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Borders & Belonging 2019-2020


THE ROBERT PENN WARREN CENTER FOR THE HUMANITIES Have a look at our logo. What do you see? A book, a door, a shield? At RPW, we believe in the importance of multiple viewpoints and interpretations. We also believe that humanistic study, conversation, and engagement lead to the kind of unconventional thinking and unexpected discoveries our world desperately needs. RPW supports interdisciplinary scholarship and research in all of its forms. All those interested in humanities-based inquiry and action are welcome: faculty of all ranks, graduate students, undergraduate students, staff, and members of the Nashville community (and beyond). Through our shared activities and goodwill, we work to advocate for and protect the importance of the Humanities in a thoughtful and democratic society.

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2019-2020

Borders & Belonging Borders. They can be physical barriers or simply lines on a map. They may be clearcut or open to interpretation. Whatever form borders take, they create inclusion and exclusion, belonging and alienation. Who gets to decide what borders exist and how and where they will be placed? What does it mean to be inside or outside the border? What are the long-lasting, and sometimes unintentional, effects of these borders? Join the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities in 2019-2020 as we explore how borders shape communities of belonging.

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2019 – 2020

ROBERT PENN WARREN CENTER

EACH YEAR, RPW BRINGS seven Faculty Fellows together in conversation around the Center’s annual theme. In addition to a teaching reduction to support their interdisciplinary work, the Fellows also present public programs related to their current research.

Candice Amich

Assistant Professor of English

Brandon R. Byrd

Jacque Voegeli Fellow Assistant Professor of History

Emily Greble

William S. Vaughn Fellow Associate Professor of History and German, Russian, and East European Studies

Ruth Hill

Spence and Rebecca Webb Wilson Fellow Andrew W. Mellon Chair in the Humanities Professor of Spanish

Sara Safransky

Assistant Professor Department of Human & Organizational Development Peabody College

Anand Vivek Taneja

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Anthropology

We Jung Yi

Assistant Professor of Asian Studies

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Faculty Fellows Public Events

Faculty Fellows

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Muslims and European Citizenship: Conflicts and Compromises over Law, Rights, Borders, and Belonging in Southeastern Europe (1878-1923)

Reconsidering the Archives and History of Haitian Emigration

Emily Greble

Assistant Professor of History

Associate Professor of History and German, Russian, and East European Studies From 1878 to 1923, around two million Ottoman Muslims became citizens of new European states. This happened suddenly without their consent and often against their will as a series of treaties shifted the political boundaries of the region. For the first time in European history, Muslims were promised equal civil and political rights; but the cost was acceptance of an inherently discriminatory and violent system and a mandate to work within it. What did it mean to be a Muslim citizen of Europe? Why did European statesmen decide to integrate Shari’a law (Islamic law) into their political and legal structures? And what did this mean for the ways that Muslim citizens of Europe would be understood, as fellow citizens and as legal Other, for the next century?

FRIDAY JAN 17 2020

4:10 p.m. | RPW

Jaun Elia and the Strangeness of (Be)longing: The Afterlife of a Pakistani Poet in Delhi Anand Vivek Taneja

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Anthology The current popularity of the Urdu poet Jaun Elia in Delhi confronts us with a set of seeming paradoxes. Jaun, who died in 2002, was relatively obscure even in his native Pakistan until a few years ago. The rise in his popularity coincides with a worsening of the always fraught relations between India and Pakistan and the rise of Hindu nationalism in the public culture of India. Given the context, how do we understand the popularity of a Shia Muslim Urdu poet from small-town India who migrated to Pakistan among young people in the major metropolises of India today? And what might that tell us about the role of Urdu poetry in popular political theology? 6

WEDNESDAY FEB 5 2020

4:10 p.m. | RPW

Brandon Byrd

Byrd calls for a reconsideration of the history of the Haitian emigration movements (the migration of thousands of African Americans to Haiti during the 19th century) and a new archival approach to understanding that history. He will also introduce a digital complement to this workin-progress, a website in which he uses GIS to offer some quantitative analysis of the Haitian emigration movements.

WEDNESDAY FEB 19 2020

4:10 p.m. | Buttrick 123

The Borders We Threw Down. How the CulturePlex Lab is Reinventing the Humanities Juan Luis Suarez

Professor of Digital Humanities and Computer Science, Director of the CulturePlex Lab, Western University In conversation with Ruth Hill, Andrew W. Mellon Chair in the Humanities, Professor of Spanish The Humanities in the 21st century are transforming. Do we know what these humanities will become? The answer is no; but we do know what they won’t be. Seen through the prisms of our partners and collaborators, we are able to map a world of possibilities and connections while we practice our own emerging 21st-century humanities.

B O R D E R S A N D B E LO N G I N G

F A C U LT Y F E L L O W S P U B L I C E V E N T S

MONDAY NOV 11 2019

4:10 p.m. | RPW

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FRIDAY FEB 28 2020

WEDNESDAY APR 1 2020

Noon – 2:00 p.m.| RPW

4:10 p.m. | RPW

Borderers without Belonging: Memories of Division in South Korean Culture

Planetary Cuba: Reimagining Cuban Belonging in the 21st Century

We Jung Yi

Candice Amich

In conversation with Yoshikuni Igarashi, Professor of History and Youngju Ryu, Associate Professor of Modern Korean Literature, University of Michigan

Amich examines artistic performances that negate the exclusionary policies of both the Cuban and U.S. governments and the aim to unite Cubans across the diaspora. These performances pose planetary -- that is, simultaneously site-specific and global -- alternatives to the island’s neoliberal transformation. Cuba’s post-1991 turn to a tourist economy has reanimated the very racial and class inequalities that the 1959 revolution defined itself against. Through a discussion of “artivist” performances that blur the line between politics and art in their disruption of national, economic, legal, representational, and religious borders, Amich assesses the possibilities and limits of human rights discourse in a post-Soviet setting that paradoxically sells socialism while tethering survival to manic entrepreneurial schemes.

Assistant Professor of Asian Studies

This talk is about the Korean experience of the Cold War division. Neither forgotten nor resolved, the conflict on the Korean peninsula has formed a palimpsestic cultural memory across time and media. In navigating this mnemonic site at work, Yi draws attention to the figure on the inter-Korean border, a figure that defies exclusive belonging to either side. Cosponsored by RPW and Asian Studies Program

Assistant Professor of English

FRIDAY MAR 27 2020

Noon - 1:00 p.m. | Buttrick 123

The City After Property: Borders, Belonging, and Postindustrial Futures in Detroit Sara Safransky

F A C U LT Y F E L L O W S P U B L I C E V E N T S

Assistant Professor of Human & Organizational Development In the early 2010s, Detroit—where one-third of all land was classified as “vacant”—emerged as a laboratory for reimagining urban property systems and enacting postindustrial green futures. This talk is based on an in-progress book manuscript that explores the deeply moral and political questions that emerge when property systems break down and people struggle to put them back together in different ways to create more productive, sustainable, or just futures. Taking the audience behind the scenes of making, unmaking, and maintaining private property in an age of austerity, Safransky analyzes the critical role that algorithms play in shaping urban investment and disinvestment and the stakes thereof for racialized dispossession, belonging, and struggles for liberation.

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2 0 1 9 - 2 0 2 0 H A R RY C . H OWA R D J R . L E C T U R E

THURSDAY MAR 12 2020

4:10 p.m. Central Library Community Room

Jaquira Díaz Jaquira Díaz is the author of Ordinary Girls: A Memoir, which recounts Díaz’s life growing up in poverty as a gay Afro-Latina during Miami Beach’s economic blight, and in Puerto Rico’s over-policed government housing projects. She explores the tacit borders, racialized and gendered violence, and the corporeal policing of Black and Brown girls. Ordinary Girls is a 2019 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection and an Indies Introduce Fall 2019 Title. Díaz is also the recipient of two Pushcart Prizes, an Elizabeth George Foundation grant, and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Kenyon Review, and the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing. Her work has been published in Rolling Stone, the Guardian, Longreads, the Fader, and T: The New York Times Style Magazine, and included in The Best American Essays 2016.

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OCT 11-13 2019 Borders and Belonging Track cosponsored by the Warren Center The 31st Southern Festival of Books presented by Humanities Tennessee

Visit humanitiestennessee.org to confirm dates and time

FRIDAY OCT 11

1:00 - 2:00 pm Library Auditorium My Year of Rest and Relaxation — Ottessa Moshfegh

3:00 - 4:00 pm Library Special Collections Room A Fortune for Your Disaster — Hanif Abdurriqab

SATURDAY OCT 12

11:30 - 12:30 pm Library Auditorium

A Beginner’s Guide to Japan: Observations and Provocations — Pico Iyer in conversation with Emily Siner 12

12:00 - 1:00 pm Library Room 1B

12:00-1:00 pm Library Commons Room

3:30-4:30 pm Library Teen Center

A Good Provider is One Who Leaves: One Family and Migration in the 21st Century

Know Thyself in Finding Identity through Memoir and Poetry

Migration Narratives: New Fiction and Nashville Stories

— Jason DeParle

— Thuy Rocco Esteban Rodriguez

1:00 - 2:00 pm Library Room 1B

2:00-3:00 pm Library Conference Room 3

— Melissa Rivero Keitlyn Alcantara Berenice Oliva Zulfat Suara

Shared History: Americans of Hispanic and African Descent

Coming of Age at the End of An Empire: Novels for Young Readers

— Carrie Gibson Christina Proenza-Coles

— J. Kasper Kramer Katia Raina

2:00 - 3:00 pm Library Auditorium On the Plain of Snakes: A Mexican Journey — Paul Theroux

2:00 - 3:00 pm Library Special Collections Room Youth Out Loud: YA Novels — Helene Dunbar Julia Watts

3:00 - 4:00 pm Library Room 1B How We Fight for Our Lives: A Memoir — Saeed Jones

SUNDAY OCT 13

12:00-1:00 pm Library Room 1A

My Country Tis of Me: Two Memoirs — Kendra Allen Jennine Capó Crucet

Telling Stories/ Stories that Tell: An Interactive Exhibit and Panel SATURDAY OCT 12

4:00 - 5:00 pm | Library Room Telling stories makes us human. But what makes a story “telling”? This unique book object embodies the insights and passions of Vanderbilt faculty as they bring stories central to their scholarship to the public in interactive, intelligible, and provocative ways. Conveying research through forms that speak across boundaries between word, image, and object, this exhibit engages you, as viewer, listener, and reader, with stories in physical forms you can touch, see, and feel.

Britt Stadig, Telling Stories (mixed media, 2019)

This installation is based on the research of faculty participants in the 2017-2018 Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities Fellows group at Vanderbilt University Ellen T. Armour (Vanderbilt Divinity School) Laura M. Carpenter (Sociology) Shaul Kelner (Sociology and Jewish Studies) Stan Link (Blair School of Music) Letizia Modena (Italian) Catherine Molineux (History) Haerin Shin (English) Britt Stadig (Artist) — Fellows unable to attend: James F. Brooks (history, University of Georgia) John Janusek (anthropology) Jonathan Rattner (art, cinema and media arts)

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Advocacy for the Humanities Working Group Co-Leaders: Leah Lowe Chair of the Department of Theatre Paul Stob Chair of the Department of Communication Studies HUMANITIES 20/20 IS JUST THE BEGINNING. The Advocacy for the Humanities Working Group at RPW will help keep the momentum going over the year. The group will focus on turning discussions about “What’s Next?” into action. We invite participation from scholars working across the humanities, including in the digital humanities, in public-facing creative projects, and in collaborative endeavors. We also invite department and program leaders, current, former, and future chairs/directors, as well as all those ready to join the conversation. The Advocacy for the Humanities Working Group will provide funding for projects and initiatives coming from the conference, as well as produce concrete recommendations for evaluating humanistic scholarship and engagement in its myriad forms and for helping public audiences recognize the value of humanistic inquiry.

End of the Year Celebration F O R V A N D E R B I LT F A C U LT Y A N D G R A D U A T E STUDENTS IN THE HUMANITIES

D AT E

Friday, September 27th 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

L O C AT I O N

Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center

RECEPTION TO FOLLOW

FRIDAY APR 3 AT 4 P.M.

Come hear about the fruits of this year’s work—and then get ready to party! Community celebration at RPW as a THANK YOU for everyone’s hard work. Music provided in collaboration with the Curb Center and RPW’s Popular Music as Historical Text for Cultural Studies Seminar


THURSDAY OCT 3 2019

6:30 p.m. | Buttrick 103

THE UNAFRAID film screening, followed by Q&A F film R screening E The E

AID

FR UNA

Thursday

03 OCTOBER

PRESENTED IN CHRONOLOCICAL ORDER

8 pm Q&A

Buttrick Hall, Room 103 Parking Available at the Wesley Place Garage

is a feature length documentary that follows the lives of three DACA students in Georgia, a state that has banned them from attending its top public universities, and from qualifying for in-state tuition at any other public college. Using observational footage shot over three years, THE UNAFRAID tells the personal stories of a group of friends connected by an underground movement called Freedom University.

The three students featured in the film will take part in our discussion after the screening Directors & Producers Anayansi Prado and Heather Courtney

Open to Vanderbilt Students, Faculty, and Staff as well as the Nashville community

Sponsored by the Latino and Latina Studies Program, the Department of History, Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities, Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition, Los M.I.X., and Conexión Américas

Cosponsored by RPW, Latino and Latina Studies Program, Department of History, Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition, Los M.I.X, and Conexión Américas

THURSDAY OCT 3 2019

6:00 p.m. | John Seigenthaler First Amendment Center

A Seat at the Table: Do Women in Congress Matter? Kira Sanbonmatsu

Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University Senior Scholar, Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics Sanbonmatsu is co-author of the book A Seat at the Table: Congresswomen’s Perspectives on Why Their Presence Matters. It includes unprecedented insights drawn from interviews of more than three quarters of the women who served in the 114th Congress (2015-2017). She is an authority on research areas related to gender and race/ ethnicity in politics, political parties, public opinion, and state politics. Sponsored by the Center for Effective Lawmaking, a joint partnership between the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at the University of Virginia and Vanderbilt University B O R D E R S A N D B E LO N G I N G

GENERAL EVENTS

General Events

6:30 pm Film

87 mins.

THE UNAFRAID

THE UNAFRAID is a feature length documentary that follows the lives of three DACA students in Georgia, a state that has banned them from attending its top public universities, and from qualifying for in-state tuition at any other public college. Through the stories of Alejandro, Silvia, and Aldo, viewers learn what it’s like to be both a young American and undocumented in the U.S. at a time when anti-immigrant sentiment is growing, emboldened by a president who has issued orders to end DACA and restrict immigration. THE UNAFRAID goes beyond the media’s portrayal of the ‘dreamer’ poster child and truly humanizes the experience of undocumented and DACA students, their families, and communities.

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OCTOBER 10-27 2019

Check website for times | Nashville Children’s Theatre

Return to Sender, a play Marisela Traviño Orta, playwright Crystal Manich, director Eleven-year-old Tyler Paquette is the son of generations of farmers. Mari Cruz, also eleven years old, is the Mexican born daughter of undocumented migrant workers. When Mari’s family is hired to help save Tyler’s family’s farm from foreclosure, both young people are forced to confront the complexities of immigration and citizenship. Orta’s adaptation of Alvarez’s award-winning novel is a powerful reminder of how young people can reach across cultural differences and find understanding. Play co-commissioned by Nashville Children’s Theatre and Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies

TUESDAY OCT 15 2019 11:30 a.m. | Buttrick 123

From Protest to Politics: John Lewis and the Civil Rights Movement

8:00 p.m. (both nights) | Ingram Hall

The Ghosts of Gatsby Evan Mack, composer Joshua McGuire, librettist Presented by Vanderbilt Opera Theatre, Gayle Shay, director Vanderbilt University Orchestra, Jennifer McGuire, conductor Vanderbilt University Big Band, Ryan Middagh, director This award-winning contemporary opera explores the hidden world of Zelda Fitzgerald and her troubled marriage to F. Scott Fitzgerald. As their glamorous life in Roaring 20’s Paris falls apart behind closed doors, the borders between Zelda’s various identities — artist, socialite, and asylum patient — begin to dissolve. Questions of marriage, madness, and selfhood collide in this operatic portrait of one of the 20th century’s most influential women.

TUESDAY OCT 22 2019 5:00 p.m. | Sarratt 363

David Greenberg

Kitchen Table Series: What Will It Take to Get a Female Head of State?

Greenberg specializes in American political and cultural history. His most recent book, Republic of Spin: An Inside History of the American Presidency, examines the rise of the White House spin machine, from the Progressive Era to the present day, and the debates that Americans have waged over its implications for democracy.

Kitchen Table Series is a peer-facilitated discussion for undergraduate students about current gender-related topics. With an election year fast approaching and a record number of women running for a presidential nomination, we’d like to consider what it will take for the United States to elect a female head of state. What makes the United States different from other countries that have already elected female leaders?

Cosponsored by the Department of History and the Program in American Studies

Sponsored by the Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center GENERAL EVENTS

Professor of History and Journalism & Media Studies, Rutgers University

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THURSDAY OCT 17 & SATURDAY OCT 19 2020

B O R D E R S A N D B E LO N G I N G

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FRIDAY NOV 1 2019

12:00 p.m. | Alumni Hall, 202

7:30 p.m., 4822 Charlotte Ave.

Seeing as Believing: Watching Videotaped Interviews with Holocaust Survivors

An Evening with Li-Young Lee

Jeffrey Shandler

Distinguished Professor of Jewish Studies, Rutgers University

Exceptional moments in video interviews from the Shoah Visual History Archive, such as when survivors display wartime injuries or religious articles that they had during the war, both disrupt the recordings’ austere visual aesthetic of “talking heads” and reveal the power of watching survivors relate their wartime experiences. Sponsored by Jewish Studies

7:00 p.m., Belcourt Theatre

Above the Drowning Sea This documentary film about tens of thousands of Jewish refugees who are trapped in Nazi-controlled Vienna on the eve of World War II and their dramatic escape to Shanghai will be shown as part of the Nashville Jewish Film Festival.

Lee’s newest collection of poetry, The Undressing, investigates the violence and dispossession increasingly prevalent around the world, as well as the horrors he grew up with as a child of refugees. Sponsored by the Global Education Center

SATURDAY NOV 2 2019

All day

American Studies Road Trip to Montgomery’s Memorial for Peace and Justice and Legacy Museum Open to Vanderbilt faculty, students, and staff. This is a part of Vanderbilt University’s Program in American Studies’ Road Trip series that explores local sites of significance. For departure time and location, please visit the American Studies website.

Sponsored by Vanderbilt’s Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life

Fort Negley Visitors Center and Park Laborer Honor and Remembrance Ceremony

7:00 p.m. | Nashville Public Library, 615 Church St

fortnegleypark.org

Conversation with Jonathan M. Metzel

Keynote Speaker:

Frederick B. Rentschler II Professor of Sociology and Psychiatry Director of the Center for Medicine, Health, and Society

Founding Director of the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities

In conversation with Meribah Knight NPR Journalist and Host of The Promise Podcast Metzel the author of Dying of Whiteness, How the Politics of Racial Resentment is Killing America’s Heartland, where he went back to the Midwest to examine health implications of political choices tied to race, health care, tax cuts and guns.

Mona Frederick

2019 marks the 157th anniversary of the construction of Fort Negley. Join Fort Negley Park and Friends of Fort Negley Park to honor the people behind the 2771 names listed in the “Employment Rolls and Nonpayment Rolls of Negroes Employed in the Defenses of Nashville, Tennessee, 1862-1863.” The commemorative panel is a gift from the 2014-2015 RPW Faculty Fellows (Public Scholarship in the Humanities).

Cosponsored by Vanderbilt Divinity School, Nashville Public Library, and the Center for Medicine, Health, and Society

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GENERAL EVENTS

TUESDAY OCT 29 2019

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TUESDAY NOV 5 2019

THURSDAY NOV 7 2019

Games of Deception: The True Story of the First U.S. Olympic Basketball Team at the 1936 Olympics in Hitler’s Germany

That Obnoxious Order: Ulysses S. Grant and the Jews

Andrew Maraniss

Visiting Author, Vanderbilt University Athletics The year 1936 was a turbulent time in world history. Adolf Hitler had gained power in Germany three years earlier. Jewish people and political opponents of the Nazis were the targets of vicious mistreatment, yet were unaware of the horrors that awaited them in the coming years. This is the incredible true story of basketball, from its invention by James Naismith in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1891, to the sport’s Olympic debut in Berlin and the eclectic mix of people, events, and propaganda on both sides of the Atlantic that made it all possible. Maraniss is the author of Strong Inside: Perry Wallace and the Collision of Race and Sports in the South.

WEDNESDAY NOV 6 2019

Noon -1:00 p.m. | Central Library Community Room

Jonathan Sarna

Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History, Brandeis University On December 17, 1862, as the Civil War entered its second winter, General Ulysses S. Grant issued a sweeping order, General Orders #11, which expelled “Jews as a class” from his war zone. It remains the most notorious anti-Jewish official order in American history. The order came back to haunt Grant in 1868 when he ran for president. Never before had Jews been so widely noticed in a presidential contest, and never before had they been confronted so publicly with the question of how to balance their “American” and “Jewish” interests. Sponsored by Jewish Studies

1:30-3:00 p.m. | RPW

5:00 – 7:00 p.m. | Sarratt Cinema

Musical Stories: Migration and the Politics of Belonging in 21st Century Barcelona

Screening and discussion of Mariannes Noires: Mosaïques Afropéennes

Professor of Spanish, University of California, Santa Barbara

Mame-Fatou Niang

Director and Producer, Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies, Carnegie Mellon University Niang’s research examines the development of Afro-French identities, and the works of second- and third-generation female immigrant writers of the banlieue. Her work has appeared in Contemporary French Civilization and Présence Francophone. She is also a photographer and the co-author of a photo series on Black French Islam, and the author of Identités Françaises. She co-directed the documentary, Mariannes Noires: Mosaïques Afropéennes, in which Seven Afro-French women investigate what it means to be Black and French in France.

Silvia Bermúdez

At the turn of the 21st Century, the once dilapidated working class neighborhood of El Raval, now one more culture-led gentrified district, became Barcelona’s epicenter for alternative music; more specifically for what came to be known as música mestiza (literally hybrid music). This lecture considers the very current “politics of belonging”—who is “stranger” and who is “truly” a national and a citizen—in the songs of several Raval performers that question social exclusion through soundtracks that underscore the fluid and dynamic relation between popular music, identity, and place. Sponsored by RPW’s Popular Music as Historical Text for Cultural Studies Seminar

Cosponsored by African American & Diaspora Studies and the Department of French and Italian

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GENERAL EVENTS

6:30 p.m. | Parnassus Books

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THURSDAY NOV 7 2019 CONT’D

3:30 – 4:30 p.m. | Special Collections Reading Room (Second floor of the Central and Divinity Libraries)

Black Studies As (A) Movement: Exhibiting Fifty Years of AADS @VU Jason Schultz

Librarian for African American and Diaspora Studies, History, and Islamic Studies

Schultz explores the origins of the Department of African American and Diaspora Studies as it celebrates fifty years on campus. Black Studies formally began at Vanderbilt University in 1969, arising from nationwide student protests intersecting the Black Freedom Struggle. Visit Special Collections to learn about the program’s growth, and achievements over the past five decades. Sponsored by African American and Diaspora Studies

WEDNESDAY NOV 20, 2019

THURSDAY NOV 21 2019 6:30 p.m. | Langford Auditorium

Chancellor’s Lecture Series: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Author and MacArthur Fellow Adichie, who was born in Nigeria and came to study in the United States at age 19, spurred international attention in 2009 with her TED Talk, “The Danger of a Single Story,” which illustrated the harmful effects of failing to acknowledge the full complexity of others in both literature and society. The speech has become one of the most-viewed TED Talks of all time with over 19 million views on TED.com alone. She has written several books, including the novels Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah. In 2014, she published the book-length essay “We Should All Be Feminists,” based upon a 2012 TEDx Talk that also went viral. Admission is free, and seating is available on a first-come basis.

FRIDAY JAN 17 2020

4:00 p.m. | Neely Auditorium

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. | RPW

THURSDAY NOV 21, 2019

War, Welfare, and Masculinity: The Failure of Populism and Rise of Fascism in Interwar Romania

Don’t Go Presented in conjunction with Sojourn Theatre Sojourn Theatre, an award-winning ensemble of artists known for their adventurous theatricality and history of civic engagement, will be in residence at Vanderbilt University’s Theatre Department in November. Sojourn will work with students on further developing Don’t Go, their original performance slated for World Premiere in 2021. Blurring the borders between theatre and civic participation, Don’t Go brings public and curated audiences together to investigate relationships, difference, connection, and most insistently, the curiosity and stamina it takes to stay in a moment of difficult conversation with a stranger… or a loved one.

Maria Bucur

John W. Hill Chair of European History, Indiana University Bloomington Bucur’s research interests focus on transnational history in the modern period, especially social and cultural developments in Europe, with a special interest in Romania (geographically) and gender (thematically). Her latest book is The Century of Women: How Women Have Transformed the World since 1900. Sponsored by RPW’s East Europe: Critical Engagements Seminar GENERAL EVENTS

7:00 p.m. | Neely Auditorium

Sponsored by the Department of Theatre

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THURSDAY JAN 9 2020

4:00 - 6:00 p.m. | Jean & Alexander Heard Libraries Fine Arts Gallery (Cohen Gallery 203)

Visionary Aponte: Art and Black Freedom Acclaimed artists Edouard Duval Carrié and Cornelius Vanderbilt Endowed Chair of Fine Arts, María Magdalena Campos-Pons, will jointly launch the opening of Carrié’s Visionary Aponte: Art and Black Freedom exhibit at the Fine Arts Gallery. The exhibit reinterprets the lost “Book of Paintings” of José Antonio Aponte, a free black artisan and soldier from Havana who led a racial conspiracy in Cuba in 1812. Cosponsors for the event include the Jean & Alexander Heard Libraries Fine Arts Gallery, the Department of Art, and the Department of History.

THURSDAY JAN 23 2020

4:00-6:00 p.m. | Jean and Alexander Heard Libraries Special Collections Gallery

Handcrafted Treasures from Matanzas, Cuba: Vanderbilt’s Unique Holdings from Ediciones Vigía Paula Covington

Latin American & Iberian Bibliographer and Senior Lecturer in Latin American Studies Covington will deliver a Curator’s Talk at the Jean and Alexander Heard Libraries Special Collections Gallery. She will discuss the library’s collection of handcrafted books produced at the Ediciones Vigía collective and publishing house in Matanzas, Cuba.

THURSDAY FEB 20 2020

4:00-6:00 p.m. | Community Room of the Jean and Alexander Heard Libraries

New Perspectives on the Black Atlantic Alejandro de la Fuente

Robert Bliss Woods Professor of Latin American History and Economics, Professor of African and African American Studies and of History, and Director of the Afro-Latin American Research Institute at Harvard University A historian of Latin America and the Caribbean who specializes in the study of comparative slavery and race relations, de la Fuente will deliver the 2020 Black Atlantic Speakers’ Series Lecture. His works on race, slavery, and Atlantic history have been published in Spanish, English, Portuguese, Italian, German, and French. He is also the curator of two art exhibits dealing with issues of race: Queloides: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art and Grupo Antillano: The Art of Afro-Cuba. Cosponsors for the event include the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities, the Jean & Alexander Heard Libraries and the Department of History.

THURSDAY FEB 27 2020

4:00-6:00 p.m. | Cohen Gallery, 203

An Untapped Source for the History of José Antonio Aponte: The Slave Societies Digital Archive Jane Landers

Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of History and Director of the Slave Societies Digital Archive Landers will speak on historical sources for the life and death of José Antonio Aponte recently discovered in the Slave Societies Digital Archive. A closing reception for the “Visionary Aponte: Art and Black Freedom” exhibit will follow. Cosponsors for the event include the Jean & Alexander Heard Libraries and the Department of History.

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GENERAL EVENTS

C I R C U M - AT L A N T I C S T U D I E S S E M I N A R E V E N T S , I N C L U D I N G T H E B L A C K AT L A N T I C L E C T U R E

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WEDNESDAY JAN 29 2020

MONDAY FEB 10 2020

7:30 p.m. | Turner Recital Hall, Blair School of Music

4:10 p.m. | Turner Recital Hall, Blair School of Music

A Sense of Belonging: The Future of the American Orchestra

At the Borders of Art and Power: Western Classical Music in the Global Marketplace

Aubrey Bergauer

Panel discussion with Venezuelan conductor Rafael Payare, composer Wu Fei, and scholar/performer Rachel Beckles Willson

Orchestra Executive (former CEO of the California Symphony)

The American classical music industry consistently bemoans a decline in concert attendance. But one orchestra, the California Symphony, defied this trend by doubling its audience, quadrupling its donor base, and adding concerts, all while delivering surplus budgets over the past five years. Armed with data-driven research, Bergauer will share the foundation of this success: creating a sense of belonging. Praised by the Wall Street Journal for leadership that “points the way to a new style of audience outreach,” Bergauer changes the narrative by demonstrating how inclusive strategies can create not only community and relevance, but a thriving future for any orchestra. Sponsored by the Blair School of Music and the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, & Public Policy

Moderated by Doug Shadle

Chair of the Department of Musicology and Ethnomusicology, Blair School of Music While many critics in the United States and Europe have lamented the supposed decline of Western classical music for decades, listeners elsewhere around the globe have sharply increased their engagement with it. How do global capitalism and colonial history shape new marketplaces in the 21st century, revitalizing and transforming this music in ways that often go unrecognized in the West? This roundtable brings together musicians with deep artistic ties to South America, East Asia, the Mediterranean Basin, and the United States to discuss Western classical music’s shifting position at the borders of art and power. A GlobalVU TIPS Event

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6 2020 5:00 p.m. | RPW

The Borders Within: U-Lead Athens and Equal Access to Higher Education Betina Kaplan,

Co-Director of U-Lead Athens, University of Georgia

GENERAL EVENTS

U-Lead Athens is a non-profit, volunteer-driven organization co-founded and co-directed by Kaplan, which opened its doors in 2014. Since then it has helped more than 100 students to enroll in higher education, and it is currently providing financial aid to 62 of them. A team from U-Lead Athens will discuss some past, present, and future challenges of providing educational opportunities to underdocumented youths and advocating for equal access to education.

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MONDAY FEB 17 2020

WEDNESDAY MAR 11 2020

Mobile Indian Lawyers and Local Histories of Minority Rights

Contemporary Identification Systems and Risks

3:10 p.m. | 124 Divinity

Rohit De

Associate Professor of History, Yale University De will present material from his current book project focusing on “rebellious lawyering” in Asia and Africa as a result of the South Asian diasporas in the twentieth century. As a legal historian (and a lawyer himself), De examines not only the nature of law, but how it was perceived by various historical actors and how this knowledge shaped their daily lives. De’s research moves beyond the political borders of South Asia to uncover transnational legal geographies of commerce, migration, and legal rights across Africa, Southeast Asia and the Caribbean. Cosponsored by the Byrn Lecture Endowment and the Department of History

Noon – 4:00 p.m.| RPW

A wide-ranging public workshop exploring new historical, sociological, legal, and anthropological work on documentation and identity systems in the contemporary world. Our panelists will examine cases ranging from the recent implementation of the Aadhaar identification system in India, to the role of documents in creating legal personhood in Myanmar, to the experience of identity theft in the United States. A moderated discussion and reception will follow.

Jordan Brensinger

Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow and Harvey Fellow, Department of Sociology, Columbia University

Amanda Cheong

Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of British Columbia

Vijayanka Nair

4:10 – 5:30 p.m. | RPW

Lifting the Ban: Northern Writers and South Korean Democratization” Youngju Ryu

Associate Professor of Modern Korean Literature, University of Michigan

For decades after the division of the Korean peninsula into two separate states in 1948, a comprehensive ban on the writings by and about “northern” writers stayed in effect in South Korea. The ban was finally lifted in 1988 following South Korea’s democratization. However, the manner in which it was done served to reinstate age-old hierarchies premised on the purported “purity” of literature. Ryu will give an overview of this complex history of censorship, reflect on the impact of the division system on South Korean literary history and canon-making, and contemplate the future of Korean literature as we face the disintegration of the last remaining Cold War border.

Sponsored by RPW’s Documented Lives Seminar

WEDNESDAY MAR 18 2020 Noon – 4:00 p.m. | Peabody 307

Women of Peabody Wikipedia Edit-a-thon All Wikipedia Edit-a-thons are free and open to all. No Wikipedia experience necessary. Bring your laptop and your curiosity, we’ll teach you how to edit and provide a range of specific tasks to do, all about the Women of Peabody. Lunch provided.

GENERAL EVENTS

THURSDAY FEB 27 2020

2018-2020 Truth, Fact, and Ways of Knowing Fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin

Cosponsored by RPW and the Asian Studies Program

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TUESDAY MAR 31 2020

FRIDAY APR 3 - SATURDAY 11 2020

7:00 p.m. | Student Life Center Ballroom

Check website for times | Neely Auditorium

Holocaust Lecture Series Keynote Lecture: Antisemitism Here and Now

We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Südwestafrika, Between the Years 1884–1915

Deborah Lipstadt

Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish History and Holocaust Studies, Emory University Over the last decade there has been a noticeable uptick in antisemitic rhetoric and incidents by left-wing groups targeting Jewish students and Jewish organizations on American college campuses. And the reemergence of the white nationalist movement in America, complete with Nazi slogans and imagery, has been reminiscent of the horrific fascist displays of the 1930s. Throughout Europe, Jews have been attacked by terrorists, and some have been murdered. Where is all this hatred coming from? Is there any significant difference between left-wing and right-wing antisemitism? What role has the anti-Zionist movement played? And what can be done to combat the latest manifestations of an ancient hatred?

Directed by Elizabeth Cizmar

Assistant Professor of Theatre

Written by the 2019 recipient for the Pulitzer Prize in Drama, Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884–1915 centers on six actors who attempt to stage the forgotten Herero and Namaqua genocide during German occupation. The play grapples with issues of the erasure of West African narratives, race, and representation on the American stage, and the ethics of actors experiencing suffering as a creative process. Sponsored by the Department of Theatre

Cosponsored by the Jewish Federation of Nashville and Middle Tennessee and

GENERAL EVENTS

Vanderbilt’s Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life

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LEGAL HISTORIES

2019 - 2020 RPW Seminars 2019 – 2020 Seminars and Coordinators 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY STUDIES Seminar Coordinators: Scott J. Juengel (English, cinema and media arts) Rachel Teukolsky (English)

ADVOCACY FOR HUMANITIES Seminar Coordinators: Leah Lowe (theatre) Paul Stob (communication studies)

CIRCUM-ATLANTIC STUDIES Seminar Coordinators: Daniel Genkins (history) Jane Landers (history)

CONTEMPORARY IN THEORY Seminar Coordinators: Alex Dubilet (poltical science, English) Jessie Hock (English) Haerin Shin (English, cinema and media arts) Ben Tran (Asian studies)

DOCUMENTED LIVES Seminar Coordinators: Sarah Igo (history, American studies) Ari Joskowicz (Jewish studies, European studies)

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Seminar Coordinators: Ari Bryan (history, classical and Mediterranean studies) Emily Greble (history, East European studies) Vladislav Lilic (history) Daniel Sharfstein (law)

EAST EUROPE: CRITICAL ENGAGEMENTS

POPULAR MUSIC AS HISTORICAL TEXT FOR CULTURAL STUDIES

Seminar Coordinators: Bradley Gorski (Russian, East European studies) Emily Greble (history, East European studies)

Seminar Coordinators: Benjamin Legg (Spanish and Portuguese) Michelle Murray (Spanish and Portuguese)

FILM THEORY AND VISUAL CULTURE

THINKING ABOUT THOUGHT LEADERS

Seminar Coordinators: Jennifer Fay (cinema and media arts, English) Lutz Koepnick (German, cinema and media arts) James McFarland (German, cinema and media arts)

Seminar Coordinators: Victoria Hoover (English) Mario Rewers (history) Terrell A. Taylor (philosophy)

GRADUATE STUDENTS OF COLOR INITIATIVE Seminar Coordinators: Takunda Matose (philosophy) Travis D. Williams (theology) Kellie Williford (neuroscience)

GROUP FOR PREMODERN CULTURAL STUDIES Seminar Coordinators: William Caferro (history) Jessie Hock (English) Joanna Huh (English) Katie McKenna (history) Samira Sheikh (history)

DESIGNER GENES: A LOOK AT THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF GENETIC TECHNOLOGY Seminar Coordinators: Takunda Matose (philosophy) Clayton Wandishin (biochemistry)

ISLAMIC STUDIES SEMINAR

2019-2020 Warren Center Graduate Student Fellows Sophia Clark

Department of German, Russian, and East European Studies

Bonnie Griffin

Department of French and Italian

Joanna Huh

Elizabeth E. Fleming Fellow Department of English

Alyssa Lowery

George J. Graham, Jr. Fellow Department of Philosophy

Mohammad Meerzaei Graduate Department of Religion

Mario Rewers

American Studies Fellow Department of History

Carolina Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian

Joe and Mary Harper Fellow Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Seminar Coordinators: Richard McGregor (religious studies) Mohammad Meerzaei (graduate department of religion)

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Holly Tucker, Director Holly Tucker is the Mellon Foundation Chair in the Humanities and Professor in French. Her most recent works include Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution and City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. A Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist, Tucker’s work has been featured in Nature, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Economist, and NPR, among others, in addition to journals specific to her field.

Elizabeth Meadows, Associate Director Meadows focuses on undergraduate and immer­ sion programming, community engagement proj­ ects in public humanities, and non-tenure track faculty development in the humanities. Before coming to RPW, she spent six years at Vander­ bilt’s Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy, where she developed and led programs offering faculty, staff, students, and community members opportunities to engage in creative practice.

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2019/2020 Warren Center Staff Holly Tucker, Director Elizabeth Meadows, Associate Director Terry Tripp, Activities Coordinator VU Station B #351534 2301 Vanderbilt Place Nashville, TN 37235-1534 615-343-6060 Vanderbilt.edu/rpw_center Design: Jaron Jackson | jxnand5th.com jaron@jaronjackson.com

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Profile for Warren Center

Borders and Belonging 2019-2020  

Events on and off campus related to the Warren Center's key word theme of "Borders and Belonging."

Borders and Belonging 2019-2020  

Events on and off campus related to the Warren Center's key word theme of "Borders and Belonging."

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