25 Brazilian contemporary artists. With swanky showrooms throughout Brazil and

Artefacto's sleek showroom

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rtist Andy Warhol created many portraits of personalities in the art, fashion, music, film and political world over the years. On November 10, one of his portraits of Washington’s own Ina Ginsburg will be auctioned at Sotheby’s in New York.

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Ginsburg was a friend of Warhol’s and was the Washington editor of Warhol’s magazine, Interview. The portrait is signed, titled and dated 1986. “Andy was drawn to power as much as to fame. To him, Washington, D.C. was the new Hollywood,” Ginsburg said. “For this portrait, I removed my makeup, and a pure white foundation was applied to my face, like a Kabuki mask. Andy then snapped the Polaroids from which he worked. The

several in Florida, all products are the visions of its renowned Brazilian design team. In the words of owner Paulo Bacchi, “Artefacto is for people who are not timid about expressing their style. And your style should be an expression of your life: the people you know, the city in which you live, the places you’ve been. So, Artefacto brings you a mix of styles to allow you to create your own.” Bacchi says the store here represents a “classic collection that we’ve restructured for a modern sensibility— that’s why Washington is such a fit. And what better way to celebrate our 30th anniversary by opening our store in the capital of the world!” The showroom opened with a VIP launch party on October 20, 2005.

neutral image gave him total freedom.” Ginsburg mentioned that Warhol had painted three different panels of her, even though he usually created all the panels the same. One will be auctioned, the other is in her possession and the Warhol Foundation has the last. Sotheby’s estimates that the portrait will fetch between $80,000 and $120,000. To make an absentee bid, visit www.southebys.com or call (212) 606-7414.

Warhol's Ina Ginsburg

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GOOD DEEDS

ACTIVISM& THEARTS

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rovisions Library in Dupont Circle will be celebrating the synergy of arts and social activism by showcasing some of the area’s leading poets, hip hop and performance artists on November 14 with “Amplify! A benefit for Provisions Library,� at Busboys and Poets, a hot new restaurant at 14th and V Streets, N.W. The facility offers a reading room, community forum, research center and an arts and cultural venue with an emphasis on fiction, poetry and memoirs. Performers at the benefit will include DJ’s Iona Rozeal Brown and Kristina Gray, poet E. Ethelbert Miller, Hip-hop performer Son od Nun and artist and playwright Anu Yadav. In 2001, the Gaea Foundation

opened a Resource Center for Activism and Arts in Washington to give the public greater access to alternative publications and other resources on social change. After the initial success of the Resource Center, the Foundation adopted the name Provisions Library. Opened by local restaurateur Andy Shallal, Busboys and Poets is named after poet Langston Hughes, who worked as a busboy at the Wardman Park Hotel in the 20’s and who, according to the restaurant’s website, once gave his poems to famedVachel Lindsey while he was dining at the hotel. The following day, Lindsey revealed to local newspapers that he had met a “busboy poet.� For more information on the upcoming event, visit www.provisionslibrary.org

 

DINING

CULINARYCOMPETITION ocal chef Morou Ouattara of Signatures restaurant in Penn Quarter will head to New York in January to take on the Iron Chef. After a surprise ingredient is revealed, the challenger and one of the Iron Chef’s face off in a timed competition against each other. He competed for the chance in a preliminary contest held by the Food Network here in Washington on October 5 against Ris Lacoste of 1789 restaurant and Cesare Lanfranconi of Ristorante Tosca. The judges, including Mayor Anthony Williams, representatives from the Food Network and Triage Entertainment, challenged

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the three chefs with to make a meal using pumpkin as the “secret ingredient.� Morou wowed them with pumpkin and lobster tea, pumpkin beignets and pumpkin sour cream with caviar. (All three chefs were nominees for Washington’s Chef of the Year Award at the 2005 RAMMY Restaurant Awards.) Morou Morou hails Ouattara from West Africa’s Ivory Coast and spices up his cuisine with a medley of African, French and American ingredients. He will compete against one of the three Iron Chefs: Bobby Flay, Mario Batali or Masaharu Morimoto. The show will air in 2006.

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1 5 M I N U T E S O F FA M E W I T H T H E CORCORAN 1869 SOCIETY P H OTO S BY Z A I D H A M I D A N D I M M A N U E L J AYC H A N D R A N

STUDIOMaybe people were celebrating the start of a holiday weekend. Maybe they were excited that rare works from Andy Warhol’s Pisburgh Museum are on exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. Or maybe the 700 guests were just having a rockin’ good time on October 7 as they celebrated the 1869 Society’s WashingtonLife-sponsored extravaganza honoring the late pop artist’s exhibit. No maer what the reason, Washington’s younger social set, including Michael Craine, Kate Gibney, Michael Saylor, Mark Ein, Christopher Reiter, Sara Allen and Alison Lukes, were content to

party in retro chic aire as DJ Seyhan pumped up the volume with ‘70s disco beats and throbbing House music. §HEAVYBAGGAGE Guests toted home gi bags with goodies from Kiehl’s, Patron tequila, Alchimie Forever, Urban Chic, Ann Hand, The Container Store, Alex Boutique, Sports Club LA, and Gucci, plus a copy of “The Philosophy of Andy Warhol from A to Z.” § AFTERHOURS Approximately 200 revelers capped off the night by making their way to WL’s invitationonly aer-party on the roof deck of the popular Tabaq Bistro in Adams Morgan.

Andy Warhol and friends

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Michael Crain and friends

Eric de Cholnoky, Liza Wynne and John Olimpitus

Sara Allen

Natalie Wilkison, Melih Buyukbayrak and Diana Minshall

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Anelli Werner and Kendall Broderick

SAMANTHA HABER AND JENNIFER DAILY

Alston Frazier

Jon Frederick and Dan Rairke

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Diana Minshak, Sarah Bowman, Gina Tunibaella, Wade ATKINSON and LESLIE HUTCHINSON

DJ Seyhan

Patrick Bateman and Erin Dougherty

Lana Hamilton and Michael Saylor

Amanda Duchek

Jose Reblando, Christina Flagler Martin and Mario Vicenzion

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Edward Cohen , Carlo Baerga and Mark Lerner

Rudy Bennett, Winston bao Lord, and Gary Bennett

N AT I O N A L S D I A M O N D G A L A PHOTOS BY JONAH KOCH

TAKERSANYONE?With no less than five out of eight competing owners groups on hand, the evening had all the makings of a showdown at the OK Corral. But the competitors were gracious sportsmen and the evening turned into an intimate opportunity to rub elbows with the new kids in town: The Nationals (yes, every player), looking dapper in their fied tuxedos at the first ever Washington Life-sponsored Nationals Diamond Gala on September 29 at the Mandarin Oriental. § Still, the electricity was palpable, particularly as manager Frank Robinson (who aended with wife, Barbara Ann and daughter, Nichelle) and Commissioner

Bud Selig have openly stated that “comfort” with the new owners is a key consideration to who will hold the title to the Washington Nationals. § The potential players are competing to pay $450 million for the privilege to purchase The Nationals. The line up included Fred Malek, who heads up The Washington Baseball Club with Jeff Zients, and a host of prominent area businessmen including Jim Kimsey, David Bradley and Winston Bao Lord. Mayor Anthony Williams, also in aendance that night, has publicly supported the Malek and Zients group owning the team. However, Malek, one of the favored frontrunners, declared, “Whoever it is

will have my full, undivided support.” § Many believe that the Theodore “Ted” Lerner family, real-estate moguls from Bethesda and part owners of the Capitals, are also an ideal pick and in the running for the title as their list of investors is mainly a family affair with Lerner’s son Mark and his two sons-in-law. § Developer Franklin Haney, SR. has made a strong bid as well and showed up with his entire family, magnanimously announcing that he would match the evening’s fundraising proceeds dollar for dollar up to $600,000. The night need $ 820,000 to fund baseball clubs for underprivileged children. § Albert Lord, chairman

Mary Alice Haney and Mae Haney Grennan

Jonathan Ledecky

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French and Lucia boone, Frank Robinson and Tara Boone

Susan Harreld, Tim Russert and Michael Harreld

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Mayor Anthony Williams and Tony Taveras

Hector Carrasco, Brian Schnieder, Ryan Church, Jose Guillen, Michael Harreld And Livan Hernandez

of Sallie Mae, and William

a serious contender because

Collins (who aended high

of his strong relationship with

school in Washington) are

Selig. A decision is expected

also in the running, leading a

to be announced this

group of Virginia businessmen

month or definitely before

interested in buying the team.

Christmas. § NON-BIDDERS

§ Jonathan Ledecky, together

Tony Taveras, Tim Russert

with investor George Soros,

along with other donors

has also entered the fray with

including French, Lucia and

a matching offer. § On the

Tara Boone of Boone & Sons

long list of potential buyers

Jewelers shared in the night’s

is Yusef Jackson, son of

festivities which celebrated

Rev. Jesse Jackson, as well

the culmination of the

as grocery store billionaire

Nationals first season. PNC

Ronald Burkle, both of whom

Bank (underwrote the event)

missed the night’s festivities

regional president Michael

and are considered long-

Harreld and wife Susan

shots. § Lacking a hometown

mingled with the players,

advantage, Indianapolis

including Brad Wilkerson,

media mogul Jeff Smulyan,

Ryan Church, Tony Blanco

missed the event as well but

and first base coach Don

nevertheless is rumored to be

Buford, among others. Mary Alice Haney and Mae Haney Grennan

Entrance to Mandarin Oriental

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Jamey and Kim Carroll

Jordan and Coach Jim Bowdan

Bill and Kerry Collins and Friend

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Abigail Greenway

MELLOW YELLOW FOR G O V I N D A’ S 3 0 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y PHOTOS BY KYLE SAMPERTON

CHANCEENCOUNTER At the 30th Anniversary of his gallery on September 23, Chris Murray recalled how he could never have imagined that knocking on folk-rock legend and artist Donovan’s door at the Mayflower Hotel in the ‘60s would lead to a 30 year friendship. Recently, Donovan played at his wedding in Ireland, and is now showing his collection of “Sapphographs” at Govinda Gallery. Inspired by the circa 600 B.C. lady poet Sappho from the Greek island of Lesbos, Donovan aempts to and succeeds at evoking the beauty of the wrien word in visual form. § MUSICAL MILESTONEJody Arlington, artist Sid Maurer and Abigail Greenway reminisced

about the Georgetown gallery’s impressive record of displaying early works by photographers Annie Leibovitz and Astrid Kirchher. Over the years, Murray has exhibited many works from Andy Warhol and others who inspired him to look at cuingedge photography. Today, the gallery is known worldwide for its music-related photography. § MARKSELINGER’S STARIRWELL In December, Govinda Gallery will exhibit works from Rolling Stone photographer Mark Selinger’s new book, “In My Stairwell.” The book features Paul McCartney, Susan Sarandon, Lou Reed, Tom Wolfe, among others, who all bring different personalities to the same small space, his stairwell.

Maureen Harrington

Andre Gregory

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Donovan and Chris Murray

Susan Burgerman

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Design Cuisine Caterers

Washington, DC 703 979 9400 www.designcuisine.com


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Kay Kendall and Blase Mills

ALL ABOARD! PHOTOS BY JOHAH KOCH

ANIGHTATSEADespite the rain, Washington Life magazine and Jack Davies set sail on the Potomac River with a crew of Washingtonians aboard the former presidential yacht U.S.S Sequoia on September 26 for what could be one of its last privately commandeered cruises. It is rumored that owner Gary Silversmith may be selling it to a museum soon. Passengers enjoyed what turned out to be a beautiful night against the dramatic backdrop of Washington’s skyline, dining on a bounty of grilled shrimp on sweet potato cakes and crisp wonton spoons filled with lobster, corn, and avocado, a lá Ridgewells. § ARICH HISTORYThe presidential yacht has had its fair share of notable guests. It was the site of President John F. Kennedy’s last birthday party before his

assassination, the night Marilyn Monroe sang “Happy Birthday.” President Harry Truman gave the order to drop the bomb on Hiroshima from the Sequoia. Approximately 30 years later, Japanese Emperor Hirhito and his wife came to Washington to meet with President Gerald Ford and to cruise the Potomac River on the same yacht. President Ford also conducted cabinet meetings on board and President Herbert Hoover loved the boat so much he even put it on the cover of his 1932 White House Christmas card. The boat’s original memorabilia, including the bed that both Presidents Nixon and Bush slept in and the piano that President Truman played on, are still on board today, each with a story or two behind it that the captain eagerly shared with the guests. Vullutat Cidunt dole

Jack Davies

Pamela Aparicio

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The Ship’s Original Piano

Judyand andMark MarkLerner Lerner Judy

Sharon Shakarji and Carlos Urrutia

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Bolivian Amb. Jaime Aparicio Bolivian and Amb. HenryJaime von ApariEichel

Peter Marx

Theo Adamstein and Mark McFadden

Farah Pampillonia

Presidential Memorabelia Including WL

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Grace Bender, Lisa Gordon Hagerty and Jodie Ugaz

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Keith Lipert

View of the Cabin

The USS Sequoia Presidential Yacht

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Thelonious Monk, Jr.

Competition Winner Lage Lund performs with George benson

A H I G H N O T E AT T H E T H E L O N I O U S MONK JAZZ COMPETITION PHOTOS BY JONAH KOCH

CUTTIN’THECHORDSAT THEKENNEDYCENTER Washington Life was proud to serve as the magazine media sponsor for the 2005 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition. The talent raised the roof of the Kennedy Center as young guitarists competed for cash scholarships and performed with some of the world’s premier jazz greats, including Terence Blanchard, Wayne Shorter, Peter Bernstein, Rodney Jones and Vic Juris. Jazz icon Herbie Hancock, Oscar winner for his “Round Midnight” film score and winner of 10 Grammys, introduced the evening and film star Billy Dee Williams emceed. § JAZZLEGENDSJAM The incomparable Dee Dee Bridgewater nearly stopped

the show as she sang a duet with venerable trumpeter Clark Terry, who le Duke Ellington to join the NBC “Tonight Show” band, (becoming the first African-American musician to be employed by the network.) Thelonious Monk, Jr., the jazz and R&B drummer and recording artist who chairs the institute named for his father, has worked hard to preserve America’s jazz legacy. § CREATING FUTURELEGENDSCarter said that thanks to corporate sponsorship, the 19-year-old institute is able to continue its educational programs around the country and the world to bring jazz to millions of people, despite drastic cuts in government funding for the arts.

Lage Lund and Dee Dee Bridgewater

Billy D. Williams

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Clark Terry

stanley jordan

Junko Moriya

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Marvin Hamlisch and Jacqueline Mars

A GOLDEN OPENING NIGHT PHOTOS BY KYLE SAMPERTON

Party Favors

AMEMORABLEAFFAIR Placido Domingo and Michael Sonnenreich wanted to make sure that prominent opera lovers Bey Knight Scripps, Ina Ginsburg, Jacqueline Badger Mars, Jo Ann Mason, Lucky Roosevelt, John Pohanka and Librarian of Congress James Billington, among others, would never forget the celebration of the Washington National Opera’s 50th Anniversary Season. Aer a daring opening night production of the rarely presented “I Vespri Siciliani,” there was no doubt they succeeded. The opera fueled much dinner conversation aer Domingo explained that it would have been much easier to produce

a very popular opera, like “Carmen” or “Aida,” to mark the occasion. § DESIGNER DUDS No celebration would be complete without gorgeous gowns. Grega Daly was one of the many fashion standouts in a hot black Oscar de la Renta gown. Rima Al-Sabah and Cindy Jones wore striking creations by Emanuel Ungaro. § PICTURE PERFECT Much of the set design featured grand picture frames, which were used to isolate plot lines as various paintings flashed across the stage. Bey Casey, whose family foundation underwrote the several multi-million dollar production, shared that she was pleased that everyone seemed happy.

John Pohanka, Betty Scripps and James Billington

Michael and Linda Sonnenreich

Shane Doty and Rima Al-Sabah

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Placido Domingo and Betty Casey

Evan and Cindy Jones

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Leo and Grega Daly and Prince Ali Aziz

Marshall Thompson and Janet Black

Daphne and Gary Rappaport, Jo Ann Mason and Susan Lehrman

Calvin Cafritz

Amber Schultz and Jane Cafritz

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Placido Domingo

Heather Vinant and Michael Flanagan

Andrew Reese and Jennice Fuentes

Dr. and Mrs. Paul Averback

Maria Galeghine, John Brudall and Selwa “Lucky� Roosevelt

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P O L L Y W O O D

Good Night, and Good Luck!

Hollywood on the Potomac BYJA N ETDO N OVA N f you think that means “sweet dreams,” you’re wrong. “Good Night, And Good Luck” is both the signature sign-off used by CBS broadcaster Edward R. Murrow on his nightly newscast in the 1950’s

reception co-hosted by the RadioTelevision News Directors Association and Warner Independent Pictures on September 20th at the newly renovated Four Seasons Hotel in Georgetown. Clad in signature black, throngs of attractive young guests got closerthanthis delaying the Q&A, but hey… It was George Clooney. Also seen: David Strathairn, who plays Murrow; Grant Heslov, cowriter, producer and the actor who plays Don Hewitt, the CBS producer who later became the founding executive producer of “60 Minutes” chatting it up with The Washington Post’s

Chris Berry and George Clooney

and the title of a new movie directed by George Clooney. It chronicles the scaremonger tactics used by SenRita Wilson, Tom Hanks, ator Joseph McCarthy to & Jim Lovel expose so-called communists in the U.S. during The Cold War, thus gaining notoriety Ben Bradlee and writer/author Sally for himself and using fear tactics subQuinn; as well as FOX News’ Chris sequently known as “McCarthyism.” While the McCarthy was terroriz- Wallace and wife Lorraine; and former Postie Myra MacPherson, who ing Americans, including many Holhas just submitted her manuscript on lywood heavyweights, an outraged muckraker I.F. Izzy Stone with her Murrow defiantly took the senator’s husband and former Florida Senator agenda to task on the air waves— Jack Gordon. much to the chagrin of the network The panel discussion was moderexecutives whom he eventually won ated by Marvin Kalb, the last correover. spondent hired by Edward R. MurClooney, who plays Murrow’s row at CBS. Clooney, whose father executive producer, Fred Friendly, arrived in Washington to speak at a was a long-time TV anchor in Cin-

50

cinnati, said he has been interested in journalism since he was a child, and that Edward R. Murrow was one of his broadcast heroes. Overheard: Asked if he would go into politics as did his father, Clooney laughingly and knowingly responded that he had way too much messy personal history, making that a rather firm no. The movie is a must see. And, if you ever hear a broadcaster sign off with, “Good night, And good luck,” beware!

third man to walk on the Moon, and often referred to as “Rocketman.” Accompanied by Tina and Spike Karalekas, the energetic Aldrin was walking on air at the VIP reception. The 40-minute film creates real lunar missions in 3-D with celebrity voiceovers of the astronauts’ actual words in a way that has never been experienced before. “Kids still want to be astronauts,” Cunningham said while commenting on today’s riskaverse society. No problem here Houston!

HOUSTONWE’VEGOT APROBLEM! That may have been the case when first spoken by Apollo XIII Commander Jim Lovell in April of 1970, and again by Tom Hanks as Commander Lovell in Ron Howard’s “Apollo 13” in June of 1995, but it certainly not the case when the National Air and Space Museum lifted off the world premiere of Hanks’ new space odyssey “Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3-D” on September 21. Hanks, looking fit and trim, was accompanied by his actress wife Rita Wilson on the red carpet where “moon walking” took on new meaning. Among the celebrity guests roaming the halls were Apollo 13 Commander Jim Lovell, Rusty Schweickart, Apollo 15 astronaut Dr. David Scott. Apollo 7 astronaut Walter Cunningham and TV’s Bill Nye,“The Science Guy.” Buzz Aldrin, who maintains a visible presence in Washington and is often seen at the home of Cristina and John McLaughlin during White House Correspondents’ Association weekend was in from California with his wife Lois as was Nancy Conrad, widow of astronaut Pete Conrad, the

JOEYULEJRISINTHEHOUSE? If you’re Mickey Rooney you don’t need to be tall or care what your real name is. The pint-sized actor who began his path to stardom at 17 months of age and dated some of Hollywood’s most beautiful women including Ava Gardner, is alive and well.The overenergized and spirited octogenarian was delighted to attend this year’s Gunny’s Ball honoring former Senator Bob Dole at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel on September 10th. Still amusing, still charming, it was clear why Jan Chamberlin his wife of many years kept a tight clutch on her man. After eight marriages, one of which lasted only 100 days, she’s been hanging on since 1978, so it’s safe to assume he finally got it right. The otherwise patriotic evening took a downturn when the emcee made a reference to Senator John Kerry’s military record. Even in a heavily Republican crowd, boos were instantaneous and loud. CNN’s Edie Emery, ABC's Chris Berry, former Afghan Ambassador Ishaq Shahryar and wife Hafizah enjoyed a revival of patriotic music from “The Halls of Montezuma to the Shores of Tripoli” accompanied by fanfare and flags.

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HIGHMARKS FORTHETROOPS➤ The Washington Life-sponsored USO Annual Gala hit another high note this year with Wayne Newton, country crooner Neal McCoy and comedian Jeff Ross. Performers and soldiers traded in camouflage for black-ties to attend the September 14 event at the Washington Hilton honoring outgoing Chairman of the Joint Chiefs General Richard Myers and five service heroes from each branch of the armed forces who received the “USO Service Member of the Year” award for acts of heroism. Surprisingly though, the “Spirit Award” actually went to his longdeserving wife Mary Jo. Myers. “I don’t know whether I’m more surprised at this award or more surprised that my husband of 40 years can surprise me,” she said. “As honored as I am, it pales in comparison to the honor we’ve had to serve in the military these last 40 years and to serve alongside the kind of men and women we have in uniform. I’m in awe of each of them.” Among those on hand to honor the troops: Hall of Fame’s NFL quarterback John Elway; NBA superstar Shaquille O’Neal; local soprano star Harolyn Blackwell, whose “God Bless America” caused nearly 900 attendees to rise their feet; also local singer songwriter Harry Rollins; Miss USA Chelsea Cooley; actress Kathy Kinney; and the evening’s emcee,TV personality Deborah Norville. It was around this time last year that “Mr. Las Vegas” of “Danke Schoen” fame packed up his bags with McCoy and headed oversees following in the footsteps of the legendary Bob Hope. Now part of the USO Celebrity Circle, Newton has made stops in Quatar, Bahrain, Kuwait and boarded the USS Abraham Lincoln with General Franks.

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sarah farnsworth and general rodney anderson

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jeffrey ross

specialist william groves and sargeant major reynard watkins

john elway, carrie stevens and friend (at left)

wayne Newton, chelsea cooley and shaquille o'neal

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

general peter pace and lynne pace

rob whittle and martha willcox

General Richard myers, deborah norville and mary jo myers

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DeSelle Design Stephen Colbert and Jake Tepper Stepping Out

Stephen Colbert and Jake Tepper red hot handbags

DESELLE DESIGN was founded by award-winning

publication designer, Wayne M. DeSelle, with a commitment to producing sophisticated print and web design ■ We’re experts in creating refined marketing and identity materials of all kinds for small businesses and individuals, and we take special delight in producing outstanding print publications ■ In fact, the magazine you’re holding was redesigned by our team ■ To see samples and a list of current clients, visit us at Cullen dirner

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Jessica Lewis

FERRAGAMO STEPS OUT PHOTOS BY ZAID HAMID

FEETDON’TFAILMENOW Ferragamo stepped into Washington’s booming luxury retail fray on September 15 with the opening of its first Washingtonarea emporium at Tysons Galleria. The chic store incorporates the new worldwide Ferragamo store design concept created by Michael Gabellini, showcasing a complete collection of men’s and women’s shoes, silk and leather accessories as well as ready-towear lines. § SHOPPERSSPECIALGuests took advantage of the opening celebration to purchase shoes, ties and handbags at a 30 percent discount. § TRAMEZZA Starting in November, Ferragamo will offer private fiing sessions to create custom designed Tramezza shoes, which will be hand-sewn in Florence. Amy Robb

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Rima Al-Sabah and Colin Powell

NSO’S SEASON OPENING BALL PHOTOS BY ZAID HAMID

Jim Johnson, Sen. John Glenn and Jim Kimsey

CLASSACTS A-list Washingtonians and their guests gathered to celebrate the National Symphony Orchestra’s Season Opening Ball, kicking off the NSO’s 75th anniversary season at the Kennedy Center. § STANDINGOVATION Music Director Leonard Slatkin led the orchestra with

Yo Yo Ma and Ann Jordan

Condoleezza Rice

Elizabeth Stevens and Sam Green

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three special performers, internationally acclaimed cellist Yo-Yo Ma, pianist Emanuel Ax and violinist Itzhak Perlman, in a diverse, energetic and exciting program. Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, and ball chair Alma Powell were the dramatic narrators in a powerful reading of

Aaron Copeland’s “Lincoln Portrait.” A lively dinner dance followed the sizzling concert. Guests included Roger and Vicki Sant, who recently donated $10 million to the NSO, as well as a who’s who of Washington’s elite and music lovers. § SEEN Vernon Jordan, Roger and Vicki Sant and Sen. John Glenn.

Mercedes Bass

Jellie van Eenennaam and Dutch Amb. Boudewijn J. van Eenennaam

Vernon Jordan, Pamela Aparicio, Yo Yo Ma, Bolivian Amb. Jaime Aparicio and Nicholas MA

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John F. Kennedy

George Stevens and Stephanie Mansfield

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Ann Free and Barbara Boggs

W E LC O M E PA R T Y PHOTOS BY KYLE SAMPERTON

Tommy Boggs and Jim Free

Mandy Ourisman and Lisa Gordon-Hagerty

THESHOWMUSTGOON The plan seemed simple and gracious. Lisa GordonHagerty and Grace Bender were going to host a dinner at Neyla on September 22 to welcome their friend Morton Cohen, an entrepreneur moving to D.C. from Houston. But when the guest of honor got stranded in Texas due to

Hurricane Rita, the hostesses decided not to cancel their evening of exotic cocktails and Middle Eastern food. § NEYLA’SHIDEAWAY The party was the first hosted in Neyla’s beautiful new back room, where rich, deep purple velvet wall hangings create

the atmosphere of being inside an exotic tent. Tommy and Barbara Boggs, Jim and Leone Reeder, Togo and Gail West, Mary and Mandy Oursiman and former Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge were among the 45 guests.

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Jim Kimsey and Cid Szegedy

azar nafisi

BOARDING THE PEACE TRAIN PHOTOS BY KYLE SAMPERTON

PRAISEWORTHY PEACEMAKERSTwo hundred and fiy charitable Washingtonians joined Refugees International (RI) on October 10 to honor former United Nations Ambassadors John C. Danforth and Richard C. Holbrooke; actor Sam Waterson of “Law and Order;” and Samantha Power, author of “A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide;” for their exceptional humanitarian efforts. § SHARINGTHE EXPERIENCE The annual RI awards dinner, “Celebrating Peacemakers,” was held at the Kennedy Center and raised about $250,000 for humanitarian aid. Ambassador Elizabeth Bagley and Dale Mathias co-chaired the memorable evening supported

by such venerable trustees and donors as Jim Kimsey, Mariella Traeger, Robin West and Eileen ShieldsWest. §EXTRAORDINARY EFFORTSThe four honorees were recognized for distinctive contributions to peacemaking: Danforth for his achievements in negotiating the Comprehensive Peace Agreement that ended a violent civil war in southern Sudan; Holbrooke for his role in negotiating the Dayton Agreement, now celebrating its 10th anniversary of bringing an end to the bloodshed in the Balkans; Waterson for 20 years of devoted service to the RI board of directors; and Power for her wrien efforts to increase public awareness about genocide.

Ken Bacon

Sen. John Danforth and Richard Holbrooke

Nadir and Kati Bulgari and Roya Rafei

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Sam Waterson

Smith Bagley, margaret warner, moroccan amb.aziz mekouar, amb. elizabeth bagley and irish amb. noel fahey

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Wondering what’s going on tonight…or any night? Promoting an event? Stephen Colbert andWayne Jake Tepper Dina and Curtis

Stephen and Colbert JakeLieberman Tepper Mariella and Michael Traeger Sen. and Joseph

Announcing Washington Life ’s free interactive online social calendar!

Search by date or category or post your own event… from black-tie galas to lectures or children’s events. Set the date and invite a friend.

Sharon and Bruce Bradley

Robert and Elena Albritton

CHILDREN’S L AW C E N T E R PHOTOS BY KYLE SAMPERTON

www.washingtonlife.com

Prince Reza Pahlavi and Princess Yasmine Pahlavi

to browse or post your event Click on social calendar and get started today! Over 1.5 Million hits a month 56

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

NOOBJECTIONS More than 400 guests enjoyed picturesque views from the Kennedy Center’s Roof Terrace as they toasted the Children’s Law Center’s legal efforts to help at-risk children to find loving homes. Lawyers from firms Akin Gump Strauss Hauer Feld, Arnold & Porter, and Stepoe & Johnson turned out in force to show their support. § FAMILYAFFAIRCo-chairs Mariella Trager and Valorie Danto-Sharpe thanked the contributors for helping to raise over $200,000 for the cause. Among the guests were Sen. Joe Lieberman, Kathleen Mahews, Reza and Yasmine Pahlavi, Kara Kennedy Allen, Linda Semans Donovan. Deborah Gore Dean and Richard Pawlik made it a family affair by bringing their 10-year-old daughter Jamie along to enjoy the music, food and conversation.

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H E A L I N G L I G H T AT T H E I N D I A N E M B A S SY P H OTO S BY I M M A N U E L J AYC H A N D R A N

CELEBRATINGHOPE On October 3, Washington author Alexandra Villard de Borchgrave and numerous VIP guests celebrated her recent publication “Healing Light: Thirty Messages of Love, Hope and Courage” at the residence of Indian Ambassador Ronen Sen.

Indian Amb. Ronen Sen and Alexandra de Borchgrave

Smita Jassal, Aniko Gall Schott, Alexandra de Borchgrave, Jo Ann Mason and Kalpana Sen

Sir Alstair Horne, Stephanie Mansfield and Arnaud de Borchgrave

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§ SHEHADADREAM “On the second anniversary of the September 11 tragedy,” Mrs. de Borchgrave stated, “I was inspired by the children going to Ground Zero. Two days later, I woke up with these poems in my head.” The book is extravagantly adorned with Indian-themed Mogal paintings from the private

Lisa Gordon Hagerty, Blythe J. Lyons and Catherine Jones

collections of major museums and a forward by Boutros Boutros-Ghali. § DININGIN SYLE Secretaries of Defense William S. Cohen and Frank Carlucci, and former National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski were among those spoed congratulating the author and enjoying traditional Indian fare.

Samia Farouki, Ann Nitze and Singaporean Amb. Chan Heng Chee

HUDA and Samia Farouki and Ann and Lloyd Hand

Hafizah Shahyar and Princess Ana Maria Al-Senussi

57


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THIS M O N TH: CHINESE

WITH DONNA SHOR

BLING • PROSPERITY? • KENYA • REUNIONS • WATER & WINE • NEWSPAPER • AGING • PAGEANTRY

AROUND TOWN

Smithsonian Secretary lawrence small, the Congressional Hispanic

Jeffrey and Juleanna Glover

Leadership Institute and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute

Weiss honored Father Angelo

hosted a reception at the National Museum of American History

D’Agostino at their Wyoming

on September 12 to celebrate a decade of Latino cultural contri-

Avenue home for his work

butions to American society. Pilar O’Leary was recently named

with the nyumbani hospice/ orphanage in Kenya on

the director of the Smithsonian Center for Latino Initiatives.

September 17. A benefit for the orphanage was also held at the CHUCK CONCONI AND FATHER ANGELO D’AGOSTINO

Renaissance Washington Hotel.

Artist Mary Page Evans celebrated the opening of her show “mountains and sea” on September 15 at Addison-Ripley Gallery in Georgetown. Guests included artist Bill PILAR O’LEARY

Dunlap, Deedy Ogden, Sally and Buck Chapoton, John Firestone, Jane Cafritz,

HENRY MUNOZ, LAWRENCE SMALL AND XAVIER BECERRA

Jackie Rush, Sarah and Ted Stettinius and Rick Rickertson. Later, First Lady Laura Bush, came to the gallery for a private viewing.

CHINESEBLINGThe Kennedy Center’s Festival of China opened with a bang, literally. Noise from the very special fireworks was so loud that frightened residents were calling emergency services from every part of the area. This monthlong celebration of Chinese culture featured more than 600 performers in Chinese dance, music, theater and traditional opera, and spurred a number of China-related events around town. One was a very charming evening co-hosted by Aniko Gaal Schott and Bill Haseltine at his handsome Georgetown home. KaiYin Lo’s jewelry collection, “The New China Chic,” was shown, and guests also toasted her fellow designers Barney Cheng, Vivienne Tam and Tim Yip as the champagne flowed.

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Kai-Yin’s collections are known for her placing of rare and precious materials—unusual jades, ivories, sapphires and pearls—in contemporary settings. PROSPERITYONYOURCOMPUTER?Also in Georgetown, over on Wisconsin Avenue, Fernando Batista’s K.N.E.W. Gallery show-

cased three notable Chinese artists. Poet-painter Huang Yung Yu uses satire in his paintings, sometimes anti-government-directed. Artist Xu Huayi was denied permission to study art during the (very anticultural) Cultural Revolution, but since then has been able to study under Huang Yung Yu, among others. The dragonflies in Xu’s painting are exquisite, and Fernando told us they are never attempted by novices, as they require over 20,000

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brush strokes for each wing (and a lot of patience!). Ninety-one year old Xu Lin Lu, a Chinese impressionist, likes to paint fish, and his viewers like that, too, because fish are the symbol of wealth, and viewing them could attract good fortune. It didn’t add anything to my wallet as I looked, but you could try the gallery’s web site, “knew.com,” and see if the finny ones can work their magic for you over the internet. FROMKENYATOKALORAMA When Jeffrey and Juleanna Glover Weiss introduced their guest of honor, Father Angelo D’Agostino, at their Wyoming

Avenue reception, Glover Weiss told of the Catholic priest’s work in Kenya, the hardships at the NYUMBANI Hospice/Orphanage

MARY PAGE EVANS AND PAGE EVANS

there, and its need for support. Among the appreciative crowd were Laura Genero, the deputy secretary of labor; Washington Times writer Ralph Hallow and his wife Millie; Antoine Sanfuentes, NBC’s senior White House producer; Washington Post cartoonist Tom Toles; Kristen Silberberg from the state department; and Time-Warner’s Matt Cooper.While Fr. D’Agostino was here from Nairobi, a benefit was held for the orphanage at the Renaissance Washington Hotel, with entertainment by Washington’s favorite musical mischief-maker, political satirist Mark Russell. FALLREUNIONSThe 250-strong crowd thronging the Chevy Chase Club at Lynda Webster’s annual fall coffee gathering included many of Washington’s most-visible and stylish

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A R O U N D TOW N A R O U N D TOW N A R O U N D TOW N A R O U N D TOW N A R O U N D TOW N

WENDI CHAPMAN, JOHN MCLAUGHLIN AND NICOLE BAGLEY

Animal lovers and their canine counterparts came out in full force for Animal Fair magazine’s jeepyappy hourto benefit the Washington Animal Rescue League on September 15. Animal Fair is the first lifestyle magazine for animal lovers in support of fairness to animals.

women.Tall and always elegant Nini Ferguson and petite, always-beautifully-dressed Tandy Dickerson were a case in point. (“Wyatt helps with decisions on my wardrobe,”Tandy says of her husband.“He has a discerning eye that I trust.”) “WATERDIVIDESNATIONSAND WINEUNITESTHEM”This is

wine and hospitality consultant Daniel Mahdavian’s (of D.M. and Company) happy motto, and it was wine which united him to his betrothed, wine authority Melanie Corcoran, granddaughter of the legendary lobbyist and FDR-confidante Tommy “the Cork” Corcoran. They celebrated their engagement at an “It’s nacho ordinary” Latin-themed party hosted by Elsie and Dr. Jim Sprague, and Melanie’s mother, Carole Anderson, with south-ofthe-border food, margaritas and wines (top quality, of course) for 80 local and international friends,

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ANIKO GAAL SCHOTT, HUDA AND SAMIA FAROUKI AND DIDI CUTLER

DAVID IGNATIUS AND WILLIAM HASELTINE

In conjunction with the Kennedy Center’s festivalofchina, Aniko Gaal Schott and William Haseltine hosted a reception to showcase jewelry designer Kai-Yin Lo’s collection, “The New China Chic” on October 4. Kai-Yin’s collections are known for her placement and use of rare and precious materials— unusual jades, ivories, sapphires and pearls—in contemporary settings. PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON

including Anthony and Chase Harrigan of IBG Partners LLC; Les and Mary Lou Zimmerman of First Capital Realty (who are big wine collectors), Jan Donovan; Salim and Himela Mohammed of Vancouver; Melanie’s father, Dr. David Corcoran, and his wife, Margaret; and Steve Maguire, the night life lounge guru, about to open his new place at Dupont Circle, the Science Club. THENEWESTOLDESTNEWSPAPERUnlike all the just-born

publications recently popping up like—well, popcorn—on the local scene, is the historical Alexandria Times. John Arundel of the communications family, has just revived—200 years later—the newspaper that George Washington sat down with at five o’clock in the morning to read under his favorite fig tree. The Times’ re-launch was celebrated at a party at Crystal City’s McCormick and Schmidt’s

restaurant, where we learned that co-owner William McCormick had just been appointed U.S. ambassador to New Zealand and was about to leave for that country. AGEDBUTNOTAGINGOne publication that is fresh and certainly even more relevant today than when it began is the recently revamped the Congressional Quarterly, which just celebrated its sixtieth birthday. Newsmakers and news gatherers flocked to Decatur House for CQ’s event, and some even made it around the corner to Olives for the instantaneous after-party. Host and CQ president and publisher Robert Merry has been attracting attention and controversy with his recent, incisive book.The title explains the hoop-la-la,“Sands of Empire: Missionary Zeal, American Foreign Policy and the Hazards of Global Ambition…” A week prior, power players, columnists and staffers joined the Washingtonian’s Philip and Ellie

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Merrill and editor Jack Limpert to celebrate the magazine “Washington Lives By.” Guests included Fred Malek, John McLaughlin, former Sen. Paul Laxalt and former GOP chairman Frank Fahrenkopf. POMPANDPAGEANTRYCarmen Petrowitz and William Feighan rep-

resented the United States recently at a colorful ceremony in Austria. The “white-tie-and-decorations” Investiture of the Order of St. Stanislas took place in the 12th century Plankenstein Castle, just outside Vienna, during an eventful weekend. The chivalric order was founded in 1765 by Poland’s last king in honor of the martyred saint, and continues today the charitable works for which it was begun. Afterward Carmen returned to the U.S. only to take off again for Buenos Aires. Send advance notice of an event you think Around Town should know about to aroundtown@washingtonlife.com.

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hey are known to the world on a double first name basis: Ben and Sally. Before Bennifer, before Brangelina, they took one look at each other and it was Kismet. He was barrel-chested and gravelyvoiced, always dashing in English shirts and a loosened tie. She was blonde and witty, a military brat in oversized sunglasses and mini skirts. Her admirers were legion: Warren Beatty, Warren Hoge. His female admirers included Jackie Kennedy and Lauren Bacall, who calls him “Benji.” And so, Ben landed Sally, soon followed by his divorce from then-wife Toni. Although perhaps apocryphal, the story goes like this: she was looking for a job and walked into the Washington Post one day to apply for a party reporter position. He was smitten. She told him one salient detail; she had never written a story before. “Nobody’s perfect,” he barked. Sally went on to fame as a seriously edgy Style writer who was nicknamed “Salty” Quinn. No one was more deft in getting well-known subjects to reveal their foibles. Who was it? Henry Kissinger, who said that being interviewed by gossip columnist Maxine Cheshire made you want to kill her. Being interviewed by Sally Quinn made you want to kill yourself. Jason Robards played Ben in “All The President’s Men”. Stockard Channing played her in “Heartburn.” Yes, they were best friends with Carl Bernstein and Nora Ephron and it was in Sally and Ben’s kitchen that Nora either dumped a bottle of wine

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over her philandering husband’s head, or a fruit pie. Details, details. That was the ‘70s. If you were invited to Ben and Sally’s you were annointed. They never entertained all that much but when they did, it was perfect. Their New Year’s Eve parties were legendary for the eclectic mix of media, celebrity and political types. During the 80’s, they proved the adage that living well is the best revenge, buying a home in St. Mary’s County and continuing their various writing projects while raising son Quinn and quietly doing work for The Lab School and Children’s Hospital. Somehow the spotlight was never very far from Ben and Sally, although they never courted it. Perhaps by this very casual approach to life and living, and the loyalty of friends and family, they have remained on most everyone’s A list. They are fun to be around.They know where the bodies are buried.They have staying power, and wicked senses of humor. And if you ever find yourself seated next to one of them at dinner, you know you’ve arrived. For this months feature story Editor-inChief, Nancy Bagley, chatted with Sally and Ben in their Georgetown home....

Washington Life: Is there anything left that no one has asked you about Deep Throat and Watergate? Ben Bradlee: No, No (laughs), I mean I’ve

been asked so many questions over so many years and the only one that ever gets a reaction is, “Did you tell Sally?” and when I say “no” I don’t think they believe me. Sally Quinn: And they really don’t believe that I never asked. They’d say surely Sally “wink, wink” could get it out of him… I


POWER didn’t want Ben to tell me because I didn’t want him to break his word to Bob [Woodward.] It was Bob’s secret to tell. Also, I knew I would be the culprit if it ever leaked. All fingers would be pointing at me. WL: How has the social scene over the years changed since the Kennedy era? BB: In the Kennedy years,The White House

was really the center of a social scene, but not the only social scene. For all that I know, there may be a social scene around the Bushes, its just not one I know anything about.They don’t’ seem to get out much. SQ: I first came on the scene during the Johnson years and that crowd was out all the time enjoying themselves. Nixon wasn’t par-

Ben Bradlee and Sally Quinn are Washington’s orignal power couple par excellence

black hole, which also happened at the end of the Reagan administration. But [the Bush crowd] never went out to begin with. Even Colin Powell who was everywhere before he became secretary of state, just stopped going out. I think part of it was he didn’t want to be viewed suspiciously by the other people in the White House who rarely go anywhere.There has been no involvement, no communication, and no interest in the people who live here. BB: There’s always plenty of leaking going on. I think [Karl] Rove and [Scooter] Libby’s troubles show that, but the journalist crowd has had trouble with the Bush administration and getting people to talk to them. I don’t feel terribly robbed but maybe that’s me. Katharine Graham gave the Bushes a great,

“I like Ben’s energy. And, as much as it annoys me, I like his sense of invincibility.” — SALLYO NB EN “I like Sally’s spirit once she wakes up. This is a lively household.” — B ENO NSALLY ticularly social but a lot of the people in his administration were. WL: Do you think part of the reason being social is frowned upon by this administration is a fear of leaking? SQ: It’s always in the second administration

when things start to go sour. They circle the wagons.The first term of the Clinton administration was very jolly. Everybody was running around meeting people and of course, in the second term, everyone went down the

fun dinner when he was president-elect. SQ: I find it astonishing that that was the last time I ever saw the president and that was five years ago. I’m not complaining. I’m speaking as an observer. I don’t know anyone who ever sees them and I could never say that about another president. BB: But, that may just mean that our circle of friends is different. SQ: But we have a fairly large circle of friends and even people that aren’t our close friends, people we sit next to at a dinner [don’t see

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them]. Most of the people who live in Washington come from other places and you can learn something from them. But when you’re in a bubble you can’t possibly know what’s going on.When I talk about the social scene I’m not talking about yakking it up at parties. It always helps if you have some social capital… with more people on your side less willing to take you down. I understand that the president needs eight or nine hours of sleep, I do, too. I want him to be well-rested but that doesn’t mean that he can’t stop by a reception and then go home.They say it is unseemly to be partying when we’re at war and I’m not saying the president should be out partying, but it is important for him to get other perspectives and for people to get to know his. WL: You have houses in D.C., East Hampton and the Eastern shore. An invitation to one of your homes is coveted. BB: Let’s be sure you understand. Sally, how many

big parties do we give in a year? SQ: We don’t entertain that much. BB: We have houses but we don’t entertain at all in the country! We have two parties in East Hampton, a cook out/clambake on the beach and the other is my birthday… that’s all. SQ: We had one big party in the spring for Kofi Annan who is a really old friend of mine from college.We had a seated dinner party for 40 people when David Ignatius came back from Paris. WL: What makes a seated dinner successful? SQ: Actually, I always put him next to cute

women.That makes for a good party. BB: Cute women make for a good party, that’s for damn sure. SQ: Often what we do is open our house for various charity events. I don’t seat according to protocol. I don’t invite people because of who they are in the administration or their positions of power. The few who do come, are there because I like them. BB: Like whom? I mean, we don’t know any of those people. SQ: Like [Donald] Rumsfeld. BB: Oh Rummy. He’s a really old, old, friend of mine [for] 30-35 years.

WILL IT BE THE UNWAVERING

SENSE OF WELCOME THAT BEGINS FAR

Life of the Party Ben Bradlee and Sally Quinn hold court with dignitaries and celebrities alike. years given by great hostesses such as Pamela Harriman, Kay Graham, Susan Mary Alsop, and Evangeline Bruce, to name a few. Sally, you are on the record as saying that society is dead in Washington today. Do you think that there’s anyone who can compare to these women today? SQ: That kind of entertaining, that kind of life,

those people— just doesn’t exist anymore and never will again. WL: Why? BB: Lots of money, millions of bucks! SQ: They had money, knew how to entertain

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[and] were brought up to be hostesses.They were raised by nannies and their children were raised by nannies. It was an era when family was not all that important.When Evangeline went to Europe with David Bruce, she left her children with a German nanny on 9th street because she felt that having the children there would get in the way of their entertaining. WL: What quality do you most like about yourself and in each other? BB: I don’t want to talk about myself. I like

Sally’s spirit once she wakes up. This is a lively household. SQ: I like Ben’s energy. And, as much as it annoys me, I like his sense of invincibility. WL: You’ve been married 27 years.What’s the secret to a successful marriage? SQ: We’ve been together 32 years and married for 27. BB: You finally got the knack of it for me. SQ: We have so much in common— we have our work, are friends, our son, Quinn, and we have a

WL: You have been to many fabulous parties over the

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HORSE COUNTRY Alison Lukes PHOTOGRAPHEDBY Zaid Hamid at Huntland (see “Open House,” page 84 for information) HAIRBY Susan Heydt t﹒h﹒ee Artist Agency MAKEUPBY Anita Bahremy

ulling out a cashmere sweater on a crisp day is truly one of the luxurious markers of fall. This season’s fashion includes a fresh look at some classic favorites like rich tweed blazers and chunky cashmere pullovers. Inspired by the Washington Life-sponsored 47th Washington International Horse Show at the MCI Center October 25-30, Washington Life traveled to horse country in Middleburg, Virginia to visit top equestrians who are modeling the best of horse country fashion. 66

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Originally from Australia, BENMEREDITH moved to Middleburg to train with legendary show jumper Joe Fargis. Ben claimed the record in Sydney jumping over a 7’2” brick wall in a puissance class aboard his horse Tc de Fleur. At just 22years-old Ben has become quite the equestrian extraordinaire. Ben is seen here in an orange and brown pullover cashmere sweater by Hermes, jodhpur pants available at the Tack Exchange, canvas saddle bag by Hermes, riding hat and boots, his own.

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A businessman by trade and top steeplechase jockey by passion, GREGG “COLVIN”RYAN maintains a balance by commuting to upstate New York to work part of the week as a finance insurer and spends the rest of his time in Middleburg riding and training his fleet of horses. Gregg is seen here in a blue shirt and orange “horse bit” tie by Hermes, window pane jacket by Burberry, jodhpurs and riding boots, his own. BENMEREDITH is seen here in an orange plaid shirt and orange cashmere v-neck sweater by Burberry, loden toggle coat by Burberry, jodhpur pants available at the Tack Exchange, riding boots, his own.

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GRETCHENSCHLAGER, of The Plains, Virginia is a prominent three-day event rider. She is a full-time rider and spends most of her days in training with her two horses Eliza Jane and Ondine in hopes to one day represent the U.S. in the Olympic Games. Seen here in a brown cashmere/silk sweater by Hermes, loden plaid cap by Burberry, mink knitted scarf available at The Monogram Shop. Jodhpur Pants and Riding Boots, her own. Originally from Middleburg and a student of The Foxcroft School, SLOANCOLES is one of the top junior show jumpers in the country today. Sloan is seen here wearing a loden plaid jacket by Burberry, eggplant turtleneck by Burberry, riding pants and boots, her own. BENMEREDITH in jodhpur pants available at the Tack Exchange, jacket and riding boots, his own.

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MICHAELESALAHI, model and wife of Oasis Winery owner Tareq Salahi, is an avid rider and enjoys riding through the scenic winery in her free time. Seen here wearing a fern cap sleeved turtleneck by Burberry, pleated belted tweed skirt and orange leather cuff by Hermes, and her own boots. Tareq Salahi, owner of Oasis Vineyard, is a highly praised polo player, who competed this past summer with his team against His Royal Highness Prince Charles’s team in England. RYANCATHCART has been riding since the age of nine. After successfully overcoming thyroid cancer before attending the college of William & Mary, he now rides for personal enjoyment and devotes much of his time to raising money for Relay For Life and the Susan B. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Seen here in a grey houndstooth shirt and black cashmere v-neck sweater by Burberry, wool plaid riding jacket, pants, and boots available at The Tack Exchange.

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Lovisa Frost and Wendy Wang

Sally Quinn, Quinn Bradlee, Ben Bradlee, Strobe Talbott and Brooke shearer

Faith Baranowski, Liz Carty and Brooke Livingston

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G E N E R AT I O N E N G AG E S YO U N G VO T E R S AT R A L P H LAUREN’S OPENING PHOTOS BY TONY POWELL

Sen. chuck hagel and adrian talbott

Sharon and John D Rockefeller IV and Justin Rockefeller

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BUSTINGATTHESEAMSThe new Wisconsin Avenue Ralph Lauren store was packed with preppy types on September 29 for Generation Engage’s “Politics through Art Initiative,” which makes grants to young artists to create works that will inspire younger Americans to vote. Sally and Ben Bradlee came with son Quinn, visiting from film school in New York. There was barely any breathing room, or shall we say sipping room, for the overflowing champagne complemented by tasty Design Cuisine bites. Cate Edwards, the daughter of former Sen. John Edwards, and the evening’s co-host, was seen

chaing with pals near a rack of pricey cashmere sweaters. § INSPIRINGWORKS Generation Engage’s energetic executive director, Adrian Talbo, the son of Strobe Talbo, and its national programs director Justin Rockefeller, the son of Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV, discussed the group’s mission to develop a grassroots social network of young people working to encourage political engagement by their noncollege-educated peers. “Now more than ever we need to engage young people in the political process,” Rep. Linda Sánchez said in a message echoed by Sen. Chuck Hagel.

Steve Boyd, Lee Barona and DeAndre deVane

Artist Alexandry Douyon

R. Gene Davis

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Virginia Gelardin and Salvador Avila



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Jellie A. van Eenennaam

col. william crabson and Lynn Leonsis

Liz Underhill, Ginger Pickel and Sharon Casey

Eileen Train

FA S H I O N EV E N T

SAKS JANDEL S T R I K E S A P O S E AT S A LVAT I O N A R M Y L U N C H PHOTOS BY KYLE SAMPERTON

RINGINGTHEBELLThe Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary of Washington presented Saks Jandel’s evening fashions at their 56th Annual Luncheon at the Ritz Carlton, which honored Lynn Leonsis. Angela Ganey and Catherine Thompson chaired the event with additional support from co-chairs Sheila Tate, Susan Pepper, Mary Ourisman and members of the Salvation Army’s Women’s Auxiliary. Saks Jandel presented it’s evening collection and the fabulous Rena Lange collection

Diane Ray Brown

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inspired by world travel. § GRACIOUS WASHINGTON SUPPORTERSPat Stern and Marlene Malek were sighted amongst the well-dressed models. Later, Judy Esfandiary remarked on journalist Jan Smith Donaldson’s great sense of humor and stage presence as the emcee. She said she had talked to Jan’s husband, TV’s Sam Donaldson, and that Sam had confessed that “All the invitations used to come only for me; now Jan’s in demand everywhere.”

Dorothy McAuliffe and debra lee

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Faye Morrisette and Faye Wickersham

Norma Ramsey and Jan Smith Donaldson

Michele Gee, Megan Byer and Cynthia Vance

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FA SHION

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Sinatra was the theme of the evening— his music, his hip joie de vivre, and his sophisticated style that Washingtonians and the “Rat Pack” alike adore. The holiday fashion preview was modeled by company dancers, board members, womens’ committee volunteers and their spouses and children. It was a night with all the right moves for the Washington Ballet.

ON POINTE

ashington Life and Saks Fifth Avenue partnered the perfect pas de deux with The Womens’ Committee of the Washington Ballet on September 20 for a night of fashion, dance and martinis to celebrate the season opener: Septime Webre’s “Carmen/Nine Sinatra Songs / Serenade,” running November 2-6 at the John F. Kennedy Center.

C O N A G H Y  •  P H O T O G R A P H E D  B Y  Z A I D  H A M I D

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The Shoe Hive

125 South Fairfax St. • 703.548.1615 • www.shophysteria.com 115 South Royal St. • 703.548.7105 • www.theshoehive.com 11-6 Monday through Saturday • 12-6 Sunday or by appointment


PRECEDING PAGE (clockwise from top): The models take a final walk down the runway. DEBORAHSIGMUND, Washington Ballet Board, and Womens’ Committee member, in Melinda Eng Peacock blue chiffon gown, white mink capelet and Stuart Weitzman sandals. RAFAELALFONZO, Jeté Society Steering Committee, wearing Favourbrook wine velvet tuxedo and black wildabout-cashmere turtleneck. Company DancersAARON JACKSONANDMORGANNROSE Morgann in Martin Grant black cocktail dress and Chanel pearl belt and shoes. Aaron in Dolce & Gabbana Brocade blazer; Armani tuxedo pants, and Zegna French Cuffed shirt and black silk tie. THIS PAGE (from above): DONNAPITTSENBERGER, Womens’ Committee member in Carlos Miele purple silk print halter dress and Prada mules escorted by twin sons, JOEL&TERRELLLIMMERICK. Joel in Dolce & Gabbana velvet jacketshirt and belt and Miu Miu slacks; Terrell in Dolce & Gabbana velvet jacket, silk shirt with Seven jeans, D Squared belt and John Varvatos boots. SHERIROSENFELD, 2005 Ballet Gala Chair, in Carmen Marc Valvo Black velvet strapless gown with pink tulle trim and Prada black suede platform pumps. MARYHAFT, Washington Ballet Board member, in Naeem Khan gold goddess gown with crystal embellishments and Gold Manolo Blahnik sandals. LAURAHAFT, who attends the Maret School and the Washington Ballet School, in Cynthia Steffe Boho chic velvet dress and gold Manolo Blahnik flats. SHIGEKOBORK, Women’s Committee member, in Carlos Miele purple chiffon gown and fur and silk shrug with Isaac satin heels. WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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THIS PAGE (from far left): MARGARETDUDAS, Womens’Committee member, in Armani black velvet dinner jacket and cashmere skirt with Stuart Weitzman black satin heels. KACZMAREK,Washington Ballet dancer, in Melinda Eng burgundy tulle dress and Gucci horsebit patent pumps. FARIDAWOZNIAK, President of the Women’s Committee, in Wayne Clark bronze taffeta cocktail dress and Prada mules. Husband, BOBWOZNIAK,in Canali tuxedo, Saks Tuxedo shirt, Carrot and Gibbs vest and Brioni silk tie. Son, FARIDWOZNIAK, in John Varvatos pinstriped slacks, dress shirt, and Corduroy tuxedo blazer with Gucci boots.

SAVE T HE DATE Washington Life is proud to sponsor this year’s Washington Ballet’s NUTTYORNICEBALL featuring a gala reception with dinner and dancing immediately following the opening of Septime Webre’s The Nutcracker at the Willard Intercontinental Hotel on December 2; with chair Gahl Hodges Burt. And, reserve tickets now for The Nutcracker, December 1-24. Visit www.washingtonballet.org or by phone (202) 362-3606 ext. 11

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O U R  H O L I D AY  H I T  L I S T For an evening at the ballet, or a night on the town. ANYTHINGVELVETBlack and rich jeweled tones as tuxedos, pants, blazers, gowns, skirts, shoes, boots and capes 1

THECOCKTAILDRESS 2 Channel Sarah Jessica Parker in a full, flirty knee length dress that has motion and screams “let’s dance and have a martini!” THEEMPIRESTRIKES Empire, goddess gowns that drape and flow or sensuously hug the body in ruched curves. 3

4

COLORWATCH Black is the new black—again; Browns and

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bronze; Gold on its own or as accents and as accessories; Purple, eggplant and the Bordeaux family of colors FURREALANDFAUX Coats, collar, capes, capelets and woven throws 5

OPULENTJEWELRY Real or faux Jet beads, gold, tassels, glamorous gems, oversized cocktail rings and exotic chandelier earrings—but watch the proportion of necklace to earrings! 6

EVENINGBOOTSWho knew boots would be heading for cocktails? Wear a hot new croc, snakeskin or velvet boot 7

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ABOVE: SEPTIMEWEBRE, Artistic Director of the Washington Ballet and KAY KENDALL, president of the Board of the Washington Ballet. Septime in Armani velvet tuxedo and Favourbrook black ruffled dress shirt. Kay in Oscar de la Renta tulle and sequined cocktail dress with Manolo Blahnik gold sandals.

SPECIALTHANKSTOSAKSFIFTHAVENUE for their gracious and fashionable hospitality: Catherine Bartels, General Manager; Andrew Blecher, public relations and fashion director; Brian Dire; Susan Neimann and Ridgewells for catering the evening. Also, special thanks to Armani Cosmetics for models makeup; Mary Bird, assistant director for the Womens’ Committee; all the volunteers who made the show so memorable; and Heidi Schroder, Special Events Director of the Washington Ballet.

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O U R  H O L I D AY  H I T  L I S T For an evening at the ballet, or a night on the town. ANYTHINGVELVETBlack and rich jeweled tones as tuxedos, pants, blazers, gowns, skirts, shoes, boots and capes 1

THECOCKTAILDRESS 2 Channel Sarah Jessica Parker in a full, flirty knee length dress that has motion and screams “let’s dance and have a martini!” THEEMPIRESTRIKES Empire, goddess gowns that drape and flow or sensuously hug the body in ruched curves. 3

4

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COLORWATCH Black is the new black—again; Browns and

bronze; Gold on its own or as accents and as accessories; Purple, eggplant and the Bordeaux family of colors FURREALANDFAUX Coats, collar, capes, capelets and woven throws 5

OPULENTJEWELRY Real or faux Jet beads, gold, tassels, glamorous gems, oversized cocktail rings and exotic chandelier earrings—but watch the proportion of necklace to earrings! 6

EVENINGBOOTSWho knew boots would be heading for cocktails? Wear a hot new croc, snakeskin or velvet boot 7

ABOVE: SEPTIMEWEBRE, Artistic Director of the Washington Ballet and KAY KENDALL, president of the Board of the Washington Ballet. Septime in Armani velvet tuxedo and Favourbrook black ruffled dress shirt. Kay in Oscar de la Renta tulle and sequined cocktail dress with Manolo Blahnik gold sandals.

SPECIALTHANKSTOSAKSFIFTHAVENUE for their gracious and fashionable hospitality: Catherine Bartels, General Manager; Andrew Blecher, public relations and fashion director; Brian Dire; Susan Neimann and Ridgewells for catering the evening. Also, special thanks to Armani Cosmetics for models makeup; Mary Bird, assistant director for the Womens’ Committee; all the volunteers who made the show so memorable; and Heidi Schroder, Special Events Director of the Washington Ballet.

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TYSONS STEPS IT UP F A S H I O N

Tysons Corner Center, bigger and better, opens with a Tommy Hilfiger fashion show

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uests at the Washington Life-sponsored opening of the Tysons Corner Center got a sampling of designer runway show glamour when Tommy Hilfiger showed selections from his collection and then made a personal appearance. Over 25 years ago, Hilfiger started his business in a town near Cornell University, reselling used bell-bottoms and jeans to college students. After moving to New York City in the early 80s, Hilfiger started designing clothes, as he says, “for the people,” and hasn’t stopped since. Today, he’s a $400 million fashion empire.



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Washington Life: What do you make of fashion in Washington? Tommy Hilfiger: I think Washington fashion is up to date, modern and in

the same zone as Miami and New York. Politicians tend to dress too conservatively, but the people on the street are very trendy. WL: Why are you opening a store in Tysons Corner Center? TH: This is one of the best malls in the country. It’s the right place at the

right time. WL: What should we wear for fall? TH: Color, luxury, cashmere. Bold and great colors should be paired with jeans. WL: What causes do you support? TH: I am a big supporter of the Fresh Air Fund, but I also support a number

of causes: MS, Aids, and pediatric causes. WL: Your daughter Ally finished filming Rich Girls, where is she now? TH: She’s doing great and is off to acting school.

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Fashion forward Models strut their stuff on the Tommy Hilfiger Runway at Tysons Corner; Tommy Hilfiger (center) takes his bow at the end of the show

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Miss america 1999 nicole johnson baker and john anderson

mike burns, eric salo, sandra stuart, rebecca burns and dave stuart

Lena and Joanne Ardaji

eric kulczycky, Tommy Hilfiger, kathy hannon and lynn nicholas

Laura Peterson and Sharif ElMahdi

tommy hilfiger and ed coppola

michael busenhart, dianna unis and nancy busenhart

ted priest and susanedvalentine coppola

chuck and ruth cope

FA S H I O N EV E N T

TYSONS CORNER CENTER: BIGGER & BETTER PHOTOS BY ZAID HAMID

MOVIN’ONUPIt’s hard to imagine why the Tysons shopping megaplex needed to expand, and yet 350,000 square feet later there's a 16-screen AMC theater, four new restaurants, a food court and 30 new retail stores, including Arhaus Furniture, Sony Style, Modern Day Spa and H Hilfiger, the new line from Tommy Hilfiger, joining anchor tenants Bloomingdales, Nordstroms and Bailey Banks & Biddle. § CELEBRATEGOOD TIMESThe Washington

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Life-sponsored evening never slowed down, with the Blind Boys of Alabama energized the crowd of 700, followed by a head turning fashion show with Tommy Hilfiger. Tysons Corner Center topped off the night by presenting the evening’s proceeds, $100,000, to the American Diabetes Association. § FANTASTICFARE Design Cuisine set up several stations of their signature catered treats and Tysons served large margaritas in swirl glasses and a never-ending supply of ice cream.



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INSIDE HOMES

SAVEDBYTHEBELL Jim Bell and Mark Scott renovate a former schoolhouse and call it home BYM A RYK N E W B O R N

fter two and a half years of extensive renovation, the old Field School at 2107 Wyoming Ave., N.W. in Kalorama has been transformed into one of Washington’s most beautiful homes. Owners Jim Bell and Mark Scott spared no expense restoring and revitalizing this 1911 property, which features 7,000 square feet of living space. Comprised of a main house, a two-story carriage house and staff quarters, there are a total of nine bedrooms, six bathrooms, two half bathrooms and four full kitchens, including a caterer’s kitchen. One is easily impressed by the imposing exterior façade, dormer windows and taupe and black color scheme. Last year, the stately property was filled with over 1,000 guests for the annual Bloomberg News party following the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner. But you don’t need to be a journalist or politician to gain entry to this stunning

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estate. Bell and Scott regularly host political fundraisers and charitable events to benefit such organizations as Greenspace and Food & Friends. Bell loves to cook and is quick to declare the kitchen in the main house as his “favorite room.” The kitchen is both a chef ’s delight and a perfect gathering place. It still occupies its original position in the house and has, over the course of almost a century, retained its original raised hearth fireplace. It also contains one of Bell’s more unusual personal possessions, an authentic 1600’s Pin-the-Tail-on-the-Donkey wall-hanging with a genuine donkey hair tail pinned to the animal’s posterior. An interesting focal point of the kitchen’s decor, the game is a subtle and whimsical reminder that Bell is a long time Democratic Party supporter who can take the heat. Elsewhere in the kitchen are modern top-of the-line upgrades, including marble counter tops and recessed lighting to highlight such trendy innovations as refrigerated drawers and appliances

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creatively camouflaged to look like furniture.The state-of the art six-burner Viking stove is a real standout, although Bell tells us he is just as pleased to prepare meals on the hearth. Indeed, cozy easy chairs cuddled close to the fireplace make this seem a particularly enjoyable retreat, especially on cold winter nights. Facilitating the easy manner in which the men entertain is a carefully constructed wet bar encased in a built-in wooden cabinet in the butler’s pantry. Like most of the furnishings, it was espeClass is IN Real estate mogul Jim Bell and his partner Mark Scott spared no expense in renovating their expansive Wyoming Ave. residence.

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dered by bay windows. Opposite the fireplace hangs an abstract painting by Israeli artist Noah Arbel that perfectly matches the colors of the bed’s headboard below. Other decorative accents include a silver table fan which no longer serves a practical purpose except perhaps to remind us of house’s early glory days when a Supreme Court justice and a bishop resided there before it became the Field School in 1976. The marble master bathroom features ecru walls and a large mirror precisely positioned above the over-sized tub to reflect the flicker of flames from yet another fireplace.The beautifully framed mirror overhanging the bath tub adds additional sparkle to a room already

entertainment value While the perfect space to host over 1,ooo prominent guests, the interior of the home is just right for entertaining intimate groups. cially custom-crafted and hand-made. Adding to the convenience and enjoyment of entertaining is a charming sun porch accessible from the kitchen through French doors. Here, plush pillow-cushioned furniture conveys a casual elegance while aromatic wisteria vines and scalloped Sunbrella drapes sway gently in the breeze beneath a ceiling fan: a serenely natural setting to relax, sip tea, enjoy a cocktail at sunset or dine al fresco. Also adjoining the kitchen is the exquisitely wood-paneled dining room, believed to be the only oval-shaped dining room in Washington. It features a beautiful mahogany floor, and, as is the case with most of the home’s public rooms, it has

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antique plaster wall moldings and an original fireplace with a recessed stained-glass window shining out from its alcove. Adding to the room’s glowing warmth is a stunning chandelier and a sturdy mahogany table surrounded by leather upholstered mahogany chairs. Guests move easily from the richly appointed one-of a kind dining room into the formal living room where an opulent chandelier accentuates the beauty of marble coffee table and a marble fireplace over which a painting of the Stars and Stripes is prominently displayed. To the casual observer the image of the flag may serve as a reminder that this home had for thirty years housed a school. But this is not your standard red, white and blue homage to the artistry of Betsy Ross or to the youth of America reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. Rather this rendition of the American flag is a 1968 painting by expressionist artist Jasper Johns, daringly done in orange, green and black to protest the Vietnam War. For smaller gatherings or as an overflow area, there is what Bell refers to as “the media room.” In this quaint preserve, a claw-foot barrel table serves as a pedestal for an elaborate model of a sailing ship which the two men purchased from an antique shop in Georgetown. A library portrait of an anonymous subject, perhaps an old time sea captain, is not only a wonderful work of art, but also makes an excellent conversation piece. Recessed lighting illuminates many points of interest in the room, and three and a half-inch plantation shutters add to its ambiance and sense of Old World charm The master bedroom boasts yet another architecturally significant alcove, with a fireplace bor-

made light and airy by large windows and limestone floors. Special decorative touches include what appears to be an old library bookcase ladder imaginatively employed as a towel rack and conveniently situated next to twin marble sinks with brilliantly polished fixtures. It is clear Bell and Scott have much experience renovating historically significant properties. This is their largest project, and the results have been gratifying. Bell, a real estate broker with Washington Fine Properties, and Mark, a mortgage banker, bought the property in late 2002. Thanks to their time and talents, it is now valued at more than $4 million, and currently on the market.

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D

E

S

I

G

N

THE SOFA

The Most Important Design Statement In Your Living Room (& ours) B Y  O LV I A  D E M E T R I O U  A N D  T H E O  A D A M S T E I N

WL asked esteemed Washington architects Olvia Demetriou and Theo Adamstein how they would approach designing a living room, and here’s what they said…

A

s architects we make countless decisions every day, from the large scale of a building facade to the micro scale of a table leg. In designing spaces for public use, each with its own character, we’ve developed a methodology to ease our decision making process. With so much great furniture design to choose from, it can be daunting to set about creating a living room from scratch. Our advice is to first hire a good designer; if that is not an option, or you like doing it yourself, then follow a few rules, commit to decisions, and follow through in every detail. 1. Define your program; for example if your

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living room is also the family room and the study, you might choose the furniture differently. 2. Next, what is your concept? Gain an understanding of what image you would like to project. If you’re beginning from scratch, (and haven’t yet inherited all those beautiful antiques?), this can be challenging.What to be: Antique? Traditional? Contemporary? Eclectic? Transitional? Funky (Neo-Sixties Pop & Plastics, “ Twin Peaks” Retro and Tribal, to name a few)? Or, last but not least, Over The Edge (the style with no rules!!)? 3. Start with the sofa. It is the largest piece in the room and should be the “anchor.” Now that you have chosen your design direction, choosing a sofa that reflects that style will set the tone. Even within each specific style, designs can vary enormously. A contemporary sofa can be sleek and minimalistic—great examples can be found at Ligne Roset or Adlon—or, it could be whimsical and flamboyant (try Mobili or Contemporaria). Having narrowed down your options, consider the following and everything in between: Expensive vs. Afffordable… Elegant vs. Casual… Clean lines vs. Shabby and comfortable… Patterned Upholstery vs. Solid…

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The design language of your sofa, its profile, stitching, welts, leg, and arm design should help you choose the remaining pieces of the room. If it is sleek and European and has metal legs, then a metal and glass or stone coffee table could work in the room. If it is “Transitional” (think Holly Hunt or Baker), then the molded plastic table and bean bag you own may not look right. Instead choose something with a clean tailored look—perhaps a dark wood will compliment the sofa. An Art Deco settee may be incongruous with a Louis IV ormolu encrusted armoire. Having design rules to follow helps everyone make decisions—but the best part, is having fun breaking them. Here are some of our favorite sofas around town, including the one we picked for our own home.

Above: the “BR02 Sofabed” by Martin Visser is for those who like playful, modern cool minimalism. Makes quite a bold design statement, but not exactly the sofa to get your hair tussled in. Shown with other classics and edgy modern accessories for the home at Apartment Zero 406 7th Street, N.W. www.apartmentzero.com.

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What can we say about this fantastic loveseat… daiquiris anyone? Made in the tropical island of Cebu, it is both exotic and contemporary and its high back profile wreaks of major chic–designed by Kenneth Cobonpue and shown with other furniture, clothing and accessories that reflect the harmonious subtleties of Asia. Organic materials and sexy garments! (shown as a loveseat, it also comes as a 3-seater); Muleh, 1831 14th Street, N.W., www.muleh.com.

Yum, we love this one! Christian Liaigre’s “Opium Daybed” is an elegant reinterpretation of a classic; paired down with clean lines, yet very comfortable, it will work in many interiors. Excellent construction and detail, a rich dark stained mahogany with caning under the seat cushion echoes the British Colonial and Plantation style; Holly Hunt Showroom at The Washington Design Center, www.hollyhunt.com.

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For antiques lovers, this neoclassical, late Gustavian, early Empire settee (ca.1820) with its original pale whitewash paint would make an incredible starting point for designing a room. It can be found at Tone on Tone Antiques & Accessories, 7920 Woodmont Avenue, Bethesda, www.tone-on-tone.com.

Ligne Roset opened a showroom in Washington many years ahead of the pack. Although much of their line is quite whimsical, the contemporary sofa “Annaba” designed by Didier Gomez, brings together the clean lines of European minimalism and comfort… enough so that we chose one for own living room; Ligne Roset Georgetown 3306 M Street, N.W. www.lignerosetdc.com.

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O P E N

H O U S E

Luxury Homes on the Block Multi-million dollar homes ON THE MARKET near you

2916 CLEVELAND AVENUE, N.W. Built by Zuckerman Brothers Builders in 2001, this six bedroom, seven and a half bath home is ideally located in the prestigious Massachusetts Avenue Heights neighborhood. The house boasts: a dramatic family room with a coffered ceiling, gourmet chef’s kitchen, master bedroom suite with a private lounge and “his-and-her” baths, ten-foot ceilings, and a full-service elevator, and all within walking distance of the Woodley Metro and the vibrancy of downtown Washington, D.C. Asking: $3.35 million. Listing Contact: Marc Fleisher, Long and Foster, (202) 364-5200.

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9827 AVENEL FARM DRIVE, POTOMAC Exquisitely crafted by builder, Charlie Edmunds for his personal residence, this stately Tudor on two beautiful acres offers all the features you expect

in a new house while maintaining the Old World charm.Top-of-the-line finishes include: Spanish cedar shutters, beams and brackets, slate roofing and cedar carriage style garage doors. High ceilings, interesting architec-

HUNTLAND, MIDDLEBURG, VA. Steeped in history and recognized by Country Life magazine as one of the seven outstanding country homes in the nation, Huntland enjoys the picturesque surroundings of Virginia’s finest. A scenic country road approaches this wonderfully private 550 acres farm, hidden behind a gated entry that leads to a winding drive past mature trees, boxwood hedges, spacious lawns and fenced paddocks. Beyond the arched bridge lie two architectural showpieces: the courtyard stable and kennel, built in 1913

and patterned after a composite of the finest kennels and stables in Europe. The gracious manor house was built by William Benton who was employed by President James Monroe in the building of Oak Hill near Aldie,Virginia. In 1911 Joseph B. Thomas bought the land and home. The pure Federal style design features spacious rooms, high ceilings, fine materials and rich details. Known not only as place of hounds, horses and fox hunting. Huntland has opened its doors to many senators, congressmen and Presidents Johnson and Kennedy.

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tural detail and nicely proportioned rooms combine to make this 13,000 square-foot home very inviting. Asking: $5.5 million. Listing Contact: Kirsten Karakul, Sotheby’s Washington Fine Properties, (202) 243-1611.

More photographs of this beautiful property can also be seen in our Horse Country fashion spread, pages 66-73. Asking: $18.8 million. Listing Contact: Rick Lowe and Anita Sisney, Armfield, Miller and Ripley, Fine Properties, LLC, (703) 973-1987.

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901 LYNTON PLACE, MCLEAN, VA. This stunningly renovated French colonial sits on a lushly landscaped one-acre lot with new stone retaining walls and columns flanking the driveway. Features include: an in ground pool, a patio, a 250 square-foot deck finished in Brazilian hardwood, a renovated gourmet kitchen with large walk-in pantry, a 400-square

foot family room with 10 foot Palladian windows, stacked ledgestone fireplace, 13ft. ceilings, custom lighting, maple hardwood floors, Wainscott dining room with French doors and butler’s pantry, master bedroom suite with sitting room, fireplace and large master bath with large Kohler soaking tub, a 550-square foot garage with dedicated storage/workshop area complete with plumbing, and finally a large mudroom complete with two double closets, a built-in seating bench, and French limestone flooring. What more could anyone ask for? Asking: $2,295,900. Listing Contact: Casey Margenau and Associates, RE/MAX Distinctive Real Estate, Inc, (703) 442-8600.

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DeSelle Design

DESELLE DESIGN was founded by award-winning

publication designer, Wayne M. DeSelle, with a commitment to producing sophisticated print and web design ■ We’re experts in creating refined marketing and identity materials of all kinds for small businesses and individuals, and we take special delight in producing outstanding print publications ■ In fact, the magazine you’re holding was redesigned by our team ■ To see samples and a list of current clients, visit us at

www.deselle.com 901 LYNTON PLACE, MCLEAN, VA. This stunningly renovated French colonial sits on a lushly landscaped one-acre lot with new stone retaining walls and columns flanking the driveway. Features include: an in ground pool, a patio, a 250 square-foot deck finished in Brazilian hardwood, a renovated gourmet kitchen with large walk-in pantry, a 400-square

foot family room with 10 foot Palladian windows, stacked ledgestone fireplace, 13ft. ceilings, custom lighting, maple hardwood floors, Wainscott dining room with French doors and butler’s pantry, master bedroom suite with sitting room, fireplace and large master bath with large Kohler soaking tub, a 550-square foot garage with dedicated storage/workshop area complete with plumbing, and finally a large mudroom complete with two double closets, a built-in seating bench, and French limestone flooring. What more could anyone ask for? Asking: $2,295,900. Listing Contact: Casey Margenau and Associates, RE/MAX Distinctive Real Estate, Inc, (703) 442-8600.

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389 Washington Blvd., Jersey City, NJ

The Athena Group A Proven Track Record A Path Unique

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G E O R G

1650 30th STREET, NW $3,500,000

E T O W N

Four Seasons Plaza 2828 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Washington DC 20007 202.333.6100

NANCY TAYLOR BUBES 202.256.2164

www.luxurydcrealestate.com

Charlie Hein

Ňż Residential Realty Washington, DC

Specializing in the exclusive properties of Georgetown and Wesley Heights

direct (202)244-5957

office (202)944-8400


R O U N D TA B L E

Follow the boomer

Three top REAL ESTATE EXPERTS chat about bubbles, ’burbs and boomers Mark Bisnow Moderator Mark Bisnow has been a lawyer, politico, and businessman in Washington for nearly three decades and publishes a growing series of electronic newsletters, including Real Estate Weekly, which features interviews with top Washington-area experts. He also writes “BizKnow,” a weekly personality column in the Washington Business Journal. Casey Margenau With more than 25 years in sales, over a decade as a “Top Producer” in Northern Virginia, and Re/Max’s “Number One Agent Worldwide” for five consecutive years. Casey Margenau uses his wealth of experience to ensure the financial success of his clients. His professionalism and attention to detail have led him to the very top of his field. Jim Bell Jim Bell recently joined Sotheby’s Washington Fine Properties and specializes in the sale of Washington, D.C., properties—primarily in the Kalorama, Georgetown, Dupont Circle and greater Northwest neighborhoods. With real estate sales of over $100 million, Jim has been a consistent sales leader. Jane Fairweather Jane Fairweather has been named the “Number One Coldwell Banker” agent in the Washington Metropolitan Area for the last six years and has consistently ranked among the top ten Coldwell Banker agents in the nation since 1998. In 2004, she made $100 million in sales, primarily in Bethesda, Potomac and Chevy Chase, Maryland.

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Mark Bisnow: Which region is the hottest: Northern Virginia, Maryland or Washington? Casey Margeneau: I guess it depends on what

price range you’re talking about and what type of product. I don’t know what’s going on in Maryland or Washington as much as I know the nuances of my marketplace in Virginia, which is doing very well, but we’re loaded with inventory. There is great supply and demand, but demand is cautious because most of the inventory is priced a little too high. MB: And why is that? CM: Because of the natural way the market

works. As the market gets hot, people raise their prices. We have raised them beyond the level of reality, so now the market is correcting and prices are coming back in line. Right now we have more inventory than demand. Jim Bell: In D.C., every price range is selling well. But the higher the price range, the better the value of property. MB: At what price do you start to see good values? JB: Anything above $2 million. MB: I thought the economy in Virginia came roaring back after 2001. Maybe there are less internet companies than before, but there are always government contractors. Why isn’t there a ton of money sloshing around to buy a $2 million- plus home? JB: Five years ago a $2 million home did not

sell at all. The fact that we are selling $2 million homes like they were $500,000 and $600,000 dollar homes eight or nine years ago is phenomenal. There are a lot of sales. The opposite could be asked: how do we have so many people who can afford expensive homes and so fast? Jane Fairweather: In our market in Maryland, a “move-up” home is probably $1 million to $1.6 million. That’s not an upper-bracket luxury home. A glamorous home, in a glamorous neighborhood will cost you at least $2 million.

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COLUMN NAME

MB: What neighborhoods are you talking about? JF: All the neighborhoods close-in—Bethesda,

generation that’s leaving Potomac? JF: There are plenty of people who still want a

Chevy Chase, Edgemore, Greenwich Forest…

big house. JB: With the baby boomers you also have an architectural element—they prefer large apartment buildings downtown or Logan Circle to townhouses unless they have an elevator.They’re looking forward 10 to 15 years in their lives.They are also interested in getting second homes and they typically want those to be one-level too.

MB: How much less house do you get close-in versus further away in Potomac? Suppose you had $2 or $3 million dollars. What is the difference between Potomac and Chevy Chase? JF: The first thing you give up is land. When

you’re out in Potomac, you get two to three acres, three-car garages and nine bedrooms with 9,000 to12,000 square feet. Closer into the city you’ll probably get 5,000 square feet for pretty much the same price as what you sold your house for in Potomac.

“As the market gets hot, people raise their prices. We have raised them beyond the level of reality, so now the market is correcting and prices are coming back in line. Right now we have more inventory than demand.” —CASEYMARGENEAU

MB: Are you seeing greater interest in living closer because of higher energy/gasoline costs? JB: They would rather not commute because

of time, not necessarily because of higher prices of gasoline. JF: In the price range we deal with, gasoline is not an issue. We are talking about the middleto-upper end of the market. When you are time-pressed, the time you spend in your car commuting back and forth is time you miss living your life. MB: But for years there has been terrible congestion. Is it that much worse now, that people are changing their ways? JF: No, what I think you have is this emergence

of baby boomers. MB: What about families who have young children? Do they want to be in D.C.? JB: They are staying. MB: Why don’t they want to move to green spaces? JB: Quality of life. Their friendships are here.

MB: Is Potomac dying? JF: No, but there are a lot of empty-nesters

whose children have grown up and who are looking to move out of the suburbs. There are 78 million baby boomers in the U.S. and the first wave, the Vietnam generation, are in their fifties. They are asking themselves, “Why do I need to live in the suburbs? I’d like to be where the action is.”The action is in all the downtown locations. It is what spurred the development of high-end stuff in Friendship Heights and it is causing developers to build town centers in suburban locations. MB: But, are there people taking the place of the

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The parks have been renovated. The stores are here. The core of everything you used to go to the suburbs for is now in the city. It is not a Washington phenomenon. You see it in all the urban centers along the East Coast and Chicago. People are in the urban areas. CM: It is always interesting to see how the market has changed. People moved out into big lots at one point, now they want to move to tiny lots. Recently I went to an Economics Summit, where I learned that, seven years from now, we will be 480,000 units [short on] inventory.We have 80,000 new jobs in Northern Virginia alone right now.There is always a group of people moving in and moving out of Washington. Fairfax County has the highest per capita

income in the country and we’re about seventh or eighth in housing prices—not so bad. The housing is expensive but it is affordable in comparison to incomes. JF: I think something else contributed to the downtown Washington phenomenon. Typically, young people rented. But with low interest rates they were suddenly able to buy. Instead of putting up rental buildings, developers are putting up condos. That makes a stable neighborhood and the retail follows because you have owners who are not moving every two years. JB: If you think about it, an entry-level associate at a law firm is making six figures. A new class comes in every September who can afford a $450,000 property no money down. And that is a nice condominium for anywhere you want to buy—Bethesda, Arlington, downtown Washington. But it is the income group that we are dealing with in Washington, inside the Beltway. The incomes are driving the amenities, type of housing being built and the quality of life that is being established here. And yes, [Mayor] Tony Williams has helped immensely, but it is just beyond that. It is a shift in population.The population shifted outside the city in the 1960’s and now they are coming back. CM: In [Northern Virginia], the condominium market has just died. Until recently, condominiums had a phenomenal investment. Normally we would have 800 condominiums on the market in Arlington and Alexandria. Currently we have 1,800 to 2,000 condominiums on the market. None of them are selling. We have over 60 percent ownership by investors. JF: It’s a totally different market than Chevy Chase. CM: North Arlington is doing fine because you have the urban center, but still they are not selling as well as they have been. JB: Everybody just jumped in and overbuilt the condominium market. You do not necessarily want to buy a condominium in suburbia because it will create more suburbia. But in an urban center where there are boundaries—as there are in Bethesda, or for Arlington or Reston Town Center… CM: Reston’s dead! JB: Well, boundaries create value. JF: Because there is a limited supply. There is only so much land for building in downtown

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Bethesda. For every unit that is for sale, I have 30 buyers! They are lined up because there are no units. If you suddenly put 30 units on the market for every one buyer, soon there will be no demand. MB: But the story about Reston does not worry you? Reston is not that far beyond McLean.You could have North Bethesda or Rockville suddenly creating luxurious new developments. JF: They are! They are developed In down-

town Bethesda, no builder will be come into that market and be able to build for less than 800 dollars per square foot and if you are going to get prices like that, you have to offer a downtown living experience, not suburban projects. Any developer that comes into town to do suburban condominiums might as well declare bankruptcy before he digs a hole because it’s not going to sell. Create your downtown first and then your buyers will follow. CM: I have no concern about the single family

houses and luxury homes.The upper end of the market is doing extremely well, so if you’re in Fairfax County in a $1million plus home, you have made a very safe investment. I’m scared of investing in these subdivisions that developers are building in Loudon County and Prince Georges County where houses are being sold for $1.5 million. We have done too much with the condominium market, the biggest problem is that they were bought by investors and now we have nine condos a week coming on the market with no sales. All of these investors paid $250,000 to $350,000 dollars for a condo and now they are trying to make $200,000, with no added value. JF: In my market, the developers are hip to that. Buyers don’t want to live with investors. They won’t let you sell it for two years, and they won’t let you rent it for one year.To protect the home owner, they do not want investors JB: Absolutely.You have to hold it for two years and, affidavit after affidavit, you have to say you are an owner occupant. They will not let investors buy. MB: What if interest rates spike up? JB: I have been in the banking business before as

head of First Union’s Morris Division in Wash-

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appreciation? JB: I think there’s going to be a healthy seven

“With the baby boomers you also have an architectural element—they prefer large apartment buildings downtown or Logan Circle to townhouses unless they have an elevator.” —JIMBELL

ington. I started when interest rates were 14 to 16 percent for adjustable mortgages, so a good interest rate is 8 percent for me. At this level, you look at the debt ratio of the people in this market and they do not carry debt. If they have debt at all, it’s student loans. CM: The Virginia market is the same we are not dealing with very much debt. We are dealing with move-up buyers.They have at least 500,000 dollars equity in their property. They are not overextending on their purchase. Interest rates are a short term factor because anytime there is indecision in the market, people make short term decisions to hold off, which has been happening since April of this year.There has been so much talk about the bubble but this is a shortterm slow down in the market and it is actually healthy for prices to come in-line, and gets us out of the crazy bidding wars, allowing the market to breath so that it can move forward again . JF: In my market, interest rates will not matter. I’m talking about people who are downsizing and expecting to live there for 20 years or looking to buy a move up house. Fall markets always have fewer buyers and more sellers.. JB: I agree to a certain extent. I do not think they are desperate, but if they do not make a deal now, there are six other people right behind who will. MB: Predictions for a year from now? Are we going to be sitting here talking about another 20 percent

to ten percent growth.There is a strong, healthy market here, and you have a lot of well qualified buyers who have a lot of cash. MB: You do not think it is going to stop? JB: It has stopped in other markets already. People forget what happened after September 11? You couldn’t give away an $800,000 house in Washington D.C. for a year. Take Columbia Heights for example. You have a lot of people who bought $350,000 condos and wanted to sell them for $450,000, but you can buy a house for $355,000. It makes no sense. That is a clear example of a housing imbalance. Where you have good housing stock at a fair market price, you will have willing buyers.That is what makes this market very healthy. MB: What is the price per-square-foot in your various markets? JB: The price per square foot in Georgetown

is $753 but a luxury condominium in Georgetown is about $1,000. In Kalorama, it is around the $650 to $700 market, and depending on renovation it can go as high as $750. Georgetown is about 20 to 25 percent more expensive than Kalorama. Logan Circle is comparable to Georgetown and Kalorama.The condo price per square foot could be as high as $700 to $900, and Capitol Hill is getting up there, too. CM: I have a different market them what is going on downtown. I don’t see that much appreciation next year, maybe four to six percent. There is a possibility that we might get a bump because of the construction costs, because of Katrina. I also believe that the big builders are going to divert resources. Right now they artificially keep up their supply and demand by only allowing so many houses to be sold per month because they don’t want to get too far out and they don’t have the production capacity to build any more. Because the developers are national, houses are built in factories, and are shipped and assembled on site. I think they are going to take some of that capacity away from those projects and use that to deal with Katrina rebuilding.The effect may be a bigger housing shortage, but I also see that there is an affordability problem.

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there is only one Nancy to call!

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R E A L E S TAT E

3025 Cathedral Avenue, NW

3252 Winchester Road

THEDISTRICT The Ritz-Carlton residence of the late heiress and philanthropist Sandra Helen Payson and her first husband, New York real estate developer William Blair Meyer, has been sold. Ms. Payson, who was also married for a time to Lord George Weidenfeld, the British publisher, was the greatgranddaughter of William Collins Whitney, and the granddaughter of Payne Whitney, who, as heir to the Eli Whitney cotton gin fortune, was at the time of his death in 1927, the third-wealthiest man in America. Payson’s mother, the late Joan Whitney Payson, co-founded the New York Mets with George Herbert Walker, Jr., who in the 1980’s, helped his nephew, former President George H.W. Bush, get into the oil business. In a family of wealthy Republican supporters, including her uncle John Hay Whitney, Ms. Payson stood out as a major donor to the Democratic National Committee. A self-described entrepreneur, she bred racehorses, owned a track and stables, founded the Beard’s Fund to benefit the arts, and served as board member of the Madeira School and the Whitney Museum in New York. She died last summer at age 78. Her UnitSD at  rdStreet﹐N﹒W﹒ was listed by Washington Fine Properties agent Giselle Theberge and sold for $1,010,000. The buyers are Gary M. Beer, CEO, Smithsonian Business Ventures, and his wife, Peggy.Washington Fine Properties Mathew McCormick and Patrick Chauvin, represented the couple in the transaction. Long & Foster realtors Charlie Hein and Terri Robinson listed and sold a beautiful Harry Wardman-designed house across from the Maret School in Woodley Park,

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Luxurious properties that offer more than just a room with a view B Y  M A R Y  K   M E W B O R N

one of the city’s finest neighborhoods. Harry Wardman, often referred to as “the man who built Washington,” in fact built 9,000 homes in the District and in 1918 opened the 1,000room Wardman Park Hotel, now the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel and Convention Center. The house located at  CathedralAvenue﹐ N﹒W﹒, features exquisite exterior masonry work and stone columns at the entranceway that Wardman copied from an Irish farmhouse. It also boasts hardwood floors and beautiful plaster moldings in the public rooms and in the master bedroom suite. The “Garfield” model Colonial was built in 1926 and has a traditional floor plan with a center hallway. There are six spacious bedrooms, four on the second floor and two on the third level that offer lovely views of National Cathedral. The home is situated on a deep lot with a garage and space to park five cars and is located near the Woodley metro stop, within easy reach of no fewer than twenty-five restaurants. The property was listed at $1,750,000, sold “as is” with a closing price tag of $1,580,000. The sellers were Sarah and Grace Daughtridge, sisters whose parents owned the house for over forty years. Sarah is an internist in North Carolina. Grace, a 1983 graduate of the Maret School, lives in Washing-

| washingtonlife.com

ton. The buyer is Herbert Cupo, Chief of the Office of Naval Operations. Mark A. Green and Michael W. Rankin of the real estate company Tutt,Taylor and Rankin, have sold their seven-bedroom Colonial at

CaliforniaStreet﹐N﹒W﹒ for a reported $4.7 million. The beautifully proportioned Kalorama residence was built in 1922 and features a grand scale living room that opens to a study and sunroom. Perfect for both formal and informal entertaining, there is an eat-in kitchen with a separate breakfast room overlooking the landscaped grounds. The large dining room opens to the patio and a lovely walled garden. The exceptional 9,750 square-foot fenced lot has an underground sprinkler system. The new owner is Kenneth D. Brody, a former Export-Import Bank president and founding partner of Winslow Partners, LLC. Brody also spent two decades at Goldman, Sachs & Co. and is co-founder of the investment firm Taconic Capital Advisors, LLC. In 1999 he established the Carolyn and Kenneth D. Brody Foundation, which consistently has ranked among the District’s top twenty-five most generous foundations.

VIRGINIA Almost a year after her death, Sandra H. Payson’s Virginia Hunt Country estate has also been sold and is now deeded to Luann L. Bennett. Bennett is the third wife of Rep. Terry Moran (D-Va.) and president and owner of RAB Management, Inc. a Washington real estate services firm specializing in leasing, construction and property management. Ms. Payson’s property, known as “Ashleigh,” is located

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3252 Winchester Road

at  Winchester Road, in Delaplane in scenic northwestern Fauquier County and has been designated in both the Virginia Register of Historic Properties and the National Register of Historic Places. Built circa 1840, the Greek Revival manor house was originally home to Margaret Marshall, the granddaughter of Chief Justice John Marshall, and was built on land she was given from the family’s Oak Hill estate. The five-bedroom house is constructed of stone covered with stucco and contains fine period woodwork including hardwood floors and pine paneling removed from the White House during the Hoover administration. Designed for entertaining, the main floor has a large entrance hall and embassy-size living room with fireplaces at each end. French doors lead from the dining room to a stone terrace. An octagonal brick addition was built in 2001 to serve as a library. Beautifully sited on a hill atop almost a hundred acres, “Ashleigh” is surrounded by beautiful countryside and has magnificent mountain views. Large boxwood hedges and exquisite flowering gardens with arbors further enhance the home’s pastoral setting. The grounds also include heated pool, pool house, pond, care-

106

taker’s house, ten-stall stable with courtyard, groom’s apartment connected to the stable, runin sheds, large paddocks with four board fencing, and a machine shed. The property was listed for $3.8 million by realtor Gloria Armfield, of Armfield, Miller & Ripley, Inc., which in September, merged with Washington Fine Properties, LLC. Both firms are affiliates of Sotheby’s International Realty and Regents members of Who’s Who in Luxury Real Estate. According to Dana Landry, the principal broker of Washington Fine Properties, “In recent years there have been an increasing number of buyers in the D.C. area looking for second homes in the Virginia countryside. By having this reputable company as a part of our operations, we will effectively extend our coverage to seamlessly serve our clients’ real estate needs.” With the merger, Washington Fine Properties gains more than fifty sales associates and expands its services to Clarke, Culpeper, Fauquier, Loudoun, Madison, Page, Rappahannock, and Shenandoah counties. In Old Town Alexandia, Begg Long & Foster agent Jeanne Livingston is in the process of selling SouthLeeStreet, a spectacular in-

town estate with a carriage house, tennis courts, heated swimming pool and formal gardens on its magnificent grounds. A true “American masterpiece,” the home known as the “Snowdon House,” was built in 1780 and has been catalogued in the Historic American Buildings Survey as one of Alexandria’s most important Federal properties. It has three bedrooms and four full baths. Priced at $6,500,000, the estate was once home to Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black who was appointed to the high court by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. A former Ku Klux Klan member in his youth, Black nevertheless served on the court for thirty-four years as a staunch proponent of civil rights and the Bill of Rights. Justice Black married twice. His first wife, Josephine Foster, died in 1951. In 1957, he married his secretary, Elizabeth Seay DeMeritte, a fellow Alabaman. Both fine dancers and excellent hosts, the Blacks often entertained in their 18th century residence and regularly used their tennis court as well. Justice Black died in 1971 at age 85. Please Send Real Estate News Items to Mary_Mewborn@Yahoo.com

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“According to the last Census report baby boomers represent 52 percent of our market in the Washington metropolitan area. The last baby boomer will turn 55 in 2020. What do boomers want to buy? They want to buy downtown locations, water properties, golf communities—any kind of a second home market. Follow the boomer and you will make money.� —JANEFAIRWEATHER

R E A L E S TAT E , C O N T I N U E D F RO M PAG E

102

When our average price of a home is over $550,000 and the mean is over $600,000 in Fairfax County, some people find it very difficult to afford housing. Even though I work on the luxury end of the market place, it still all trickles up. Long term, we’re going to go up. Short term, I don’t know if we’re going to have as great as an appreciation as we have had over the past few years. MB: And what about square footage? CM: We’re at $250 to $300 a square foot for

houses and $500 per square foot for luxury homes. That is construction price, not including land. The lots are going anywhere from $500,000 on the low end to over $1 million. JF: My market is different because we operate in scarcity of single family homes. Chevy Chase has a building moratorium that is going to further tighten the supply. Builders are not

"         !         

going to want to go in there and take the risk of knocking a house down and putting up a big house. The few houses that do come on in the market are going to continue to appreciate because there is no place to go. In the last three years, the price per square foot for land has gone from $315 to $750 to $800 in prime locations. If you want to buy something in Edgemoore you are at $2 million, and that’s a tear down. In terms of the condo market, unlike Northern Virginia, we are under built to an extreme. The Adagio, in downtown Bethesda, came on the market with 90 units and sold out in two weeks with a waiting list of 3,000 people. According to the last Census report baby boomers represent 52 percent of our market in the Washington metropolitan area. The last baby boomer will turn 55 in 2020. What do boomers want to buy? They want to buy downtown locations, water properties, golf communities—any kind of a second home market. Follow the boomer and you will make money.

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BRADLEE

&

Q U I N N , C O N T I N U E D F RO M PAG E

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SQ: Every poll shows that most journalists are Democrats.

good time together. WL: What are some of the things you like doing together? SQ: We like hanging out with our friends and

we plan things that are interesting to do. We love meeting new and interesting people BB: Especially that. Meeting new people is really fun. But, if you’ve been married more than once, people sometimes try to get you to say that previous marriages were all disasters and a mistake. And that isn’t true either. WL: With the decline in newspaper readership how do you think the Washington Post will fare? BB: It worries the hell out of me. I was at the Post at the perfect time; the circulation was going way up. WL: What can newspapers today do to capture a younger readership? BB: We’ll have to work on that. It’s going to

change because it is silly for them to try to stop the Internet, so they’ll accommodate it. WL: Do you think there’s any danger in the corporatization of media and having fewer owners and therefore fewer voices? BB: That’s way down on my list of worries. So

long as the quality of journalism improves. Think how many more sources of news there are now. WL: But the same corporations own so many. Hasn’t journalism, especially broadcast journalism, become more of a “he said, she said” versus real investigative reporting? BB: “Investigative reporting” bothers me as a phrase,

because it presumes that a reporter goes to work, turns on a little switch and says, “Now I’m going to be an investigative reporter instead of a regular reporter.” What kind of reporting is investigative? Any kind of reporter is investigative as soon as [he/she] asks the third question. The criticism I hear of newspapers is that they’re doing too much of this.The television news audience has decreased faster than the newspaper reading audience by far. The nightly news audience has declined 30 to 40 percent. SQ: They’re getting it off the Internet… We’re like fossils to our kids, [as] we sit with a drink and watch the evening news. WL: Do you think the political left controls the media?

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WL: But they’re not controlling it. SQ: Well, the owners of the media are mostly

Republican or conservative and they control it. BB: Out of 1,500 newspapers, the daily newspa-

pers, the vast majority would be Republican: 75 percent I would think.And reporters, I don’t know. I’m very apolitical, I don’t give a goddamn who’s president now, I just want him to be elected. SQ: That’s not true. You want somebody who’s good. BB: Well, good for my country. WL: Our democracy is built on checks and balances and the media is obviously an important part of that. Do you think it is dangerous for our democracy if the White House press corps does not have much access, and that the White House—any White House, not just this one— does not give regular press conferences? BB: Look, that’s been an argument and that’ll

be the argument till the world ends. [But] good reporters get access. SQ: I think yes. BB: They’re spoon-fed the information differently. People who are good at press conferences give them. People who aren’t good at it don’t. That seems so frighteningly logical to me. What I’m really interested in [is] why people read newspapers? I think one of the reasons is that they get to watch a story develop, things aren’t immediately clear. Watching the story unfold is what keeps newspapers and reporters going. WL: Do you think journalists have become too cozy with their sources or the people they are reporting on? BB: Under Franklin Roosevelt, there were twelve

men and May Craig, that lovely lady from Maine with the stovepipe hat.Today, they wish they were cozy. Everybody tries to distinguish themselves and their access from other people’s access. SQ: Getting too close to a source is always a major problem with any reporter.That is why I don’t like beat reporting, I’ve never been a beat reporter even when I covered parties because when you’re covering a beat, you get to know people really well, and then its hard to write something negative about them and go back the next day. I couldn’t pull myself away when I became friendly with them. Ultimately it’s up to the editor [to decide] if the

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reporter is getting too close. BB: I think historically, like during the Eisenhower and Truman days, there were only two or three reporters covering the president and most of them kept it pretty tight. I think it’s much better now. SQ: I agree with that. I don’t think reporters are nearly as cozy with sources as they used to be. Reporters used to be called in to give advice to the President and to the people on Capitol Hill. A lot of them succumbed. It made them feel important that the President wanted to know what they thought. BB: Kennedy had two reporter friends who were really, really his friends, I was one and the other was Hugh Sidey of Time Life. SQ: Another was Charlie Bartlett. BB: But he wrote for the Chattanooga Times and nobody read that. WL: Planning any future projects? BB: I may be approaching the end of my proj-

ect career. Jim Lehrer and I have done six hours of one-on-one interviews that he’s going to make into a one hour special. I’ve written about Kennedy and I’m not going to revise my opinion because I haven’t changed it. I’m very interested in lying. I’ve become hooked on lying. Sally and I talk about it a lot. I taught about it at Harvard and Georgetown. I got people interested in questioning whether anybody is telling the truth at any given time. If I write another book, it’ll be on lying but I don’t feel under tremendous pressure at 84. SQ: I’m hooked on Homeland Security and emergency preparedness, particularly in light of what we’ve seen with Katrina. We know that we’re not prepared now, but we’re less prepared than we were four years ago. So, that’s what I’m focusing on at the Post right now. I’m starting a book on religion in Washington. BB: What is the influence of religion? SQ: The influence of religion on the people in power in Washington. WL: If you could each interview anyone living or dead who would it be? BB: God I can’t think… that’s the ol’ problem—

to interview them if they’re in the mood. Any world leader, if they’d talk. SQ: Some of them aren’t that interesting but if Hillary would tell the truth about what she was really thinking…

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C A L E N D A R

Visit Washingtonlife.com’s extensive online social calendar to view hundreds of other galas and events by category, or to post your own event and to have it considered for the print social calendar and the annual balls and galas directory.

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Towers; black-tie; contact (202) 772-0429

5

KNOCKOUTABUSEAGAINST WOMEN benefits five area women’s

THERENEMOAWAD FOUNDATION’SANNUAL BENEFITGALA gathers about 400

members of the Arab-American community for a Lebanese cultural evening honoring Richard C. Shadyac, former CEO, ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The gala will feature Lebanese fashion designer Gemy Maalouf, and a silent auction to help to finance a social development project in Lebanon. 7 p.m.; The Ritz Carlton Hotel, 1250 Hays St., Arlington, Va.; black-tie optional; $165 dinner ticket, $250 VIP seating; contact (202) 338-3535

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FIGHTNIGHT Fight Night

was established by Fight for Children, Inc., a charitable organization raising money for children’s charities. A boxing match, live auction and dinner follow a cocktail reception and silent auctions.

6:30 p.m.; Washington Hilton and

shelters whose mission is to help women and children whose lives have been shattered by domestic abuse, poverty, and homelessness. Event includes cocktails, dinner, music, and silent and live auctions. 6:30p.m.; The Ritz Carlton Hotel, 1150 22nd St., N.W.; cocktail attire; $350; contact (202) 625-8348

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FIFTHANNUALCELEBRATIONOFHOPE& PROGRESS Sibley Memorial

Hospital will host the Fifth Annual Celebration of Hope & Progress to thank donors for their contributions and support of the Sibley Cancer Center. Featured speaker Bob Schieffer will be joined by event chair Mrs. Jeanne Ruesch to raise funds for the Sibley Cancer Center. 7 p.m.; Four Seasons Hotel Georgetown; black-tie; $350; contact (202) 537-4362

SAV E T H E DAT E

For the following Washington Life supported and sponsored events coming up in the months of November and December! KNOCKOUTABUSEAGAINSTWOMENNOV 11TH NATIONALREHABILITATIONGALA &VICTORYAWARDSNOV 15TH STARLIGHT-STARBRIGHTTASTEOFTHESTARSBALLNOV 18TH KENNEDYCENTERHONORSWEEKENDDEC 3-4TH SMITHSONIANAMERICANARTMUSEUMBENEFIT DEC 7TH THEWASHINGTONBALLET’SNUTTYORNICEBALLDEC 9TH CHORALARTSSOCIETYOFWASHINGTONDEC11TH

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NATIONALREHABILITATIONGALA&VICTORY AWARDS honors distinguished

will be honored for their lifetime contributions to the arts and American culture. This weekendlong event includes a formal dinner at the State Department, a reception at the White House, a brunch and a televised gala attended by the President, and dinner after the show. Gala held

individuals who have overcome disabilities. Past honorees include Stevie Wonder, Gloria Estefan, and former Sen. Bob Dole. An awards ceremony follows the dinner and silent and live auctions. 6:30 p.m.; The Ritz Carlton Washington; blacktie; $400; contact (202) 877-1781

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STARLIGHT-STARBRIGHT TASTEOFTHESTARS

BALL works to help seriously ill children by providing them with innovative programs and services that empower, educate, entertain, and inspire. The event will include a cocktail reception, silent and live auction, dinner and dancing. 7:30 p.m.; The Four Seasons Hotel, Georgetown; black-tie; $250; contact (202) 293-7827

19

THENIGHTOFHOPE GALA is the most exclu-

sive event put on by the Capitol Chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). The Gala is a fundraiser for juvenile diabetes research; the event raised $1.2 million last year. The Honorees for this year’s Gala are Gov. Mark Warner (D-VA) and his wife, Lisa Collis, who have shown tremendous dedication to finding a cure for type 1 diabetes.

6p.m.; The Mandarin Oriental Hotel; black-tie; $400; contact La Shawn Lancaster at llancaster@ jdrf.org

D ECEM B ER

3 &4

KENNEDY CENTERHONORS

WEEKEND Tony Bennett,

Suzanne Farrell, Julie Harris, Robert Redford and Tina Turner

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

on Dec. 4th at 7p.m.; The Kennedy Center Opera House; tickets starting at $200; www.kennedy-center. org

7

SMITHSONIANAMERICAN ARTMUSEUMBENEFIT

A diverse youthful crowd of art lovers will enjoy gourmet hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and live music in the Grand Salon while bidding on silent auction items benefiting the museum’s educational programs. 7 p.m.-

9p.m.; Grand Salon of the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum; $200 for Art Patrons, $100 for Art Friends; call (202) 275-1500

9

WASHINGTONBALLET’S NUTTYORNICEBALL

will include a festive evening of dancing following the opening night performance of Septime Webre’s The Nutcracker. Cocktails, hors d’oeuvre, and dancing after the performance. The Willard Intercontinental Hotel; contact (202) 362-3606, ext. 125 or visit www.washingtonballet.org

11

CHORALARTSSOCIETY OFWASHINGTON This

Christmas concert followed by a fabulous silent auction, dinner and dancing is sure to bring out the Christmas spirit in all who attend. 6:00p.m.-1:00a.m.; Mandarin Oriental Washington; black-tie; $475/person; contact (202) 244-3669

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Profile for Washington Life Magazine

Washington Life Magazine - November 2006  

Washington Life Magazine 2005

Washington Life Magazine - November 2006  

Washington Life Magazine 2005