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Teacher Resource Notes

John Piper 1 May—21 June 2018 Mead Gallery Warwick Arts Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL Exhibition open Mon-Sat 12pm-9pm, Sundays and Bank Holidays 12pm-5pm FREE ENTRY


The Mead Gallery is committed to increasing

This resource is designed to

understanding of, and engagement with, international contemporary art. Through our exhibition programme, we encourage young people

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help you with planning and preparing your class visit to the exhibition

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support you on your visit

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provide ideas for follow-up activities

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encourage cross-curricular work

to engage with key themes and ideas relating to the world they inhabit and offer opportunities for them to meet and work with artists. Every exhibition is

supported by a programme of artist-led talks and discussions, workshops and other events. Details are available on our website: meadgallery.co.uk These notes are designed to support your visit to the Mead Gallery, including planning prior to your visit and suggestions for follow up discussion and

provide information about the artists and their work

encourage individual and collaborative creative work

activities. They are aimed at all key stages, enabling you to develop them to suit your needs and inspire discussion and practical work.

Previous page: Detail of Baptistery Window in Coventry Cathedral by John Piper and Patrick Reyntiens This page: John Piper, Interior of Coventry Cathedral, the day after the Blitz, 1940. Herbert Art Gallery & Museum


Contents

Introduction…………..…………………………..…………………………………………………………………………………….….…….

1

Timeline ……………………………………………………………………………………..…………………….……………………………….

2

Seeking inspiration from your surroundings …………………………………………………………..…………...…………...

6

Stained glass colour study....................................................................................................................

7

Coastal collages (papier collé)............................................................................................................... String Paintings, Abstract Constructions and Abstract Painting ........................................................

8

10

Ancient influencing modern ..............................................................................................................

12

A War Artist who designed stained glass for peace – John Piper and Coventry ..................................

14

Planning a Visit to the Mead Gallery ………………………………………………………………………….…………..………

15

Risk Assessments ……………………………………………………………………..………………………………………….…………

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Introduction John Piper (1903—1992)

John Piper is an artist who worked in a huge variety of styles and who sought inspiration from the landscape, eighth century stone carvers and both historical and contemporaneous artists. This pack will provide a timeline of his career and opportunities to explore Piper’s techniques and influences as you learn more about him as an artist. This pack and the exhibition lends itself to Sketchbook development as there are so many techniques at play. Activities have not been divided by key stage. Most are suitable for KS2 upwards.

Darren Pih, exhibition curator and author of the accompanying book states:

Piper is particularly significant for Coventry. He painted the ruins of the old Cathedral as it still smouldered from the bombing in 1940. His painting later became a Ministry of Information postcard symbolising England’s resilience to war. Fittingly, he also designed the Stained Glass Window for the new cathedral. We would recommend all visitors to this exhibition to also visit Coventry Cathedral to see both the ruins captured in the postcard and the stained glass. Schools are able to book a combined visit, please contact education.resource@warwick.ac.uk to discuss further and to book. Images of works by Piper are featured with each section but more can be found on the Tate website http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/john-piper1774.

“Piper is relevant today because he prompts us to look more attentively and more affectionately at our surroundings—our buildings, public spaces, landscapes and the objects that inhabit them.”

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Timeline

1903

Born in Epsom, Surrey

1923

Piper tours northern Italy with his father and is inspired by the art and architecture. He attempts to persuade his father to allow him to study art. His father agrees that Piper can choose his own career path on the proviso that he first studies law.

1923-1927

On completing his legal training, Piper follows his father’s wishes that he enter the family firm of solicitors. He works there for three years whilst, inspired by the work of Paul Nash, he becomes an amateur illustrator. Piper exhibits at the Arlington Gallery in 1927. Reviews compare his woodcuts to the work of Ethelbert White.

1928-1929

After his father’s death in 1927, Piper enrols at Richmond School of Art. A year later, he enters the Royal College of Art. In 1928, he paints Houses in Surrey, which he will later describe as the strongest of his early work.

1929-1932

Piper makes copies of stained glass windows. These include the 13th century stained glass window depicting the stoning of St Stephen in St Leonard’s parish church, Grateley. The window was originally in Salisbury Cathedral. He will later write about how this exercise taught him about colour and he will stage a photograph showing abstract works in his studio arranged around his stained glass studies.

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1933

The period 1927 to 1933 had been one of fervent experimentation for Piper, during which he developed an interest in the European modern movement as it developed in Britain. Piper’s series of seaside images, including Coast (1933), shows a convergence of his interests: a simplification of form inspired by Ben Nicholson’s Dieppe collages and also Jean Arp and Picasso’s 1924 Nudes on a Beach.

1934

In June 1934 Piper travels to Paris, visiting the studios of artists including Jean Hélion, Alexander Calder and Cesar Domela. Following this visit, Piper begins making his abstract constructions and paintings. In this year also, Piper joins the Seven and Five Society which, under the leadership of Ben Nicholson, promotes abstract-constructivist work. Other members include Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore.

1935-36

Piper supports Myfanwy Evans, his partner and future wife, with launching and editing AXIS: A Quarterly Review of ‘Abstract’ Painting & Sculpture. AXIS is the first magazine in Britain to be devoted to international abstract art. While Piper regards abstraction to have been a useful exercise, he begins to think it inadequate in recording and understanding landscape and architecture. In May 1936 the artist writes to Ben Nicholson to disassociate himself from the Seven and Five Society.

1937

Piper and Myfanwy marry. The last issue of AXIS is published and Piper writes an article ,‘Lost, a valuable object’, in which he says that since cubism destroyed the object—or the painter’s subject—abstract painters have tried to replace it but are now attempting to retrieve it despite their ‘horror of [the object] in its proper context.’ He continues: ‘The object must grow again; must reappear as the ‘country’ that inspires painting.’

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1938

In 1936, Piper had returned to making representational collages based on familiar coastal and landscape subjects. He works in situ, creating the collages on the seafront. In 1938, Piper writes of finding inspiration in the 'magnificent wreckage' of the seaweed, driftwood and objects found washed up on the beach. 'Whatever direction you look… is worthy of contemporary painting. Pure abstraction is undernourished. It should at least be allowed to feed on a bare beach with tins and broken bottles.'

1939

Piper explores aquatint, a technique developed in France in the eighteenth century, to create a book of twelve architectural views of Brighton. He claims his inspiration to have come from JMW Turner and James Edward Smith. He also becomes concerned with poorly renovated historic buildings with their ‘pleasing decay’.

1940

Piper becomes official war artist. This brings him to Coventry on the morning of 15 November, the day after the Coventry Blitz. From a solicitor’s office on Priory Street, Piper sketches the ruined cathedral, which he will later describe as: ‘a grey, meal-coloured stack in the foggy close; redder as one came nearer; and still hot and wet from fire and water: finally presenting itself as a series of gaunt, red-grey facades, stretching eastwards from the dusty but erect tower and spire.’

1942

In the early 1940s, the term ’Neo-Romanticism’ had first been used to loosely define a group of British artists who had a personal and often poetical identification with nature as well as a shared interest in artists of the eighteenth century Romantic period such as JMW Turner, Samuel Palmer and William Blake. This included Piper as well as Paul Nash and Graham Sutherland. In 1942 Piper’s book, British Romantic Artists, is published by Collins as part of the ‘Britain in Pictures’ series. Originally, it was to be titled English Romantic Painting.

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1950s

After the mid-1950s, Piper's painting falls out of fashion with art world tastes. Nevertheless, he begins to receive high-profile public commissions for murals, textile and wallpaper designs. These commissions require him to collaborate with craftsmen and to develop new approaches to subject matter and traditional methods of making art. Piper’s commissions include designing stained glass windows for Coventry and Liverpool Cathedrals. On both projects, Piper works with stained glass artist Patrick Reyntiens and is inspired by the stained glass work of Fernand Léger , Margeurie Huré and Henri Matisse.

1960s and beyond

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s Piper spends much time painting in Pembrokeshire. He also designs theatre sets, including for many productions of Benjamin Britten's operas at Glyndebourne Festival Opera, the Royal Opera House, La Fenice and the Aldeburgh Festival. Piper also designs the firework Displays for the Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 1977.

1992

After suffering from Alzheimer's Disease for some time, John Piper dies in his home at Fawley Bottom, Buckinghamshire, where he has lived for most of his life. His wife, Myfanwy, will die in 1997.

List of illustrations: 1928-29: John Piper, Houses in Surrey, 1928. Private Collection 1929-32: John Piper, The Stoning of St. Stephen, from Grateley Parish Church, c.1929. Private Collection 1933: John Piper, Coast, 1933. Kirklees Collection, Huddersfield Art Gallery 1934: John Piper, Construction, 1934, 1967. Tate, purchased 1968 1935-36: Myfanwy Piper, Axis 3 (July 1935). Private Collection 1937: John Piper, Newhaven, 1937. Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne 1938: John Piper, Angle Bay, 1938. Private Collection, courtesy of Offer Waterman, London 1939: John Piper, Brighton Aquatints, 1939. Private Collection 1940: John Piper, Interior of Coventry Cathedral, the day after the Blitz, 1940. Herbert Art Gallery & Museum 1942: John Piper, British Romantic Artists, Collins, 1942 1950s: Baptistery Window, Coventry Cathedral, designed by John Piper and Patrick Reyntiens

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Seeking inspiration from your surroundings

John Piper drew what he saw around him, the countryside and the architecture. Sketching the things you see most regularly helps you look at them differently. You might want to share this BBC Bitesize video about sketchbook making: https://www.bbc.com/education/guides/z8sv97h/video (accessed 28 March 2018). Explain that, in addition to taking photographs and sketching, John Piper also collected writing and information in his sketchbooks. If possible arrange for students to visit a local building, church or town hall that is architecturally interesting. Provide them with sketching materials. If you are visiting a building with stained glass you might also consider doing that activity or taking photographs in preparation at the same time. If it is not possible to leave the school grounds, this exercise can be done with school buildings. Invite the students to sketch both the detail and the shape of the building. They might even want to take rubbings from the stone. Encourage students to collect contextual information about the building:

What’s it made from? When was it built? etc. Give the students time to sketch as much of the building and its detail as they can. Once you are back to school share the sketchbooks, maybe picking several to show. Invite the students to discuss what they found significant about the building and whether they saw the building in a new way as a result of the visit.

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Stained glass colour study

culture. Invite the students to explore paint mixing to create the colour palette and depth of tone.

What do they notice?

Why do watercolours work well for this activity? Invite them to annotate their colour testing with these observations.

John Piper visited churches and other historic buildings all over the country. The stained glass

window pictured here from St Leonard’s Church in Grateley was one he copied in watercolour in around 1929 . He later wrote that this exercise taught him how to use colour. Provide the students with watercolour paints and images of stained glass windows. Photographs of local wndows would be best to promote further engagement with local visual

Once they have explored the palette, invite them to recreate a small section of the window. Add a photograph of the window, their recreation and their colour experiments and annotations to their sketchbooks. Invite students to make further observations about the process and further annotate the page. If you are working with primary aged students you might want to make a class sketchbook, collating all the learning in one place and creating shared annotation.

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Coastal collages Papier collé

Piper’s Inspirations

Picasso collages Georges Braque Ben Nicholson

Between 1933 and 1934 John Piper created a series of collages, or papier collé, which means drawing with paper. He used a range of papers to ‘paint’ with, adding paint to finish the image and creating beach scenes and still lifes. Share some of these images with the students. Invite them to observe how different effects have been created, where just paper has been

used and where additional paint effects have been added to develop texture.

Image: John Piper, Beach with Starfish, c. 1933-34. Tate, presented by Lady (Charlotte) Bonham Carter, 1988

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With the group, collect a range of papers:

detail. Encourage the students to try a range of

tracing, wrapping, newspaper, music score, sugar

ideas before they choose one and to annotate

paper, tissue paper, sandpaper etc. You might

each attempt.

want to photocopy some anatomical drawings of sea creatures. Also provide glue, fine liners and

Once they have chosen a paper and/or paint

paint or oil pastels.

effect for each element of their picture, invite the students to start building their image.

Invite the group to bring in seaside photographs

Provide them with cartridge paper to build their

or print out images from a British Beach Google

image on, A3 preferably. Encourage the students

image search. Spend some time looking at the

to spend time considering how and where each

textures and shapes in these images. You might

texture meets the other. You might want to

encourage the students to use magnifying

return to Piper’s images, examining the joins

glasses to further explore the texture. Better still,

between elements and how they have been

invite them to bring in seaside objects such as

managed. Encourage the students not to start

sand and shells and observe these closely,

again but to rectify perceived errors with paint

studying the textures and range of colours.

or paper.

Invite the students to sketch their own versions of a chosen image. Invite the students to create a mood board. Choose paper to represent each element of the drawing, then model how paint effects might be

added on top of the paper to create further

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String Paintings, Abstract Constructions and Abstract Painting Piper’s Inspirations

Alexander Calder Jean Arp Piet Mondrian

John Piper described his abstract paintings as

“arrangements of shapes and colours that are good to look at.”

Image: John Piper, Construction, 1934, 1967 Tate, purchased 1968

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Provide the students with paper shapes in

Share Construction with the students. Invite

different colours (these can be bought cheaply

them to consider whether they think this is an

from education suppliers), and invite them to

arrangement that is good to look at and to justify

create temporary arrangements on their tables.

their reasons. Look back at Piper’s collage work:

Encourage them to cut shapes into halves or

Are there clues that this is the same

quarters if they want to. Invite the students to

artist?

present their work to a partner on their table, explaining why their arrangement is good to look at. Encourage them to use appropriate vocabulary, reflecting on form and line as well as colour palette.

Piper photographed his studio with his copies of stained glass windows set alongside abstract pieces. If you have tried the stained glass Exercise, maybe refer back to this too and consider arrangements of shapes and colours.

Now invite the students to create a version of

their arrangement by sticking string to card. This doesn’t have to be an exact reproduction; instead it can draw on the types of line and combinations of shapes they observed.

Invite students to plan a construction using a range of materials. Piper endeavoured to use everyday materials, to make abstract art nonelitist. Students might want to consider kitchen utensils, craft materials, sweets or other food

Once they are happy with the string arrangement they can paint additional shapes onto their work.

stuffs. Encourage them to think about their colour palette and to make sketches and mood board additions to their sketch books where appropriate.

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Ancient influencing modern

John Piper photographed buildings and

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/tategallery/so-

monuments throughout his career. The V&A

surreal/.

website has a large selection. The above are just a sample.

Repeat the exercise. Invite them to draw connections between the two.

Invite the students to choose images of the carvings that they are drawn to and to sketch the

Can they feel a connection?

elements they feel are compelling. Encourage

Where is it?

them to do several sketches, filling a page, exploring the lines and forms that they find. John Piper believed that the same forces were at play in early carving as in Surrealism. Share the Tate’s So Surreal Pinterest page with the

Invite the students to create their own piece in response to these exercises and what has spoken to them. Be expansive with the range of materials offered for this piece.

students:

Images: Left to right: John Piper: Lathbury, Buckinghamshire, church, capital in south arcade with amphisbaena, c. 1936 Milton, South Devon, church, font (detail of bowl), c. 1936 Castle Frome, Church font (detail), Herefordshire, c. 1936 St Stephen-in-Brannel, Cornwall, Church font, c. 1936 All photographs from the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Purchased from the artist in 1936.

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A War Artist who designed stained glass for peace – John Piper and Coventry Piper’s Inspirations

Fernand Léger Marguerite Huré Henri Matisse

On 15 November 1940, the day after the

Consider the techniques described in the video,

Coventry Blitz, Piper visited Coventry and made a

including painting onto different colours of glass.

series of drawings of the ravaged city, in particular of the cathedral and other gutted

Provide the students with different colours of

churches. He returned to the city in the 1950s

acetate and using glass paints or permanent

when Basil Spence commissioned the artist, with

markers add texture and colour. Encourage the

Patrick Reyntiens, to design a huge stained glass

students to trial a range of techniques and to

window for the city’s new cathedral, which was

annotate these trials in their sketchbooks.

consecrated in 1962.

Move on to consider the whole window. Invite We recommend visiting the cathedral to

the students to make their own lattice shape

experience the window in situ.

using black sugar paper. Using pencil crayons, invite them to try different designs, considering

You might want to share the video where Patrick

images spread across the lattice or creating a

Reyntiens describes the process of making the

pattern or motif, before transferring to acetate.

window and the options they tried:

Layer colour onto transparent, stick the lattice over the top and display on windows to check

https://www.youtube.com/watch?

the desired effect.

v=lbN9RIhFRTQ

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Planning Your Visit to the Mead Gallery

Contact Details and Opening Hours

Coaches

Mead Gallery

On all occasions when any number of minibuses or

Warwick Arts Centre

coaches are expected at any time of day, the Front

University of Warwick

of House team MUST be informed so that they can

Coventry CV4 7AL

make arrangements with Campus Security.

Box Office: 024 7652 4524

Please call our Box Office team on 024 652 4524

Open Monday – Saturday 12 noon – 9pm. Free Entry.

Cars Charges apply for all University of Warwick car parks

For group visits, it is advisable to book in advance.

during the day. The nearest to Warwick Arts Centre

The Mead Gallery is exclusively available for school

is CP7 (free if arriving after 6pm). CP7 has no lift.

group bookings Monday – Friday, 9am – 12noon by prior arrangement. Staff and resources are available

Minibuses

to support these visits.

Please call our Box Office team for advice on 024 652 4524

Parking at Warwick Arts Centre Daytime parking on campus can be difficult so

Lunch

please allow plenty of time. For directions to

If necessary, rooms are available where pupils can

Warwick Arts Centre, go to http://

eat their packed lunches. Let us know in advance if

www.warwickartscentre.co.uk/your-visit/getting-

you want us to book one.

here/ For a map of the campus, go to http:// www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/ campusmap/

Toilets Public toilets are available in the Arts Centre.

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Before Your Visit

Drawing

We recommend a preliminary planning visit and are

The Mead Gallery has some drawing materials

happy to discuss your requirements with you.

available and can supply a certain amount of clipboards. Please contact Gallery staff on 024 7657

Adult supervision of students under 16 is required at

3732 to discuss your needs. We regret that we

all times. An adult student ratio of 1:5 for under 5s,

cannot supply drawing materials with little or no

1:10 for 5-11 year olds, 1:15 for 11-16 year olds and

notice.

1:20 for 16-18 year olds is required.

During Your Visit Teachers/group leaders and accompanying adults are responsible for their group’s behaviour whilst at Warwick Arts Centre. Many artworks are fragile and damage easily.

Unless you are told otherwise, please take extra care to ensure that your group follows the Gallery guidelines at all times: No running No touching No leaning against walls or plinths No eating or drinking

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Risk Assessment Area

Front of House & Venues

Responsible Staff

Duty Manager, Education Director

Hazard

School age parties attending performances and workshops

Description of Possible Risks

Trip hazards, children misusing seating, personal injury through participation

People at Risk

Young audience

Potential Severity of Injury (Major, Serious, Minor)

Minor (trip hazards and childish behaviour)

Description of Possible Injuries

Cuts, bruises, sprains caused by trips and falls

Probability of Occurrence (High, moderate, low)

Low

Measures to Control Occurrence

Sufficient stewarding of foyer and venues. Notify teachers / chaperones of requirements to adequately supervise groups they are responsible for Circulate current policy to schools visiting the building on request. Adequate warm-up before physical activity

Potential for Injuries to More Than One Person

Low

Plans for Elimination / Control

Adherence to current Child Safety legislation Follow current policy (see attached sheets)

Training Requirement / Information

Liaise with schools, Steward training

Monitoring / Health Surveillance

Liaison with teachers / chaperones Venues and building regularly inspected by competent staff. All accidents and near misses are reported to the Duty Manager in the first instance, and subsequently reported online to the Health, Safety and Wellbeing Team.

Emergency Procedures

Immediate first aid assistance Ensure all staff and visitors are aware of how to contact Arts Centre First Aiders and/or Security staff

Assessment Review Date

21 November 2016. Or if: The Assessment is no longer valid There are significant changes in activities or facilities A related accident occurs

Signed

Brian Bishop, Education Director - Department Head Andrea Pulford, Director-Planning & Operations Responsible Director 20.11.2015


Risk Assessment Area

University of Warwick campus and journey from coach/ minibus drop off point to Warwick Arts Centre

Responsible Staff

Duty Manager, Education Director

Hazard

School age parties attending performances, workshops and the Colour and Sculpture Trail

Description of Possible Risks

Road Traffic Accidents, Trip hazards

People at Risk

Young audience

Potential Severity of Injury (Major, Serious, Minor)

Major (road traffic accidents)

Description of Possible Injuries

Death or serious injury resulting from road traffic accidents Cuts, bruises, sprains caused by trips and falls

Probability of Occurrence (High, moderate, low)

Low

Measures to Control Occurrence

Full liaison with University Security regarding any visits by schools/colleges arriving by coach or minibus. Security will guide parties to Arts Centre when coaches/ minibuses arrive at the front of the building or bus exchange. Notify teachers / chaperones of requirements to adequately supervise groups they are responsible for if the drop off point is further away from the Arts Centre requiring crossing roads or they are taking the Sculpture or Colour Trails. Circulate current policy to schools visiting the building on request.

Potential for Injuries to More Than One Person

Low

Plans for Elimination / Control

Adherence to current Child Safety legislation Follow current policy (see attached sheets)

Training Requirement / Information

Liaise with schools, Steward training

Monitoring / Health Surveillance

Liaison with teachers / chaperones All accidents and near misses are reported to the Duty Manager in the first instance, and subsequently reported online to the Health, Safety and Wellbeing Team

Emergency Procedures

Immediate first aid assistance Ensure all staff and visitors are aware of how to contact Arts Centre First Aiders and/or Security staff

Assessment Review Date

21 November 2016. Or if: The Assessment is no longer valid There are significant changes in activities or facilities A related accident occurs

Signed

Brian Bishop, Education Director - Department Head Andrea Pulford, Director- Planning & Operations Responsible Director 20.11.2015


Risk Assessment Advice to Persons Accompanying Visits by School Parties

GENERAL

IN VENUE

Warwick Arts Centre is situated on the campus of the University of Warwick, which during term time has over 24,000 students on site. We therefore have a medical centre on campus with trained medical staff a phone call away. Warwick University and the Arts Centre have pools of first aiders.

In the Mead Gallery, we ask that you follow the guidelines:

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY As a department of the University of Warwick, Warwick Arts Centre is monitored by the University Health, Safety and Wellbeing Team. The University Safety Policy, Safety Plan and Safety Audit cover all elements of health and safety, including visitors on campus. In addition the Arts Centre has a Departmental Safety Officer (Technical Manager). An Arts Centre Safety Policy details area-specific issues and evacuation procedures.

CAMPUS Whilst on visits, children should only leave the Arts Centre under the strict supervision of their teacher. They should be made aware beforehand of the busy nature of the site including its main road, which is well used by cycles, cars, University vehicles and buses. Please see below regarding arriving and departing by coach.

FRONT OF HOUSE Warwick Arts Centre has a large foyer area with a cafĂŠ bar, shops, bars and large open spaces where normal general hazards apply. The foyers are well used by University students and staff at all times. Children should be briefed before their visit about staying safe in this environment. Advice should include: No running. Attention to be paid to automatic door operation. Avoid trapped fingers in the doors. No unsupervised use of the lift. No unsupervised visits to the Bookshop. Take care around the glass balustrades. Not talking to anyone who is not part of their party or a member of the Warwick Arts Centre staff that they know. Please note that we cannot accommodate groups eating lunch in the foyers. If schools wish to stay for lunch, Arts Centre staff should make particular arrangements with teachers in advance.

No running No touching No leaning against walls or plinths No photography No eating or drinking

SCHOOL GROUPS ARRIVING FOR WARWICK ARTS CENTRE BY COACH On all occasions when any number of minibuses or coaches are expected at any time of day, the Front of House team MUST be informed so that they can make arrangements with Campus Security. Daytime When 3 or fewer coaches are expected, drivers and teachers will be asked to drop off at the bus exchange. Security will meet them and accompany young people to the Arts Centre doors where stewards will take over. When more than 3 coaches are expected, drivers and teachers will be asked to drop off on the hard standing at the front of the Arts Centre. Security will meet them and direct the parties to the Arts Centre doors where stewards will take over. Evening When minibuses or coaches are expected for evening events, the Front of House team will make particular arrangements with Campus Security dependent on the amount of activity taking place campus-wide on that particular evening, the size and number of minibuses/ coaches expected and whether any group has particular access needs that must be met. Drop off and parking information can then be sent to schools and/or coach companies. Please note that coaches and minibuses may not be able to stay at the drop off point for the duration of their visit, and should be advised by Security on the day of a safe place on campus to park-up. They can then return to the drop off point to collect school groups at the end of their visit.


Risk Assessment Management of Safety

Warwick Arts Centre ensures that safety standards are maintained in accordance with the University’s and the Arts Centre’s Safety Policy. The Health and Safety policy is reviewed annually and reported accidents and incidents are monitored through Warwick Arts Centre’s attendance at the Campus and Commercial Services Health and Safety meetings. The Safety Committee shall meet at least three times every year. The minutes of each meeting shall be made available to all staff and to the University Safety Office. Emergency Safety Personnel Duty Fire Officers Operations Assistants

First Aiders Operations Assistants

Emergency Telephone Numbers internal 22442 Radio 51724 – 217#

internal 22442 Radio 51724 – 217#

House Management

Internal 22793 / 24903 Radio 51724 – 216#

Security Staff

Internal 22222 / 22083

University Safety Office John Phillips (Director of Health & Safety)

024 7652 3208 Mobile 07884 733064

Graham Day (Food Health & Safety Manager)

024 7615 0023 Mobile 07920 053111

Web Site http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ healthsafetywellbeing

Internal Emergency Services Health Centre Security / Main Gate Mobile phone users should call External University Hospital Coventry

x 22222 x 24888 x 22083 / 22222 024 7652 2083

024 7696 4000 Main switchboard

Emergency services should be called via x 22222 not 999 in order that Security can escort the vehicles to the incident. Emergency First Aid incidents should be reported to x 22222 and not to the Health Centre which does not provide first aid cover. Staff wishing to report a health and safety issue should contact either their head of department, area safety representative, Duty Manager or go directly to the Departmental Safety Officer. All personal accidents must be recorded on an accident report form (obtained from the Departmental Safety Officer, General Office, and Front of House Office) and passed to the Departmental Safety Officer (copied to the Arts Centre’s Director of Planning and Operations) who will forward a copy to the University Safety Office. Where applicable, accidents will be reported to the H.S.E.


Risk Assessment School and Post-16 Workshop Activities

An aspect of much of the education work carried out by the Arts Centre is that the venue hosts workshop events; in general these are aimed at school children and post-sixteen year old students. The safety concerns of such events are distinct from those related to organised trips to visit the Arts Centre and for students on work experience placements, for which separate documents exist. The presence of a large number of children, some as young as four years old and with no previous experience of the hazards associated with performance venues, can raise particular safety issues, which all those concerned with the events, should be aware of.

Chaperone Under no circumstances should any participants be attending events without adequate supervision. It shall first and foremost be the responsibility of teachers or, if so delegated, the Arts Centre’s Education Director or Education Officer or (where appropriate) parents or guardians of children under the age of sixteen, to ensure that participants are sufficiently supervised. Supervisors and workshop leaders must ensure that students are aware of hazards and do not enter or leave the area of the workshop without their knowledge and permission It is the policy of the Arts Centre that all staff, both venue and visiting, whose work requires them to take on a supervisory position with children, should have a Disclosure and Barring Service Enhanced Certificate (DBS) dated within the last two years. Venue General Safety Issues It shall be the responsibility of either the Technical staff working with the event or members of the Education Department to make an assessment of the hazards in Existence associating the venue. All efforts must be made to minimise the risks from hazards which can not be eliminated. All participants in the workshops must be made aware of the existence of hazards. Evacuation The Arts Centre’s evacuation procedure is detailed in the venue’s safety policy. It shall be the responsibility of the Education staff or the member of Technical staff who organised the event to ensure evacuation and safety information has been given by a competent person.

All participants should be made aware of routes of safe evacuation in the event of an emergency as soon as is practicable after they have entered the building Workshop leaders should be made aware of how to contact first aiders. No workshop should take place unless there is a Duty Manager and a Duty Fireman in the venue. A full register of students and supervisory staff attending the workshops must be held by a competent member of Arts Centre staff. The Mead Gallery  Participants must be made aware of the hazards associated with specific exhibits  Participants must not enter the office or workshop area unless accompanied by a member of Arts Centre staff considered competent by the Curator


This pack has been written and designed by Warwick Arts Centre April 2018

Above: John Piper, Ruins of St. Michael's Baptist Church, Coventry, 1940. Herbert Art Gallery & Museum

Mead Gallery: John Piper Teachers' Resources  
Mead Gallery: John Piper Teachers' Resources  
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