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T H THE SCIENTIST S OF MODERN MUSIC

MAY 2012

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LANIE LANE

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sat 2 june 7.30pm sat 2 june 7.30pm FeDeRatIOn COnCeRt HaLL HOBaRt FeDeRatIOn HaLL HOBaRt sat 2COnCeRt june 7.30pm FeDeRatIOn COnCeRt HaLL HOBaRt

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Researchers from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre would like to speak to people who use drugs when they party. Face to face interviews will be conducted between April and May. The interview takes around one hour and is held at a convenient location for you. Interviews are anonymous and You will be reimbursed $40 for your time. If you live in Hobart contact the Research Team on (03) 6226 7697, email estudy@utas.edu.au or SMS details to 0458 748 758 (you do not have to use your real name).


6 News

Warp news in brief W arp Warp LIVE IT UP

------------------------------------------------Warp Tasmania MAY 2012 ------------------------------------------------Editor Ali Hawken ali@warpmagazine.com.au ------------------------------------------------Sub Editor Rebecca Fitzgibbon rebecca@warpmagazine.com.au ------------------------------------------------CLUB / ELECTRONIC Nic Orme nic@warpmagazine.com.au ------------------------------------------------ART Alison McCrindle alison@warpmagazine.com.au ------------------------------------------------Performing Art Sarah Mashman sarah@warpmagazine.com.au ------------------------------------------------DESIGN Miu Heath catspop@gmail.com ------------------------------------------------ADVERTISING ads@warpmagazine.com.au ------------------------------------------------GIG GUIDE Submit your events to gigs@warpmagazine.com.au ------------------------------------------------Writers Sose Fuamoli, Sarah Leary, Eva Lubulwa, Josh Clements, Lyn Geisel, Daniel Townsend, Jervis Dean, Jarred Keane, Lucas Thomas, Caity Rode, Lisa Dib, Brett Neuling, Sybelle Foxcroft,Rebecca Whitehead, Loani Arman, Calum Power, ------------------------------------------------NEWS Submit your press releases plus publicity images through to the appropriate editor for consideration. ------------------------------------------------www.warpmagazine.com.au www.facebook.com/warp.mag ------------------------------------------------INTERESTED IN WRITING FOR WARP? contact ed@warpmagazine.com.au -------------------------------------------------

As a special offer to younger audiences, The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra has launched the Live It Up Live Season Pass. Open to all full-time secondary and tertiary students, the Live It Up Live Season Pass costs only $30 and gives pass holders entry to almost all of this year’s TSO concerts subject to availability. For more information contact the TSO Box Office on 1800 001 190, or head along to www.tso.com.au JAZZ TRAIN Virtuosi Tasmania continues its tributes to modern jazz greats with a new program, Tribute to the Gerry Mulligan Quartet, which will be performed at five beautiful locations around Tasmania in May. Cambridge, Ranelagh, Cranbrook, St Helens and Spreyton will all get to experience the masterful playing of Danny Healy on baritone sax, Hayden Dare on trombone, Steve Martin on bass, and Matt Ives. Tickets are $30 ($25 concession), for bookings contact TSO Box Office on 1800 001 190, or visit www.tso.com.au BROADCAST ROYALTY UPHELD The High Court recently made a controversial ruling that relates to almost everyone in the Australian music industry. The case was the Phonographic Performance Company of Australia Limited (PPCA) & Ors v Commonwealth of Australia & Ors. It concerned the Copyright Act 1968 and its cap for Royalties payable for the radio broadcast of sound recordings. In 1968 it was decided that Broadcasters were only obliged to pay a maximum of 1% of their gross earnings. The Howard Government announced its intention to lift the cap with its 2006 Copyright Act amendments, but this didn’t happen. In March, the PPCA argued that the 1% cap was in contravention of section 51 (xxxi) of the Constitution, the High Court did not agree, and decided to uphold the 1% cap. You can read the High Court’s decision here: http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/ cases/cth/HCA/2012/8.html FAGAN FLAMENCO

A celebrated Tango Flamenco Guitarist, Matthew Fagan plays works featuring the fire of flamenco and the passion of tango from the deep flamenco of the South of Spain to the Tango clubs of Buenos Aires Argentina. Matthew will be performing at the Republic Bar & Café on Thursday May 3, Brookfield Margate on Saturday May 5, The Royal Oak Hotel on Thursday May 10, and Squiz Café Gallery on Friday May 11. Matthew will also be performing and conducting workshops at the Moonah Arts Centre on Friday May 4 and Saturday May 5. AXIS OF AWESOME The Axis of Awesome is returning to Australia! The World’s Most Awesomest Comedy Band will be making two stops in Tasmania, playing at UTAS in Launceston on Wednesday May 30, and UTAS in Hobart on Thursday May 31. They recently picked up the Time Out Award for Best Australian Act at the Sydney Comedy Festival, and the prestigious Moosehead Award for their first ever Melbourne International Comedy Festival show before heading off to tour the U.S., and release their most recent album Animal Vehicle.

bands in metal today. Joined by Singapore’s underground metal elite in Impiety, and Tasmania’s dark and brutal metal warriors, Ruins, the tour will be stopping at the Brisbane Hotel on Sunday July 8. Tickets are on sale now and are available via moshtix. BLOOD, GUTS AND GREEN STUFF

ADAMSON RESCHEDULED

The event is a chance for the LGBTIQ community, family and friends to get carried away with fancy dress a must, this year’s theme being “God Save the Queer”. The Hobart Zombie March is on again this year, scheduled for Saturday July 21. The Zombies will gather at the Boat Park in Battery Point at 1pm and march at 1:30 to the Brisbane Hotel for Beers, Brains and Bands. The gig is and All Ages event which starts when the zombies arrive.

TROUBLE’S DOOR TOUR

August. The Speaking in Tongues tour will cover all states, including a show in Hobart on Saturday August 11 at the City Hall. The show is all ages and tickets are available from Oztix, Ruffcut, Centretainment, Mojo's Music, Red Hot CDs and Collectors Corner.

The Queen has made it through another year to reach the ripe age of 86 (with her real birthday just been on April 21). Official celebration of this doesn’t come until June 11 when we are all treated to a well deserved long weekend. Of the many local celebrations around this date one of the most outlandish and obscenely fun is the Taspride Queens Ball.

JAY HOAD’S WORLD

HARD ONS

Iconic Sydney rock band The Hard-Ons are well overdue for a reissue, and it seems the calls are finally being heeded. Smell My Finger is the title of Part 1 of a 5 part reissue series on Citadel Records. Spanning the years 1984 – 1987, Smell My Finger presents the entire official recorded output of The Hard-Ons, all the 7 Inch releases, both 12” releases, even all the obscure compilation tracks, all 60 songs!

This year it returns with a bigger and better schedule, comprised of over 50 free unique audience experiences and events. With the ever-popular Junc Room (a live music venue in a big-top circus tent) located in Civic Square and housing a fully licensed bar and catered café, alongside art and performances in a variety of locations throughout the city, the 2012 Junction Arts Festival will be held August 22 - 26. For more information, head to www. junctionartsfestival.com.au GOD SAVE THE QUEER!

There are three Tasmanian dates in early July for Trouble’s Door, Devonport on Thursday July 5 at Spurs Saloon, Launceston on Friday July 6 at Hotel New York and Hobart on Saturday July 7 at The Republic Bar & Cafe. Tickets on sale now at the venues and usual outlets.

Tickets are available via www.bigtix.com.au and the venues.

To accompany the release, the three-piece are touring nationally, appearing at Hotel New York in Launceston on Friday June 15, and the Brisbane Hotel in Hobart on Saturday June 16.

ALL SUBMISSIONS REMAIN THE PROPERTY OF WARP MAGAZINE. ALL CONTENT IS COPYRIGHT TO WARP MAGAZINE AND CANNOT BE REPRODUCED IN WHOLE OR PART WITHOUT WRITTEN AUTHORISATION OF THE PUBLISHERS. WARP MAGAZINE makes no guarantees, warranties or representations of any kind, whether express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of the information provided. WARP MAGAZINE will not be liable for incorrect use of the information and will assume no responsibility for consequences that may result from the use of the information. WARP MAGAZINE is not responsible of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. The opinions expressed in Warp Magazine and Warp online do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or publishers.

The irrepressible Ash Grunwald is out with a new studio album Trouble’s Door. With two years between this and the award winning Hot Mama’s Vibes, Ash has been busy forging a record based upon highlighting Australia’s political and environmental injustices. ‘I had just done a benefit gig to stop coal seam gas mining.  There were other issues going on at the time, you can take your pick really, and it occurred to me that our system just doesn’t work.  We are experiencing the result of rampant unchecked capitalism.’

Fijian-born South Australian didgeridoo and stringed instrument virtuoso Jay Hoad has supported Bob Marley’s The Wailers in North America, he has performed at WOMAD, and headlined the FIJI Jazz and Blues Festival. He has toured with super-groups such as The Temptations and The Drifters. In 2012 Jay is focusing on covering new ground in Australia, performing in all major cities. As part of this new focus, Jay will be performing at Brookfield Vineyard in Margate on Sunday the July 8, with more shows to be announced.

PETER COMBE

FESTIVAL OF VOICES EXPANDS The annual Festival of Voices is returning once again. The popular participation based festival will be taking place between July 6 and July 15. International guests this year include Moira Smiley (USA), Lydia Adams (Canada), Eric Dozier (USA), April Guthrie (USA), Paul Jarman, and Inga Swearingen (USA), with performers from Australia including Paul Jarman, Amelia Alder, Chris Blain, Julie Christiansen and The Idea of North. For more information, head to www. festivalofvoices.com.

After 9 sold out shows for Adelaide Fringe, Peter Combe returns to Hobart after many long years for a very special live, night time performance for the big kids (18+) at the Brisbane Hotel on Saturday July 28. The original King of the Kids will be performing all his classics, Toffee Apple, Spaghetti Bolognaise, Newspaper Mama, Wash Your Face in Orange Juice, Chopsticks and Juicy Juicy Green Grass. Bring your newspaper hats and Toffee Apples!

METAL GOAT

Tickets are available now via oztix.com.au and Ruffcut Records.

Extreme metal legends Goatwhore return to Australian shores in July as part of the Underground Legions Tour. Inspired by the old guard of Celtic Frost, Slayer and Kreator but with a modern and vicious twist, Goatwhore are one of the most talked about

JUNCTION ARTS FEST In just three short years Launceston’s Junction Arts Festival has quickly become a can’t-miss event on Tasmania’s calendar.

The Queens Ball will be held at The Republic Bar and Cafe on Sunday June 10. Tickets available from the venue, TGLRG stall at Salamanca Market and Centretainment.

Barry Adamson of Bad Seeds fame has changed his Australian tour to September. See him at the Brisbane Hotel Saturday September 15.

do you need another one? please say no!

The tour co-incides with a new studio album, the first in four years. www.facebook.com/ mrbarryadamson

LITTLE OZ LEGEND On April 2, 2012, Australia lost one of its most well respected and accomplished artists with the passing of James Oswald “Jimmy” Little. With a career in the music industry spanning six decades, Little was one of the most celebrated artists on Australian shores. An induction into the ARIA Hall of Fame, being made an Officer of the Order of Australia, being named a Living National Treasure, receiving the John Campbell Fellowship, and receiving honorary doctorates from the University of Sydney, Queensland University of Technology and the Australian Catholic University, are just some of the awards and recognition that Little received. Above and beyond his contribution to music, it has been Little’s work for the community towards reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians that will leave an on-going legacy. Jimmy Little will be sorely missed. HILLTOP hoods announce hobart show

With the recently released album Drinking From The Sun now platinum selling in Australia, The Hilltop Hoods have freshly announced an Australian tour for July and

BLACK KEYS

Despite recently stating in interviews that they wouldn’t be touring Australia for quite some time, The Black Keys have locked in a six stop Australian tour for late October. Unfortunately not coming to Tasmanian shores, The Black Keys will play Newcastle, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide and Melbourne as well as a headlining appearance at Perth’s Rock It Festival. The show features huge visuals from 20 projectors, giant mirror balls, and all the hits from their deep and consistently awesome back catalogue. Tickets on sale now.


Music

Music

LANIE SINGS THE BLUES

ROYALLY ROCKED IT’S NOT EASY BEING AN EMERGING BAND IN WEST AUSTRALIA, AND EVEN HARDER WHEN HALF THE BAND IS AVERSE TO FLYING. HENCE, PERTH BAND EMPERORS IS HITTING THE LONG ROAD.

EMBODYING THE SEXINESS OF A BYGONE ERA, LANIE LANE IS LEAVING A TRAIL OF BROKEN HEARTS IN HER WAKE.

Growing up in a musical family with a brother and father who both played guitar, some would say that Lanie Lane was always going to be gifted with musical bones. Inspired by artists from the ‘40s and ‘50s including Billy Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald, Lanie’s sound is a mixture of blues, roots and pop, although she never limits herself to one particular style.

‘It definitely makes life interesting when you come from Perth and you don’t like flying,” shared frontman Adam Livingston as he enjoyed a day off work. “The ideal is of the struggling artist, the reality is of the artist with the day job.”

“I am not really set on one style. As you can hear the album is quite eclectic, even though it is inspired by old school ways of recording and talking. I am always writing more music so it is always changing. I wouldn’t say that the next album will be the same as the last. I want to keep moving forward into new territories.”

Emperors have been around since about 2007, but it’s taken a few years, gigs galore, an EP and an album for them to reach the comfortable stage they are at now. With a now solid line-up, and a sound of their own, Emperors are now ready to show us why they setting the Aussie music scene alight with the new album Stay Frosty.

Whilst Lanie’s success can be credited to her rich, distinctive voice, her retro fifties style has assisted in projecting her originality and setting her apart from the rest.

“With most of us having day jobs, the less time spent away the easier it is on us,” Adam remarked. “But it also helps keep you in the zone. If there’s too long between shows you sort of lose momentum.”

“I think I have always been really weird with my style, mixing different stuff. I’ve been like that since I was a kid. When I was a little girl, I was coming home from school and getting changed seven times. I was never satisfied with plain and boring; I am still like that. I like vintage but not classic housewife dresses. I mix modern with old school glamour and enjoy taking time with hair and makeup.” Lanie’s debut album To the Horses highlights her talent for songwriting, bringing to life a collection of songs that have character and warmth. From the horse tattoo on her forearm to the title of her album, horses hold a particular place in Lanie’s heart. “[The horse tattoo] is all tied in with my first album and having a big change in my life last year. Everything changed personally and with my career. It is about breaking free and learning who I am. The horse represents being passionate about what you do, sticking to your guns and doing what you need to do in life.” The past 12 months have seen Lanie play her first sold out national tour and grace the stage at notable festivals, including Falls Festival and Splendour in the Grass. Now she is ready to embark again, setting off on her new Bangity Bang national tour joined by special guests The Rubens. “In my home town Sydney, we are playing at the Metro and that has already sold out, so we are doing another show which is exciting. It’ll be fun, playing at home. I can’t wait to come to Tassie either; it is such a beautiful place. I think I have someone who is going to take me horse riding down there.” With her shows selling out at an unbelievable rate, the nerves and excitement are beginning to rise. However, as Lanie shares, the nerves don’t always arrive when expected. “I think nerves creep up on you at strange times. Like when you are particularly 8

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It’s a good test of your fitness too. Adam revealed he has even got a calorie burner counter app on his phone that includes an option for playing a music gig. And rock concerts burn more calories than an acoustic set. The Emperors are playing The Republic Bar in Hobart on Wednesday May 23. The entire band is looking forward to finally hitting Tasmania on their latest tour especially Adam.

excited about a certain show. We played at Golden Plains and there was only one stage, you have the whole crowd watching you. Beforehand I wasn’t nervous at all and I got out there and did a really good gig. It was one of the biggest crowds I’ve played to. “Then the other night we played in Melbourne to about 2000 people and I was so excited. We were waiting to go on, jumping around, couldn’t wait to get on. Nerves are funny you never know when they will happen.” One person who identifies with Lanie’s appreciation of music and recognises her obvious talent is world renowned singer, song writer and producer Jack White. After being captivated by her unique vocals, Jack contacted Lanie asking her to record with him. Together they recorded the tracks Ain’t Hungry and My Man, which Lanie describes as the pinnacle of her career.

before anyone else will. If you have the talent and drive, it will work out.” Lanie Lane is an undeniable talent and one that Australia should keep an eye on. She knows where she is headed and has no plans of slowing down. “I just want to get straight back into the studio. At least start getting the songs together. Record an album later in the year. I am not just going to just relax now. I don’t

want to wait three years to put out an album. I want to do it now.” REBECCA WHITEHEAD

Lanie Lane plays Hotel New York, Launceston on May 18 and The Grand Poobah, Hobart on May 19.

“Being a Pom, I’ve heard it’s a little like England; beautiful and green,” Adam revealed. “WA is beautiful, but it’s a different colour scheme, lots of brown. And Tasmania is one of those places that’s been on my ‘want to go’ list for a while.” Their latest offering is Stay Frosty, an album fresh off the press as the band goes on tour. It was produced by Dave Parkin (Jebediah) who also had a hand in the making of their EP last year. “It’s a pretty cool feeling,” Adam said. “I feel as a band we’ve stepped it up a level. An album should have a certain sound and feel to it, not just be a collection of songs. Hopefully we have achieved that.” Of great importance to Adam is that the sound on the album is reminiscent of how the band actually sounds live. Now with a solid line up of four members, they have honed their music so as to have consistency between their live sound and their recorded works. And it sounds good. KYLIE COX

Over a relatively short period of time, she has risen from playing small venues to gracing the cover of numerous magazines. For up and coming female artists, Lanie can only be described as an inspiration. The advice she provides is simple: success does not come without effort. “Just stick to your vision of what you are doing. You need to be true to yourself. Follow your instincts musically. Put in the hard yards. Nothing will happen if you are sitting in your room. You have to believe in yourself

The Emperors play at the Republic Bar and Cafe on May 23. www.emperors.earplugmusic.com

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Music

SOUNDS OF SCIENCE AHEAD OF THE A PERSONAL UNIVERSE DEBUT ALBUM TOUR, THE SCIENTISTS OF MODERN MUSIC SHARE THE SPICY STORY ABOUT ITS DELAYED RELEASE, FEARS OF FLYING AND THE REASON THEY ARE NOT DJS.

Music

WARP: Let’s start by talking about your single new Because If I Die. What is it about?

with the goods. We’ve done about 20 tracks over two years.

CAL: It is about my fear of flying. One day I just had a really bad flight and it just clicked. I used to enjoy it. I don’t like it as much now, I get sweaty and nervous. On my way to Japan I freaked out real bad, there was a lightning storm outside. And [the single] is about leaving someone behind if I die.

SIMON: We got the chance to go to London to spruce them up and pick a crop. There is like an album worth of songs left. We came out of the album with a lot more skills than what we started. We might be able to release them with fresh ears.

What does the A Personal Universe album title referring to? CAL: I think it is referring to the fact all the songs we wrote are about personal experiences, but they are universal topics love, death; everyone experiences that. What is the most personal song on the album? SIMON: The hardest one was Happy You Came. CAL: One of our friends committed suicide and it really moved me. It just all came out. SIMON: One of our friends came around to help construct it. It felt like a tribute without being regal. Despite [suicide] being common, it still matters. We tried to turn it

Looking back, what do you think of your old tunes? SIMON: The old stuff is raw, but raw in a good way. We just plugged it in and went for it. It captured that fun that we had at the time. At that time it was in our room jamming to drums, and then we would put the drums on sampler and just go out and perform what we just did. Nothing was made into a song. It was just, play it live, and play it live at home. CAL: It was very minimalistic. We would just plug everything in, play it, and record it. Geez, our first EP sounded shit. That EP we made in our lounge room. It went heaps of places; overseas, Triple J - we have just been lucky in that regard. Do you think of your success as just luck then?

“There is a bloody rumour, can’t shake it [laughs] that we live in Melbourne... People got the impression we lived there. But we love Hobart. I think it is starting to become a cultural hub.” around so that it was something meaningful rather than something that brings you down. Why the long time between albums? CAL: It has been a three year process. We had second album syndrome; we didn’t have any new songs. SIMON: We wrote our first EP and we toured it a lot. Then we decide to stop everything and just write. All the gears stopped, and then we were stuck. CAL: We got kicked up the arse a lot by our manager. But in the end we came through

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SIMON: I think luck is a major component. It is a person passing it on to the right person and saying the right thing. CAL: I think we were in the right place, right time. We had that vibe that everyone wanted to see, but there was nothing in Hobart that was similar to us. I think we got a lot of community support in that regard and it just pushed it. Are you planning to stay here in Hobart or is relocation in your plans? CAL: There is a bloody rumour, can’t shake it [laughs] that we live in Melbourne. We

always spent time there gigging and I had a girlfriend there. People got the impression we lived there. But we love Hobart. I think it is starting to become a cultural hub. What are your future plans? SIMON: We will definitely focus on getting this album out. And it is something we are excited about finishing. Tour it, and we have been looking at the structure of our live set. It is just the two of us, but we are effectively the size of a rock band. We tried to expand to create a more flexible sound on stage. We used to use an iPod, two synths and a vocal mic. Now it is like ten channels coming out of the laptop, eight channels from the keyboards. CAL: [Laughs] Lots of headaches for sound guys. “What? I thought you guys were DJs?” I bet you guys get that a lot, people thinking you are DJs. SIMON: Sometimes we look at it and think we could, get two decks and be done with it. But it would be so boring live. CAL: We like to put on a show. People watching us mixing is boring. SIMON: It feels real playing it live. CAL: It is hectic taking our gear around and it is annoying at stages. But getting everything set up and sounding great is beautiful. How do you guys define yourselves? You obviously don’t want to be defined as DJs. CAL: We are not necessarily a band. I guess we are an ‘outfit’. SIMON: An electronic duo. That is kind of DJ isn’t it?

COOL AS ICE IT’S NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TO AVOID THE CLICHES OF MUSIC WRITING WHEN IT COMES TO SLAVA GRIGORYAN. AGED IN HIS THIRTIES, HE’S NOT QUITE A NATIONAL TREASURE... BUT THAT’S A MERE FORMALITY WAITING TO HAPPEN.

In the meantime, Grigoryan is a very fine player in his field who has dedicated himself to his craft and art since releasing his first album at age 16. Delving into his musical world will provide anyone with even a passing interest in classical guitar with something genuinely rich that moves beyond the world of technical skill into a more ethereal realm of expressive playing that has real character – or to put it another way, it’s more than just a bunch of deftly picked notes. “I r Mr. Grigoryan on TV (and he’s been on a few times, taking it to the masses) will have seen him play solo, what he really likes to do as working musician is collaborate.

It’s something of a rare treat for Slava – he has not played this windswept work in its large movements live all that much, as it requires a full orchestra to be correctly realised. He has been here before and played, and even recorded with the TSO before and is looking forward to returning to Hobart, but it seems that he just likes the aspect of a musician’s life that involves touring: “A busy musician has families everywhere”. Seems like Slava Grigoryan is pretty much exactly what he claims to be - a player who tells stories with music. ANDREW HARPER

“One is good but two musicians can create something together in a moment that will never exist again” he noted when the subject of improvisation came up Slava is currently most noted for the enduring collaboration with his brother, Leonard, but a very important collaboration for him is the one with Nigel Westlake, himself a notable Australian music maker, best known currently for film scores. Westlake has a three decade long commitment to playing and writing music, and has a massive body of work. Slava is incredibly enthusiatic about Westlake, a man he regards as a likeminded spirit; they have worked together now on and off for over decade. That’s what will bring him to Hobart on the second of June: he’s the featured soloist for a Westlake work the Tasmania Symphony Orchestra will be featuring as part of their concert White Continent – all about Antarctica. The Westlake piece has its origins, Slava informed me, as the soundtrack for the first Australian IMAX film, Antarctica (1991), but Westlake edited and re-wrote it for live performance.

Star guitarist Slava Grigoryan shines in Nigel Westlake’s Antarctica Suite plus orchestral favourites by Grieg & Vaughan Williams, on June 2 at the Federation Concert Hall in Hobart. www.tso.com.au/ month/june-2012

REBECCA WHITEHEAD

The Scientists of Modern Music play at the Republic Bar on June 9. A Personal Universe will be released May 18 through Rubber/Shock. www.tsomm.com

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TIME TRAVELLING

TZU AFTER FOUR YEARS IN THE MUSICAL WILDERNESS MELBOURNE’S TZU ARE BACK WITH A BRAND NEW TRACK. MC JOELISTICS TELLS US ABOUT THE HIATUS, MAKING A RECORD THAT WILL DIVIDE OPINION AND THE RESIGNATION OF BOB BROWN.

The pleasure of a late afternoon coffee and a nice dose of Queensland sunshine were shattered for Joelistics when the news that Australian Greens Party leader Bob Brown had resigned from politics. Given his great respect for the former Greens chief, the TZU mouthpiece (or Joel Ma as his birth certificate states) was treating the news with a degree of melancholy when he phoned in from a Brisbane café. “I held the most unlikely hopes that he would one day be Prime Minister of Australia, kind of realising it would never happen. He was one of the few politicians keeping the bastards honest. He was a f**kn’ legend. At least he’ll never be tarnished, he bowed out when the time was right,” lamented Joelistics. “Maybe he’s going to do what TZU did and take four years off and come back stronger than ever? How was that for a segue!” 12

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Even through all the excitement and zeal in his voice, there is a sense of trepidation in the way Joelistics speaks the reunion of TZU. Four years is after all a very long time, especially in the goldfish memory of today’s music industry. Take into account that TZU are about to release on their most daring album to date and it is completely understandable that there may be a small amount of apprehension to their comeback. The yet to be officially titled album, set for release in the latter half of the year, saw Joelistics reunited with band mates Countbounce, (Phillip Norman, vocals/guitar) Paso Bionic, (Shahab Tariq, DJ) and Yeroc (Corey McGregor, percussion) to create what was initially envisioned as an instrumental record. Inevitably, the two weeks the four spent together ended up yielding much more. “Over time these stories started to develop. Stories about time travel, convict Australia and the last man on planet earth. Also, individually, we all wanted to move away from

“The whole album is based around the idea of a futuristic drug called Chronos that when taken as an eye drop, allows you to have a time travel experience.”

summery, feel good anthems. All of that kind of led into the record that we’ve made. Which is probably going to be a challenging record to listen to, but it is easily the best music we’ve ever made, without a doubt in my mind.” The record looks set to share a lot of the characteristics of its predecessor Computer Love, with the lads further exploring the electronic path that they set out on their 2008 release. However, don’t just expect Computer Love Mark Two, TZU’s fourth LP will be a different beast completely. There will be far less in the way of traditional song structures as the boys employed more complicated synth work. While Joelistics maintains there is a definitive bounce and nod to the album, only now they are accompanied by more psychedelic and dreamy textures. “There are no obvious radio anthems,” Joelistics explains. “Which we’re really happy with in a way ‘cause the by product of that is that we’ve written an album

that works as a whole. There’s a concept and a story behind the entire record and each song has a part to play in that.” Joelistics and Countbounce, the principal songwriters of the band, had turned each other onto some different kinds of song writing than they had previously utilized. The ‘dreamy textures’ we are set to hear on the album make a lot more sense after the mention of the atmospheric tones of Thom Yorke’s solo record and the lyrical focus of Bright Eyes as influences. If you are starting to think that TZU are consciously trying to separate from the genre they have long been associated with, then you’re dead right. “We’ve watched Australian hip-hop climb to its zenith as a commercial form, and humbly I think we had something to do with that and we’re by no means cashing in on that. In fact we’re going in another direction; we’re trying to move even further away from the pack

with this record.” TZU, Joelistics admits, has never been completely at ease with being pigeon holed as another Australian hip-hop act. It is fair enough complaint to have, the Melbourne boys have always been ahead of the curve when compared to their hip-hop counterparts. Articles dated back to 2006 laud TZU’s use of instruments instead of just DJs in their live show. Fast forward to 2012 and live instrumentation is commonplace with hip-hop acts. Even Computer Love, which was chastised by many for its electronic vibe in 2008, sounds even more at home in 2012 as more and more artists adopt the electronica trend that’s sweeping the music industry. “It was hard for us, I mean we love hip-hop, we all still listen to it and to some degree all make it. When the four of us came together there was almost a self analytical mechanism that prevented us from just being hip-hop and you know at

some point one member would say lets just write a banging hip-hop anthem but its always just come out a little bit mutated. This album, more than ever, we were like we’re not even gonna try that.” This album will be unlike anything we’ve heard from TZU before and Joelistics admits that it is thanks to their lengthy interval that they are finally in a position where they can tackle this project. It is interesting to note that the hiatus was more or less forced on the band. With serious illness afflicting one band member and a spate of pregnancies amongst the band members’ partners meant that four members had to work on ‘life issues’ before seriously reuniting. It seems that the universe was telling them they needed the time off to finally realise their ambition. “We’re more confident in making moody music now and not pleasing, I guess, the audience that we love and still want to play to, obviously. I think we wouldn’t have been able to do that if we didn’t

have a break because we almost need to forget about touring and the live show and what people are expecting of us and what we expected of ourselves. We needed to just take a break and come back and look at it and make something artistically satisfying for us.” Despite the concept-heavy nature of the record, the refreshingly frank and honest lyrics we’ve come to expect from Joelistics and Countbounce can still be found on album number four. While it may not be as in-yourface as on previous records you can still feel confident that the socially-conscious lyrics will still be present. “The album is collection of stories and for instance Beginning of the End, the first single is about the main protagonist of the album; a girl who time travels into the mind of the last surviving person on planet earth and she asks the questions ‘how did it all go wrong?’ Where did all the mistakes which led to the inevitable destruction

of the human race and the planet, where did they begin and where did they end? For me that’s still got a social conscience, but it just frames it in a way that’s less yelling and dogmatic.” That detailed storyline is not just limited to one song, however. The whole album is based around the idea of a futuristic drug called Chronos that when taken as an eye drop, allows you to have a time travel experience. Usually taking you back in time, Chronos is always location specific, it takes you back or forward in time from the place where you take it. The album follows Chronos users and their experiences in different eras of Australian history. “I’m interested in telling stories, I’m interested in being able to get messages across which don’t have to be the literal truth but have to have the truth embedded in them. A lot of the songs have that. To me a lot of the songs have a story that alludes to things like inequality or the class system or racism or even

Australia’s dark history.” This album may not please all of TZU’s traditional fans, a fact that Joelistics and his band mates embraced a long time ago. To write this record they had to do so with reckless abandon and while there may not be a good time vibe found on this record, those brave enough to embrace it could find something a lot more meaningful. “We’ve consciously thrown a spanner in the works. We’ve written music that is asking people to think and feel on a different level.” LUCAS THOMAS

TZU play the Republic Bar in Hobart, May 25. Tickets from the venue or Moshtix.com.au

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Music

Music

GUTHRIE GETS A GUTFULL

MURDER MOST GRIM THEY BEFRIEND AUDIENCES ACROSS AUSTRALIA AND EACH PERFORMANCE ENDS THE SAME; WITH THE BROTHERS GRIM AND THE BLUE MURDERS GAINING A HANDFUL OF LOYAL FANS.

TASMANIAN DUO GUTHRIE PLAYS BLUES WITH A GRUNT AND A SNEER TAKEN FROM PUNK AND HARD ROCK, ON THE ROAD FROM CAIRNS TO BRUNY ISLAND.

In 2007, brothers James and Matt began writing blues-inspired songs, choosing to deliver them with the abandonment of rock ‘n’ roll. It is this morphing of genres that has allowed Brothers Grim and the Blue Murders to lay the foundations for a new scene on the Melbourne music circuit. “If you asked someone who is into the blues whether we are blues they would say yeah, probably reluctantly. If you asked whether we are rock n roll they would say yeah, probably reluctantly,” James Grim says. “It is definitely blues inspired. Basically, it is the three chords that is not in the blues; manipulated and given a bit of a rockabilly swing, but delivered with some possession of rock n roll. “It is excellent [Melbourne], especially for us seeing we are a band of morphed genres. There are a few bands here like that. We could have played blues bills, rock n roll bills, but we would have stood out like a sore thumb. So, it is great to be surrounded by bands that we really gel with. Together we became a scene.”

Rock ‘n’ Roll can never die, but the blues is the reason behind its immortality. Distract yourself as much as you like with whatever fad ebbs or flows while you’re young and rich, but pain stalks all of us through the years. Blues is the form of music to soberly embrace any kind of pain with a smile and make the composer or listener better off. Rather than whine or scream or poetically cry, Guthrie’s songs can make the ground shake, and sweat sting from the guts out. And they’re not alone; in every city of this country, bands with a similar cross pollination are touring faster and harder, refining their sounds and reaching higher than local radio or sub-genre cultism. Alongside bands such as The Fumes, The Snowdroppers, Kira Puru & The Bruise, Glitter Canyon, Brothers Grim & The Blue Murders, Calling All Cars, King Cannons, The Beards, Stonefield and King Cake, the Blues can set you free and fill your cup, and in their own words, there is a true sense of community among these bands. Warp: Who are you trying to impress and make proud; your father or your mother? Liam Guthrie: With music? With life? In general? I don’t know if I consciously try to impress my parents with what I do. I was a bit of a f**k-up when I was younger and probably tried to actively make them unimpressed. Now I think that you don’t

have to “do” anything to make your family love you or feel pride. It’s great when your mother really listens to your lyrics and asks questions about them... sometimes. If I can look back on my life and honestly say that I was even just half as good a person as my mother and father are, I’ll be happy. What’s the hardest you’ve worked or reworked a song? Some songs we’ve been working on for a couple of years, they sit on the small hot plate and never seem quite right. No matter how many herbs and shit you put in them they just don’t taste that good. Some you poach lyrics from and turn into other songs, some turn out good after a long time; others just die in the arse. All the good ones never seem to take much work, they just kind of happen. One of our new songs Death Train is the third rebirth of an idea, a lyric that never quite stuck. The original idea is maybe five years old and has only just seen the light of day. Do you have a favourite guitar? Yes I do. I did. A black Gibson SG. I have it tattooed on my right arm. Just before Christmas my place was burgled... She was probably sold off for a lousy eightball. That guitar kicked arse! But, as they say, “all great loves must one day part”.

What’s more interesting, love or death? Love. Love can make you want to die; dying doesn’t make you want to fall in love. You can only die once but you can love over and over. Death you can rationalise, death you can accept, death has finality. Love is wild and fickle and extremely powerful. Death can’t kill love. Do you think humanity can be, or needs to be, saved? From whom or what? Hatred, greed, inequality, indifference, money, closed mindedness, fear, fake boobs and Hollywood. Maybe we’re all f**ked, maybe not. Maybe if we all ate more salads, that would be a good start. Are you politically interested in any way? Coming from Tasmania, I think you have to be politically interested. My interests lie in the anti-politician movement mostly. Like all good musicians we feel strongly about the environment and justice and accountability. We are big supporters of the Sea Shepherd and are very proud and in awe of the work that they do. They are the modern outlaw heroes of our time and should receive the support and respect that they deserve from our governments for doing the work that said governments ought to be doing themselves! How do you feel when you play at home?

Finally, after ritually driving the coastal highways, playing live show after live show, the Brothers Grim exchanged their electrifying, if not somewhat humorous live performances for a studio and hammered out their debut album The Year to Forget. A title inspired by personal experience?

Tasmania will always be “home”. We are very proud of where we come from and will remember our roots until we die. For us, playing Tasmanian shows is the most fun. The beer is good, there are friends and family and fantastic bands to play alongside. We can’t wait to come back down south in June!

The Tasmanian leg of the tour will be our highlight for sure. After 60+ shows right down the east coast we’re gonna be in need of a Boags XXX and a hell of a party! JARRED KEANE

“I guess it is a broad reference to the truth,” James says. “But it could be a year in anyone’s life if you look at the themes of the songs on the album. For us personally, it was on the back of a solid three years of ruthless touring and dealing with the death

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Now, after three months recovery from their last tour, the Brothers Grim and the Blue Murders are off again on their Whole New Beast – Double Feature Tour. However, this ‘time off’ hasn’t just been about recuperation for them. They have managed to recruit a new bassist, who James describes as ‘ideal’ and make a music video for their single On the Meter, which was filmed in the back of a cab (no acting involved). James reveals time was even found to begin working on an up and coming album, which fans can expect out sometime next year. “Realistically, I would be looking at February/March next year. We will probably have a 7 inch out between now and then, keep you guys warm... But I think we are definitely a live band. That is basically why I still play music and don’t get a real job. I think live is interesting. It is like trying to cave a wild beast and still make that beast have the life it does in the jungle, if you know what I mean. You are getting this thing that is used to being exhausted, fatigued and then on stage giving it life.” REBECCA WHITEHEAD

The Brothers Grim and The Blue Murders play The Brisbane Hotel on June 2.

QUICKENING THE FUNK FUNKOARS ARE ON THE ROAD AGAIN, BRINGING WITH THEM FUNK-LACED HIP HOP BEATS, SATIRICAL LYRICS AND THE RECIPE FOR AN ALL-DAY HANGOVER. OH, AND VINCENT D’ONOFRIO.

Guthrie take their extensive tour to Tasmania next month, playing Hobart’s Brisbane Hotel on Friday June 8, Dover Hotel on June 9, Bruny Island Blues and Roots Festival on June 10, Burnie’s McGinty’s on June 15, and Launceston’s Royal Oak on June 16.

For most bands, figuring out what to name your tour is simple. You either a) name it after your album, or b) name it after your single. Not the Funkoars though. They just want to have a laugh.

“I think every album gets harder and harder as you go along. You start taking more effort and time. There was more work put into this album. We were touring quiet heavily with The Hangover, which delayed this one a bit.

“We decided to be different”, DJ Reflux says. “We came up with Being Vincent D’Onofrio and the photoshop guy ran with it. The tour poster that came back was hilarious, our faces photoshopped into Vincent’s. We lost it, it was gold. We don’t take things too seriously. We take our shows serious and our business and music but it is also a bit of fun. We like to push that out there.”

“We had a few guest producers on [The Quickening]. A young guy called K21 from Adelaide, he is making a bit of noise. We value his talent and wanted him on the album. We also got to work with Large Professor from New York who is an incredible hip-hop producer. That was amazing, working with him. We had a very diverse group of friends and people on there.”

After twelve years, four albums and too many tours to count, the Funkoars are still together and still making great music, as seen by the acclaim received from their latest album The Quickening, which, as DJ Reflux shares, was harder than previous albums to create. 14

of my brother’s girlfriend. Going from all that grief, exhaustion and pain and diving into the studio was a stressful situation. I think everyone rose to the challenge and that is what produced that album.”

Third single on the album, Vamoose, has just been released and is another solid song from the boys, bound to get fans moving on a Saturday night. The film clip for the track is yet to be launched but DJ Reflux reveals to Warp a little of what can be expected.

“The film clip is a little bit odd. We didn’t want to do the old rapping to the camera film clip. It is not as weird as Black Keys’ Lonely Boy, but it still doesn’t make any sense. That’s what we wanted to do; something a bit different.” With their tour underway, Funkoars have already pulled out some amazing gigs, including playing at Tasmania’s Breath of Life Festival. Featuring artists such as Drapht and Illy, the festival drew in Australian hip hop fans.

“We basically are getting busy: we have some interest from a television show that we have worked with before; I am mixing Illy’s album at this point in time; MC Trials produced beats on that album and a new Drapht album. We are getting back into the studio doing a few sneaky tracks. We are also looking at another release toward the end of the year maybe, whether a single or album, not sure yet.” REBECCA WHITEHEAD

“We had a blast [at Breath of Life]. Getting to hang out with our friends and getting up with Drapht. It had a good vibe.” With so much happening for the Funkoars it is a wonder they have thought about future plans at all. But from the sounds of things, they are more than ready for what is to come.

Funkoars perform at the Republic Bar on May 11 and 12.

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Music

Music

ANGELCORPSE THE INEXORABLE

DAMAGED DO NOT SPIT

CANNIBAL CORPSE THE BLEEDING

Now, this is one extreme album. This album optimises what extreme metal is all about – unrelenting, brutal and metal as f**k. The opening track Storm Gods Unbound sets the pace of what’s to come over the course of the album – a full and unrelenting assault to the senses. While borrowing a lot from death metal legends Morbid Angel’s early work, Angelcorpse manages to also infuse many Black Metal traits throughout the album; creating an ungodly racket. And they are scary looking dudes as well.

Australia has been the birthplace of many legendary metal bands – arguably none more infamous than Damaged. Their career was as turbulent off stage as it was on the stage; constant line-up changes, public airing of band politics and even a book written about the chaos and turmoil that followed the band.

When an album starts with a song called Staring through the Eyes of the Dead, you know you’re in for a wild ride. Cannibal Corpse are by far the most popular death metal band to have ever existed, and it was The Bleeding that really propelled them into the lives of many angry teenagers around the world... with good reason – the album is sick. Both in terms of “this music is sick man”, and “David, these lyrics are really sick... you shouldn’t be listening to that!” (sorry Mum).

The Inexorable is about as subtle as a hammer to the face and as sophisticated as a crowbar, which only adds to the charm of it. Unrelenting death metal insanity at its very best.

DRUMMER DAVE HALEY OF TASMANIA’S WORLD FAMOUS TECHNICAL DEATH METAL BAND PSYCROPTIC SHARES HIS ULTIMATE METAL ALBUMS. When I was asked to write a Top 10 list of metal releases I got quite excited and thought to myself Yeah! This will be great! Then the realisation of what I had got myself into hit me; this was going to be a lot harder than I thought. For those of you who might not know, the heavy metal community is a very strict, dedicated and of course very opinionated group of individuals. Other words that spring to mind are loyal, obsessive, and fanatical - and did I mention very opinionated - group when it comes to bands and the metal genre in general. Rule #1 - We all have opinions about music, but yours is wrong. Rule #2 – If you’re not sure what to think, see rule #1. OK, now to the list. It’s bad enough that I have to have arguments with myself about which albums are going to be in the top 10; I’m going to have every metal fan reading who read this saying ‘Bullshit! That’s wrong! What about (insert cult album name) by (insert cult band name) – this is a crap list! I would have made it way better’. How do I know this? Well, I do exactly the same thing every time I see a top 10 metal album list. Yes, I’m one of those strict, opinionated metal fans. For those of you who aren’t into metal; keep reading if you want to have a giggle and think “those damn wacky metal heads with all their different sub genres and funny band names”... and excuse my self-indulgence as I refer to rule #1. DAVE HALEY

www.psycroptic.com

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SLAYER REIGN IN BLOOD

METALLICA RIDE THE LIGHTNING

IMMORTAL BATTLES IN THE NORTH

Reign in Blood will be in every metal top 10 list ever created, until the end of time. Why you ask? Well, if you had to ask why you obviously haven’t heard it! 9 songs, 29 mins long, recorded over 25 years ago and still can’t be topped. Many have tried but all have failed.

I vividly recall the day I brought this album; on Cassette for $19.99 from Allan’s Music in the Elizabeth Street Mall. I’d saved up my pocket money for a few months and I was loaded (well, I had $30 saved up. That’s heaps for a 9 year old). I’d never heard Metallica, but I’d seen their cool artwork on t-shirts being worn by scary looking dudes. I knew I wanted in. My Mum saw the tape, instantly took it off me, and read through the lyrics to make sure there was nothing ‘bad’ in there. She eventually gave it back. That was the day I became a fully fledged metal head; I only had the one album and only liked one band, but it didn’t matter.

This will open up a can of worms (or a can of evil, inverted, spiked and grim satanic worms), but Battles in the North by Norwegian legends Immortal is for me the most important Black Metal album of all time.

Reign in Blood was the moment the guitar stopped being a guitar; it was now an Axe. Hands in the air at live gigs become goat horns in the air. The air guitar changed from being a Gibson SG to a Jackson Flying V – if you don’t know what I mean when I say this - listen to the guitar break in the album opener ‘Angel of Death’ – all will become clear; you will feel the power of the metal riff. Damn, the album has Angel of Death, Raining Blood, Altar of Sacrifice and Jesus Saves on it. On one album! The album is a blue print on how a metal album should be; grabs you by the throat, drags you into the abyss and doesn’t let go until the very end – and you love every second of it!

Master of Puppets is often cited as Metallica’s pinnacle release, yet there is something about Ride the Lightning that makes it stand out more for me. It’s a dynamic album – fast, slow, brutal, melodic and original. While still a very young band at this point, Metallica circa 1984 were a force to be reckoned with and set to take over the world. Hungry, powerful and they meant business (not Bu$ine$$). The rest is history - although I wished some of their later releases could deleted from the history books.

Of course Mayhem’s De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, Satyricon’s Nemesis Divina and Darkthrone’s Ablaze in the Northern Sky get very honourable mentions, but Battles... really embodies the don’t-give-a-f**k black metal ethos. The sound on the album is harsh, the playing furious (and only just keeping together as a band) and the songs to the right to the point. The album is raw, ugly, abrasive and just plain vicious.

Their debut album Do Not Spit could either be called a hardcore inspired death metal album, or a death metal inspired hardcore album. I don’t know, or care really... just listen to it... it’s INTENSE. It’s now almost 20 years old and still sounds fresh, aggressive and like they mean every note played. It’s a classic, without a doubt. If you need a history lesson in heavy music from Australia, this album will be your teacher...then it will kick you out of the class room for bothering to come to school in the first place!

The songs on the album are exceptionally catchy, heavy and memorable. While not as crushingly heavy as their later albums, The Bleeding is one of the albums I hold responsible for hurling me down the path of being a poor heavy metal musician; as all I wanted to do was play music like they did. Thanks guys, I owe you one.

MISERY INDEX HEIRS TO THIEVERY

PANTERA FAR BEYOND DRIVEN

BURZUM FILOSOFEM

Bands like Misery Index are unfortunately few and far between. Albums like Heirs to Thievery are even rarer. This Baltimore quartet is tougher and angrier than the city they are from; if you know anything about Baltimore - you know that is saying something. Sonically, MI play their own brand of extreme metal – taking as much influence from grindcore as they do from thrash and death metal. Dynamic and vicious, Heirs... rips through 11 songs in 35 mins, all the while educating you on a lot of political wrong doings with their lyrical manifesto.

Say what you will about Pantera but one thing cannot ever be disputed about them: they created some of the heaviest, catchiest and grooving riffs that ever came from a guitar and changed the face and sound of metal as we know it. End of story. Far Beyond Driven was Pantera’s “third album” (let’s not talk about the glam metal years), and it’s when they really nailed their sound. The riffs and groove on the album cannot be denied. I don’t care what you think about them, this album is untouchable.

Burzum is a controversial act. Sole member Varg Vikernes is a convicted murderer, having spent 16 years in a Norwegian prison for killing a former band member in 1993. It’s the black metal equivalent of the 2pac vs Notorious BIG feud. Varg is very politically out spoken, and, well let’s be honest, a bit mental.

I can honestly say I have listened to this album at the very least once a week in its entirety since it was released in 2010... which with the short attention span many of us have with music these days, it is a big call. It’s the newest album on my list, but its well deserving.

Far Beyond Driven is a combination of aggression and anger bounded together with large dose of groove, all neatly packaged for mass consumption. As a 14 year old, I loved this album. As a 32 year old, I love this album. It’s essential for everyone’s collection.

“What the hell?” I hear you say. “Powerage, what are you talking about? What about Highway to Hell or Back in Black?” My Answer - this is my top 10, so piss off. I don’t have to justify which albums are the most important to me... but if you’ve read this far, I will.

Recorded as a duo by blood brothers Abbath Doom Occulta (vocals, bass and drums) and Demonaz Doom Occulta (guitars) in 1994, this album is a must have for anyone with even the slightest curiosity about the black metal genre.

AC/DC POWERAGE

To be honest, I was a rather late convert to the church of AC/DC. While as a kid I had a taped copy of AC/DC: Live, which I listened to all the time and loved; I lost touch with my spiritual roots when I first heard death metal. Upon hearing death metal, I promptly became obsessed and nothing else musically really mattered. Such is the

Filosofem is half atmospheric minimalistic black metal and half ambient music. Is it a metal album? I’m not sure. There are 6 songs on the album; 3 metal songs and 3 ambient songs. Vikernes plays all instruments on the album; he’s only just a competent player but his sense of melody is amazing. Each of the tracks holds you in a trance-like state, and I find myself listening to the album on repeat. Truly a masterpiece.

power of the ‘blast beat’ and death metal growls. For the rest of my teenage years, it had to be faster, faster, heavier, heavier and more brutal. AC/DC is a merciful god and all forgiving, so when I returned to them in my 20’s, they welcomed me back with open arms and all was forgiven. I promptly acquired all their albums and did my penance. You can’t pick what albums you love; they pick you. Powerage from start to finish gives me chills up my spine, and makes me happy. Everytime, without fail. Thats why it’s in the list. www.facebook.com/warp.mag 17


Music

Music

LETTING RIP

THIS IS NOT A Q&A THE TASK: INTERVIEW A WHIMSICAL FLOCK OF MELBOURNE ARTISTS WITH A REPUTATION OF BEING FIREY, FRIVOLOUS AND ALL-ROUND CHARMING. THE REALITY: ARMED WITH DOZENS OF GENERIC BAND QUESTIONS, I DECIDED I WASN’T AT ALL INTERESTED IN HOW THEY MET OR WHAT THEIR FAVOURITE ICE CREAM FLAVOUR IS. I WANT TO KNOW THE HARD STUFF.

WARP: First of all, why the name Flap!? FLAP! Oh man! That’s one of those generic questions! Our favourite ice cream is rum and raisin, by the way. You ever seen a bird flying into the wind? It’s flapping and flapping – and it doesn’t get anywhere, because as hard as it flaps, the wind blows harder, right? But still, it’s flying – it’s doing its thing, and that’s great. It’s an instruction – and a metaphor for life. If some weird scientist decided to create a hybrid of John Denver and Missy Higgins I imagine it would somehow sound like you guys, how do you feel about that?

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cold. Is this a ridiculous thought, or do you agree?

Are you talking about hipsters? I like hipsters; I think it’s nice that people are wearing white socks and pretty clothes, and drinking cheap booze, eating tacos and listening to Sonic Youth. Because white socks look good, exxy booze is for wankers, tacos taste great and Sonic Youth are excellent.

Oh shit yeah! On the south coast of Tassie, when you stand by the water’s edge there is no land mass between you and the Antarctic and that is one seriously big block of ice. In Melbourne, we’re just emotionally cold.

And sure, we don’t really play the sort of music that everyone is listening to, but who cares? It’s still good music, and if you’re listening, which some people are, you’ll probably like it and buy our album.

Now that’s more like it! They don’t ask you questions like that on ABC radio! I think that’s great you think we sound like Missy Higgins and John Denver – I actually had to google John Denver to find out he was the Leaving on a Jet Plane guy – I don’t think I own albums by either of them. I’ve always thought we’re more like the mutant child of Kylie Minogue and Jelly Roll Morton, but hey, now that I’ve got John Denver’s playlist up on YouTube, I reckon he’s pretty good. I don’t mind Missy either, she was one of the first people in the Australian mainstream to sing in her own accent – I think that’s important.

Lady Gaga, Eminem or Justin Beiber: if you had to produce a cover of one of their songs, which artist, which song, and why on earth would you bother?

Some say there is only so far we can move forward before we stop to look back. Is your music evidence of this nostalgia?

Your music has a certain circus like quality; there is nothing melancholy or mournful about it. Was this your intention?

I grew up playing avant-garde jazz and noise music, so you’re not going to find me saying that there’s only so far we can go forward; I think there are plenty of boundaries to be pushed, but I reckon those boundaries aren’t necessarily in the places you think they are.

Sure – but half of our songs are about death and heart-break too… point being, things are always going to be shit, but you might as well have fun. That circus quality? Jess’ husband is a clown – seriously – and my girlfriend can hula-hoop and hammer nails up her nose.

Put frankly, ‘indie’ is the big thing right now and your music is anything but. Why has your style caught the attention of so many people in a time where oversized, woollen 18

jumpers and starched white socks have become so insanely popular?

Justin Beiber plays great drums you know – I didn’t believe it at first, but it’s true - and Eminem is one clever sociopath and that sandwich-making scene in Lady Gaga’s Telephone is totally rad. To be fair, they’ve also done a lot of crap as well; Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett singing Lady is a Tramp springs to mind. My sister reckons we should cover Just Dance by Lady Gaga. That could be cool.

People say that somehow, the cold weather in Tasmania and Melbourne are different, that they are totally different types of

Adding a female to an all-man-band is very popular these days. Is this how it all came about or was choosing group members more complicated than this? Jess can play the banjo at a rate of 400 strokes per minute, sings ridiculously beautifully, and writes some of the best songs you’ll ever hear. But yeah, mostly it was an equal opportunity employment thing… not. You were in Tassie not long ago as part of your national tour, will you be back anytime soon?

THE MAN OF MANY FRONTS, TIM RIPPER OWENS OF JUDAS PRIEST, ICED EARTH AND BEYOND FEAR, IS RETURNING TO OUR SHORES AND FLYING SOLO.

like Pink and stuff; I just love Pink, she is amazing!

First time you realised you wanted to be a musician?

What’s one thing you can’t live without on the tour bus?

A real one? When Judas Priest called me, haha!

What are your vices?

Monster Energy - it is a must for me; absolutely zero and espresso.

Last song you sang in the shower?

Coffee, Sugar, Air, Sleeping, Breathing; I have a few more...

If you could have a super power, what would it be?

What is a random skill of yours that you couldn’t make money off?

Invisible... oh Lord, what I could do!

Judas Priest/Defenders of the Faith.

First piece of music you listened to today?

Last time you spoke to Rob Halford?

Catch the Rainbow by Rainbow What was the last thing you dreamt about?

A year and a half ago in Argentina... Hung out a bit and had a few laughs and I got a few pointers.

Strangely enough, it was that I was golfing.

First tattoo?

First thing you do after you wake up each morning?

Skull on my upper arm.

Warp: What’s the most common misconception about you that you’d love to clear up, right here and right now? Ripper: [The movie] Rockstar is very loosely - and I mean loosely - based on me.

Why do you think they call me ‘Big Tim’? Oh wait, they don’t haha! Ok, maybe just my gift to make people laugh. And I kinda do some people laugh at me when they aren’t supposed to. What is one thing you’d like to change about yourself right now? Love to have more hair on top... Ha! I could go on all day. I got it - that I am a millionaire. What did you want to be when you were ten years old? Wow, not sure. Probably a baseball player, loved sports and still do. But not sure I ever knew what I wanted to be - not the best plan!

Look at my kids. Last thing you’d do before you die? Say OH SHIT!

Not sure... Maybe the national anthem. First concert you went to?

Last meal you cooked? Burgers on the grill. ALI HAWKEN

First album you ever bought? Elvis.

What’s your guilty pleasure music-wise?

Last time you called your Mum?

Well I listen to a lot of my kids’ music,

Yesterday.

Catch Tim ‘Ripper’ Owens performing his solo work alongside some of the Judas Priest classics when he takes over the Brisbane Hotel on May 18.

I’ve played music in Tassie a bunch of times and it’s always been utterly fantastic, beautiful towns and real nice people. It’s always great to call someone from Bagdad after you’ve sprained your ankle and scuffed your knee to tell them you’ve been in the wars. BRITTANY BROWN

Flap! plays the Grand Poobah on May 26. New album A Great Day for the Races is out now.

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Music

Music

OLD SCHOOL CAPTAINS DEF WISH CAST ARE THE PARAMOUNT EXAMPLE OF HIP HOP CULTURE IN AUSTRALIA.

For over 20 years Def Wish, Die C, Sereck, DJ Murda One, and recent addition Thomas Rock, have upheld a strict philosophy of maintaining and preserving the four elements of hip hop, and respecting its pioneers and traditions. As an elder statesman of the scene, Sereck shares his thoughts on the development of Australian hip hop ahead of the release of their new album, and their upcoming Republic Bar gig. Warp: What have been the five most important hip hop tracks from Australia? Sereck: 1 AKA Bothers, On The T-Cozy Tip - This track took a real local approach and kept it raw. 2 Just Us, Combined Talent - First track out on vinyl and was also first underground track to get radio play. 3 Prowla, Money Walks - Took production level and MC’ing to another level. 4 Hilltop Hoods, 1979 - This track set everything up for their big single Nosebleed Section to blow up and for the Hoods to open the doors for everyone else.

5 Westside Posse, Pull The Trigger - This track led to Sound Unlimited getting signed to Sony later on. Where do you see Australian Hip Hop right now? Has the “golden era” passed already? Are we yet to reach it?  Australian hip hop is in a great place right now. It’s the meeting of old and new. The scene has evolved and the music has had its time to mature. Time tells all and you see who stuck in there. It’s not just about record signings and sales, but also the entities themselves, and creative bodies, who keep the art form developing. Who influenced you in the early years, and where do you look at for inspiration now? Public Enemy, LL Cool J, Run DMC, and Ice T... but also it’s not only about the music. Art and movies have also inspired us. We used to go to the Sydney Chinese Cinemas to watch early 90’s Kung Fu films before mainstream locked onto them. We draw inspiration from so many sources, every single day... Mad as a Hatter and in particular Knights of the Underground Table have proven to be landmark releases for Australian hip hop.

What were you setting out to achieve when you made those albums in the early days? It was great to hear that we made the Triple J Hottest 100 Albums, and especially good to know it was an industry-voted top 100. It’s that fight of rising above, and that’s how we always were. We didn’t look to battle the next suburb, but instead looked to battle the international stage. We were talking about this the other day. We held the jams, made the records and painted the walls. We aimed to do each of those to the best of our ability. That’s all that we ever wanted to achieve, anything that comes from doing that well is a bonus. What have been the most important factors in the longevity of Def Wish Cast? How have you kept going for so long, at such a high level? The thing that links us is that mind set of hip hop the day we first discovered it. We can’t get enough of the rawness. As KRS One stated “it’s not in everyone”. That full fightor-die spirit is the key factor. Believe in what you love and don’t let anyone tell you less.

That’s it. As stated by the pioneers of this culture. First of all we are the example and as a veteran crew we represent all elements. We are connected with writers, bboys, DJs and human beatboxers all over the world. The pure culture is still alive, but can be harder to find amongst the commercial mainstream these days. A lot of dancers are calling themselves Bboys but not understanding what it takes to become a BBoy. A lot of DJs are pushing buttons rather than touching wax, with all the technology that is now available to them. The 4 elements are always there though, and some elders uphold it dearly and continue to pass it on. We just got to do what we do and people are always watching. Come to watch any DWC show and you’ll see it for yourself. Def Wish Cast as support for KRS One was the obvious and logical choice - how was that whole experience? What did KRS think of Def Wish Cast, and the scene here in general?

“We are connected with writers, bboys, DJs and human beatboxers all over the world. The pure culture is still alive, but can be harder to find amongst the commercial mainstream these days.” In the end they will know. Kind of like Kevin Costner saying “Build it and they will come” haha... But it actually works. The 4 elements of hip hop culture - MCing, DJing, Bboying and graffiti writing – are not all referenced in the music of today. Are they still just as relevant as they’ve always been? They are the fundamentals of hip hop...

When the KRS tour was announced, we were blessed to watch so many fans flooding the internet with requests, or rather demands, to get us on the tour... Nah, it’s great, and a boyhood dream for all of us. We don’t care about supporting overseas acts anymore, but there comes along those special opportunities, when it’s someone you’ve watched your whole hip hop life, someone who continues to evolve and inspire, and who is a key figure, especially with his passion and longevity on the protection of TRUE hip hop. There has not been much communication on the tour as he is in and out a lot as we are too. We were honored to be asked to speak at his Sydney press conference and with him on his visit here. He’s an inspirational man and an incredible speaker. His energy is amazing and his live shows are second to none.

FASTEN YOUR SEATBELTS AFTER A HUGE 2011, CALLING ALL CARS HEAD OUT ON A FINAL HEADLINE TOUR BEFORE BUNKERING DOWN TO RECORD ALBUM NUMBER THREE.

“I think overall, the vibe of the band is that we’d much prefer to be playing and touring all the time,” bassist Adam Montgomery says. “It’s fun! It’s hard work, but it’s hard work playing music, which is pretty awesome.” The Calling All Cars bassist is having an easy day off with a coffee when he rings through today, yet his excitement about the band’s upcoming tour is unmistakeable. For a band that has been working so hard over the past few years, it’s not surprising that there haven’t been many moments for reflection for the Melbourne three-piece. Supporting the Foo Fighters, scoring a spot on the 2012 Big Day Out tour; for Montgomery and co, 2011 was a year where they just threw themselves into their work and enjoyed the benefits. “2011 was really great; once we got our record out and did lots of tours and toured with lots of cool bands that we looked up to… it was amazing. It was a good time. I think we’re looking forward to this tour and then looking forward to album three. We don’t really think about what happened, we just do it and then move on; there was always something to be done or something else coming up. “Maybe in a few years’ time we’ll look back and go ‘well, that was pretty awesome’ or ‘we made a pretty horrible decision there’ or something. As we’re doing it, it just happens and then we go on to the next thing, which is probably kind of shitty in hindsight, because we’ve done some cool stuff. We always appreciate it, but we might be able to reflect on it a bit better in the future.” On supporting American rock legends the Foo Fighters, Montgomery describes the

moment as being an incredibly special part of his performing career. “When you get an opportunity like that, you’ve just got to go with it. Just put everything into it, because those sorts of things don’t happen that often and they don’t happen to many bands. So when we heard, we were so stoked to be able to be a part of it.” Another thing to put on their reflection list is The Delirium Tour, the band’s final headlining tour before they retreat into the studio to continue working on the follow up record to their acclaimed sophomore effort, Dancing With A Dead Man. It’s a tour which will see the band visit the Republic Bar in Hobart, a venue Montgomery and the Ing brothers think fondly of. “I think we were only there in August last year. We had an awesome time down there last time, it was really fun. It’s really cool to be going back; there were so many good vibes there. “There’s that classic ‘small town’ vibe, but it’s actually one of those small towns where people do go and see bands. There are a lot of small towns where it’s really hard to get people to see bands still. They’re real loose as well, which suits us!” SOSEFINA FUAMOLI

Check out Calling All Cars when they hit the Republic Bar on May 18.

What should Hobart be expecting at the Republic Bar on June 1? We are so looking forward to Hobart, as we have never been there. DWC will be bringing you guys one of the most energetic stage sets. Straight up! We have worked together for so long, so you will see a natural sequence movement about us. ON POINT vocal punches and our DJ is so sharp and brings nonstop action as always. Our latest addition to the fam, Thomas Rock, will be on the vocoder and keys. He brings another great rare sound, so we fill the stage with 5 of us. Any Bboys/Bgirls want to bust out let us know, or hit us up on Facebook. We want everyone to step back in time with us, and take a trip on the Evolution Machine. Let’s make this an old school BBoy Jam! All elements will be getting love on the night! SHANE CRIXUS

Def Wish Cast play the Republic Bar & Café on Friday June 1.

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Music

Music

ONGOING EFFECT

MUSICAL WIZARDRY WHAT DO YOU CALL SEVEN HAIRY DUDES FROM A MIXTURE OF COASTAL AND COUNTRY TOWNS WITH SIX DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTS AND A PENCHANT FOR THRASHING STAGES TO THE POINT OF COLLAPSE? If you answered King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard, you’d be correct. They’ve been together for less than two years, but these uber-chilled fellas have swiftly rocked their way into our hearts with their not-so-chilled music. Psychedelic, surf, swamp, sleaze, garage, punk, and “music to rob a bank to” are just some of the ways that King Gizzard’s sound has been described, and speaking to Warp from his home in Anglesea, Victoria, lead singer Stu Mackenzie reveals that all of these labels are completely unintentional. “We’ve never really thought about what sound to go for. I suppose when you have seven people playing at the same time, you get something a bit unusual. We have a bit of a weird line-up as well, with harmonica and theremin and stuff, so I suppose that adds to it.” Although most of the boys are from coastal towns and have done their share of surfing in the past, Mackenzie says that the surf music label is perhaps the most unintentional of all. “We’re definitely not trying to shake anything. I kind of like surf music, but just never intended to make it.” Labels aside, the boys have clearly made an impression, and are finally on the cusp

AFTER A TECHNICAL HICCUP AND A LESS THAN IDEAL INTERVIEW LOCATION (PARKED ON THE SIDE OF A HIGHWAY), WARP MANAGED TO MAKE CONTACT WITH DRUMMER BEN HALL FROM THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT.

of releasing their first full-length album. They’ve just released new singles; Bloody Ripper – a track rife with all the raw energy that King Gizzard’s fans have come to love and Sam Cherry’s Last Shot – a spoken word story about cowboys and Indians, set to grinding western riffs. “We’re trying to face that now,” says Mackenzie of the new album. “We’ve got a first lot of tracks already done, so we’ll probably be recording a bunch more soon. Put them all together and you’ve got an album.” Like most upcoming bands these days, King Gizzard has built a solid reputation around their live performance. Having originated in a garage in Anglesea, Mackenzie agrees that their sound is undoubtedly suited to smaller indoor venues, despite their increasing appearance on festival stages (including this year’s Big Day out). “We’ve done a few now, but we’re still trying to figure out how to play at a festival,” he admits. “When you play indoors you can just make a lot of racket and it tends to sound good. Everything’s just kind of loud and in-your-face. But it’s really, really different playing at a festival.” That said, the band still counts the opening slot at Meredith as the highlight of their performing career.

The rough setting, however, proved rather relevant, after Ben explained the difficulties the metal band has been having over the past few years. Having written only a couple of dozen songs over three years, the band embarked on some soul searching, seeking to resolve their problems. Sadly, this has resulted in singer Clint Boge officially announcing he is leaving the band to pursue other musical interests.

“Just because I’ve been to it so many times. I really never thought that we’d ever get to play there, and then being able to was kind of shocking, and great, and really satisfying.” Kicking off at the end of April, the Bloody Ripper Tour will have seven wizards playing their first ever show in Tassie – something that their fans from across the Straight will no doubt be pencilling in for a great night. Once the tour ends, it’s anybody’s guess what these mysterious muso’s will get up to. Unwaveringly relaxed about life and the band, they take things as they come, and

don’t like to spend too much time (if any) pondering their future. “It’s something I haven’t really thought about,” says Mackenzie in his mellow, sunsoaked drawl. “It’ll go where it’s meant to go and that’ll be the end, I suppose.” KELLY SNYDERS

King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard play at the Brisbane Hotel on Saturday May 19 with Deep Sea Arcade, Ben Salter and Joe McKee.

“I was talking to Clint about it the other day. I think he has always had his other musical interests on the side. I just don’t think his heart is in this project anymore. “We have always been the best of friends, but we have also always got results. Even if we didn’t like each other from day to day we have always been able to listen to the music and say ‘yes, this is good, it is worthwhile pursuing’. I think he is at the point where he doesn’t think that [anymore] - he wants to move on and try something else.” Over the twelve years they have been together, the Butterfly Effect have worked up an impressive list of achievements, including 6 top 100 hits, 1000 plus shows and over 200,000 records sold in Australia alone. To celebrate ten years of recording the band is releasing Effected, a compilation CD of their best work. “Each chapter of the songs bring back memories. I listen to them [the old songs] and they seem kind of heedless. We just wrote songs the way we knew how to.” Were they to have their time over again, one change Ben said the band would have made would have been to wait longer to record their last album, Final Conversation of Kings.

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FRI 18

POPUPCLUB#5 feat. Peter Escott, International Dragon, Phat Meegz, Kowl & Pop DJs! SAT 19

LANIE LANE Supported by The Rubens THURS 24

Cirque de Merde Andrew Harper and David J MC: Mick Davies Plus Special Guest: Mick Lowenstein and his ladders FRI 25

The Tearaways & The Sin & Tonics

“I think the overseas thing we would have liked to pursue a little more. We also probably wouldn’t have recorded the last record when we did. We probably should have waited till we had four or five more songs, made it an amazing record instead of just an alright record.” It is far from over for the Butterfly Effect though, with the band hoping to find a replacement for Clint after their latest national tour - which kicks off in April with fans sure to be treated to some epic, high energy performances. So what is next for the Butterfly Effect? Ben reveals the band are beginning work on a new album, they are just looking for a new vocal talent. “I still really like the music we are making. I think the problems we were having were with vocals; from release to release trying to do something slightly different. In the perfect world, you want to have that song that you release as a single that you go ‘Wow, this song is awesome. It sort of sounds like The Butterfly Effect but I don’t know if it is’. You want to come out and interest people, let them know you are still working on your craft and trying to push forward.” REBECCA WHITEHEAD

SAT 26

Flap http://www.flap.net.au/

Catch the final shows for Clint Boge with The Butterfly Effect at Launceston’s Hotel New York on May 22 and Hobart’s Wrest Point on May 23.

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Club / Electronic

Club/Electronic DJ PROFILE

Club and Electronic News

MID-WEEK MASH

SIMON LOVELL

LOCAL NEWS

SYDNEY-BASED DJ DUO THE HUMP DAY PROJECT HAS GONE FROM A SURREY HILLS GARAGE TO BLOGOSPHERE FAME AND BBC RADIO. AND IT’S ONLY WEDNESDAY.

HAVING RUN THE TUU DANCE MUSIC SOCIETY, PROMOTED SOME HUGE EVENTS AND DJ’D ALL OVER TOWN, HOBART DJ STALWART SIMON LOVELL IS MAKING INROADS INTO THE BUSY MAINLAND SCENE TOO.

ALL THE CRAZE AT PLANB

genre’s pioneers to wiggle bums on their dancefloor. Ghetto Funk master Busta will be following in his genre-partner Badboe’s footsteps this month when he graces the decks at the underground Collins Street club. If you like it funky, this is for you! Busta plays at Regrooved at Ivory Lounge Bar, Saturday May 12. Doors at 10pm, FREE before 11pm, $7 after.

FRESH REFRESHER

A Nice Ego Experience

Mr. Nice and DJ Ego are a Melbourne duo with big stars in their eyes. The pair has melded an incredible Audio/Visual show to take your ears and eyes on a journey from Hip-Hop to House via Bollywood and the BMX Bandits. The 4-turntable toting masterminds will be throwing down their latest show at Ivory Lounge Bar this month.

KNIFE PARTY IN RAGE VALLEY Two of the founders of Drum & Bass band Pendulum, Rob Swift and Gareth McGrillen, are pushing on in leaps and bounds with their side project Knife Party. Since dropping their hit single Internet Friends earlier this year, the duo have been busy readying their EP Rage Valley. Rage Valley drops May 6 on Earstorm Records and Warner Music. www.knifeparty.com

HOWLING AT THE MOON

Nice and Ego AV Show Extravaganza at Ivory Lounge Bar on Saturday May 26. Doors open 10pm, free before 11pm, $8 after.

For those uninitiated, DJ Craze is one of the masters of his craft. The 3-time consecutive World DMC Champion and 2-time World Team DMC Champion has worked as Kanye West’s official tour DJ, has remixed some of the best in the business, and is known for his unique blend of irresistibly danceable tracks combined with incredible turntable skill. He will return to grace the turntables in Hobart this month, bringing his ‘mindblowing, unparalleled skill’ to PlanB Nightclub. Supported by some of Tasmania’s best turntablists, this is sure to be a cracking evening with some of the best! DJ Craze plays at PlanB Nightclub, Wednesday May 30, supported by DJ Dameza, DJ Grotesque Tickets $20 from Ruffcut Records or the venue.

MONTHLY BASS DROP As continue our ineluctable crawl toward Winter, Andrew Corney and the Fresh Crew return to warm us up with another bumper Fresh Autumn Rave. This time featuring Australian dance superstars Yolanda Be Cool and Dcup as headline act, a Funk/ Breakbeat laneway, a hard-dance room and epic production! So get your smiley face T-shirt on, don those knee-high fluorescent socks and come remember that good old ravey-happiness of yesteryear. Fresh Autumn Rave featuring Yolanda Be Cool and DCup at the Huon Quays, Regatta Grounds, Hobart on Saturday May 12.

Just a friendly reminder that the first Wednesday of every month is the night of magic that is Launceston’s favourite dubstep night, Drop. It is hosted at Alchemy Bar on George St, and features some of the best dubstep DJs from the local pond and abroad. Check recreationalthugs.com for line-up details. Drop June at Alchemy Bar, Launceston, on June 6. www.recreationalthugs.com

CAN SHE DJ? YES SHE CAN!

Supported by 15 Local DJs. Tickets $40+BF from Ruffcut and Greentix.com.

RUFFCUT RELAUNCHED DOWN FOR GHETTO FUNK

Ivory Lounge Bar has once again shown its support for bass-driven, funked-up breakbeat by bringing down one of the

Local institution and Tasmania’s only dedicated urban culture and music shop Ruffcut Records has recently completed a shop move and revamp. They didn’t go very far - moving next door into 35A Elizabeth St (above Naturally Tasmanian in the Elizabeth St Mall), and have decked out the new premises with some cool street art from some of Hobart’s best graffiti artists. They are celebrating with some great specials on clothes, gear, CD’s and more so come in and check it out. Ruffcut Records relaunched at 35A Elizabeth St, Hobart. www.ruffcut-records.com

Entries are now open for Australian and New Zealand entries for EMI’s global “She Can DJ” search. The competition is open to any female DJ of any genre that thinks that they might be in the cream of the crop. Simply write yourself a short biography, grab a couple of press pics, record yourself a 20-minute mix of your best material and head to www.shecandj.com

Both well accomplished classically trained musicians & composers, Doctors Andrew Bell and Adam Zae decided to take their careers to the next level; completing their respective PhD’s in ‘Tearing shit up’ and ‘Rocking the house’, before finally unleashing the beast that is Doctor Werewolf on an unsuspecting Sydney club scene 2 years ago. Werewolf sightings have since been reported at festivals and clubs across the country, including Goodvibes, Foreshore, Parklife, Warehouse, Arthouse, Academy, Family, Brown Alley, and of course the Werewolf’s favourite haunt, in the Cave at Chinese Laundry (no1 club in Aus –ITM 2010) In between Studio sessions they will be rocking-the-fuck-out at a club near you. While no two sets ever the same, you can definitely expect a killer show, with the Doctors both mixing up a dubstep, drum n bass, drumstep rave, plus creative turntablism, sample triggers and even a bit of CDJ trombone, while the multitalented Adam Zae takes to the mic like he was born with one in hand. Underpants will be thrown… sweat will be dripping… drinks will be spilling… and your girlfriend will most probably be friends with Werewolf on facebook the next day. See them at The Republic Bar & Café  Saturday July 14.  Or for a taste of the beast go to www.doctorwerewolf.com

The Troublemakers Music duo have had residencies at Chinese Laundry, The Rouge and Candy’s Apartment, and now they’re bringing the messy party to Hobart. Sydney based DJing duo The Hump Day Project are bringing the party to Hobart this May. Heath had a little chat with Warp about THDP and what we can expect. WARP: How did you two meet? Heath: Both Steve and I had residencies at the Sydney club Chinese Laundry, so it was inevitable that we would cross paths one day. I can vaguely remember being front and centre for many of Steve’s epic party sets. Tell us a little about Hump Day? THDP was originally born out of a desire to create unique bootlegs for our own sets but somewhere along the way we discovered that other people enjoyed what we were doing. So being the nice guys we are, we decided to share our work – this lead to offers for remix work and eventually putting out original tracks. Both of us have varied influences - basically it’s anything goes, as long as it’s heavy on the party vibe. We’ve actually tried our hands at many things outside DJing – producing, promoting and even setting up and running our own netlabel, Troublemakers Music. Any significance to the name? Unfortunately there’s no exciting story here; with both of us having busy schedules, the only day we could get together to write music was Wednesdays, so from there it was a short step to the name The Hump Day Project. I think we need to fabricate a story which makes us sound a bit more imaginative.

What have THDP been up to so far this year? Loads of gigs, remixing for Kid Kenobi’s label Klub Kids which was heaps of fun, and just constant work on fresh bootlegs for our shows. What is the most requested track in your sets? The track that we play in almost every set is our bootleg of Bloc Party’s Banquet - it never fails to get people hyped. Is this your first time in Tassie? Last time we played in Hobart was in December 2008. That was a bit of a whirlwind; we literally got off the plane, played and flew out extremely early the next day, so we are well overdue to come back. Where would be your dream place to play? One venue I’d love to play is London’s Fabric Nightclub – the acts they have going through that place are amazing, it would be a dream to be included on that list. Describe a set by THDP? 2 parts party, 1 part rave, 1 part cheese and a sprinkle of sirens and samples. Mix well and leave to set in a dark, cool venue. Serves hundreds and best enjoyed with friends. What can Tassie punters expect? Lots of fun, party tunes to get everyone out on the dancefloor. Plus loads of THDP remixes, edits and bootlegs. Steve may even crowdsurf. KYLIE COX

What’s your favourite drink? I’m a tee-totaller but I have an extremely sweet tooth so anything with sugar and lots of it! I think Steve enjoys the fact I don’t drink... he gets my bar tab. 24

warpmagazine.com.au

Hump Day Project plays The Republic Bar & Cafe Saturday June 9. www.thehumpdayproject.com

WARP: How would you describe your sound?

How did you get involved in event promotion?

LOVELL: My DJ sets are all about dance floor reaction and building the correct vibe in a venue. I like to take people on a journey, play with their emotions, build suspense and really interact with the crowd. The ultimate goal for me is to try to create a dance floor full of people enjoying themselves in unison.

I was definitely a DJ first and a promoter second. I fell into becoming an event promoter purely through my love for the music. There were very little to no events where I could play the music I am truly passionate, I realized if I didn’t put them on, such events wouldn’t happen. I have always enjoyed organizing and hosting parties; I guess it was only a matter of time.

I would describe my sound as being very diverse with lots of tech grooves, uplifting synths, powerful vocals, melodies and lots of climaxes. If I had to put genres to it, I’m currently playing a mix of everything from House, Progressive, Tech, Uplifting, Trance and Electro. Basically anything that has a 4-4 time signature, but it really depends on the event and of course, the crowd. A lot of DJ’s produce tracks primarily for marketing purposes. Do you think a DJ/ producer can make it based on their music alone? I don’t think a producer could make a living based purely on their music alone. There is such little margin to be made off tracks given that most people can download music without paying for it, which has severely decreased music sales revenue worldwide. Whilst there is some money to be made from releasing tracks, touring is where it’s at. How do you feel the scene on the mainland differs from Tasmania? It’s an entirely different game on the mainland, everything is a lot bigger and the crowd is highly educated on music. When you’re at home, all your family and friends are there and you have a rough idea what tracks they like. At interstate gigs you know very few people, making it harder to read the crowd.

You don’t use a moniker or alias for your DJing – why is this? When I first started I was running under the alias of Gorak and was playing Hard Trance/ Hardstyle. As my sound developed I realised it was also time for a name change and switched back to using my real name. I no longer find myself having to introduce myself to people twice, once as Simon and then as my moniker. It’s just simpler this way and I thought my name had greater marketing potential. calum max power

Current Top 5 Tracks: 1. Andy Harding - Adagio Without Strings [Nuked Records] 2. Gareth Emery - Concrete Angel (John O’Callaghan Remix) [Garuda] 3. Porter Robinson - Language [Big Beat Records] 4. Rank 1, Jochen Miller - Wild and Perfect Day (Cosmic Gate Remix) [High Contrast Recordings] 5.Michael Woods - Airborne [Diffused Music] www.facebook.com/warp.mag 25


Club/Electronic

Club/Electronic

LET’S TAKE THIS OUTSIDE TASMANIANS HAVE LONG BEEN FOND OF THE OUTDOOR GATHERING. MELBOURNE’S TRIBEADELIC CREW HEAD OZZY TRIBEADELIC LAYS DOWN HIS LIST OF FAVOURITE PARTIES.

Why are Tassie folk so down with outdoor doofs? Maybe it’s the dirty, dusty dancefloors. Maybe it’s the late nights (aka early mornings). Perhaps it’s the fascinating blend of people who make the effort to attend. Whatever the reasons, the creative effort and community input make these mini-festivals an experience to remember, if you can remember them.

Australian [Outdoor] festivals. Rainbow has long been the biggest and the best Festival on the circuit for over 10 years. Never to be missed, Rainbow has always provided sounds for all music lovers. I haven’t missed one yet and I don’t expect to either!” #3 Summer Dreaming

Here is Ozzy’s pick of doofs to check out: # 1 Tribeadelic Gathering

spectacular natural manifestations, the Total Solar Eclipse in 2006. Held in the Paradise Canyon in Turkey, the festival attracted open-minded people from all over the world and was host to over 80 artists over 5 days. Ozzy’s Take: “It’s not every day you get to play in front of 10,000 people and close the main stage. This festival has more artists then you could shake a stick at, over 7 days of pure bliss. Even a Main Stage collapse a day before the party was scheduled to start couldn’t dampen spirits. This one will always be close to my heart, for the fun times and special people I met. *** TASMANIA’S OUTDOOR GATHERINGS Although Tasmania’s are usually quite sporadic with their outdoor parties (often announced only 2-3 days before the event takes place) there are several static parties on our island’s doof circuit. These parties often attract attendees from the mainland, and sometimes even overseas. Let There Be Doof (AKA Fractangular Gathering)

Trio. They have consistently attracted many big-name national and international psychedelic acts, and recently branched out to include a second stage run by Renegades of Dub, showcasing dub and dubstep talent. Check out: www.fractangular.com.au and facebook.com/Fractangular Shroomed

PLAY SOME D THE FRESH RAVE IS FAST APPROACHING, TO SINK ANCHOR IN HOBART’S HUON QUAYS WITH SYDNEY’S DCUP BLASTING 20,000 WATTS OF SWEET HOOKS AND BREAKS INTO THE SWEATING, HEAVING CROWD.

Shroomed is a mid-year party, usually held around the end of April or start of May. It is an open-air experience of a lifetime, with a broad range of musical tastes and an even broader visual component to stimulate your senses. Shroomed is a 3-day event, and usually takes place in the southern end of the state, out toward the Tasman Penninsula.

In typical art-wank style, Dcup (aka Duncan MacLennan) was questioned on the early dabbling that conjured up his love affair with music. “Scottish folk music,” he said. “No, really, I’m not kidding. My father was Scottish and he and his crew of expats would spend late nights, song after song, strumming old pains away on a guitar... The next great shaping of my taste came from Dangerous by MJ, the first CD I ever bought. The tightness of the music, down to the drum machines and synths; blew me away.”

The Quamby Project Whilst a relatively new project, Tim Wells and his crew have put together an awesome amalgamation of minds in order to throw not just parties, but exhibits of light and sound. With the first gathering of the project held earlier this year, expect great things from this little group of psy-heads.

around the Cross, I started to hone in on my sound.” Working with other artists has proved to be “a game changer, both personally and professionally. The most interesting collabs are where your styles are juxtaposed,” he explains. “The most important thing is to communicate what you want without it being a demand for creative control.” We’ve nailed a fantastic festival like MONA FOMA, which the metropolitan areas thought they deserved more, and now for the kids who are all about the filthy, hard-hitting techno world, we’ve got the FRESH Rave; it’s got a car and it’s as big as a whale. “I’m going to really step up my game to play beside these legends. I think this rave is going to be one to remember.” Welcome to Camelot, mate. MORGAN DUHIG

Having studied Media and Communications at University, Dcup explains, “I was there with the hope that I’d somehow fall into a job related to music, so I could be within arm’s reach of a studio... the rich tapestry of information that I consumed gave me clarity to decide what I wanted to do with pinpoint accuracy.”

Calum Max Power

About: Summer Dreaming was a travelling gathering that previously had sites at Byron Bay, Lake Grabine and Glenworth Valley. With acts such as Space Tribe, Space Cat & Sun Control Species on previous line-ups, this truly used to be one of the best of the best. Ozzy’s Take: “[Summer Dreaming was a] Byron Bay hippy fest which is sadly no longer with us. They constantly brought the most cutting edge tunes to a group of likeminded people.”

The young and ambitious Sydneysider heads the line-up this year - an emerging artist in the nu-disco/two-step scene, who is probably best-known for his collaboration work with Yolanda Be Cool on the hit single We No Speak Americano, which won the 2011 ARIA award for Best Dance Release. Don’t get down with a batch of frownies when I tell you that the mystery and allure behind his nom de plume consummates to no more than an “old high school nickname”, and is not in fact, “the name of his first porn production industry”...

Breaking into the music scene takes a lot of testicular fortitude, but the reward is monumental. For the past 3 years, LTBD has been one of the biggest events on the outdoor party calendar, run by locals legends Fractangular

“First I started giving them [my demos] to DJs at the bars I worked at. A few of them played them, and I’d freak out and tell my co-workers and they’d vacantly try to look impressed. Then as I got a few regular gigs

Ozzy plays the Brisbane Hotel on Friday May 25.  Door sales $12.

Dcup plays FRESH Rave on May 12 at Huon Quays, Hobart with plus 14 Local DJs over 3 Dance Floors.

#4 Cairns Winter Solstice

NO SLEEPY LEGOHEAD

About: Tribeadelic Gathering is an annual party organised by the Tribeadelic Records crew. Last year it was held over the days on New Year’s Eve. It is a family-friendly and is always set in a stunning location in rural Victoria. Ozzy’s Take: “Well after 14 years of my life being spent on this festival, it’s no wonder it’s my favourite. Focusing on the more full-on edge of psychedelic trance, Tribeadelic has become a Melbourne institution for trance lovers around the globe. It was a small party, with a big sound focused on the psychedelic side of music and life. Tribeadelic festival has been a constant on the Australian festival circuit for over 10 years.” #2 Rainbow Serpent Festival

MELBOURNE’S LEGOHEAD HAS RELEASED ON SOME OF THE BIGGEST LABELS IN THE BUSINESS IN HIS EIGHTYEAR PSYCHEDELIC MUSIC PRODUCTION TRANCE. About: The annual event, in its fourth year in 2009, was one of the region’s biggest and most creative festivals, attracting well over a hundred acts, performers, healers and artists over four days and three nights in the rugged beauty of the Atherton Tablelands. Sadly the organisers have had to cancel the previous year’s events in order to recoup lost capital. Ozzy’s Take: “Sadly another festival that is seemingly on a break. The Cairns Crew are staunch warriors when it comes to partying. Everyone has Bush mechanic skills & being held on my birthday, it was always a Grande Celebration.” #5 Soulclipse (Turkey)

About: Rainbow Serpent Festival is an annual gathering of epic proportions, also held in rural Victoria. The party attracts 10,000 plus people, and has evolved in recent years from a purely music festival to event that places an emphasis on sustainability, well-being, performance and art. Ozzy’s Take: “Not much needs to be said about this one. It’s the granddaddy of all 26

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Legohead (Alistair Craig) is not always working full time on his ultrasonic projects but has managed to piece together a new set of audible explorations into the undiscovered reaches of our consciousnesses. The name may suggest to some an unfashionable haircut, or perhaps simply the head of our beloved figurines that live in the magical snap-together land of plastic bricks. To Aistair Craig, however, it reminds him of something that one may not necessarily be keen to remember. “[As a child] I had Lego as I assume most people did. When I was around two years old I fell asleep on a Lego brick which then left a permanent partial imprint of on the side of my head. You can still kind of see it!” Championing the name of such a famous childhood icon can sometimes inspire people to bring the strangest things to parties, as Al found out at a recent outdoor party. “[I’m] pretty sure there was a green Lego tree getting about at the Eclipse festival. I have never been tempted to make a mask for any of my Legohead performances, but now that you have put the idea in my head, you never know!”

Psychedelic Trance can often be cited as being too repetitive, or simply boring. What does this veteran of the scene see as important to focus on in the lab? “I think pretty much all the elements of a track need to be of a certain level to really make an impact these days. A healthy balance of production, arrangement, sound design and overall musicality is a pretty good formula for a rocking track.” With trance being one of the most produced genres at the moment and a flood of new tracks and producers popping up every day, it can sometimes be hard to weed out the bad from the good, so we thought we’d let Lego tell us who is exciting him at the moment. “Brainiac, Kindzadza, Avalon, Tron, Headroom, Sinerider and Mental Broadcast to name a few, plus a lot more that I can’t think of right now.” CALUM ‘MAX’ POWER

Without any major releases in the past four years, Lego has been taking some well deserved time off, but has now returned with a new plethora of twisted rhythms and melodies to expand your mind.

About: Soulclipse was an outdoor open air festival to celebrate one of nature’s most

“I’ve been producing Psy again for the past 6 months or so after a long break, so I’m looking forward to playing a fresh new set of new tracks.”

Legohead and Ozzy Tribeadelic play at The Brisbane Hotel on Friday May 25, supported by Corney, Seannie and Justin Time. Doors at 10pm, entry is $12.

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Performing Arts

Performing Arts

BURLY DAYS ARE HERE AGAIN

IDENTITY IN DANCE IDENTITY IS FORMED AT BIRTH AND GOVERNED BY NATURE AND NURTURE. FOR QUEENSLAND CHOREOGRAPHER ANTON, HIS WAS DESTINED TO DANCE.

One of his earliest memories is as a two year old, “holding onto a speaker in the lounge room and hearing my European family shout “dance, dance!”

for Fanta, ABC2 Giggle and Hoot specials and the Nickelodean Kids Choice Awards, choreographing for pop princess Delta Goodrem.

Identity premiered in 2009, is a work based on communication and isolation. It has been dusted off and revived for 2012 with new dancers interpreting the choreography that Anton and Frances Rings created.

Anton’s identity then seems firmly entrenched in the dance world. He says that dance is his life, “I do have other artistic passions and interests but one in the public domain is enough.”

“My work is not about me personally but it is definitely my movement,” Anton says. “This work was inspired by personal observation and my experience of the world I live in. I believe we communicate through screens and multi task with such speed that we live in a community where we forget to see each other, even though we live in close proximity.”

As for after dance, that is a question that for now remains unanswered. A career in dance demands a constant and unerring faith in your mind and body, one to create and the other to push the boundaries of human endurance daily.

Anton has toured extensively through Australia, Asia, Europe and USA after graduating from Queensland University of Technology with an Associate degree in Dance in 1996, Anton performed with a number of contemporary companies including Australian Dance Theatre, Legs on the Wall and Sydney Theatre Company. At the age of 23 he started choreographing and has since created work for the Sydney Opera House TasDance, Australian Dance Theatre and the Brisbane Arts Theatre. He has also found commercial success working

THE THIRD ANNUAL AUSTRALIAN BURLESQUE FESTIVAL IS RETURNING TO HOBART WITH AN ENTOURAGE OF INTERSTATE AND INTERNATIONAL PERFORMERS TO SWELL OUT TASMANIA’S RANKS.

“I am a mother to a wonderful, active one year old boy, and am fortunate to have a very supportive husband,” says Rose Black, who knows how to juggle - at least in a figurative sense. “But to be honest, between being a mother, festival preparations, performing and designing costumes there is not much time for anything else!” Black has been co-producer of the Festival for the past three years. Last year, her co producer Dolores Daiquiri took charge of the Tasmanian leg of the tour leaving Black holding the fort in Melbourne. The women started the Festival as a way to unite the burlesque community in Australia.

SARAH MASHMAN

“We had the unique opportunity to offer a fabulous community event to local and international performers, as well as bring famous (and infamous) acts to Australian cities and audiences. Hobart certainly understands this community spirit and has a thriving burlesque scene of its own. We love the Tasmanian artists - Grace Cherry, Lucy Sky Diamond and Scarlett Jezebel - who are all incredibly supportive and enthusiastic. It is an honour to return!”

Image: Paul Scambler

As it is a Festival, there is a chance for the audience to find their inner queen as workshops are being run to coincide with the Festival in June.

Performing Arts Guide THE SOUTH COMEDY

The North COMEDY

Onba The Yard May 8 and 22

Fresh On Charles Fresh Comedy May 17

Southern Lights Hotel Kingston Comedy Bar May 9

DANCE

The Brisbane Hotel Comedy Forge May 31 The Lower House Lower House Comedy Lounge May 10 Waratah Hotel The Clubhouse May 18 DANCE Derwent Entertainment Centre Riverdance Farewell Tour May 9- 13 The Theatre Royal Syncopation May 29 and 30 THEATRE Backspace Theatre The Journey Girl May 3- 13 The Playhouse The Mousetrap May 25- June 9 The Theatre Royal The Uni Revue May 11- 26 28

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Burnie Arts and Function Centre TasDance presents Identity May 11 Princess Theatre Syncopation May 24- 25 THEATRE Devonport Entertainment and Convention Centre Bad Girls May 18- June 2 Earl Arts Centre Sherlock Holmes May 10- 12 Newstead College presents Midsummer Night’s Dream May 31 and June 1 Princess Theatre The Uni Revue May 29 - June 2

Hobart welcomes Finland newcomer, LouLou D’Vil and Canadian performer, Coco Framboise, local performers, Grace Cherry, Lucy Sky Diamond and Scarlett Jezebel and interstate headliners, Imogen Kelly, Vesper White, Rosy Rabbit, Poppy Cherry and Lillian Starr, whose strap-on rolling pin left last year’s audience in shock and awe. Katherine Farrell spoke to Festival producer, Rose Black (Rosy Rabbit) and Finnish performer, LouLou D’vil.

“That is a question that will be answered when I arrive at the end of my career. I have to be 100 percent committed in order to keep going.”

Tasdance presents Identity at the Burnie Arts and Function Centre on May 11. www. tasdance.com.au/identity

The Festival is about celebrating a form of dance that has risen from the depths of exploitation films and seedy bars and taken its place in theatres and on stages around Australia. The Festival features International queens of burlesque; performers who have earned their crowns at the annual Burlesque Hall of Fame in Las Vegas.

Image: Shimona Henry

PARTNERS IN CRIME WHEN YOU THINK OF GREAT PARTNERSHIPS IN POP CULTURE, YOU THINK OF BATMAN AND ROBIN, BONNIE AND CLYDE, AND SHERLOCK HOLMES AND DR WATSON.

“The workshops are open to established performers as well as anyone wanting to have a bit of fun and get to know our gorgeous and vivacious headliners up-close and personal. They will be a fabulous way to get a taste of tease while exercising their glamorous side! All the workshops will have a fun and supportive atmosphere and

The recent spate of films and television programs reaching our shores has featured contemporary versions of the 19th Century detective and his sidekick, the language, the action or even the century has been sped up, computer generated or brought forward, setting a stark contrast between the original stories by Arthur Conan Doyle.

traditional Sherlock Holmes was ahead of his time.”

Stephen Beckett, producer and director of theatre group, Stephen Beckett Productions, admits that the popularisation of the detective in recent times contributed to his decision to mount the play, Sherlock Holmes.

“There is a particularly strong drug scene (in the play) where Holmes shoots coke in his arm. The real Sherlock Holmes was intended to be a drug addict and the modern interpretations have tended to leave it out.”

Beckett professes to his favourite story from the 60 that Conan Doyle wrote, The Hound of the Baskervilles, but found it impossible to stage. Instead he has combined two of Conan Doyle’s stories, choosing the best bits to create a storyline that will be traditional. “It is not a modern interpretation of his work, we stick to the text however many people would be surprised to find that the

Beckett does not shy away from strong imagery and as a company that does not rely upon sponsorship or funding, he is able to create his own vision and also be true to the Sherlock Holmes of Conan Doyle’s stories.

encourage confidence and awakening that inner showgirl.” Since her first show in Helsinki in 2008, LouLou D’Vil has never looked back. Burlesque has taken her across Europe and the United States where she has garnered a fierce reputation as one to watch in the burlesque world after taking out the title of Best Newcomer at the Burlesque Hall of Fame in 2011. She has performed with some of her idols and the rest have found their way onto her “arm of fame,” which is tattooed with pinups and burlesque performers she admires or has felt a connection to. Her latest addition, Bambi Jones, joins an array of the burlesque world’s finest including Tempest Storm and Betty Page. When she is not on stage, D’Vil works as a graphic designer. She says that finding time for her commitments can be tough but she manages. “It’s not always an easy job but I think I have found some kind of balance between everything. For me the hardest part is that I usually never say, no. But I’m learning!” Black has a dance and theatre background she says that burlesque was “a wonderful chance to be completely independent in my creativity. There was no director, or pre-determined plot, it was just me and my audience and a space for my imagination to run wild. When I first started out it was refreshing and exciting to explore my sensuality in a very public way,” she said. “Rosy Rabbit has developed over the years into something I am quite fond of, but I am sure she will keep evolving with me and my changing life and I think that is the beauty of it, burlesque can be anything you want it to be.” Although D’Vil has covered most of Europe and North America it will be her first time in Australia. She says, “I’m very excited! I really want to see the beautiful nature and some exotic animals like koalas. I’m pretty sure it will be great fun!” KATHERINE FARRELL

The Third Annual Australian Burlesque Festival takes place at Hobart’s Backspace Theatre on June 15. Tickets are on sale and workshops will be announced at www. australianburlesquefest.com

familiar with the stories and have worked closely together in previous productions. They know each other professionally and really suit the characters. One is thin and eccentric, the other is slightly portly, and so the imagery is there!” TOM HOPKINS

Conan Doyle was not particularly fond of Sherlock Holmes, Beckett explains, “Sherlock Holmes ended up eclipsing Conan Doyle’s other work, he tried to kill Holmes off but the public wouldn’t let him.” The partnership between Holmes and Watson is a friendship based on tolerance and affection and is, alongside the mystery, a critical part of the story. Beckett has faith in his two actors, “they know the text, are

Sherlock Holmes runs from May 10 – 12 at the Earl Arts Centre, Launceston. www. theatrenorth.com.au

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Arts

Arts

ANDREW ON SOMETHING OTHER THAN ART YOU KNOW WHAT’S REALLY, REALLY GETTING ME DOWN IN HOBART?

Don’t get me wrong, I like living here. I do. It’s got its ups and downs but you can manage a fair quality of life and the arts and culture thing is really getting up and running, some months there can be quite a bit to take in, culturally. What’s getting me down I think, is something like the hole in the CBD where once a grand department store stood. There are rumours that this group or that family have purchased the space, but I don’t really know anything, and it’s a bit much, that hole. Recently, Sydney changed its selling-ofalcohol-in-an-establishment laws so a basic licence is now $500. That you can do. Melbourne has been like that for years; I think Nasty Old Jeff Kennett may have done something there. In Melbourne, that law led to, in part at least, the growth of a laneway culture; it is starting to do something similar in Sydney, I am led to believe. If you’re not exactly with me, Melbourne’s laneway culture consists of really small bars and places you can eat. There are spots that would seriously only seat 30 people, and you can get a drink there and have a nibble at 11 on a Wednesday. There are lots of them and no-one is making a

killing but the good ones who do this right get by fine.

has come and gone in any of a great many spots around the CBD.

I went to one that featured a turntable and great cool vinyl collection. You could request a record, and I sat there listening to The Specials with a delicious beer and chilled with buddies, and it was the ambience of a friendly lounge room party. It was not too loud to not talk and it was not so packed it took a week to get another round in. You could also buy a longneck and share it. Brilliant.

I could be asking for a serious investigation into rents around the inner area and maybe the possibility of some sort of cap on rents, but let’s not get ahead of ourselves. That might be impractical.

Now, there are some places starting to do this kind of thing around Hobart. They are chilled, the beer costs a bit more, but the inability to buy a double vodka Redbull actually sees off the box-headed morons that plague a number of venues around the waterfront area and this is a wonderful thing. I really, really want to see more venues like this in Hobart and I want to see the council legislate for them now. I want a serious investigation into the empty spaces of the Hobart CBD. I want to know why the old Black Prince has been empty since Sublime moved to the Maypole. I want to know why seven potentially interesting food stores have opened and shut up in one building in North Hobart whilst nothing

It’s just that I do think that at least some of those empty spots could be used, and there could be room for a few small bars that are not barns, but are trying to do something else. I am seeing this start to happen anyway, but I think it needs to happen quicker, I think that the council needs to actively support it by looking at rents and looking at empty spaces, and that we need to as well, by going out and checking out new places when they appear. ANDREW HARPER

ART FORUM

ART ABOVE & BEYOND

MATERIAL GIRL

GET INSPIRED BY UTAS ART FORUM, A LECTURE-BASED PRESENTATION HELD AT THE UTAS ART SCHOOL IN HOBART, EACH FRIDAY FROM 12.30PM – 1.30PM. ARTISTS OF ALL WALKS OF LIFE PRESENT A FOLIO OF THEIR WORK.

CAST PRESENTS A FREE EVENT FOCUSING ON ART THAT GOES BEYOND ALL OF THE RESTRICTIONS OF CONVENTIONAL EXHIBITIONS, WITH ART AND THE OUTERMOST LIMITS OF LOCATION-SPECIFICITY.

HIGHLIGHTING THE CREATIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF TASMANIA’S WOMEN ARTISTS IS THE AIM OF BENDIGO BANK MATERIAL GIRL 2012.

{ 18 MAY } Joel Zika is a Melbourne based print and new media designer .   Using multiple projection installation and large format digital imaging he creates work based on popular entertainments and the spaces of cinematic horror.  His work is featured in the touring show ‘Dreamweavers’ opening at the Plimsoll Gallery, he is represented by Dianne Tanzer Gallery in Melbourne. Joel Lecturers in Visual Communication at Deakin University and is completing a PHD at Swinburne University entitled ‘The translation of cinema into space’

Image: Jade Carden

{ 25 May } Tony Trembath will discuss the work of Li Gang and provide a context for his work by discussing Chinese contemporary art movements in Beijing and an overview of contemporary Chinese photography. He has recently provided this talk at Monash Gallery of Art, PICA etc { 1 June } John Vella is an artist and the head of Sculpture at the Tasmanian School of Art. Vella commits acts of frottage on communities, objects and systems. Working across diverse media & modalities he strives to contrive iconoclastic abstractions. John Vella will talk about his relatively recent travels and the trajectory of his practice. ART FORUM @ Dechaineux Lecture Theatre, The Centre for the Arts (UTAS), Hunter Street, Hobart

Anthony Johnson, Sean Lowry and Mark Shorter will deliver a compelling series of presentations on their respective projects and take part in an open public discussion centered on dematerialised art practice. The half-day event will begin with a performance by Sydney-based artist Mark Shorter who will enlist Schleimurgeln, a performance alter-ego conceived as an eroticized primitive European Other. Shorter will follow this with a presentation on his upcoming performance work Song for Glover which features Schleimgurgeln ascending Mount Wellington, an action that pits endurance against farce. Hobart artist Anthony Johnson will speak about Eclipse, his mysterious and hard-topin down performative work in four stages. Eclipse was one of thirteen commissioned works developed for Iteration:Again, an epic project curated for CAST by David Cross (NZ) in late 2011. Sean Lowry is a Sydney-based artist, music producer and writer who recently launched, Project Anywhere. Set-up as a vehicle for

The 60th

BLAKE

PRIZE exploring the religious and spiritual in art and poetry

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Image: Amber Koroluk-Stephenson

the dissemination and peer validation of practice-based artistic research at the outer limits of location-specificity, Project Anywhere is a new expanded exhibition and research platform that hosts work from invited artists and also calls for proposals. Lowry will introduce the project, speak about why it came into being and discuss upcoming projects. KYLIE JOHNSON

It is an annual award and exhibition which will tour selected artworks statewide and begins at the Moonah Arts Centre opening on Friday May 11. This year sees a prize pool of $3,500 on offer with the theme “Speak to Me” and entries are currently open until May 1st with a small entry fee of $15. All mediums are accepted. Prizes are awarded for overall excellence, emerging artist and the people’s choice award. Tasmania Regional Arts if the driving force behind Material Girl and has continued to receive sponsorship from Rio Tito Alcan, Zonta International and the Premier’s Department. This year they have managed to secure a new major sponsor The Bendigo Bank and in addition the exhibition is now recognised by the Australian Business and Arts Foundation under the Premiers Arts Partnership Fund.

Art and the outermost limits of locationspecificity presented at CAST (27 Tasma St, North Hobart) on Saturday May 12 from 4pm.

The new and continual support for this commendable award exhibition in Tasmania has helped Tasmanian Regional Arts to maintain and exceed the profile of the competition as well as creating a greater

acknowledgment of excellence and participation of Tasmanian women artists. So Women of Tasmania, get inspired by the words Speak to Me, start creating your masterpiece(s) and get amongst this wholesome feminine Tassie opportunity, it’s sure to be a class event. ALISON McCRINDLE

Further information and entry forms can be found on the Tasmanian Regional Arts website: www.tasregionalarts.org.au or by contacting the TRA office on (03) 6426 2344. Jo Hansen is curator of the 2012 Bendigo Bank Material Girl Exhibition and can be contacted on 0402 452 728.

Touring ExhibiTion

PuBlic PRoGRaM

12 May – 17 June 2012 Rosny Barn and Schoolhouse Gallery Rosny Hill Rd, Rosny Park Tuesday - Friday 11am-4pm Saturday and Sunday 12-4pm Phone 6245 8740 Email schoolhouse@ccc.tas.gov.au

ArTisT’s forum sundAy 20 mAy 2PM aRT and SPiRiTualiTy bus Tour TuEsdAy 22 mAy 10aM – 1PM RicHMond RicHES, JERuSalEM GEMS and BlakE BEauTiES floor TAlk sundAy 27 mAy 2PM BlakE and HiS MySTiciSM, HElEn QuilTy For information call 6245 8740

Customised gallery logo to go in this space.

THE BlakE PRizE FoR REliGiouS aRT iS PRESEnTEd By THE BlakE SociETy and claREncE ciTy council

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Arts

Arts

BLAKEFOR CASH CASH FOR Arts Opportunities PRIZE CREATIVITY CREATIVITY Check out the list of upcoming workshops,

CODED POETRY

ESTABLISHED 1951, WHAT DO BEN IN WELLS THE BLAKE PRIZENAMES, IS THE AND THE MIDDLE OLDEST NATIONAL ART PSYCROPTIC AND LINC PRIZE DEDICATED LE FEVRE HAVE IN TO SPIRITAULITY, RELIGION COMMON? ARTS TASMANIA AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY. ASSISTANCE, AND SO CAN YOU.

WORD EXLORATIONS IN NANCY MAURO-FLUDE’S ism | breath | she | who | with | I |

The theme and enduring nature of the Blake Prize has made it as well known to Australians as the Archibald Prize for portraiture. It is also a benchmark for artistic professional development, exposing the works of living contemporary artists to thousands of art lovers and collectors as it tours nationally each year. The prize has three prize categories: The Blake Prize ($20,000), The John Coburn Emerging Artist Award ($5,000) and The Blake Prize for Human Justice ($5,000).

The touring exhibition, containing paintings, prints, drawings, new media works and sculpture, is renowned for providing an opportunity for artists to be a catalyst for social debate.

Image: Nancy Mauro-Flude

The written word represents a certain type of symbol, one akin to the image, but somewhat removed due to the strict parameters of shape that make it discernible to a broad audience who are able to instantly identify and read what has been assembled via a careful hand. Written words have structure because it is the individual letters retaining the rules that define them that makes the word itself possible. A word is but the sum of its letters. A word is but a sum of the context in which it is applied. ‘I’ means little. ‘I love you’ says a lot. It is the combination, the arrangement, and the art of formation that makes the written word so beautiful. What happens then when the written word becomes type, and when the type becomes computer text, and the computer text becomes something more than the written word on screen? It becomes something that most of us are unlikely to access or even understand. It becomes code. Recently exhibited in the New Media Gallery space at Sawtooth ARI in Launceston, Nancy Mauro-Flude is an artist who not only understands the language of code, but also has the ability to use it as a vehicle for literary exploration and artistic outcomes presentable to a visual arts audience. What Mauro-Flude creates in a darkened room via multiple projections is a Live Code display that is familiar yet foreign. There are words, but they are displayed to us in a way that evoke the feeling of being witness to something, but to that of which we are not quite sure what we are seeing. There is a substrate that exists through Mauro-Flude’s work and one of which

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most of us are accustomed to being blissfully unaware thanks to the Graphical User Interface (or, point and click to make things happen). The realm that MauroFlude inhabits and interprets into art is that of Command Line Computing (cap, sed, grep, regux, to name a few).

to be experimenting with combination in order to find the right match. The result of this seemingly indecisive sequence is, to me, poetry. For example:

ism | breath | she | who | with | I is a work that delves deep into literary meaning and its place in computer mediated communications coupled with the artists’ own experiences of feminine roles in academia, and in life.

our breath

In this work Mauro-Flude explores the writings of Virginia Wolfe, in particular Wolfe’s essay A Room of One’s Own. The work presents itself on screen as short couplings of vertically scrolling words that seem

s heart

#cat roomofonesown.txt | grep -oE “[a-z]+ breath\b” | uniq |sort >> breath.txt drew breath her breath his breath hot breath my breath

their breath #cat roomofonesown.txt | grep -oE “\b[a-z]+ heart\b” | uniq |sort >> heart.txt excitable heart his heart human heart its heart

s heart the heart And this continues on and on. It is simply mesmerising. For a while it is possible to forget the human interaction of the artist at work, and feel as though the computer is in the infancy of AI searching for the right words to connect with us on a deeply

emotional level, as if it is attempting to instigate the feeling of love through the combination of words. Again, to me, like poetry. In the dedicated exhibition space, we experience the scale that is offered by the use of multiscreen projection. In addition to the onscreen work itself, the immersive environment created through Matrix-esque green font in a pitch-black space is beautifully overwhelming and it is hard not to be drawn into the complexity of not only the work, but of the artist. It is at this junction that the work becomes slightly disconcerting because once the realisation is made that this is an artist operating with a language and expertise that most of us lack the ability to

access, questions surface about our own ambiguous relationship with computers and just how passive we are as users. Work like this opens up the gap in knowledge like a flexed muscle splitting stitches. In the early days of computer interfacing, the vast majority of us fell into the what can the computer could do for me category, while I feel Mauro-Flude hitched herself up on the rolling wagon that asked the question what can the computer do, and off she went. Perhaps this is what makes ism | breath | she | who | with | I so fascinating. It is a rare glimpse behind the curtain of what language is in the 21st Century. Words are no longer just written, typed or spoken. They are altered and rearranged to form a script that fuses the bond between woman and machine, woman and place, woman and life, and more importantly woman and word. The work of Nancy Mauro-Flude offers us something visually appealing, deeply thought provoking, and suitably confounding. Just the way I like it. If you missed ism | breath | she | who | with | I at Sawtooth ARI in Launceston, I highly recommend you visit http://sister0. org/ and explore this and other works by a highly talented and imaginative artist. PATRICK SUTCZAK

The Prize has helped to ignite and enhance the careers of well known Australian artists such as Stanislaus Rapotec, John Coburn, Rod Milgate, Hilton McCormack, Rosemary Valadon and James Powditch, to name a few. This year the winning work – Naqshbandi Greenacre engagement, a three channel video installation by Khaled Sabsabi – requires the viewer to enter and participate in a space of traditional Islamic Sufi ritual within contemporary Australia. This space is both sacred and mundane, a place of workshop and together of family and community. The work utilises video as a means to both access and forge connections between peoples, representing and enacting the hospitality shown by a religious community in opening up their practice to draw in a wider audience. Also included in the touring exhibition is the sublime work of Launceston based artist Paul Snell. The touring exhibition represents 34 of the 72 finalists in this year’s competition that were selected from over 1,100 entries. The Blake Prize Touring Exhibition will be shown in the Rosny Barn and Schoolhouse Gallery May 12 to June 17. www.blakeprize. com.au and www.ccc.tas.gov.au, information 03 6245 8740 TRACEY COCKBURN Images: Abdul Abdullah

WHAT DO BEN WELLS AND THE MIDDLE NAMES, PSYCROPTIC AND LINC LE FEVRE HAVE IN COMMON? ARTS TASMANIA ASSISTANCE, AND SO CAN YOU. Arts Tasmania offers funding to artists every year through its Assistance to Individuals program. The program will open on the 1st of May and offers support to artists in any art form (including but not limited to actors, dancers, musicians, designers, poets, painters, bands and writers) for projects that will help them achieve a higher level of practice. The program accepts applications for grant and loans for most types of projects including (but not limited to) recording albums, buying equipment (some conditions apply), touring costs, publicity and promotion, creative development and much more. Emerging Tasmanian band Ben Wells and the Middle Names have been supported recently to record and promote their music (including the production of a promotional video available on YouTube); and to purchase vital equipment. Other successfully funded musicians include Adam Cousens who received support for his Queensland tour; bands Psycroptic and Ruins who received a grant towards their joint European tour ; and Lincoln le Fevre, Jane McArthur and Julius Schwing who have all received assistance for recording and producing albums. In other art forms a few examples of the type of projects that could be funded include: poets and writers wishing to prepare manuscripts or employ professional editors; visual artists developing work for exhibitions, attending workshops or undertaking residencies or mentorships; actors, playwrights, producers and directors undertaking creative development or working with professional mentors on drama projects. If you are under 26 you may be eligible for a Start-Up Grant which can be used to purchase essential equipment (capital assets are normally excluded from grant assistance). In 2011 Ellen Pittman received a Start-Up grant to purchase jewellery design equipment; and Zach Sonstegaard received a Start-Up Grant to purchase tools for his design practice. There are many ways you can develop your professional arts practise and apply to Arts Tasmania for the support you need, get started by visiting the website www.arts.tas. gov.au or calling 6237 6323 for advice about you project ideas. Or scan the QR (quick Response) code with your phone for more information. Check out the Ben Wells and the Middle Names Electronic Press Kit on YouTube http://bit.ly/benwells EDWINA MORRIS

grants, residencies and other arts opportunity’s. This is only scraping the surface of what’s out there for artists and alike so jump on the World Wide Web and do some surfing around the websites listed to find out more awesome stuff to do and be part of.

Workshops

Other Opportunities

Ink & Watercolour Wash workshop, learn how to combine ink with watercolour. May 12th 10am - 4pm at the Forth Art Studio with Evelyn Antonysen. Cost $45 (includes materials) for more information or to make a booking Phone: (03) 6428 2675.

Commission. Tasmanian artists are invited to create work for the TMAG Redevelopment, one or more site specific public artworks that reflect the values and intentions of the redevelopment. Artists working in a variety of contemporary arts media are encourage to apply and artists may submit solo or collaborative applications. Applications close May 9, for more information visit: http://www.arts.tas. gov.au/arts@work/public_art/public_art_ commissions

Know your bytes: Online opportunities for artists is a free, one day workshop run by arts@work in Devonport, Burnie, Smithton and Queenstown. The workshop will review different online opportunities including websites, RSS feeds, social media, blogs, online marketplaces and many more. Participants will also learn tips on developing content for online distribution as well as tools to develop their own online strategy. The workshop is free but spaces are limited. To RSVP or for more information contact Josie Hurst on 6431 6285 or email Josie.Hurst@artsatwork.com.au

GRANTS Scholarship: the 2013 Anne & Gordon Samstag International Visual Arts Scholarships. Applications are invited for 12 months study overseas in the visual arts in 2013. Applicants must be Australian citizen or have permanent residency status and a graduate, of not more than five years by 30 June 2012, of a visual art degree. For more information visit: http://www.unisa.edu.au/ samstag/default.asp Scholarship: The Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship for Emerging Artists provides assistance towards travel for educational purposes and/or tuition costs for young people building a career in the visual arts. Applications close June 5. For further information visit www.visualarts.net. au/grants/freedman-foundation-travelling -scholarship

RACT Portraiture Prize Emerging Tasmanian artists are invited to paint a portrait of a living Tasmanian who is important to them. It is also an opportunity to exhibit work in a professional exhibition and be in the running for some great prizes. Entries close June 30. For more information visit: http://www.typp.com.au/ Youth ARC Gallery is seeking young artists 12-25 or organisations working with young artists to present 2d work at the recently established gallery space at Youth ARC in Collins St, Hobart. For more info contact potterm@hobartcity.com.au

Website’s of interest • Arts Tasmania - www.arts.tas.gov.au Contemporary Art Spaces Tasmania - www.castgallery.org • Moonah Arts Centre - http://mac.gcc.tas.gov.au/Pages • Tasmanian Regional Arts - www.tasregionalarts.org.au *If you are an arts organisation or body with an upcoming opportunity that is within the arts bracket and would like it included in Warps Arts Opportunities guide please email all details to alison@warpmagazine.com.au

Artsbridge Connect. for individuals and organisations to assist in bringing a leading national or international arts professional or practitioner to Tasmania to conduct professional development opportunities for the benefit of a group of Tasmanian Artists. Available for projects and opportunities that arise outside a relevant grant round closing date and which cannot be delayed until the next funding round. Applications always open, for the Artsbridge toolkit visit: www. arts.tas.gov.au/artsbridge Small Museums and Collections . Arts Tasmania is calling for applications from smaller public and community collections and museums to assist with the curatorial and collection management practices of Tasmania’s moveable cultural heritage. This program is particularly focused on improving information about collections, increasing public access to information and on enhancing curatorial practice and collection management. Applications Close: 9 July 2012, for more info go to www.arts. tas.gov.au

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Arts

Album Reviews

WARP GALLERY GUIDE SOUTH 146 ARTSPACE Remote Control, David Hawley, ends May 24 Latitude, Karin Beaumont & Vicki West, May 31 - June 28. ART MOB Queen in Arnhem Land Drawings, Alexander Nganjimirra, May 4 - 22, OPENING May 4 at 6pm. BETT GALLERY Light Cities, David Stephenson, May 4 - 26, OPENING May 4 at 6om. David Keeling, Jun 1 - 30, OPENING Jun 1 at 6pm. BACKSPACE: The Stain, Meg Walsh, May 4 Jun 30, OPENING May 4 at 6pm. CARNEGIE GALLERY A Measure of things, Group Exhibition, ends May 27. An Awfully Beautiful Place: the Antarctic Art of Stephen Eastaugh, Stephen Eastaugh, Jun 7 - Jul 1, OPENING Jun 7 at 6pm. CAST Bad Samaritans, group exhibition, May 5 Jun 3, OPENING May 4 at 6pm. DUALLEY WATERFRONT CAFE & GALLERY Overall Girl, Leanne Halls, ends May 31. ENTREPOT GALLERY • MAIN: Pen to Paper, Group Exhibition, ends May 10. Drawing Group, group show, May 14 - 31. Painting Society, Jun 4 - Jul 12. • LOUNGE: Sound and Video Collaboration, ends May 10. Women’s Day, Emily Blom, May 14 - 31. I Felt Something, Hailey Gearman, Jun 4 - Jul 12. HANDMARK GALLERY New paintings by Josh Foley, ends May 9. INFLIGHT • MAIN SPACE: Inchoate, Rhani Allan & Holly Radunz. • PADDY LYN MEMORIAL SPACE: Engagement: a discourse, Samara McIlroy. Both shows May 4 - 26, OPENING May 4 at 6pm. INKA GALLERY INC. Cryptid Creatures of the Wildwoods, Belinda Graudins, ends May 16. My Sale, Inka Members, May 17 - Jun 6. Following the Light, Ann Menzies, Jun 7 - 27, OPENING Jun 8 at 5.30pm. MOONAH ARTS CENTRE An Evening of experimental Music presented by Andrew Harper, May 5 at 7pm, gold coin donation. Material Girl, Tasmanian female artists award and exhibition, May 9 - 31, OPENING May 9 at 6pm.

MIDDLE middle TAS tas

MUSEUM OF OLD AND NEW ART Monanism, permanent collection. NOURISH CAFE Coloured Pencil Illustrations, Fearless, ends May 2. PEPPERCORN GALLERY A co-operatively run outlet for the fine art and craftwork of local Richmond artists. PLIMSOLL GALLERY ArtRage, group exhibition by year 11 & 12 students of Tasmania, ends May 13. Dreamweavers, group exhibtition, May 19 – Jun 15, OPENING May 18 at 5.30pm. SADDLERS COURT GALLERY Exhibiting over 100 Tasmanian artists & crafts people. SALAMANCA ARTS CENTRE • LONG GALLERY & SIDESPACE: Art From Trash 2012, May 4 - 20. • LONG GALLERY: Le Gang: in the grey scale, Li Gang, May 25 – Jun 10, OPENING May 25 at 5.30pm. • TOP GALLERY: Behind Closed Doors, Trish Verdouw, May 1 - 31. • LIGHTBOX: Australian Native Beasts & Birds Preview, The Spindle Tree fibre art competition, May 1 - 31. • SIDESPACE: Possession, Michael Morton, May 29 – Jun 6. SCHOOLHOUSE GALLERY & BARN 60th Blake Prize Touring Exhibition, May 12 Jun 17, OPENING May 11 at 6pm. SONA GALLERY Ongoing stock exhibition TASMANIAN LANDSCAPES GALLERY Luke O’Brien Photography. Art printing & mounting services also available. TASMANIAN MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY Within & Without, Colonial to Contemporary art, ends Sep 23. Isle of Many Waters, an exploration of Tasmania’s Waterways, ends Aug 26. Regarding Landscape, TMAG Collection, ends Sep 23. WELLINGTON GALLERY Thomas Anderson last available works original paintings, gallery open by appointment Ph. 6223 6643

BRUNY ISLAND ART AT THE POINT Closed for winter until September 1.

DESIGN CENTRE TASMANIA 10 Design Journeys, selected group exhibition, ends Jun 29. GONE RUSTIC STUDIO & GALLERY Spot the Spots, textile art quilts NSW Quilting Guild, ends May 26. HANDMARK GALLERY Jan Dineen Showcase, May 27 – Jun 6, OPENING May 27 at 2pm. POWERHOUSE GALLERY Annual First Year Show, first year students at the School of Visual and Performing Arts, May 30th - Jun 10, OPENING May 30 at 6pm. SAWTOOTH ARI • FRONT GALLERY: May: Doing Lines, Sonya Brough. June: Chance, curated by Victor Medrano. • MIDDLE GALLERY: May: Dissolve, Melissa Smith. June: Works on paper, Anne Morrison. • PROJECT GALLERY: May: Jennifer Dickens. June: Shit, Amanda Davies. • NEW MEDIA GALLERY: May: Chris Morgan. June: Whitepinkblack Noise, Matt Warren. * May exhibitions end May 19. June Exhibitions open May 25 at 6pm and end June 16. THE ACADEMY GALLERY Phototropic, Penelope Davis. Work, Place and Change, Academy Gallery Volunteer Club. Both exhibitions run May 4 - 25. THREE WINDOWS GALLERY Changing Southern Midlands Artists

NORTHERN TAS BURNIE REGIONAL ART GALLERY Waterfront, Christl Berg Max Dupain. In Response, Rick Eaves, Lisa Garland & Peter Lord. Both shows end Jun 3.

Everyone’s got a different opinion of Lana Del Rey, so perhaps the best way of looking at her major-label debut, Born To Die, is that you’ll find precisely what you’re looking for. If you’re open-minded, then you may even find yourself enjoying every minute of this “Hollywood sadcore music,” as odd as that may seem.

NORTHERN TAS CONT. ULVERSTONE VISITOR INFORMATION CENTRE The Edge of the World and East, Evelyn Antonysen, ends May 31. Botanical Artists, North West Tas Botanical Artists, Jun 1 - 29.

KING ISLAND LOLLIPOP GALLERY + BOATHOUSE GALLERY Paintings by Caroline Kininmonth and Bridget Levy on exhibit throughout the year and continually changing.

LANA DEL REY BORN TO DIE

Across the dozen songs on Born To Die, this husky vixen reveals an ongoing penchant for bad boys and love that is occasionally good but mostly bad. You only need look at songs named Summer Sadness and Dark Paradise to know they’re all one colour and that’s blue. The title track is another pinnacle of the album; pop music with a slight orchestral

* If you are an exhibiting gallery or space in Tasmania and want to be included in the Warp Gallery Guide email: alison@ warpmagazine.com.au

tinge and some electronic bleeps and blopsthink like Nick Drake-meets-Ladytron. This is all love, hedonism, craziness and sadness wrapped up into one round stress ball. Off to the Races misfires as it boasts some of the worst lyrics of this record, and while Million Dollar Man contains some clichés, the horrid wording of the former is perhaps only equalled by National Anthems. This femme fatal knows how to look good and produce something pretty, even if you may find things are a tad hollow beneath the surface. The record is a bittersweet one that will tease and titillate with its alluring menace and should please thanks to its cinematic swirls, although it leaves much room for future improvement.

Whether you find this all to be fake or fabulous, there’s no denying that this doomed damsel’s effort could be renamed Born To Run. If you love it you’ll run with these haunting songs, lapping up every bit of their luscious pop melodies and the sensitive sentimentality. But for every one of them there’ll be countless others who’ll find that the glamour and chic imagery is just a front for a derivative and vapid set of sorry stories that will make you want to run for the hills.

BLEEDING KNEES CLUB

Single Reviews

NOTHING TO DO

Art of Sleeping – Empty Hands ** Single of the Month **

Indie rock done well. The textures and crescendos are familiar while the earnestness is shy of sickening and the lyrics deserve a look or three. Graveyard Train – I’m Gone Smooth and genuine rockabilly without all that pesky attitude or pathos. King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard – Bloody Ripper There might be promise here, though there’s nothing new and not a lot of levels. Sounds like tranquilized retro punk.

DEVONPORT REGIONAL GALLERY Moving Parts, 2D and 3D works by Tasmanian Artists, May 5 - Jun 10, OPENING May 4 at 6pm.

Planet Love Sound – My Shadow Industrial melancholy that moves just too hauntingly for anyone not in the mood.

PARADOX BAZAAR Unique Tasmanian Art & Craft creations operated by, and featuring the works of, local Artists and Craftspeople and is constantly changing throughout the year www.paradoxbazaar.com.au

MegaLove – Come With Me Badly tuned soft/rock vocals bleating within a swirl of meek millennium era dance beats and out of place guitar riffs. I’d rather not go with you.

STUDIO 2 ELEVEN Burnie Coastal Art Group Exhibition, BCAG members, May 6 – Jun 3, OPENING May 6 at 2pm.

Venus Fire – The Sound I don’t know what just happened. Vague and pretty with a primitively repeating

keyboard beat and chords that don’t go anywhere. Bellusira – Culprit As far as mainstream Metal with an unabashedly female vocalist goes, this works on a bare bones level with genuine attitude. The Belligerents – Infatuation Far sweeter and boyish than their name would lead on. More indie pop for the pyre. The Jezabels – Rosebud As far as ripping off the horrible melodrama of mid-80s pop with echoing piano and female vocal goes, they probably do it the best. Razika – Vondt i Hjertet It’s Norwegian – you can’t understand it, but the sweet vocals have some probable heart in it and the guitar is simply gentle 60s dreamscape. Jarred Keane

Bleeding Knees Club is one of Australia’s hottest indie groups today and this 12-track album opens with Teenage Girls; a catchy, upbeat rock-pop-punk world with peculiarly addicting vocals. A recurring theme across the album seems to be the short, snappiness of each track, but it ensures that these simplistic tracks stay enjoyable. Finding a flaw on the album is quite a challenge, with the quality spread out across the entire 42 minute playtime. However, across the album, there seems to be a lingering sense of reparability between key songs Have Fun and Boy In Lust with their fast, distorted, 4-chord strumming. The album also arouses a sense of nostalgia, hitting a Buddy Holly sound, which adds to their individual sound. Lyrically, the album consists mostly about partying, with Drummer/Vocalist describing Brainwaves as a “song is about waking up feeling shit every day but still trying to go out and party and hang with my friends.”

NATALIE SALVO

SLEIGH BELLS REIGN OF TERROR

The 2012 release by New York indie thrashpop duo Sleigh Bells has all the elements I’d wanted and waited for in the follow up to 2010’s debut smash hit Treats. Reign of Terror is an 11-song collection of shaking rock riffs and glam thrash beats, all tied up with Alexis Krauss’ smoky vocals. The bounce between the pure and unadulterated throwbacks to 80s guitar metal (True Shred Guitar, You Lost Me) and insistent nature in the album’s lyricism (Comeback Kid, Leader of the Pack) is excellent without being too glossy and cheesy. The chants featured on Leader of the Pack and Crush bolster the massive nature of the music. Album opener, True Shred Guitar, is perfect in providing an insight into the journey Sleigh Bells want to take you on.

The Surf-Blues-Punk rock sound may seem as if it had past its use by date, however with this release it all seems unique again, with Bleeding Knees Club.

This record is less about the grime-based and is not so much homage to slick hip-hop producers, but more about exploring the sheer power of adrenaline-fused guitar rock. You only need to look through the lyrics booklet to get the impression that the guitar is its own weapon, and it should be treated as such.

ALEX LANGLANDS

SOSE FUAMOLI

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Album Reviews

Event Guide

Claire Boucher, the Montreal based artist better known as Grimes, has experimented with lo-fi bedroom recordings for years. By age 22 she had already released two full length albums but it wasn’t until last year’s track Vanessa (off the split EP Dark Bloom recorded with fellow Montreal artist d’Eon) that Grimes started getting serious attention.

conventions of song structure, she layers her wispy and hypnotic vocals over the loops of propulsive, beat driven music. On Visions, Boucher effortlessly transcends from euphoric, glossy pop (Cicrumambient) to minimalistic and ambient (Vowels = space and time) and piano driven soudscapes (Genesis). The vocals on Visions are sometimes chopped up, often indecipherable but always sung in an arresting falsetto.

It was also the pivotal moment in Grimes’ career as it was a leap into a more atmospheric, electro pop sound, complete with a robotic drone and haunting vocals. Grimes has continued to explore this wonderfully strange sound in the form of her latest album Visions.

GRIMES VISIONS

The lyrics and the innocence of Boucher’s voice give Visions an intimate and personal feeling, all the while the inorganic, electronic sounds and drum machines make it sound like it comes from a different planet. This conflict of ideas is never a problem, but rather, it’s a big part of the album’s charm.

Visions draws on elements of pop and electronic music with a tinge of K Pop and even RnB. Boucher deconstructs

Visions is a far cry from Boucher’s earlier lo-fi, bedroom recordings. This new release sees every track is polished to a glossy sheen, but in a good way. Visions is a captivating record from start to finish. It’s a perfect display of Boucher’s talents and shows a more mature, cohesive sound. Visions is also Boucher’s first release with 4AD, a record label that appears to do no wrong, boasting the likes of Deerhunter, The National, Bon Iver and Twin Shadow, and with nothing but glowing reviews following her SXSW performance last month, Grimes is a name to watch in 2012.

DEEP SEA ARCADE

PASSENGER

THE DEAD LEAVES

OUTLANDS

ALL THE LITTLE LIGHTS

CITIES ON THE SEA

If ever there was an album that could’ve been called ambivalence or conflicting emotions, then it is this one, with 12 killer tracks that musically jingle-jangle with a joyous vibrancy, even though the lyrics are heavily conflicted and often deal with heavier themes like loneliness and isolation.

Formerly known as Matt Joe Gow and The Dead Leaves, the Melbourne fourpiece’s new album sounds like a slow acoustic version of British post-punk/indie band Editors, although far lighter; their instrumentation is more whimsical and has a summery feel.

Things That Stop You Dreaming is brilliantly arranged, from the violin section in the beginning to the simmering percussion which continues throughout. Rosenberg’s lyrics may be simple, but his delivery of them is passionate and emotional.

Opening track If The Shoe Fits also draws comparisons with some of the lighter work by 1980’s alt-rock maestros The Smiths. Although the content of the lyrics is far too upbeat to truly be a nod to the Manchurian four piece. Ordinary Lot becomes more lighthearted, while Never Had a Lover frames the band at its most pensive.

Let Her Go has to be one of the album’s highlights; a song about reflection and hindsight, particularly in the life of a musician. The aching nature of the violin amid the feature of a sole acoustic guitar makes the song so much more beautiful.

Steam is a call to arms, with elements of both The Rolling Stones and The Beatles, while Together comes via the ocean. It’s basically like waves of water glistening in the sun and serves as an excellent prelude to the record’s subsequent pinnacle because Lonely In Your Arms is a bona fide crowd favourite.

In My Surrender is more upbeat and perhaps the closest the band get to radio friendly. This Living, features some nice additional female vocals from Gin Wigmore, brings the track to life. Changing also sees guest vocals in the form of Emma Louise who has very recently signed with US indie label Frenchkiss Records, the same label Bloc Party just signed with.

The flow of the album is so, so fluid that there are moments when you realise Rosenberg is baring some pretty personal insights (The Wrong Direction), but the rather sunny disposition of the accompanying music distracts you from what could be some borderline-depressing content.

Outlands is all peace, love and melodies, a dense love letter to classic English sounds with some reverb-laded guitar pop that while optimistic and shiny also contains subtle traces of melancholy. Groovy.

Dali and the Paper Band present a short suite of six songs. Acoustic instrumentation serves to expand the clear song writing with a hint of the jazz to make it a bit more ‘musicy’ and you have a pleasant enough experience available. Everything flows along, no surprises either way and this is clearly what Dali, who writes everything want to do: make spartan music that presents his songs at the fore while allowing some room to breathe for his band. It’s tight and precise in presentation, has an aurora of professionalism and is recommended for those enjoy the ‘roots’ stream of current music. If you want simple songs and solid playing that is not about overwhelming you, but a polite experience, (I think polite is a good word for this band – they seem very well mannered actually), you should nip along and see them sometime somewhere, as they play locally, and if you find yourself nodding along, you could purchase this local release.  

Acts / Start Time

Date

CITY

Venue

Acts / Start Time

May

May Thursday

3

Tonic Bar

Comedy Festival - Greg Fleet

Wednesday

2

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Tapas Trivia 7pm

Friday

4

Tonic Bar

Andy & The Woodman 7pm

Thursday

3

Devonport

Molly Malones

Proud Phoney 8:30pm

Tonic Bar

Ian Holman 10pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Simon Astley (Album Launch) 8pm

Country Club Show Room

Noiseworks 7:30pm

Friday

4

Devonport

Molly Malones

The Unit 9:30pm

Bolters Bar

Geale Bros 7pm

Saturday

5

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Brett & Josh 9pm

Tonic Bar

Julz & Lee 7pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

The Lumberjacks 9:30pm

Country Club Show Room

Noiseworks 7:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Midnight 9:30pm

Tonic Bar

Ian Holman 10pm

Sunday

6

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Tarin & Erin 6pm

Crossroads (St Helens)

Live Band/Open Mic

Wednesday

9

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Open Mic 7pm

Fitzpatricks Inn

Virtuosi Tasmania: Mozart and Borodin

Thursday

10

Devonport

Molly Malones

Jerone Hillier 8:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Chris Meek 8pm

Tapas Lounge Bar

TMG 9:30pm

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

The Lumberjacks 9pm

Saturday

Sunday

DALI AND THE PAPER BAND

Venue

NORTHWEST

5

6

Thursday

10

The Royal Oak

Matthew Fagan (Guitarist) + Belly Dancer 9pm

Friday

11

Tonic Bar

Nic & Carmel 7pm

Friday

11

Devonport

Tonic Bar

Ian Holman 10pm

Saturday

12

Latrobe

Bolters Bar

Andy & The Woodman 7pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

Cheeky Monkey 9:30pm

Tonic Bar

Two Strung 7pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Candy Feet 9:30pm

Tonic Bar

Ian Holman 10pm

Spreyton

Milton Vineyard, Cranbrook

Virtuosi Tasmania: ‘Tribute to the Gerry Mulligan Quartet’ 11am

Hans Vonk Music House

Virtuosi Tasmania: ‘Tribute to the Gerry Mulligan Quartet’ 1pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Tidal Waters Resort, St Helens

Virtuosi Tasmania: ‘Tribute to the Gerry Mulligan Quartet’ 6pm

Salsa Theme Night (Dancers, Sangria, Fun Fun Fun)

Devonport

Molly Malones

Unbalance 8:30pm

Country Club Show Room

Rhonda Burchmore in Concert 2pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Neil Gibson 8pm

Tapas Lounge Bar

Guv’nor 9:30pm

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Kram 9pm

Saturday

12

Sunday

13

Sunday

Thursday

13

17

Monday

14

Hotel New York

Minx

Friday

18

Devonport

Friday

18

Tonic Bar

Two Strung 7pm

Saturday

19

Latrobe

Tonic Bar

Ian Holman 10pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

The Doctor Rocksters 9:30pm

Bolters Bar

Julz & Lee 7pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Ringmasters 9:30pm

Saturday

19

Hotel New York

Lanie Lane - Bangity Bang Australian Tour

Sunday

20

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Ella Rose 6pm

Tonic Bar

Erin & Cabe 7pm

Thursday

24

Devonport

Molly Malones

Kram 8:30pm

Country Club Show Room

Forever Rod 7:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Paddy (Liam Padmore) 8pm

25

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Under the Covers 9:30pm

26

Albert Hall

Dmitry Sitkovetsky 7:30pm

Friday

Tonic Bar

Ian Holman 10pm

Saturday

Tuesday

22

Hotel New York

Butterfly Effect

Friday

25

Tonic Bar

Julz & Lee 7pm

Country Club Show Room

Ian Moss in Concert 8pm

Sunday

Tonic Bar

Damian Maloney 10pm

Thursday

Bolters Bar

Geale Bros 7pm Nic & Carmel 7pm

Saturday

26

Tonic Bar Tonic Bar

Damian Maloney 10pm

Tuesday

29

Country Club Show Room

Mick Flavin 7:30pm

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Brett & Josh 9pm

Devonport

Latrobe

Molly Malones

Cheeky Monkey 9:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Candy Feet 9:30pm

27

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Trev Heins 6pm

31

Devonport

Molly Malones

Jeff Woodward 8:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Pie and Stu

ANDREW HARPER

Cities on the Sea is a stylish affair for those who like their indie a little more layered and well thought out.

The entire album doesn’t ride on the usual themes of love and heartbreak; it seems that Rosenberg aims mainly to present some of his own insights and stories which traverse many different things, not all sad and dark.

NATALIE SALVO

Date

DALI AND THE PAPER BAND

Mike Rosenberg, aka Passenger, is quickly becoming one of my favourite new songwriters. His new album All the Little Lights is a lovely listen, encompassing all the elements folk-rock artists are employing well of late.

The title track opens with some outright broodiness and is a self-proclaimed Led Zeppelin-meets-Portishead-style song. Thankfully, the mood swells high on the following, Seen No Right with its handclapping goodness. Girls lives up to the album’s perplexing theme, as it started off not knowing whether it was Arthur or Martha.

ANDREA GAVRILOVIC

Launceston

ALEXANDER CROWDEN

SOSE FUAMOLI

for the signs of depression

to your friends’ experiences

about what’s going on

together!!

Help someone find a way back from depression and anxiety. ■

www.youthbeyondblue.com

www.youtube.com/youthbeyondblue

1300 22 4636

infoline@beyondblue.org.au

$5 entry at door Drink specials New Tapas menu Doors open 6.00pm Comedy starts at 7.30pm

LAUNCESTON’S PREMIER COMEDY NIGHT @

www.tonicbar.com.au

©at+m45799

First Thursday of every month

This is an over 18 event

36

warpmagazine.com.au

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Event Guide

Event Guide

Hobart CONT.

Hobart Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

May Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday Tuesday

Wednesday

Date Wednesday

1

2

3

4

5

6

7 8

9

9

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Date

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Joel Everhard

Tuesday

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Irish Murphy’s

Joel Everard

Brisbane Hotel

Art @ The Brissie

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Millhouse

Republic Bar & Cafe

Blue Flies 9pm

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

Birdcage Bar

Where’s Mary 8pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Brisbane Hotel

Simon Astley & Band (vic) + Trev & Si

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Joel Everhard

Irish Murphy’s

Micheal Clennett

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Grotesque

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

Republic Bar & Cafe

Ray Martians 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Quiz Night Fundraiser

C Bar

Karaoke

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Micheal Clennett and Guests

Irish Murphy’s

Kriegan Hill

Republic Bar & Cafe

Matthew Fagan 9pm

Alley Cat Bar

Dali and the Paper Band

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Brookfield Vineyard

Nadja & 101 Candle Orchestra

Brisbane Hotel

Damage Nightclub w/ Wolf Pack + Your Demise + Mother Mexico, + DJ Peta Rabbit and The Get Loose Kids

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Sticks and Kane followed by Tim Davies Duo

Grand Poobah

Grand Poobah Bazaar Night Market 6pm Followed by Spiral Kites, Pines, & Manfred Manfeelings

Home Hill Winery, Ranelagh

Virtuosi Tasmania: ‘Tribute to the Gerry Mulligan Quartet’ 6pm

Thursday

Friday

Venue 15 Brisbane Hotel

Date

Quiz-A-Saurus Quiz Night

Thursday

Venue 24 Birdcage Bar

Acts / Start Time Joel Everard 9pm

Joe Pirere 9pm

Brookfield Vineyard

Kingborough Music Night

Where’s Mary 8pm

C Bar

Karaoke

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Joel Everhard

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Micheal Clennett and Guests

Atmosphere + Crixus 9pm

Irish Murphy’s

Joel Everard

Grand Poobah

Tim Guy

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Grotesque

Cirque de Merde, Andrew Harper and David J, Mick Davies, Mick Lowenstein

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

Irish Murphy’s

Rogue Acoustic

Brisbane Hotel

Number 1 Hits (Hobarts Finest) with Treehouse + Chris Burrows + more tba

Republic Bar & Cafe

Spielbergs Dog 9pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Lively Up 9pm

Brookfield Vineyard

Sitar Lounge

C Bar

Karaoke

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Micheal Clennett and Guests

Irish Murphy’s

Darlington

Republic Bar & Cafe

Swump 9pm

10 Alley Cat Bar

11 Alley Cat Bar

Drury Lane, Alan Gogol & Hayley Simson

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Paul Collins Beat (usa) + The On and Ons (vic) + Johnny B & The Goodes + Richard Lane (The Stems) + Glen Morris (Screaming Tribesmen)

Republic Bar & Cafe

Acts / Start Time

Wednesday 16 Birdcage Bar

Thursday

Friday

17 Birdcage Bar

Glen Valentine 9pm

C Bar

Karaoke

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Micheal Clennett and Guests

Irish Murphy’s

Fritz

Republic Bar & Cafe

Horehound 9pm

18 Alley Cat Bar

Friday

Truck Show & The Super Kunts

25 Alley Cat Bar

Suicide Swans, Pines & Rosegarland Hotel

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Legohead + Ozzy + Corney + Seane + Justin Time

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Sticks and Kane followed by Tim Davies Duo

Grand Poobah

The Tearaways & The Sin & Tonics

Irish Murphy’s

Steve & Fee, Joel Everard, Atari 26 Hundred Behind Closed Doors

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Ivory Bar

Brisbane Hotel

Tim Ripper Owens (ex Judas Priest, Iced Earth) + Tyrant + Taberah

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Grotesque

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Johnny G

Brookfield Vineyard

Acoustic Night - Ukelele Special

Republic Bar & Cafe

TZU 10pm

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Tim Davies followed by Ado and Devo

Federation Concert Hall

Dmitry Sitkovetsky 7:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

with Wolfpack

Grand Poobah

POPUPCLUB#5 feat. Peter Escott, International Dragon, Phat Meegz, Kowl & Pop DJs

Brisbane Hotel

Brand New Second Hand “music” with DJ BTC + Astraia Saga + DJ Mary Jane + DJ In Lak’ech

Irish Murphy’s

Alex Hutchins, Joel Everard, Dr Fink

Brookfield Vineyard

Zion Songs

Ivory Bar

Grotesque

C Bar

Steve & Fee 8pm

Saturday

26 Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Brookfield Vineyard

Open Mic

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Tim Davies followed by Ado and Devo

Federation Concert Hall

Scottish Fantasy 2:30pm

Irish Murphy’s

Steve & Fee, Mickey & Kazu, Atari 26 Hundred

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Millhouse

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Millhouse

Irish Murphy’s

Micheal Clennett, Joel Everard, Dr Fink

Ivory Bar

Grotesque

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Johnny G

Grand Poobah

Flap

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Millhouse

Calling All Cars + Ballpoint + Upsize Generation 10pm

Irish Murphy’s

Mickey & Kazu, Storm Trooper

Johnny G

Virtuosi Tasmania: ‘Tribute to the Gerry Mulligan Quartet’ 11am

Republic Bar & Cafe

Observatory (Main Room)

Meadowbank Estate, Cambridge

The Telegraph

Micheal Clennett followed by Dr Fink

Ivory Bar

Ivory Lounge Bar presents Nice and Ego (Av Show)

Republic Bar & Cafe

Sin & Tonics + Truck Show 10pm

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Grotesque

Wrest Point Showroom

Forever Rod 7:30pm

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

The Telegraph

Micheal Clennett followed by Dr Fink

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Johnny G

Glen Challice 9pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Sam Brittain

Wrest Point Showroom

Blues and Jazz 7pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Boil Up 10pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Simon Russel & Guilty as Charged 10pm

Alley Cat Bar

Dogtower, Silver Sands & Bent

The Telegraph

Micheal Clennett followed by Entropy

King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard (vic) + Wolfy and the Bat Cubs (vic) + Tiger Choir

Sails

Billy Whitton 6pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Wrest Point Showroom

Harry Manx (Canada) 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Moe Grizzly - LAST SHOW EVER!

Brookfield Vineyard

Saturday

19 Birdcage Bar Brisbane Hotel

Pearly Whites

C Bar

Tony Voglino 8pm

Birdcage Bar

Sticks & Kane 9pm

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Johnny G

Matthew Fagan

Brisbane Hotel

The Toot Toot Toots (vic) + The Muddy Turds

Grand Poobah

Lanie Lane supported by The Rubens

C Bar

Girl Friday 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Irish Murphy’s

Naked Acoustic, Pirates of the Cover Scene

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Johnny G

Front Bar - Late Night Krackieoke w/ MC Unicorn Ejaculation

Ivory Bar

Malakai, Mez and Kenny Beeper

Home Hill Winery, Ranelagh

Virtuosi Tasmania - Mozart and Borodin 6pm

Brookfield Vineyard

Tim Guy

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

Irish Murphy’s

Brett Collidge, Mashups

C Bar

Micheal Clennett 8pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Sugartrain 10pm

Ivory Bar

Malakai, Mez and Kenny Beeper

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Millhouse

Sails

Billy Whitton 6pm

MONA

Virtuosi Tasmania - Mozart and Borodin 11am

Federation Concert Hall

Chamber-sized Classics 7:30pm

The Telegraph

Tim Davies followed by Entropy

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

Grand Poobah

Nadya’s 101 Candles Orkestra

Republic Bar & Cafe

International Blues Conspiracy with Larry McCray (USA) + The Outloop Way Blues Band 10pm

Irish Murphy’s

Naked Acoustic, Vendetta

Brisbane Hotel

Rock n Roll Bingo with Timmy Jack Ray

Ivory Bar

Regrooved presents Busta supported by Mez and Grotesque

C Bar

Billy Whitton 6pm

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Sticks and Kane followed by Grotesque

Republic Bar & Cafe

Funkoars + Mic Dons 10pm

Irish Murphy’s

Ian Murtagh, Micheal Clennett

Sails

Billy Whitton 6pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Wahbash Avenue 9pm

The Telegraph

David Wicks followed by Pirates of the Cover Scene

Sails

Billy Whitton 6pm

The Telegraph

Tim Davies followed by Entropy

Theatre Royal

Henry Rollins

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Rock n Roll Bingo with Timmy Jack Ray

C Bar

Tony Voglino 6pm

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Sticks and Kane followed by Grotesque

Irish Murphy’s

Ian Murtagh, Mickey & Kazu

Republic Bar & Cafe

King Pin & The Blackberries 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Bowerman & Parker 8pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Carl Rush 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Nerd Night

Republic Bar & Cafe

Baker Boys Band 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Where’s Mary 8pm

Saturday

Sunday

12 Alley Cat Bar

13 Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Rock n Roll Bingo with Timmy Jack Ray

Brookfield Vineyard

Mothers Day - Entertainment all day

C Bar

Pete Thomas 6pm

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Ado and Devo followed by Grotesque

Irish Murphy’s

Ian Murtagh, Mickey & Kazu

Republic Bar & Cafe

The FIRMM 9pm

Monday

14 Birdcage Bar

Tuesday

15 Birdcage Bar

Republic Bar & Cafe

Bowerman & Parker 8pm Quiz Night Billy & Randal 8pm

Sunday

Monday

20 Birdcage Bar

21 Birdcage Bar Republic Bar & Cafe

Tuesday

22 Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

Monday Tuesday

Nerd Night

Republic Bar & Cafe

Graham Rix 9pm Where’s Mary 8pm

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Joel Everhard

Irish Murphy’s

Joel Everard

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Millhouse

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

Republic Bar & Cafe

Emperors + Counterfeit Club 9pm

Wrest Point Showroom

The Butterfly Effect - Effected Tour 2012

Rock n Roll Bingo with Timmy Jack Ray

C Bar

Manhattan 6pm

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Ado and Devo followed by Grotesque

Irish Murphy’s

Ian Murtagh, Alex Hutchins

Republic Bar & Cafe

The Hobart Smiths 9pm

28 Birdcage Bar 29 Birdcage Bar

Wednesday 30 Birdcage Bar

Thursday

Jason Patmore 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Republic Bar & Cafe

G.B. Balding (Finger Pickin’ Blues) 8:30pm Billy & Randal 8pm

27 Birdcage Bar

Republic Bar & Cafe

Bowerman & Parker 8pm

Brisbane Hotel Wednesday 23 Birdcage Bar

Sunday

Bowerman & Parker 8pm Quiz Night 8:15pm Billy & Randal 8pm Hoot Owls 9pm Where’s Mary 8pm

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

David Wicks

Irish Murphy’s

Micheal Clennett

Observatory (Lounge Room)

Grotesque

Observatory (Main Room)

DJ Beerex

Republic Bar & Cafe

The Blues Licks with Ross Sermons (USA) 9pm

31 Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

C Bar

Karaoke

Cargo Pizza and Lounge Bar

Micheal Clennett and Guests

Irish Murphy’s

Infected

Republic Bar & Cafe

Adventure Bay Blues & Roots Showcase: Yonderwall + The FIRMM + The Goldylocks Area 9pm

Wrest Point Showroom

Mick Flavin 7:30pm

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GOT TO LOVE

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THE NEW $30 LIVE IT UP LIVE STUDENT SEASON PASS GIVES YOU ENTRY TO OVER 20 TSO CONCERTS.

TSO.COM.AU


Warp Magazine May 2012  

Warp Magazine is Tasmania's only monthly street magazine featuring Music and the Arts.

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