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EXPERIENCE PRESIDENT’S REPORT 2015

CHRIST-CENTERED

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URBAN

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FLOURISH

LIBERAL ARTS

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DIVERSE

BEYOND THE CLASSROOM H OW S T U D E N T S A N D A LU M N I A R E T R A N S F O R M I N G O U R CO M M U N I T I E S

2015

FINANCIALS


PRESIDENT COOK IS ENTHUSIASTICALLY GREETED AS SHE MAKES HER ENTRANCE AT WELCOME WEEKEND, AUGUST 2015. Welcome Weekend is a time of exciting activities and time-honored traditions, designed to remind both new and returning students of what it means to be a Knight.

In my time as president of Warner Pacific, I have come to believe that the work we do together goes so much deeper than a degree; it is transformational. Across our seven campuses, the College is blessed with dedicated staff, talented faculty, and intellectually engaged students; each of us joined in support of a focused and Christ-centered mission. It is clear that the members of our community love Warner Pacific and find it a compelling place to work, teach, and learn. I believe the College’s distinct value sits at the intersection of the four core themes of our identity; our dedication to serving students from diverse backgrounds with a Christ-centered, urban, liberal arts education is exactly what the world needs right now.

The work we do here every day propels us forward as a community, state, and nation. The data is clear, the higher the level of educational attainment, the greater the economic development opportunities for any state or nation. The vision we see being realized today is built on the generous support and cooperation that we have received from our alumni, donors, church partners, and friends of the College. Not only are we transforming the landscape of our beloved institution as we serve historically marginalized and underrepresented groups of students, we are preparing our communities for the future by training ethical and thoughtful leaders who are prepared to respond with hope to the challenges of tomorrow.

As you read this annual report, you will hear stories from students and alumni who are living abundantly into the core themes of Warner Pacific College. You will learn about innovative programs that are cultivating vital skills in our future leaders. You will understand the full meaning of why it is a fantastic time to be a part of Warner Pacific College. I thank you for your faithful support of Warner Pacific College and I ask for your continued prayers as we share the transforming power of education through the love and grace of Christ. Andrea P. Cook, Ph.D. President


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CHRIST-CENTERED JENNY ELLIOT, JOSHUA-JAMES LAWRENCE, NIGHT OF STORIES: FINDING JESUS IN PORTLAND

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URBAN ADAM RISTICK, RICKI RUIZ MADRIGAL, FYLCS: BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

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LIBERAL ARTS DR. KERRY KUEHL, BROOK MENGISTU, CREATING THE FUTURE OF GOOD BUSINESS

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DIVERSE MIKE MORELAND AND MICHAEL MORELAND JR., ASWPC: LEARNING AND LEADING LESSONS FROM A COHORT

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DONOR REFLECTIONS

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BY THE NUMBERS

20 ON THE COVER Social Entrepreneurship majors Thalia Garcia Aguilar ‘16, Ricki Ruiz Madrigal ‘16, and Joe White ‘18.

EDITOR: MELODY BURTON CREATIVE DIRECTOR: KAREN GIBSON PHOTOGRAPHY: ATHENA DELENE, ZACH KRAHMER, NASHCO PHOTOGRAPHY, JUSTIN TUCKER ‘14 PRESIDENT: ANDREA P. COOK, PH.D. VICE PRESIDENT OF ENROLLMENT AND MARKETING: DALE SEIPP, JR. VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT AND EXTERNAL RELATIONS: AARON MCMURRAY, PH.D. EDITORIAL INTERN: DEBORAH LANDERS ‘16


BEING CHRIST-CENTERED means that Jesus is the subject of my life, I am not. If I claim to be a Christian, my life and time should reflect that I am wholeheartedly following Christ’s example of love in how I act, think, and speak towards God, others, and myself. After careful prayer, I chose to attend Warner Pacific College because of the welcome I received from students and staff during my visits. I was familiar with the institution since it was my parents’ alma mater [David Marble ‘76 and DeAnn (Salisbury) Marble ‘78] but I still wanted to be sure it was the right school for me. I felt it was important to study in a Christian environment where I would be challenged academically and encouraged to grow spiritually. Warner Pacific provided the ministry degree I was seeking and support for women in ministry. Participating in the Missions @WP program on a trip to Auckland, New

campus community helped me see abilities I had not yet recognized in myself and empowered me to use my gifts in the world for Christ’s glory. For example, preaching is scary; it is also a great passion of mine. I know I received a solid Biblical foundation and resources from Warner Pacific and a constant reminder that Christ is in me. These truths still remind me that I can minister confidently by “Just Being Jenny.” Learning in a Christ-centered environment gave me confidence and an understanding of who I am in Christ. I learned to lean into what I thought were inadequacies, and challenge myself to turn them into strengths. Learning in a Christ-centered environment also added accountability. I discovered that I was not studying simply for a degree or to attain a goal: I was receiving a degree that impacted and affirmed who I am and whose I am. Being grounded in this sense of call, studying, leading, and having

JENNY (MARBLE) ELLIOT, M.DIV. B.A. IN RELIGION AND CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES ‘10 ASSOCIATE PASTOR AT FRIENDLY STREET CHURCH OF GOD; EUGENE, OREGON

Zealand, was life-changing. Through that experience I grew closer to both students and faculty as we prayed and served together in a culture unfamiliar to us. Being in a different culture greatly expanded my world-view. As part of the program, we had opportunities to teach and it was through those experiences that I received my call to congregational ministry and to preaching. Meeting people of other cultures helped me grasp the beauty of Jesus in other parts of the world and opened my eyes to the ways God is constantly working in everyone’s lives, whether we choose to see it or not. Throughout my life, my parents always told me to “Just Be Jenny.” While I knew this growing up, the saying really began to sink in at Warner Pacific. Being active in the

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conversations with others becomes an experience of worship, where we can learn about God’s character together. I now know that when there is a challenge in my life or ministry, or in the lives of others, with Christ’s help we can get through it. In my work, I have the privilege of learning, changing, and growing by walking alongside others through life. Sometimes, facing the pain in peoples’ lives is difficult; ministers see into some of the darkest places. This challenges me to live an authentic life, to hurt with people instead of letting them think that I have all the answers because I don’t. I know who is the answer though, and I do my best to show them Christ’s love in real and meaningful ways.

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JOSHUA-JAMES LAWRENCE B.A. IN HISTORY & SOCIAL STUDIES ‘16

DURING MY FRESHMAN YEAR at Warner Pacific, I was losing my faith. I was making the wrong choices and surrounding myself with people who didn’t challenge me to do better. I put myself in situations that were unhealthy and I didn’t care about the consequences. I felt like I didn’t need God in my life. Then, my world started falling apart. First, I got sick. For days I tried to ignore the constant pain that I was feeling until finally it became too much to bear. I was rushed to the hospital and my dad was told that I needed emergency surgery to save my life. My appendix had burst and my entire body was infected. I remember lying on my hospital bed before I was wheeled into surgery and praying that God would save me. I promised to change my life… just please, let me live through this. Thankfully, the doctors were able to remove my appendix and treat my infection. As I began healing, I remembered my promise to God and I started to wonder what I should do when I went back to school. During my recovery, my world was turned upside-down again when my friend and classmate, Michael Muange died suddenly from an undiagnosed

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heart condition. We had just set up a time for him to visit me as I was recovering at home and now he was gone. I never got a chance to say goodbye; I was devastated. The world seemed so dark to me during this time. I struggled to understand how God could have spared me and let my friend die. Nothing seemed to make sense. I returned to Warner Pacific and again, I felt lost. I had never really enjoyed chapel services at the College but I remembered my promise to God and going to chapel seemed like a good first step. When I walked in, I was shocked. The services weren’t like anything I had ever experienced at Warner Pacific. Michelle Lang had just joined the College as the Associate Director of Campus Ministries and she brought a new energy to chapel. I was hearing gospel music and singing songs that connected with me on a personal level. Right after the service I went up to Michelle and said, “I want to get involved in this. I’ll do whatever you need; I just want to be part of it.” I started playing drums with the Worship Team and I began to build relationships with other students involved in Campus Ministries. Michelle became a mentor to me and provided me

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with a safe space to ask questions and be real about my struggles. Eventually, I became more involved in leadership and now I work as a Resident Assistant so that I can be that type of person for other students who need support. I have to admit, when I used to hear that Warner Pacific was Christ-centered, I felt like it was kind of a cop-out. Why wouldn’t they just say Christian? But Michelle made me think differently. She told me to picture our solar system and imagine that Jesus is the sun. No matter where the planets go or how they rotate, they are always moving in a relationship with the sun; they depend on the sun at all times, even when things seem dark on the surface. That’s how I understand being Christcentered at Warner Pacific. Whether we’re playing songs in Chapel, sitting in a history class, or just hanging out with our friends; Jesus is at the core of every interaction, giving us the light we need.


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TESTIFY: EXPLORING VOCATION & CALLING

A FLANNEL-CLAD GROUP of seven college students gather around a makeshift campfire. They argue over who was supposed to remember the ingredients for s’mores, they gently tease one another in the knowing way of friends, one-by-one they step into a spotlight for their turn at a microphone and tell their stories. They are not in a wooded campground; there are no tents, no raccoons trying to steal away their forgotten food. They sit in front of an audience of friends, family, instructors, and church members all packed into a small chapel. The campfire image on a television screen glows warmly from its spot at the center of the stage. This is not your typical camping trip but at the end, all those assembled have shared in an adventure with interweaving paths of grace, doubt, pain, and redemption; an adventure that reveals the story of a God who is moving powerfully in the lives of these seven students. There is a rich history of storytelling in the Christian church. Jesus masterfully

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used parables to simplify often complex and counter-cultural teachings. Those to whom he ministered also became storytellers as the miracles they witnessed and the personal transformations that they experienced began the work of spreading the Gospel. As [Jesus] was getting into the boat, the man who had been possessed with demons begged him that he might be with him. And he did not permit him but said to him, “Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and everyone marveled. Mark 5:18-20. These eyewitness accounts are often called testimonies and they are powerful tools to share the unspoken challenges and internal growth that are at the center of a personal relationship with God. Testimony allows the storyteller to explain

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why they have chosen to follow Christ and what they are learning on their journey. Testimonies are often shared with other people to help them through difficult situations or to demonstrate a point. Testimonies can reinforce the truth and promises of the Gospel by bearing witness to the transformative power of God’s love in one’s own life. For Warner Pacific students preparing to graduate with a degree in Religion & Christian Ministries (RCM), this time of testimony is called Night of Stories and it has become a well-loved tradition on the Mt. Tabor campus. This evening is the public culmination of a personal exploration of vocation and calling that all RCM students must experience to better understand their meaning and purpose in the world, finding where their gifts and passions intersect with the needs and opportunities in the world today.


The stories themselves are as unique as the students telling them. A recovering heroin addict tries to fill a longing through a chemical high, only to discover true fulfillment in Christ. A woman struggles to find where she fits into ministry when faced with a calling that is not fully understood, eventually gaining the confidence to trust God’s leading even when she can’t see where the road may lead her. A young man feels rejected and abandoned by his faith community but with God’s help, discovers the strength he needs to live as his true self, opening the door to ease the pain of others who will follow in his footsteps. Riddled with self-doubt and a fear of public speaking, a preacher is called out of deep depression, finding a peace that passes all understanding. The ministry of presence changes the course of multiple lives when a traumatic event provides an opportunity to be the hands and feet of Jesus in the midst of the world’s frightening darkness. A new mother uncovers a passion for Biblical studies and embraces her identity in Christ, empowering her vocation as a religious teacher. A Midwest farm boy travels to Portland and sees himself in the story of Abraham’s call, learning to embrace the unknown and live in the moment.

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Each story is a path to the heart of God, an exploration of how a life lived for others is at the center of personal growth. These RCM graduates leave Warner Pacific with a contextual approach to ministry, knowing that there is no cookie cutter formula to share Christ. Rather, they see a broader vision and are prepared to participate in the love of God, self, neighbor, enemy, stranger, and the world today. They are released into the world, ready to serve, understanding that ministry isn’t about the job you choose, it’s about the life you live. – MELODY BURTON

Save the date and plan to join us for the next Night of Stories on March 2, 2016! Learn more about the Department of Religion & Christian Ministries at warnerpacific.edu

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ADAM RISTICK B.S. IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ‘13 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ACT SIX AT PORTLAND LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION

HAVING LIVED his entire life in the often tumultuous streets of inner Southeast Portland, Adam Ristick has had to overcome adversity since he was a small child. Raised in the chaos of situational poverty and addiction, Adam persevered and was the first in his family to graduate high school. With an insatiable desire to learn and a natural gift for loving others, Adam cultivated a deep connection to his community which ignited a dream that seemed impossible to others in his situation; Adam wanted to go to college. Through hard work and determination, he was awarded a spot in the inaugural Act Six Scholarship cadre to attend Warner Pacific College. Today, his passion for the transformative work of Christ has developed a longing within him to see his city flourish. As the Assistant Director of Act Six at the Portland Leadership Foundation, Adam is responsible for annually recruiting and selecting diverse, multicultural cadres of Oregon’s most promising emerging urban leaders to be considered for the Act Six, City Builders, and Avenues to College scholarships. These initiatives provide leadership training and partial or full scholarships to selected students who want to use their college education to make a difference on campus and in their neighborhoods. Through his work at Portland Leadership Foundation, Adam empowers 50 students each year to attend college. Many of these scholars are the first in their families to pursue higher education and have not benefitted from intentional preparation for college. To help bridge the gap, Adam and his team intensively train students in the year prior to college, equipping them to support each other,

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succeed academically, and grow as service-minded leaders and agents of transformation. He also works with staff members from the institutions that award these scholarships to help provide strong campus support and ongoing leadership development. “I’ve been engaged in urban ministry for 17 years and Adam Ristick rises to the top when considering what we hope to see as we seek to strengthen and develop leaders for the spiritual and social renewal of the city,” says Ben Sand, Portland Leadership Foundation CEO. “We asked him to direct all of our scholarship efforts at Portland Leadership Foundation because his life is coherent. Jesus said, ‘if you want to tell if a tree is healthy, look at its fruit.’ Looking at the fruit in Adam’s life, I can’t think of anyone else I trust to empower the future diverse leaders for the city of Portland.” During his time at Warner Pacific, Adam was able to find a unique balance between academic striving and community service, all while honoring his Roma heritage and family. Through academic achievement, leadership development, and personal introspection, he has discovered that he can be of two cultures and still follow one Christ. With his strong mind and humble heart, Adam is able to function within the many subcultures of the American city, blending his wide variety of coursework and his diverse cultural experience into a single voice for the Christ he follows. “Adam is a prime example of how equitable access to Christ-centered, liberal arts higher education can change the trajectory of an entire community,” says Dr. Andrea Cook, President of

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Warner Pacific College. “Adam is a born leader who could have easily slipped through the cracks due to circumstances beyond his control as a child. Today, he is using both his academic training and his deep, personal calling to open doors of opportunity to urban and diverse students throughout Oregon.” Of course, even with all he has accomplished, Adam’s journey is still just beginning. He is actively building relationships with employers in the region to place scholars in strategic internships and prepare them for success after graduation. He also continues to seek innovative partnerships with local organizations who share his passion for empowering the next generation of urban and diverse leaders. One such project is a new collaborative called Portland Accesses College Together (PACT), with the organization All Hands Raised, which brings together local business, government agencies, non-profits, faith communities, parents, students, and community stakeholders to ensure the sustained success of every child in Portland and Multnomah County from cradle to career. Adam Ristick is the embodiment of the Warner Pacific College mission: • His vocation is directed and guided by the Christ-centered calling to love our neighbors as ourselves. • He has embraced his urban roots and is working to see Portland flourish. • He faces obstacles with the critical thinking and collaborative problem solving learned in his liberal arts training. • Since his graduation in 2013, Adam has already empowered hundreds of diverse students to successfully pursue their dreams of higher education.

Warner Pacific is grateful for alumni like Adam, who, in all things, strive to be good and faithful servants for God’s Kingdom. – MELODY BURTON

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“WHAT IF WE actually made this a legit field,” was the thought that transformed a neighborhood and a Warner Pacific student. Desperate for a place to hang out, kids in Gresham’s Rockwood neighborhood have been scaling two chain link fences in order to use the faded, chipping roller hockey rink at Vance Park as an ad hoc futsal pitch. Backpacks and jackets formed goals as kids practiced footwork and goal tending skills, dodging weeds and grass sprouting from cracks in the pavement. As one of those kids who climbed the fences for years, Ricardo (Ricki) Ruiz Madrigal ‘16 desired to make his corner of the city better, he just didn’t quite know how. It wasn’t until he was sitting in his Entrepreneur Enterprise class at Warner Pacific that inspiration struck. “It was the best class ever!” remembers Ricki. “It opened my eyes to how small organizations are formed and why they often fail. Knowing that, I realized it was important to have an open mind; being flexible and willing to weather the ups 12

and downs is crucial to achieving the results you want.” The Act Six Leadership and Scholarship Program gave Ricki, a quiet 2012 graduate of Reynolds High School in Gresham, the opportunity to attend Warner Pacific, which he describes as being “full of great people!” Act Six is Oregon’s only full-tuition, full-need urban leadership scholarship. The Warner Pacific program is tailored to help talented and highly-motivated high school leaders succeed. Students in this program are service-minded and eager to embrace their unique cultural identities as leaders. While test scores and GPA do partially inform the decision, often it is seeing a spark of unrealized potential in a candidate that influences the award. Ricki, a first-generation college student, came to Warner Pacific with an entrepreneur’s heart. Dr. Roger Martin, Chair of the Business Department, explains in its simplest terms, an entrepreneur is an individual who recognizes and meets a need. “Ricki was able to see the potential of an under-utilized piece of property in his neighborhood and WARNERPACIFIC.EDU

coordinate resources to accomplish the transformation.” Woven into the fabric of the College community is the desire and the commitment to actively engage in the concerns of the city and to dedicate time to serve the needs of its people. This is where course work and a community’s need intersect, where a dream is born; for Ricki, that dream looked like a futsal pitch called SNAKE Court, which is an acronym for Sports, Neighborhood, Action, Knowledge, and Empowerment; and the Rockwood Initiative. With the confidence and resilience cultivated through his business course work and the encouragement of mentors, classmates, and friends, Ricki founded the Rockwood Initiative. This community-based group has a vision and purpose of creating safe environments for local youth. Joined by alumna, and Rockwood native, Yesenia Delgado ‘14, along with Craig Greunewald and alums Robert Brewer ‘13 and Vanessa Ruelas ‘15, the Initiative is changing Rockwood for the better. “Once again, our residents have stepped up and collaborated to bring a family-friendly amenity to the Gresham


FLOURISHING WITH FUTSAL

LEADING ON CAMPUS AND BEYOND Ricki Ruiz (far left) welcomes new students as part of his role as President of the Campus Activities Board.

community. It is wonderful to see this effort start at the grassroots level, attract key partners along the way, and be successfully realized,” commented Gresham Mayor Shane Bemis, about the group’s efforts. Having the courage to take action and develop partnerships is the byproduct of Ricki’s Social Entrepreneurship major. To gain traction for the Initiative’s project, Ricki and the others sought out influential partners such as the Portland Timbers, Operation Pitch Invasion, Fields for All, and other sponsors. Shawn Levy, with the Timber’s Operation Pitch Invasion, dreams of a time when games at SNAKE Court could “one day yield a player for the Timbers or Thorns!” In a 2014 survey of neighborhood residents, the Rockwood Community Development Corporation discovered that families wanted more opportunities for children to safely play in Vance Park. In the first week after SNAKE Court opened, 600 neighborhood children showed up to take advantage of this new resource. Lynn Ketch, with Rockwood CDC, reports that “parents now have a more positive feeling about the park. They are thrilled with the addition of the futsal fields because it provides a safe,

kid-friendly place in their neighborhood.” This project is just a snapshot of what collaboration, setting aside barriers, and honoring a vision can accomplish. “When I think about our students and alumni running the Rockwood Initiative, my joy comes from knowing that the investment we have made in them at Warner Pacific is translating to healthy fruit back in their home community,” shares Dr. Andrea Cook, Warner Pacific president. “Warner Pacific’s holistic education with an emphasis on servant leadership shaped how I want to use my skills to impact and serve my community,” comments Rockwood Initiative collaborator, Robert Brewer. The relational learning environment at the College ignites students’ hopes in making a difference for their home communities. As Initiative member Vanessa Ruelas puts it, “my professors taught me to think not just about me; it’s about what I’m going to do with my degree to benefit society.” SNAKE Court is just one very public example of the investment staff, faculty, and students make in each other. Ruiz is a humble student, grounded in his WARNERPACIFIC.EDU

faith and family, and he will continue to improve the SNAKE Court site and perhaps others in the area. However, right now, “to graduate on time is definitely a priority.” “An investment in Warner Pacific isn’t just about what happens in the life of a student in a four-year period. Our mission is far reaching as we empower young leaders to transform their neighborhoods and engage actively in a constantly changing world,” reflects Dr. Cook. “Rockwood will be forever different because of the Warner Pacific students who are bringing their degrees back to their neighborhoods.” – KATHY COVEY SNAKE Court as seen today.

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FIRST-YEAR LEARNING COMMUNITIES: EDUCATION BEYOND THE CLASSROOM THERE’S A MIST in the air as the autumn sunset bathes Portland in shades of rose and violet. The reflections of bridges flicker across the Willamette River as the twinkling lights of downtown skyscrapers begin to dot the skyline. A group of young people wander through a pod of food carts, scoping out the various menus. The rich smells of basil, cumin, lemongrass, and vinegarlaced BBQ sauce all mix together as each one brings their chosen meal to a group of benches. As the meals are eaten, stories are shared about famous family recipes as the diners experience exotic new flavors. Questions about where the food was purchased leads the group into discussions about the ethics of food sourcing, the struggle of eating well in the midst of poverty, and thoughts on how what we eat in Portland effects communities around the globe. Not far away, another student group walks along the west side of the Standard Insurance Center, on their way to see a play. Noticing a round, bronze sculpture lovingly called, “the onion ring,” they stop to learn more about this public art piece. Getting closer, they discover the artist, Hilda Morris, was once considered

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Oregon’s greatest sculptor. Ring of Time, the work’s official title, is a twisting circle, epitomizing the love of natural forms that defined much of Morris’ work. Reportedly inspired by the Mobius strip, the sculpture sparks deep conversations that encompass ideas of art, inspiration, science, and how we understand the world around us. On the other side of the river, a third group is listening to the heartbreaking journey of women who have escaped the vicious cycle of human trafficking. Over paper cups of warm coffee, stories are shared, friendships are formed, and the seeds of advocacy begin to grow. As they leave, the students begin to imagine what they could do to help end slavery. What begins as a simple idea to talk about it to their friends expands into a journey that will take them from raising campus awareness, to engaging the Portland City Council and lobbying for positive change in our community. While these scenarios may not sound like typical college classes, they are real snapshots of the interactive and relational educational environment that we have become known for. Welcome to FirstYear Learning Communities (FYLCs) at Warner Pacific College.

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BENDING TRADITION The idea of what college should look like is beginning to shift. Traditionally, students spend most of their classroom time extracting knowledge from second hand sources like textbooks and professors. Learning happens on a set schedule, with calculus from 2:00-2:50 pm and ethics from 3:00-3:50 pm. Lecture halls filled with note-taking students, reading thick textbooks while listening to a lone professor may work for some but many of today’s college students are seeking something more collaborative. For students who excel in a more traditional model, college is often a simple step up to the next level. The work may be a bit more complex but the learning strategy remains the same; listen, take notes, study, test your knowledge. However, for many students, more interactive learning strategies are needed to ensure academic success. That’s where FYLCs come in.


WHAT’S NEW IN FYLCS? • Students in FYLCs have been exploring real-life questions about fair housing, equitable food justice, human trafficking, wage theft, music and the arts, gentrification, environmental justice, voices of oppression, InDesign and print culture, and wellness in the city.

The FYLC “Building Bridges to Wellness in PDX” explores urban sustainability on the Noble Rot rooftop garden.

THE CITY AS YOUR CLASSROOM In addition to supporting students and faculty, FYLCs also help Warner Pacific better reflect its urban identity. “In order to engage the city, First-Year Learning Communities are designing exciting new courses that connect students through an issue or topic relevant to Portland,” explains Jessie Thompson, Director of Learning Communities for the College. “Using the city as a classroom, curiosity is cultivated through question-based curriculum with faculty and peer mentors.” These learning activities extend outside the traditional classroom settings and focus on issues of transitioning to college, finding social support, developing study skills, and communitybuilding. Students are in at least one other class together in the same semester or in classes linked thematically across

semesters, weaving a strong network of support. Warner Pacific’s mission statement is the framework of this model as students explore four themes: Christcentered, urban, liberal arts, diverse. “What we’re doing here is more than just trying out new teaching methods,” reflects Dr. Timothy Peterson, Executive Director of Teaching and Learning. “Through First-Year Learning Communities, Warner Pacific is seeking to redefine what it means to be urban. For too long, people have associated urban with words like ‘decay’. But here we are, saying that urban is positive, a word rich with life; our city is a place where meaningful collaborations spark the creative thinking that deeply impacts our city and our world.” – MELODY BURTON

Learn more at warnerpacific.edu/fylc

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• The FYLC program began three years ago with only two learning communities and has grown to welcome every incoming freshman into one of our eight FYLCs! • Every FYLC is led by a dedicated team of two instructors and two upper-class peer mentors. • A first during the 2015-2016 academic year, all FYLCs are offered during the same time slot. This allows more freedom for freshmen to choose an FYLC that interests them rather than being limited to the one that fits into their schedule. • The Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) opened last year and is a dynamic new space that houses the program’s administrative leadership as well as meeting and classroom space in a welcoming, comfortable atmosphere.

- Ben Irwin ‘15

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KERRY S. KUEHL, M.D., DR.P.H., M.S. B.S. IN HEALTH RECREATION MINISTRY ‘81 PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE, CHIEF HEALTH PROMOTION & SPORTS MEDICINE, DIRECTOR HUMAN PERFORMANCE LABORATORY AT OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY

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I WAS ATTENDING another institution when a friend invited me to a Campus Crusade meeting. That was the beginning of finding meaning and truth in my life through Jesus Christ as I started to read the Bible. At the suggestion of my brother Harry, I decided to take a look at Warner Pacific College, which I hoped would provide a solid Christian liberal arts education. Initially I didn’t know what I wanted to study, so I felt that a liberal arts education would give me an understanding of the world, and how it works. I think training in the liberal arts provides an essential educational breadth and depth necessary for every young adult to find their interests, their burden, their passion, their goals, what really gets them going, and how they will pursue their dreams. As one of my favorite hero scientists, Albert Einstein stated about a liberal arts education, “the value of an education in a liberal arts college is not the learning of many facts, but the training of the mind to think something that cannot be learned from textbooks.” The standard of excellence and the commitment and dedication from the

professors was unparalleled. These men and women make Warner Pacific a life changing place for students by investing in their educational success, professional development, and spiritual walk. A personal example of this life-changing relational learning environment is when I took an elective science class from Professor Dwight Kimberly. It took only a few weeks to discover that this was the smartest, most humorous, faithful, passionate, and brilliant man that I had ever known. Even though this was just an elective class, he actually took note of me and invested in my academic interests and career. He challenged his students, and drove me to excellence in my academic and personal and professional life. He was a role model, a mentor, a dedicated professor who helped shape and alter the course of my education and career. I am the doctor I am today because I had Dwight Kimberly as a professor. As a professor of medicine and doctor at a medical school, I have three main duties: to see patients, to conduct research, and to teach medical students and residents. One of the true joys I have

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in this occupation is the opportunity to make a difference in a patient’s or student’s life, or when I am part of a new scientific breakthrough that will improve patient outcomes or change the course of a disease. My daily challenge as a doctor is to support my patients well, helping them find wholeness and achieve the highest quality of life through physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health and healing. My challenge and desire in research is to be a conscientious scientist, discovering new ways to prevent disease and illness. My challenge and desire as a teacher is to be the kind of instructor Dwight Kimberly was to me at Warner Pacific; to inspire, to motivate, to challenge, to cause my students to pursue excellence in all they do, to find truth in the understanding and knowledge of Jesus Christ that will prepare them for service to humanity, so that this next generation will make our world a better place. This desire to succeed and help others flourish is what Warner Pacific College did for me!

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I CAME ACROSS Warner Pacific while I was looking for 4-year colleges to transfer to upon the completion of my associate degree from South Seattle College. I was attracted by its Christcentered and urban approach to higher education and the quality academics and inclusive atmosphere won me over. In my experience as a student, Warner Pacific offers a warm, positive, friendly, and caring learning environment. It’s a place where I’ve found a personalized education, meaningful experiences, and a great sense of purpose. Everyone is like a family and the sense of community is unparalleled. I feel that everyone here legitimately cares about

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your success. There are many resources on campus and mentors are easy to find. Professors are really friendly and helpful; they want to know you and genuinely care about your growth as a person. I knew when I came to Warner Pacific that I was definitely not just a number. In my religion class we read a commencement speech given by David Foster Wallace in 2005. Talking about the meaning of real and significant education he said, “…the freedom of real education is to be able to decide how you’re going to see things.” This quote struck me when I first read it, and it has resonated with me ever since. I learned to see the world around me in a more prolific way; helping me to notice people

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around me, and consider their struggles. I believe that a liberal arts education does more than prepare students for a future career; it prepares students for life, giving them the freedom to think freely and openly. In the beginning, I found it an uncomfortable process, as I was encouraged to look deep into my identity and who I am. That level of personal reflection wasn’t something I was used to, and I have met other students who found it challenging as well. However, learning in this way has helped me develop a sense of social responsibility, great character, and better understanding of the world. I started discovering who I am and who I want to be, separate from my educational pursuits. Truthfully, since transferring


BIRUKTAWIT “BROOK” MENGISTU B.S. IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE ‘17

to a liberal arts college, I think that my knowledge has broadened; I’ve grown to realize the important things in life. I am grateful for the level to which my educational experience has affected the way I now live my life. After graduation I plan to do research for some time and go on to study medicine. The liberal arts education at Warner Pacific maintained a distinctive focus on cultivating me as a whole person, not just as a job title that I may someday hold. Because of that well-rounded approach, I feel equipped for life’s many challenges. One of my favorite passages from the Bible, Matthew 19:26, captures it best, “But Jesus looked at them and said, ‘With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.’”

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CREATING THE FUTURE OF GOOD BUSINESS: THE SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP CAPSTONE PROJECT “SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS ARE NOT content just to give a fish or teach how to fish. They will not rest until they have revolutionized the fishing industry.” This is a quote from social entrepreneur Bill Drayton, and it perfectly sums up the goal of this unique business leader: to create lasting change. Social Entrepreneurship (SE) is a new major that is gaining ground on the Warner Pacific campus. A combination of business, sociology, and theology classes, the major offers a cross section of courses and a wide variety of paths to take after graduation. But before students can toss their caps and enjoy the odd combination of accomplishment and fear that follows accepting their diploma, they have one more hurdle to clear. The Capstone Project is a culmination of all the learning students have experienced across their classes. “The goal of the Capstone project is to give students a practical application of what they have learned, to develop practical skills in a safe environment,” said Dr. Roger Martin, Associate Professor and Chair of the Business Department.

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The project is spread over an entire year. During fall semester, students develop their business idea and create a proposal that meets a social need. They present these ideas to a panel to receive feedback about how to move forward with the plan. “I think the Social Entrepreneurship program and in particular the Capstone project is one of the most challenging undergraduate courses that Warner Pacific offers,” says Tom Mears, Chairman of the Board of The Holland Inc., who serves on the SE Advisory Board (SEAB), a group of local entrepreneurs and business leaders who provide insight, support, and guidance to the SE program. In spring semester, the SE majors develop the idea into something tangible. They must identify the revenue stream, the target market, and how the business can successfully meet the social need. They present their business model to the SEAB. First and second place winners are chosen and each receives a grantfunded cash prize to begin development. By graduation, the foundation for their business is already complete.

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What sets SE majors apart is the integration of knowledge needed for this project. The business courses go into the ‘how’ aspect of their work. Students acquire practical skills that they use to create their business plan and learn how to fund and maintain their ideas. The sociology courses are concerned with ‘what’—specifically what problems exist and what needs must be met. The required course, Social Problems and Public Policy (SOC 345), makes students aware of the issues in the greater community and how public policies are trying to address these problems. Theology courses in the SE major address ‘why’. “The theology aspect, that’s the reason behind it all,” says Martin. “I firmly believe in Luke 12:48—to those that much is given, much is asked.” While business and sociology courses could turn students into well-informed entrepreneurs, theology courses are the heart of the Social Entrepreneurship program, encouraging students to dedicate their skills in service of the community. Creating a business plan that will meaningfully serve the community is the foundation of the Capstone project.


Students must identify a problem and propose a solution. Once they have this to work with, the budding social entrepreneurs can start building their businesses. The Capstone project is designed for students to use after they graduate, so the plans must be evaluated for the strength and feasibility of the business model. It needs to operate in a real world economy, so one issue to consider is sustainability. “If it is a non-profit, how are they going to generate revenue?” Dr. Martin pointed out. “If it is a for-profit, how are they going to make sure that they sell as much product as they need to in order to sustain their business?” The evaluators from the SEAB also examine how scalable the project is. Can it be sustained? Can it grow? Some small businesses should stay small, while others can benefit from growth. Social Entrepreneurship projects have the potential to work well on many levels. When the business grows, it can reach more people. The more people they can reach the more change they can create. “The Capstone project is useful for students because it challenges them to articulate a business in all its facets,”

explains Arne Kainu, founder and former CEO of NTT Centerstance, Inc. and SEAB member. “It requires them to draw on the knowledge that they have accumulated during their college career and not only present a business concept but also develop marketing approaches, sales projections and product or service fulfillment plans.” Cathy Lara ‘16 joined the SE program shortly after its inception. “It was brand new when I got here, so I didn’t even know it existed until I started attending Warner Pacific,” she said. “But it’s one of the primary reasons that I would stay. The pivotal moment for me was interacting with the people I wanted to help, putting faces to the numbers and knowing that there is a need that I can help fulfill,” she said. “Before, I thought I would try it out. Now, I know that this is where I belong and what I should be doing.” SE major Jonathan Hillis ‘16, was actively searching for something like the SE major when he stared looking at colleges. “I knew I wanted to be in business, but as I was doing research, I discovered that a degree in Business Administration

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seemed generic,” he said. “But the Social Entrepreneurship program is distinct. It offers the chance to get something rare and offers a distinct specialty.” The Social Entrepreneurship program is still young, the Capstone project younger still, but already, they are challenging students to pursue their passions in thoughtful and ethical ways. “Passion in a Capstone project comes in all forms,” says SEAB member Sandra Morris, CEO of CafeGive, a Cause Marketing Agency. “...but for me, true passion is expressed when a student tackles the hard things, the things they may not be as confident or knowledgeable about.” Students leave the program as socially aware leaders with the tools they need to live out the mission of the College in their personal and professional lives and the knowledge that they can change the world. And by the time they stand on that stage to accept their diploma, Social Entrepreneurship students already have a plan. – DEBORAH LANDERS ‘16

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MIKE MORELAND & MICHAEL MORELAND, JR. M.S. IN MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP ‘12 CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER AT PROVIDENCE HEALTH & SERVICES, OREGON AND ALASKA REGION B.S. IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ‘15 FINANCIAL SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE AT MASSMUTUAL FINANCIAL GROUP

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MIKE I was already a Human Resources (HR) professional when I decided to go back to school to earn a master’s degree. My career aspirations were growing and I wanted to find a program that would cultivate my leadership skills. I considered pursuing an MBA at another institution but the Master’s in Management and Organizational Leadership (MSMOL) curriculum at Warner Pacific was a better match for my personal style and professional needs and having a single class just one night a week worked well with my schedule and allowed me to still be available to my family while I was working and going to school. This was the third cohort that I have been a part of in my educational journey, so I definitely value the cohort model. My MSMOL cohort was very diverse; something that I believe was intentional on the part of Warner Pacific. In forming teams, the College really tried to mix us up in a way that showcased our diversity of skills, experience, gender, and everything in between. This reinforced the idea that diversity does not happen without intentionality; working in HR, that concept is key. To move the dial in an organization, you must be intentional. Being aware of whether or not there is diversity in leadership and having conversations about expanding opportunities for diverse employees is an important component of organizational success. In my work over the past few years, we have seen progress but you can’t just leave it to chance. As we look at a pool of qualified applicants, we must always keep an eye toward diversity. I believe the diversity of backgrounds in our cohort deepened our education and helped prepare us for the roles we would step into after graduation. Our professors were also diverse and had a wealth of professional experience so our coursework wasn’t just about academics;

it was real talk with real world application, guided by people who are already doing it. As someone who was already working in upper management coming into the program, I think it was a positive experience for my fellow students to get to know a black professional at this level and find out how my story has shaped my understanding of diversity. As a student, I appreciated that chance to re-engage material that I had experienced previously and see it through the new eyes and fresh perspective that my learning team brought to the experience. Workforce demographics are shifting rapidly, so to prepare graduates to work in the real world, they need to learn to flourish in diverse teams. In my experience, many settings approach having a diverse learning environment by forcing minority students to fit into majority culture, rather than expecting everyone to prepare themselves to truly work collaboratively within a diverse culture. I believe that Warner Pacific helps all students build positive relationship dynamics that welcome a wide variety of perspectives.

MICHAEL, JR. Coming in as a transfer student, the diversity I experienced at Warner Pacific was much more authentic than the pseudo-diversity I have found in many other institutions, where “diversity” is seemingly just a benchmark to meet target numbers of minorities and is often limited to the brochure used for marketing a campus as welcoming diversity when it actually does not. Similarly, I think the College helped me to value diversity outside of race and ethnicity; at Warner Pacific I grew to appreciate the diversity in backgrounds, experiences, and faith, just to name a few. Looking at diversity in terms of religious and spiritual views was an unexpected joy for me. To be honest, I was

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not eager to take the required religion courses but I found them to be a blessing in disguise. It was refreshing to be in a Christ-centered school that didn’t look down on different forms of spiritual expression but rather encouraged students to challenge the status-quo and to seek out truth for ourselves. Coming from being one of just a few people of color at my high school and previous college, I didn’t realize how much of a difference it would make for me to be around so many other well-rounded people of color who were actively engaged in the classroom, athletics, and various other activities around campus. My time at Warner Pacific was the most comfortable and “at-home” I’ve ever felt in an educational environment. In the fall semester of my senior year, I took a class taught by Ken Loyd. It examined many topics surrounding faith, race, and some of the societal forces that have shaped and continue to shape Western Culture and Western Thought. The class served as a vehicle for me to share some of my opinions and views on race and faith that I didn’t feel safe voicing in other places, for fear of being judged too abrasive or honest. Similarly, Ken’s insights, along with the course materials and discussions, acted as a springboard for my HUM 410 paper, which used the perceptions of Hip-Hop and African American culture as a case study for analyzing the human condition as a whole. Being around people who were all so different, yet were able to coexist under one umbrella of diversity with a shared goal of bettering themselves and investing in their future was a transformative experience for me. I definitely feel that Warner Pacific played the largest role in helping me gain the confidence I needed to step out into the real world, ready to engage and network with others from all walks of life.

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LEARNING AND LEADING: STUDENT LEADER REFLECTIONS BY DEBORAH LANDERS ‘16

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS of Warner Pacific College (ASWPC) encompasses more than just student government. It is a dedicated group of student leaders, devoted to creating an environment in which their fellow students have a sense of connection on campus. Under the umbrella of student leadership, there are six branches: Student Government, Student Diversity Council, Campus Ministries, the Service Learning Team, the Campus Activity Board (CAB), and Residence Life. All other clubs and organizations on campus fall under their leadership, making ASWPC the head of a large network of student resources. “Each team provides a different avenue for students to find community,” said Kyra Pappas, Director of Leadership Development and Student Programs. “Part of supporting students is making sure they have a sense of belonging.” In addition to the skills and passions they bring, ASWPC has something else working in their favor as they cultivate that sense of belonging: the diversity of the leadership team. They strive for more voices to be included, opening up the floor to all students to be full, active participants in campus life.

AALEYAH PATTERSON ‘17, STUDENT DIVERSITY COUNCIL

Being part of a diverse leadership team gives me the opportunity to discuss different beliefs and values. It’s always great to hear different perspectives because everyone has a different experience and has something unique to offer the conversation. People may not want to do something a certain way based on the experiences they’ve had, and together, you need to figure out what will work for everyone involved. I have learned that I am comfortable being up front as a leader. I can be in front leading the team and the team gives me space to do that. They helped me figure out my communication style. I’m learning how to work in a team and what we can accomplish as a team. Before they get to college, some people think they know what they want to do and then they change their major three times; it’s the same thing with leadership. You think you know how you do it best, and then you change. Being a leader is about learning to bridge the gaps; it’s about being authentic and giving yourself to every project.

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THALIA GARCIA AGUILAR ‘16, STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Everyone comes with a certain perspective, with one lens. By working with a diverse group, I can interact with and gain new perspectives. I get a better sense of issues that I didn’t think of because I didn’t see it as an issue from my perspective. I have been able to develop because of the responsibilities and opportunities through leadership but I have also learned to be my authentic self in whatever role I am put in, to make it my own. The best example of leadership I’ve witnessed is seeing someone take a role and fit it to who they are. I have learned that it is important to step out of the way and listen so that others can be leaders. One thing that has been especially influential for me is the process of learning to believe in myself. I have learned to recognize the times when I am needed and not needed. Leadership is not about the leader, it’s about the people they serve. CATHY LARA ‘16, STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Being part of a diverse leadership team helps me look at things from different angles. I myself have a certain idea about what leadership is and even that can be biased. But working with other leaders helps me realize other points of view. I have learned that I am more of a listener and a processor of information. I bring my insight to the discussion. There are a lot of people in the ASWPC with good ideas who need to think out loud. But I need to internally process the ideas and understand them. It took their external processing to learn that about myself. My role on ASWPC is helping me overcome biases I hold with certain issues. It’s preparing me [for life after college] by opening my mind, allowing me to take in what everyone else is saying. Basically, it’s humbling me. [My participation with ASWPC] has helped me understand that I can’t lead by myself. I need others to keep me accountable. It’s everyone coming together and working together that makes me a better leader. MOLLIE MEYER ‘16, CAMPUS MINISTRIES

A diverse leadership group provides the entire team the opportunity to express very different ideas from one another. We as a team are able to consider a wider scope of students. I don’t have every lens; I need to depend on others to see different perspectives. I love being able to serve my colleagues in any way possible. I didn’t realize how much work, effort, and devotion went into student leadership until I was in it and now that I have that knowledge, it hurts to not be helpful to my partners. This has taught me that my leadership style is one of equitable empowerment; if everyone is being helped, listened to, and recognized, then everyone can flourish. My role on ASWPC is continuing to prepare me for life after college by training me in basic skills of facilitation, assertion, and collaboration. I have learned more about building concrete relationships with my colleagues in ASWPC than any class or job. ANGEL CASTANEDA ‘17, STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Being part of a diverse team has made me more aware and open to different backgrounds. When you bring different backgrounds to the table you grow through the experiences of your peers. I am a very individualistic leader, meaning I prefer to do things by myself. But, being part of diverse group of leaders who are always willing to help has pushed me past my boundaries. I am someone who is a very futuristic thinker. I am a part-time Residential Appraiser for Multnomah County, working as an intern with the Mayor’s Office for the City of Portland, the Operations & Communications Manager for ASWPC, and a full-time student. I am someone who functions best by wrestling with multiple things at once. As I think of what’s next after college, I believe ASWPC is equipping me with leadership skills and confidence to accomplish anything I put my mind to.

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THE FUTURE OF LEADERSHIP: HOW DIVERSE COHORTS PREPARE GRADUATES FOR CAREER SUCCESS BY MELODY BURTON

IN THE WARNER PACIFIC ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM, cohorts of 14-22 students stay together for the duration of their degree program. So how do you benefit from a diverse learning environment when you find yourself always interacting with the same small group of people? We asked members of one cohort to share their thoughts on what they’ve learned about diversity and how their Warner Pacific experience is training them to lead well as they prepare to graduate.

I enjoy everyone in our cohort and what they bring to the table. I feel our cohort is respectful, open, and honest in our exchanges. I appreciate that I don’t have to wait for graduation to start putting what I’m learning into practice. I feel that being part of a diverse cohort is helping me respond well to what is happening in my life and work right now.

KAY BEAULIERE

I deeply appreciate the wide range of backgrounds and experiences that I have found at Warner Pacific, and the open discussion environment, where you are not afraid to think, challenge, and be challenged by your instructors and cohort partners.

MOHAMMED MARAEE Outcome and Evaluation Analyst, Lutheran Community Services Northwest 26

Adjunct Faculty, Clark College

“COLLECTIVELY THIS COHORT EPITOMIZES THE CONCEPT OF A DIVERSE LEARNING COMMUNITY IN EVERY RESPECT.” DR. CHRIS TURNER, INSTRUCTOR

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My cohort brings together learners from Portland, rural Oregon, Tennessee, Columbia, Iraq, Mexico, Romania, and beyond. The benefit of this diversity is found in being exposed to these differing perspectives, which can’t help but expand one’s view of the world. Everyone has mutual respect for one another and is accepting of differing views. In an ever-expanding global market and social consciousness, the ability to communicate ideas across cultural barriers is invaluable.

ROY ADAMS ‘09

I was not expecting to be so comfortable in a room filled with people so different than myself. One unexpected challenge is definitely making sure that as I deliver my point, that I do not accidently disrespect someone because of how my words are perceived. Practicing this in the classroom environment is giving me a better understanding of what it takes to lead a group of people from a wide range of backgrounds.

ANDRE J. LOCKETT Juvenile Parole/Probations Officer

RAYLENE DONALDSON

DAVID DACE Business Systems Consultant, Data Management Services

Bellman, The Allison Inn and Spa

I have always valued diversity, but in my cohort I am learning how many different aspects of diversity we encounter. Diversity has such a broad definition and includes so many different categories. I am learning to communicate and listen to others who have varying styles and preferences.

This experience has enhanced my view of diversity by proving to me that people of diverse backgrounds can come together in civil discourse to discuss, debate, and at times argue difficult subject matter while still accepting each other as people with valid points of view. By studying in a diverse community, I have discovered that we are more alike than the dividing lines make us appear. This environment is giving me a new set of tools to use in management situations.

Studying and learning in a diverse environment really prepares us for life after graduation. As managers and leaders we will be dealing with people from different backgrounds, with different beliefs and values, so it is really helpful to have that challenge within the classroom and take advantage of that benefit.

MELISSA CARABALLO Student

Quality and Professional Development Specialist

Just looking at my learning team, we have three males and one female; there are over 20 years between the oldest and the youngest teammate; and we speak multiple languages including English, Ukrainian, and Arabic. The differences in opinion can be a challenge at times but as a team, we’ve learned how to work with it and how to transform it into an asset. It’s helped me realize the value of having diversity in the workplace.

ALENA PROTSENKO WARNERPACIFIC.EDU

Human Resources Coordinator

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A WORD FROM OUR DONORS… THE REASON I DONATED TO WARNER PACIFIC FOR THE INAUGURAL FOUNDER’S DAY IS BECAUSE OF MY POSITION HERE. I’M NOT TALKING ABOUT MY LEADERSHIP POSITION, BUT MY POSITION AS A SENIOR ABOUT TO GRADUATE. I WHOLEHEARTEDLY BELIEVE IN GIVING BACK TO THE ONES WHO GIVE TO YOU, ESPECIALLY TO THOSE WHO GIVE WITHOUT ANY EXPECTATIONS, AS WARNER PACIFIC HAS DONE FOR ME. THE COLLEGE HAS GIVEN ME MANY THINGS BUT WHAT I APPRECIATE THE MOST IS HAVING A SAFE PLACE TO DIALOGUE AND SIT IN THE HARD QUESTIONS WITH OTHERS. SHAYLA COLLIER ‘16

WE GIVE TO WARNER PACIFIC COLLEGE BECAUSE WE BELIEVE IN THE ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT’S MISSION TO PREPARE ATHLETES ON AND OFF THE COURT. TYLER ‘04 & MICHELLE ‘03 TONEY

I GIVE TO WARNER PACIFIC BECAUSE I LIKE WHAT THEY DO, HOW THEY DO IT, AND WHY THEY DO IT. DR. ADRIENNE OCHS

WE SUPPORT WARNER PACIFIC BECAUSE WE BELIEVE IN THE MISSION, VISION, AND

I SERVED ON THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES AT

VALUES OF THE COLLEGE. BRADY AND I

WARNER PACIFIC FOR NEARLY 15 YEARS,

BOTH RECEIVED SCHOLARSHIPS WHILE

BOTH AS A CHURCH OF GOD (ANDERSON, IND.)

WE ATTENDED THE SCHOOL AND IT IS A

PASTOR AND AS A PASTOR OF A REFORMED

PRIVILEGE TO INVEST IN THE LIVES OF

CHURCH IN AMERICA. THE FACT THAT I WAS

THE NEXT GENERATION AT WPC! BRADY

WELCOME AFTER SWITCHING DENOMINATIONS STILL BLESSES MY

‘02 AND TANA ‘02 LANDER

HEART! THIS KIND OF INCLUSIONARY VISION IS WHY WE GIVE TO WARNER PACIFIC COLLEGE. TIM & JAN ARENSMEIER


WE CONTRIBUTE TO WARNER PACIFIC BECAUSE WE BELIEVE IN OFFERING YOUNG PEOPLE A STRONG, THRIVING ATMOSPHERE TO LIVE IN, TO LEARN IN, AND TO BELONG TO. WE BELIEVE STRONGLY THAT THE ACT SIX PROGRAM HAS MADE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON THE SCHOLARS AND THE STUDENT BODY AS A WHOLE. WE HAVE WITNESSED THE TRANSFORMATIONS OF MANY OF THESE STUDENTS AS THEY HAVE NOW GRADUATED AND ARE MAKING POSITIVE CHOICES IN THEIR LIVES, FOR THEIR COMMUNITIES, IN THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO GOD, AND FOR THE HEALING OF FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS. STEVE AND MARYLU GRAY

I GIVE TO WARNER PACIFIC BECAUSE… I JUST LOVE IT HERE! I’VE BEEN AT THE COLLEGE FOR 30 YEARS, AND

I

ENJOY COMING

TO WORK EVERY DAY. I BELIEVE IN THE MISSION AND I’M INVOLVED AT ALL LEVELS. IN ADDITION TO WORKING HERE, I’VE BEEN INVOLVED IN MINISTRY AS WELL. I CARE ABOUT THE STUDENTS

AND

ENJOY

SPEAKING

INTO

THEIR

LIVES. DEREK BRADFORD ‘90

I GIVE TO WARNER PACIFIC BECAUSE THE STUDENTS, LEADERSHIP, AND MISSION REFLECT

THE

PURPOSE

OF

HIGHER P O S T-

SECONDARY EDUCATION. NOT LEARNING FOR THE SAKE OF LEARNING, BUT INSPIRING, LEADING, AND

I GIVE TO WARNER PACIFIC IN GRATITUDE

FOR

THE

OPPORTUNITIES I HAD AS A WPC STUDENT AND FOR THE CHANCE TO BE A PART OF CHANGING THE WORLD FOR GOOD BY OPENING DOORS FOR

OTHERS.

HEMENWAY ‘71

CLAUDIA

TRANSFORMING THROUGH SERVICE,

I N T E L L EC T,

COMMITMENT, PERSEVERANCE, AND FAITH. IT HAS BEEN MY PRIVILEGE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE COLLEGE’S EDUCATIONAL JOURNEY AND IMPACT, WITNESS DR. COOK’S INSPIRED LEADERSHIP, AND GET TO KNOW THE ACCOMPLISHED WARNER PACIFIC STUDENTS WHO ARE ALREADY STAKING THEIR CLAIM AS OUR FUTURE LEADERS. TRACI ROSSI


As we look to the year ahead, Warner Pacific is implementing new strategies to diversify our donor base, deepen relationships with foundations, and build new partnerships with local corporations who share our vision to support urban and diverse students. Below you will find a financial snapshot from our most recent fiscal year, which runs from June 1 – May 31.

TOTAL ENDOWMENT VALUE 9,632,379 6,932,097

7,429,316

7,690,731

2010-11

2011-12

10,248,105

10,883,738

5,260,225 3,361,521

3,459,937

2006-07

2007-08

2,000,000 2005-06

2008-09

2009-10

WHERE DOES THE MONEY COME FROM? AUXILIARY 16%

GRANTS 1.6%

TUITION & FEES 68.5%

2013-14

2014-15

WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO? AUXILIARY SERVICES 14.8%

CONTRIBUTIONS 6.1%

INVESTMENT INCOME 4%

2012-13

INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT 17.7% ACADEMIC SUPPORT 4.2%

STUDENT SUPPORT 20.4%

PUBLIC SERVICE 0.7%

OTHER 3.8% INSTRUCTION 42.2%

NET OPERATIONAL VARIANCE 879,886

495,296 379,484

2015 AUDITED FINANCIALS Total Assets

$31,828,450

Total Liabilities

$15,217,057

Total Net Assets $16,611,393 202,855

Total Liabilities $31,828,450 and Net Assets

-3,673 -303,211 2009-10

30

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

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2015 President's Report - Warner Pacific College  

Warner Pacific's annual report.