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DECEMBER 2018

Swift survives sword attack

A man was found guilty of attempting to murder a police officer with a samurai sword.

WAPU welcomes new Directors

The rising of Annual Conference marks the start of the Board’s new term.

WAPU 82nd Annual Conference

The motions, wrap-up and photos from this year’s Annual Conference.

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE

WA

POLICE UNION


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DEC 2018

POLICE NEWS THE MAGAZINE FOR THE WA POLICE UNION

CONTENTS

10

21

30

A 46-year-old man is now behind bars after attempting to murder Senior Constable Andy Swift in Rockingham last year.

Two trophies belonging to the WA Police Pistol Club have been missing for more than 30 years.

The motion outcomes from this year’s Annual Conference.

16

22

WAPU’s Adventure Club makes the trek to Newman to support the Bloody Slow Cup.

The Australasian Police and Emergency Services Games finished in a spectacular fashion last month in Mandurah.

Swift survives sword attack

Adventure Club tackles the Bloody Slow Cup

18

WAPU welcomes new Directors Get to know our five new Directors.

21

Christmas charity single hits a blue note 4 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

The WA Police Force Pipe Band pairs up with comedy singer Kevin Bloody Wilson to raise money for WA Police Legacy.

BOLO: Two missing trophies

Mandurah Games set the bar high

26

Criminal injuries compensation still a major issue The 82nd WAPU Annual Conference is finished for another year. Read all the highlights.

28

Annual Conference Dinner Did our photographer catch you at the Annual Conference Dinner?

2018 Annual Conference Motions

06 WAPU DIRECTORS AND STAFF 08 P  RESIDENT’S REPORT 24 FIELD REPORT 51 H  EALTH 53 L  EGAL 55 F  INANCE 56 MEMBER BENEFITS 57 M  OTORING 58 R  ETIREMENTS, RESIGNATIONS AND VALE 59 FROM THE ARCHIVES


WA

POLICE UNION

639 Murray Street West Perth WA 6005 P (08) 9321 2155 F (08) 9321 2177 E admin@wapu.org.au OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 7am-4pm AFTER HOURS EMERGENCY DIRECTOR 0438 080 930 www.wapu.org.au Follow us facebook.com/WAPoliceUnion Twitter @WAPoliceUnion PUBLISHED BY WA Police Union 639 Murray Street West Perth WA 6005 (08) 9321 2155 ADVERTISING WA Police Union (08) 9321 2155 DISCLAIMER WAPU (“Publisher”) advises that the contents of this publication are the sole discretion of the WA Police Union and the magazine is offered for information purposes only. The publication has been formulated in good faith and the Publisher believes its contents to be accurate, however, the contents do not amount to a recommendation (either expressly or by implication) and should not be relied upon in lieu of specific professional advice. The Publisher disclaims all responsibility for any loss or damage which may be incurred by any reader relying upon the information contained in the publication whether that loss or damage is caused by any fault or negligence on the part of the Publishers, its Directors or employees. COPYRIGHT All materials in this publication are subject to copyright and written authorisation from WAPU is required prior to reproduction in any form. ADVERTISING Advertisements in this journal are solicited from organisations and businesses on the understanding that no special considerations other than those normally accepted in respect of commercial dealings, will be given to the advertiser. All advertising is undertaken in good faith and WAPU takes no responsibility for information contained in advertisements.

COVER The visible scars on Senior Constable Andy Swift’s head will stay with him for a lifetime after a horrific attack in July 2017. ABOVE Delegates voted on a range of motions at the 82nd Annual Conference. Pictures: Jody D’Arcy.


WA

POLICE UNION

Board of Directors 24/7 EMERGENCY DIRECTOR

HARRY ARNOTT President 0407 989 008

MICK KELLY Senior Vice President & 24/7 Emergency Director 0438 080 930

BRANDON SHORTLAND Vice President 0488 9080 93

WARD ADAMSON Treasurer 0457 603 311

DAVE CURTIS Director 0400 864 591

PAUL GALE Director 0403 314 426

JASON GENTILI Director 0437 417 467

MICK GILL Director 0427 097 000

Staff

PAUL HUNT Secretary 6 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

CHRIS VITLER Finance Manager

WENDY ROUTHAN Executive Personal Assistant

STEVEN GLOVER JESSICA PORTER Media Officer Media Officer

KATRINA MASON KATRINA TAYLOR Industrial Industrial Officer Officer


BOARD OF DIRECTORS & STAFF

DEBRA HUTCHINSON Director 0414 935 498

MATTHEW PAYNE Research Officer

MARK JOHNSON Director 0488 352 525

JASON MORA Director 0410 927 445

DEAN GIACOMINI Field Officer

HARRY RUSSELL Director 0412 585 429

CARL GROSSETTI Field Officer

GEORGE TILBURY Director 0409 105 898

CARL STEWART Field Officer

CLINT WHALLEY Director 0409 118 381

PENNY BROWN Member Services Officer

BRANCH PRESIDENTS Academy Air Wing Armadale-Gosnells Avon Bunbury Australind Cannington Central Great Southern Central Midlands Central West Coast Commissioned Officers East Kimberley Eastern Goldfields Eastern Wheatbelt Fortescue Fremantle Gascoyne Geraldton Great Southern Intelligence Services Joondalup Leeuwin Naturaliste Licencing Enforcement Lower South West Major Crime Mandurah Maylands Complex Midland Midland Workshops Mirrabooka Murchison North Eastern Goldfields North Pilbara Northern ROG Perth Perth Watch House Professional Standards Prosecuting Branch Rockingham Kwinana Serious & Organised Crime Sex Crimes South East Eyre South West Hinterland Southern ROG State Intelligence State Traffic Operations Traffic Enforcement Group North Traffic Enforcement Group South Upper Great Southern WAPU Now Water Police West Kimberley West Pilbara

Graham Daisley John Gobbels Paul Bourke Dave Flaherty Matt Fogarty Rod Moore Aaron Honey Thomas Louden David McDonald Noreen O’Rourke Stuart Lapsley Kevin Guy Dayna Rigoir Russell Evans Matt Turner Darren Wood Glenn Wishart Danny Richmond Contact WAPU HQ Ben Giff Tim Saxon Michael Sedgman Sasa Dzaferovic Greg Hart Harry Russell Scott Sulley Jason Mora Jeanette Maddison Debra Hutchinson Jake Hendry Matt Parsonson Sarah Clarke Cris Marzo Andrew Simmons Gemma Priest Ian Moore Jarred Gerace Richard Wells Peter Birch Cliff Daurant Emily Woodland Dion Jackson Mark Crossley Peter Potthoff Paul Gale Chris Patten Steve Kent Kirsten Morrow (Secretary) Debra Hutchinson Brendan Packard Dave Groenenberg Neil Vanderplank

7 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


HARRY ARNOTT President

Strategic focus key to achieving our goals I AM HONOURED AND PRIVILEGED to write my first report to you, our Members, as President of our Union. Since joining the WA Police Force as a cadet back in 1992, I have spent the past 26 years on the frontline, primarily serving throughout regional WA. Prior to my election as President, I was the OIC at Manjimup Police Station and my family and I are thoroughly looking forward to the challenge of moving to Perth after spending years in the bush. I want to thank George Tilbury and Brandon Shortland for their service as President and Senior Vice President. Thanks also to our retiring Directors Anntoinette Cashmore, Lindsay Garratt, Michael Henderson, Kevin McDonald, Peter McGee and Peter Potthoff. They have all worked hard for Members and now it is up to the new Board shape the future direction of WAPU. I want to welcome aboard Paul Gale, Jason Gentili, Debra Hutchinson, Jason Mora and Clint Whalley, who will all bring fresh ideas and a frontline perspective to the Board. For those of you who aren’t familiar with our new Directors, I can vouch that they are good people and you can read more about them on page 18 of this edition.

… a consistent theme in discussions … was the need to be more strategic with our communications. In particular, the need to communicate what we are doing with you.

8

The resignation of Anntoinette after the election was officially declared has left us one short on the Board so, we will be holding a by-election to fill that vacancy over the coming weeks. Constitutionally, this needs to be conducted by the Australian Electoral Commission and you will be advised of all the details as soon as they have been finalised. Congratulations to Mick Kelly (Senior Vice President), Brandon Shortland (Vice President) and Ward Adamson (Treasurer) on their election to the Executive and I am looking forward to working closely as a team to help guide the Board through the challenges we face. At time of writing this report, the new Board had not held its first official meeting but we are communicating and developing ideas for where we want and need to take our Union. The new Board were also present at Annual Conference and were able to engage with Branch Delegates, listen to the debate and receive feedback on where we need to make improvements. Without speaking out of school, a consistent theme in discussions with the new and returning Directors, as well as Delegates at Conference, was the need to be more strategic with our communications. In particular, the need to communicate what we are doing with you. To this end, a comprehensive Communications Strategy is being developed which will drive change in this space. Over the coming months, you will notice changes to how we communicate and how we embrace technology to give you the information you need to know. We need to get back to what we are here to do, look after you in the industrial, legal and welfare spaces. Plus we need to be proactive and give you information and tips in these areas to help you go about your duty.


PRESIDENT'S REPORT

Now is the time for genuine industrial and legislative reform to ensure the needs of our membership are cared for by Government. We will do everything in our influence to achieve this for you.

While we do focus on you, we will still be working hard politically to ensure a Police Compensation Scheme is introduced into Parliament and we right the wrongs stemming from the Cooper decision, which leaves seriously injured officers with no recourse via criminal injuries compensation. Now is the time for genuine industrial and legislative reform to ensure the needs of our membership are cared for by Government. We will do everything in our influence to achieve this for you. There is a video on our website of a speech by retired Sergeant Laurie Morley to our Annual Conference. To say Lozza has been through a lot, is an understatement and I urge you all to visit our website, clear your schedule and watch the video. He is a legend and true inspiration. While the new team has a lot of work ahead of itself reviewing policies, procedures and priorities, the office will continue to run as per normal. If you have any issues or need help, call WAPU HQ, email admin@wapu.org.au or contact the Emergency Director and we will look after you.

01

To my brothers and sisters in the Southern Region. Even though I am in Perth, you are still the region I represent and I will be present throughout the South West and Great Southern, when you need me and even when you don’t need me. Nothing changes because I am not in Manji, if there are issues affecting you I need to know about them, so do not hesitate to contact me. The next three years shape as an exciting time for WAPU and I for one am looking forward to the challenge ahead. From all of us at the WAPU office we wish you a safe festive season. Care for each other and get home safe.

01 Brandon Shortland, Harry Arnott and Mick Kelly at Annual Conference.

Kind regards, H

9


Swift survives sword attack BY JESSICA PORTER

0110 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES.

01 Andy was back at work only one month after the horrendous attack. 02 Andy suffered lascerations to his forehead and skull. The injury to the top of his head fractured the bone..

“At that moment, I couldn’t hear anything. I couldn’t hear a sound. The adrenaline just started flowing and my mind became incredibly focused. I just knew I had to fight for my life.” Those thoughts went through Senior Constable Andy Swiftʼs mind just moments before he felt the tremendous blow of a 1.2m samurai sword cracking his head and fracturing his skull. Despite the potential outcome of that forceful strike, it wasn’t his own life that Andy was focused on; it was the lives of two teenage boys and their mother. Full details of the evening of July 19, 2017 came to light in October after a Supreme Court jury found former boxer Milos Radovic guilty of attempting to murder the police officer. The horrific injuries Radovic caused were confronting and graphic. They were shared throughout Australia and shown to millions of people as an example of the incredible sacrifice Andy made by putting himself in harm’s way, protecting the lives of innocent people. Just a couple of hours before the culmination of this fateful day, Andy and his partner Constable Natalie Sgherza were tasked to attend a Rockingham home because of a frantic triple zero call. The caller believed 46-year-old Radovic was breaching a violence restraining order by attending and damaging the home of his ex-wife and sons. Andy and Natalie had never worked together before this night. In fact, Andy had just returned to work from holidays and this was his first shift after being promoted to senior constable. Natalie had also just been made operational about three weeks prior, after graduating non-operational from the Academy in 2016. The duo were sent to the job under priority two conditions because of alerts against Radovic. “There were alerts on the system that meant if any family domestic violence incidents came through for that address and involving Radovic, we had to get there as quick as we could,” Andy said. When the pair got to the house, the full story was starting to unfold as two terrified teenagers emerged at the front door. Luckily, their sister was not there. A trail of destruction was also apparent as windows at the house looked as though they had been slashed by a razor sharp object. The family was also shaken by threats to kill. The children believed these came from their father. The police duo split up and interviewed the two teenagers, with their mother and a family friend present.

02

At the same time a few suburbs away, Radovic’s menacing trail continued. He was caught on CCTV at an automotive workshop brandishing the samurai sword in the hope of intimidating the workshop’s owner and associate. Radovic told the jury he went to the workshop after hearing a rumour that one of his sons was being used as a drug smuggler. Radovic said he left the workshop with the intent of going home, but turned back after receiving a phone call from a man he tried to confront. He then said he headed for an address in Rockingham where he believed he had seen the man and his associate before. Back at the Rockingham house, the police officers continued their interviews with the teenage boys. Andy could tell both sons were petrified of their father and were incredibly fearful that it would only be a matter of time before Radovic would return to terrorise the family. Andy poignantly remembers answering the teen’s question of ‘what if he comes back?’ “I said to him that I would arrest him,” Andy recalls. “And I promised him that their father would never hurt them again.” That powerful promise was enacted only moments later when a loud banging came from the front door. A man yelled to get the attention of police, saying Radovic was out the front. Andy drew his taser and walked quickly to the front of the house, with Natalie following closely behind him. They were confronted by a tall figure who appeared to have something behind his back, with his hands reached behind his head. Both officers told the Supreme Court jury that at that point, they could not see what he was holding. “I thought he was holding a baseball bat,” Andy told Police News. ▷

11

POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


03

“I knew that if I stayed at the distance I was, the sword would come down directly and kill me. Or if it came down on an angle, it could have cut my throat.”

12 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

Telling Radovic to drop the weapon, Andy armed his taser. But the threat of a taser did not deter Radovic. He willingly and decisively came towards Andy with the sword raised above his head. His two-handed grip would bring the sword rapidly towards the officer’s unprotected skull. “I used my taser but it had no effect on him whatsoever,” Andy said. In a move that undeniably saved his life, Andy did the exact opposite of what most people would do; he moved towards the danger. “I knew that if I stayed at the distance I was, the sword would come down directly and kill me. Or if it came down on an angle, it could have cut my throat.” In a moment of selflessness, Andy could only think to put himself between the attacker and the innocent family. With heartfelt compassion, Andy recalled his decision. “I knew that if I didn’t stop him, there could have been three people that could have been dead. He could have gone into the house and killed his ex-wife and those two kids.” The forward motion put Andy directly under the path of the blade, but it gave him more of a chance to disarm Radovic. The sword rushed towards Andy’s head, causing deep lacerations to his forehead and the top of his skull. He blacked out for a moment. “I didn’t realise the extent of my injuries until later. I wasn’t in pain, my head was probably numb, however I was acutely aware of the blood running down my face and dripping everywhere,” he said. Andy and Radovic struggled while Natalie fired her taser into Radovic. Luckily, Andy managed to wrap his hands around Radovic’s neck and bring him to the ground. They both fell onto the road. The samurai sword landing just centimetres away. Despite being struck, Andy immediately got up and grappled with Radovic again. Andy managed to restrain Radovic with Natalie’s help and told Radovic he was under arrest on suspicion of breaching a violence restraining order. The officers managed to handcuff Radovic and place him in the rear of their vehicle. Now that the initial threat of Radovic was reduced, Natalie was able to fully appreciate the extent of Andy’s injury.

“I thought he was going to die,” she said. “When he looked down, I thought I could see his brain. It was so deep and it was just pouring out blood. I just got really shaky. I couldn’t even open the first aid kit properly to try and get him a bandage.” “Taking into account the injury he had, I can’t believe he managed to do his job the way he did. It’s very impressive,” Natalie said. At Andy’s request, Natalie started taking photographs of his injuries and the scene. “I was quite glad that he was so experienced and calm. He was able to give me direction so I didn’t have to panic. But it was quite clear that he had a very serious injury.” Andy also praised the support and quick action of Natalie that day. “Natalie is an awesome person and a great police officer,” he said. “She deserves a bravery medal for her actions. She was professional and efficient, she stepped up when required, something more seasoned officers maybe wouldn’t have done.” Within minutes, colleagues who had heard the pair’s radio calls for assistance converged at the address. They were confronted by a blood-soaked street and a man screaming from the inside the pod of the police van. On a video recorded at the scene, Radovic could be heard screaming “fear me” and “feel my power” in what was coined as a “community broadcast” to the people of Rockingham. Witnesses also gave evidence that Radovic yelled “I’m going to kill youse” before the attack on Andy. While Andy was taken immediately to Royal Perth Hospital’s trauma unit, Rockingham Detective Senior Constable Sam Baker initiated his investigation into the confronting attack. “It would have been gut wrenching for the first responders,” he said. “Witnessing firsthand, a work colleague sustaining such a horrific injury and not knowing if Swifty was going to live or die. As a police officer you hope you never encounter this type of event.” With the assistance of the Department of Public Prosecutions, Sam’s investigation provided compelling and overwhelming proof that Radovic tried to kill Andy.


04 05

Radovic’s defence was that the attack on Andy was entirely accidental. He claimed he had a muscle spasm after being tasered. This was despite taser logs disputing any effective deployment causing Radovic neuromuscular incapacitation at that moment. Notwithstanding the evidence, Radovic still maintained the spasm caused him to bring the sword from a downward position in his left hand, across his body, changing hands, then turning it upright in a “flowing” tai chi motion. He then said he bumped into Andy and the sword “rolled over the top” of Andy’s head. Prosecutor Justin Whalley led the State’s evidence throughout the five-day trial. He questioned Radovic as to why he had the samurai sword in the first instance. Radovic claimed he brought it for protection because he believed the men he planned to confront were armed with guns. Quizzically, Mr Whalley asked if Radovic planned to deflect bullets with his “magic sword” to which Radovic said “maybe”. During closing arguments, Mr Whalley said a number of witnesses heard Radovic yell “I’m going to kill you all” on the day of the attack, and that Andy’s fractured skull was consistent with the actions of a deliberate blow. Speaking to the jury, Mr Whalley questioned whether the rambling from the back of the police van by Radovic was consistent with his version of events; that the whole debacle was an unfortunate mistake. “The audio, that six minutes of him in the back of the police van, his community broadcast to the people of Rockingham as he described it yesterday… Is that consistent with an angry man who deliberately attacked a police officer with homicidal intent or is it consistent with his version which is a remorseful man who belatedly realised he’s accidentally injured Senior Constable Swift as he claimed in his evidence yesterday,” Mr Whalley said. He asked the jury if Andy’s injuries were consistent with a double-handed blow straight down onto the scalp and tracking onto the forehead. “Or, is it consistent with some sort of uncontrolled application of force with the sword coming into contact with the police officer’s head and the accused having no control over it whatsoever?” Needless to say, the jury were not going to believe the farcical version of events Radovic proffered. ▷

“When he looked down, I thought I could see his brain. It was so deep and it was just pouring out blood.”

06 07

03 A knife was also located in Radovic's sock. 04 The bloody street outside the Rockingham home. 05 Andy's head was sliced open to the bone by Radovic. 06 The area where the sword cut Andy is still sensitive a year and a half on. 07 Andy will be permanently scared from the attack.

13 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


“Hopefully Radovic will be put away for a long time, giving his children the chance to grow up without fear of him.”

14 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

“I’d suggest it goes something like this,” Mr Whalley told the jury. “The accused man was enraged. He was extremely angry about something. He’s waving his sword around. He’s shouting threats, “I'm going to kill youse”. He was going to kill someone, anyone.” In a profound comment on Andy’s bravery, Mr Whalley said Andy stepped in, when everyone else ran away. “As all the civilians quite understandably ran away from this armed man shouting his threats to kill, as they ran away from the danger, Senior Constable Swift walked towards him because that’s his job. And he had the courage to put himself in harm’s way to protect the community that he’d sworn to serve. That’s why he was the one who confronted the accused in the middle of his homicidal rage, and that's why he became the target of the accused’s homicidal intent,” he said. It did not take long for the jury to judge the facts and convict Radovic. Andy was relieved with the guilty verdict and said he was pleased the whole ordeal was now over. “It's been a long time, 14 months waiting for this verdict,” he said. “I don't feel anything towards him personally, it's just an unfortunate series of events. “I did black out momentarily and if it had been any longer I don’t know if I would have received another injury that could have been fatal.

“My wife understandably wanted me not to work in this job again… but I actually like my job and I do feel that on the whole we do a good job and we help people,” Andy said. Andy’s 23-year-old son also felt differently about policing and has now changed his mind about entering the WA Police Force due to the injuries his father sustained. Sam was pleased the investigation he undertook was able to successfully convict Radovic. “I was absolutely over the moon when I heard the verdict,” Sam said. “I was so happy for Swifty his family, and Nat and her family too. It was a great result and lead by a great team from DPP,” he said. “I was fully aware of the emotional stress and the impact the horrific incident was going to have on work colleagues, family, the police force, WAPU, external agencies such as domestic violence advocates and the Government.” Sam, who has been a police officer for 18 years, said he had never seen an injury like the one inflicted on Andy. “I would be lying if I said it didn’t affect me. This incident affected all police officers, knowing what happened to Swifty could happen to any of us in a split second.” Natalie said the incident did not take a huge toll on her however, her 11-year-old daughter was apprehensive about her mum going to work. “She would bring it up in conversation, about being safe at work,” Natalie said. “But it’s definitely something that is always in the back of my mind, particularly going to any kind of job that includes a weapon.” Andy said while the severity of incidents such as these were not common, domestic violence in the Rockingham region was an issue. “I’d say about 70 per cent of all the jobs we go to are domestic violence incidents.” Attending these types of jobs day-in, day-out could have an enormous cumulative effect on officers if they are not able to process the horrific scenes they are confronted with. “You can’t let it become your life,” Andy said. “We have to be able to distance ourselves from the emotional aspect of the situation and focus on the practical task in hand.” Returning to work just one month after the incident, Andy said he was a bit nervous. “Or maybe I should say, self-conscious, because I was aware that I had become recognisable but I wasn’t concerned about returning to frontline duties,” he said. Following Radovic’s conviction, Andy and Natalie have planned to meet with the family they were protecting that day. “Hopefully Radovic will be put away for a long time, giving his children the chance to grow up without fear of him,” Andy said. “I just hope they will be able to create their own lives away from him.” Radovic is due to be sentenced on January 15.


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01 02

ADVENTURE CLUB TACKLES THE BLOODY SLOW CUP BY STEVEN GLOVER

03 04

16 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

01 The Adventure Club enjoying Karijini National Park. 02 The teams lining up before the start of the Bloody Slow Cup in Newman. 03 Swimming at Hamersley Gorge. 04 The entrance to Hamersley Gorge.


M

embers of the WAPU Adventure Club made the trek up to Newman recently for the Bloody Slow Cup. Held every October, the weekend begins with a Remembrance Ceremony at the crash site and is followed by a series of sporting events, including games of rugby, cricket, netball, golf, bowls and soccer held to fundraise for WA Police Legacy. The feature sporting event is the “Bloody Slow Cup” rugby match between Australia and New Zealand on the Saturday night, a tongue-in-cheek homage to the “Bledisloe Cup”. Six Adventure Clubbers set off from Perth and reached Peace Gorge, just outside Meekatharra, to camp for the night before arriving at Newman the next day. They attended the Remembrance Ceremony and Bloody Slow Cup match on Saturday before heading to Karijini National Park and set up camp at Karijini Eco Retreat. Over the next couple of days, the crew hiked into Joffre Gorge, Hancock Gorge, Hamersley Gorge, Dales Gorge, Weano Gorge with visits to Fortescue Falls, Fern Pool, Circular Pool, Kermit’s Pool, Handrail Pool and Spider Walk. The team returned to Perth with an overnight stay at Wooramel River Retreat, just south of Carnarvon. Club Secretary Dean Giacomini said everyone had a great time. “It was a terrific trip and a touching experience to be in Newman to remember our fallen colleagues,” Mr Giacomini said. “I have always wanted to attend the Bloody Slow Cup to pay my respects, so to finally get that opportunity was something I will always remember.” Newman OIC Senior Sergeant Mark Fleskens said it was a fantastic weekend and he was confident they would exceed the $85,000 raised last year. “Newman is a fairly unique community where the community are 100 per cent behind police,” Sen. Sgt. Fleskens said.

“It was a very tragic event for police but also for the Newman community when the four police officers lost their lives. “After a couple of years of mourning their loss, the OIC at the time Geoff Stewart, decided to do something that could recognise and remember the officers whilst also including the Newman community and it has been an annual event since 2005. It has grown every year and has raised a substantial amount of money for WA Police Legacy.” Sen. Sgt. Fleskens said he knew three of the officers involved and one was a friend. “When I applied to come to Newman I was aware of the responsibilities as the OIC to organise and run the event with the support of my staff and the community,” he said. “So having that involvement to get the event up and running, especially in my first year was fairly manic, it was an unknown quantity as to the amount of work you put in but this year we were fortunate to spread the load amongst a number of police officers and community members. It is really an honour for me to be the figurehead but one of a very large group of people involved.” He said they would not be able to raise the amount of money without the support of the main sponsors BHP, FMG and a number of local businesses. “There also a number of other areas like the Union, the emergency motorcycle association Blue Knights came along with $3,000, a number of smaller donations from $500 and above but also the community getting behind and pretty much this year we have sold 90 per cent of our merchandise which is a great way to raise money for Police Legacy,” he said. “I look forward to next year and providing the confidence to the families of the four officers that they will never be forgotten.”

17 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


WAPU welcomes new Directors

The rising of Annual Conference marks the start of the Board of Director’s new term.

Paul Gale WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR INVOLVEMENT WITH WAPU? I became President of the State Traffic Operations Branch in October 2013.

Jason Gentili

WHY DID YOU WANT TO BECOME A UNION DIRECTOR?

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR INVOLVEMENT WITH WAPU?

As a Branch Official, it has been my purpose to ensure that everyone gets heard. After five years at Branch level, I decided that as a Director I could have more influence in the direction of the Union’s strategy ensuring that the direction of the Board of Directors was aligned with the Members’ needs.

In 2009, I was President of the East Kimberley Branch and I’ve been President of the West Kimberley Branch since 2017.

WHAT ARE SOME GOALS YOU HOPE THE BOARD CAN ACHIEVE BEFORE THE END OF THIS TERM? A closer working relationship with the State Government of the day and the WA Police Force Corporate Board. Better communication with the Members and education of the advantages to being a WAPU Member.

MY MOST MEMORABLE ACHIEVEMENT WITH IN THE WA POLICE UNION IS? Assisting in the creation of two new Branches within the State Traffic portfolio and my Branch submitting the motion for the additional legislation commonly referred to SLOMO.

WHY DID YOU WANT TO BECOME A UNION DIRECTOR? I wanted to continue with the efforts of my predecessor Michael Henderson and the other members of the Board. I felt that I needed to become more involved and try be part of a new team and champion a new direction for WAPU, to reinvigorate the WAPU ethos that I am a Director representing the membership.

WHAT ARE SOME GOALS YOU HOPE THE BOARD CAN ACHIEVE BEFORE THE END OF THIS TERM? I want to see fur ther grow th of membership, fully implemented Police Compensation Scheme, pay rise in line with the Government of the day and test the WAIRC, if need be.

SOMETHING PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT ME IS? Nothing, I am an open book.

SOMETHING PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT ME IS? I love my golf, am super inconsistent, I can’t chip to save myself but manage to be a single figure handicapper.

18 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


In addition to changes to the WAPU Executive, the Board also comprises five new Directors.

To get to know the new Directors, Police News sat down with each of them to discuss their Union involvement as well as goals for the future.

Debra Hutchinson

Jason Mora

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR INVOLVEMENT WITH WAPU?

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR INVOLVEMENT WITH WAPU?

I have been Secretary of the Midland Workshops Branch (2015); President of Midland Workshops Branch (2016 – 2017); WAPU NOW Committee member (2017); and currently I am the President Mirrabooka Branch and WAPU NOW Chairperson.

I have been a police union (federation) member since joining the Scottish Police Service in the late 1990s, but it wasn’t until transferring to the WA Police Force in November 2007 that I became a fully active Member thanks to WAPU’s excellent Branch structure with meetings and conference. In 2014, the opportunity to develop my interest in the Union arose when I was elected to the position of Branch Secretary – Traffic Enforcement Group 2, continuing this development in 2015 with my election to the position of Vice President at State Traffic Operations Branch. After transferring to Forrestfield in 2017, the opportunity again arose to serve as a Branch Official, this time as East Metro (Midland) Branch Vice President. In late 2017 with the departure of the then Branch President, I was elected to the vacant position of Branch President – Midland, the position I currently hold.

WHY DID YOU WANT TO BECOME A UNION DIRECTOR? Towards the end of 2014, I approached the Union for assistance when I was finding it difficult to return to the frontline from a specialist area as a single parent in the wake of the reform. I wasn’t completely happy with the response I received and I’m a big believer of if you don’t like something, get out and change things. So I became involved in the Union to be able help Members with the small things that get lost along the way.

WHAT ARE SOME GOALS YOU HOPE THE BOARD CAN ACHIEVE BEFORE THE END OF THIS TERM? I would like to think we can finally get a resolution to the great work put up by the previous Board in relation to police compensation but I would also like to see the Union get back to the Members. I want to go to Branch meetings where Members are attending because they want to know what their Union is doing and know their voices will be heard.

MY MOST MEMORABLE ACHIEVEMENT WITH IN THE WA POLICE UNION IS? Ask me in three years…

SOMETHING PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT ME IS? I’m pretty much an open book so if there is something people don’t know about me, there’s probably a reason.

WHY DID YOU WANT TO BECOME A UNION DIRECTOR? Over the last 20 years I’ve seen the very best and worst of conditions that our unique profession has to offer. Throughout it all I believe we have been served by some great Union Officials, working publicly and behind the scenes on our behalf, to support us through it all and improve our conditions. As I’ve developed and progressed through the WAPU Branch structure I saw the same opportunity arise that I might serve the Members as a Director, to work as part of a united team, to help in conveying the ideas, feelings and opinions of the Members at the Board level, to help shape and deliver WAPU’s agenda moving forward. I’m a firm believer in ‘Team’ and ‘Strength in Unity’! ▷

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WHAT ARE SOME GOALS YOU HOPE THE BOARD CAN ACHIEVE BEFORE THE END OF THIS TERM? First and foremost, my main goal is to work as part of a successful team delivering on the subjects that matter to our Members. On a personal level, some of my own goals going forward include increasing both the exposure and membership of the WA Police Legacy and Police Families Assistance Council; advocating for a review and reform of the Police Promotion System, to have the ongoing demonstrated skills, ability and potential (for promotion) of Members as identified in yearly ‘Performance Agreements’ and ‘Development Plans’ better recognised and utilised in the Promotion Process; advocate on behalf of the Members regarding ‘Sick Reporting’ and “Certification of Sickness/Unfit for Duty’; and advocate on behalf of the Members regarding ‘Urgent Duty Driving’ and ‘Urgent Duty Riding’.

MY MOST MEMORABLE ACHIEVEMENT WITH IN THE WA POLICE UNION IS? Sounds cheesy, but it would have to be my nomination and election as a Director.

SOMETHING PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT ME IS? Being a proud Scotsman you would get no prizes for guessing that I love soccer (football) and whisky but what might surprise you is that in my humble opinion WA’s very own Limeburners Distillery (based in Albany) produces dram-for-dram the very best whisky in the world! If you haven’t tried it yet, I wholeheartedly recommend “Darkest Winter” (my personal favourite), a small batch peated cask streng th, gold medal winning delight. Remember, always drink responsibly!

Clint Whalley WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR INVOLVEMENT WITH WAPU? I was a Branch Official at the old Central Police Station in 2001 and 2002 before leaving that district. I then became the Branch Secretary in 2012 at Cannington Police Station and had to resign that position in 2018 when I transferred to the State Operations Command Centre, where I became the Branch Secretary in August 2018.

WHY DID YOU WANT TO BECOME A UNION DIRECTOR? I’ve wanted to become a Director since 2014, when a current serving Director became my supervisor at the old South East Metro Northern Response Office. I did nominate for the 2015 Board Elections, but had to withdraw my nomination due to not being eligible for the position.

WHAT ARE SOME GOALS YOU HOPE THE BOARD CAN ACHIEVE BEFORE THE END OF THIS TERM? I hope that the new Board will be able to get a fair pay rise for the Members, without having to trade off any current conditions, and to hold the police hierarchy and State Government to account for broken promises and lip service.

MY MOST MEMORABLE ACHIEVEMENT WITH IN THE WA POLICE UNION IS? Becoming a Director!

SOMETHING PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT ME IS? I am a huge geek and a computer gamer.

20 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


01 02

The WA Police Pipe Band with very special guest Kevin Bloody Wilson and WA Police Legacy Manager Jill Willoughby.

Christmas charity single hits a blue note The award winning WA Police Pipe Band has crossed another item of its bucket list after co-writing a song with Australia’s cheekiest comedian, Kevin Bloody Wilson. WA Police Pipe Band OIC Sergeant Ian Stewart said the collaboration was the result of raising money for WA Police Legacy and the Police Families Assistance Council. “We had been looking at various ways to publicise the great work that WA Police Legacy do, whilst also raising money to help support our police families in need,” Sgt Stewart said. “Using the power of music, we decided that recording a charity single was the most cost effective way to achieve our goal and we began working on our own single.” Wilson, who is a big supporter of the band, heard about what the Police Pipe Band was doing and wanted to get involved. “He immediately jumped on board and offered to write a brand new song especially for WA Police Legacy and did it all for free,” Sgt Stewart said. After throwing a few ideas around the table ‘The Outback Highland Band’ was created. “The song itself is loosely based on Kevin’s grandparents coming to Australia from Scotland many years ago and loving their new life in Australia, but they also kept a few Christmas traditions and passed them onto the next generation.” The single is available to purchase in both CD and digital formats. “Although the Police Pipe Band supports a large number of other charities and fundraising events within our community, we have always been a strong supporter of WA Police Legacy, so we hope that our single is a huge success in Australia and all around the world,” Sgt Stewart said. “To do that, we need the help of every member of the WA Police Force to promote it to all their family and friends and for everyone out there to buy the single. Every cent raised will go to support our Blue Family,” he said.

The digital download is available at wapol.com.au/ downloads with a minimum cost of $2, but any amount can be donated. The hard copy CD is $5, plus postage and available from WA Police Legacy. The song is also available from all leading digital download sites, at standard download prices.

BOLO: TWO MISSING TROPHIES A retired police officer is returning to his investigative roots in order to track down two trophies that have been missing for more than 30 years. The WA Police Pistol Club (WAPPC) formed in 1970 and regularly held meetings at the old Maylands Police Academy. It disbanded in the 1980s and since then, the two trophies have disappeared. Retired Chief Inspector and former WAPPC Secretary Dave Williams has taken up the case to track down The Famous Grouse Whisky Trophies. “I instigated the formation of the club when I was stationed at VKI in Highgate in 1970,” Mr Williams said. The Police Social Club provided financial assistance to get the club off the ground and provided about $250, which back then enabled the club to purchase firearms, ammunition and the targets. After a casual conversation with an Elders Board Member at the local pub, the WAPPC was presented with two perpetual trophies to be awarded to winners at club competitions. The main trophy (02), which was manufactured in Scotland, features two solid bronze, hand pained grouse birds mounted on a slab of porphyry marble. This stands on a wooden plinth and faced with two strips of solid silver. The first person to win this trophy in 1971 was “S. Sandilands”. The second trophy (01) was smaller in size and has a larger solid bronze grouse bird mounted on a wooden base. Mr Williams ceased as secretary when he was transferred to Nannup, but the club wound up sometime in the 1980s. The club secretary at that time is unknown but some preliminary investigative work by Mr Williams has indicated that a man by the name of Joe Italiano may have been the last secretary. There was also a coach by the name of Rowley who was connected to the club at that time as well. Mr Williams feels he has unfinished business with the club and wants to find the trophies in order to return them to the Social Club “because under the constitution, that is where they are supposed to go.” If anyone has any knowledge of the whereabouts of these trophies, please contact Dave Williams on 0455 632 208. 21 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


MANDURAH GAMES SET BY STEVEN GLOVER

T

he 17th Australasian Police and Emergency Services Games in Mandurah has set a high bar for future events following a hugely successful week in October. More than 3,000 participants from WA, interstate and overseas converged on Mandurah to take part in the Games across 50 sports. The home State dominated the medal tally and also won the two main trophies, Australia and New Zealand Police Games Trophy and the Emergency Services Shield, which are awarded for the highest number of points across certain events. Games Director Acting Senior Sergeant Jeremy Petersen said the feedback had been tremendous from both local participants and those who had travelled. “The location of the Games is critical, and the City of Mandurah as a host delivered on so many fronts as we anticipated. People were able to enjoy the high class sporting venues across the seven days, then come back to the city centre and accommodation in the evening, before heading out again and enjoying the restaurants, entertainment precinct or the Games MARQUAY social hub at night,” A/Sen. Sgt Petersen said. “The majority of participants attend the Games in their own time and at their own expense, so it was vitally important to stage an event to meet

22 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


THE BAR HIGH their expectations across the board, be they sporting, tourism, cultural and social expectations.” A/Sen. Sgt Petersen said his highlights for the week were the Opening Ceremony, the nightly themed MARQUAY social hub and a number of special performances at the Indoor Rowing event which saw two official Australian records achieved (one from WA Police Force’s own Detective First Class Constable Declan Clancy-Lowe) and three gold medals to Department of Fire and Emergency Services Ian Beard, who was left a paraplegic after being struck by a car whilst riding his bike in Attadale in 2014. “I think the Opening Ceremony cultural performance was a highlight for many. It was organic and by the end of the performance it had competitors from across Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Singapore and China all involved dancing. It was a magnificent performance to showcase our rich Aboriginal culture,” he said. A/Sen. Sgt Petersen believed the Games played an important role in allowing participants to get away from the rigours of their work. “It is an opportunity to release from the mental strain of work, be it police, fire, ambulance or corrective services and actually enjoy the company of likeminded people on both the sporting fields or through the social experiences the Games offer.

The games was also able to raise approximately $20,000 for charity partner beyond blue through the Nissan vehicle raffle, RockTape strapping donations, physio donations and a number of other donation initiatives throughout the week. “We were happy to have beyond blue involved and support their research work at the University of WA into post-traumatic stress disorder in both law enforcement and emergency service agencies.” The next Games will be hosted in Wollongong in 2020 and A/Sen. Sgt Petersen hopes the next Organising Committee can surpass the collective efforts of the Mandurah 2018 team. “I hope we have set a high bar for future Games, we had a delegation from Wollongong 2020 attend our Games who undoubtedly will be a little nervous, but also excited about what to expect in October 2020. “I hope that they can go even higher because it will make it a magnificent event.” A/Sen. Sgt Petersen thanked all of the agencies, partners, sponsors, volunteers and staff involved in bring the event together. “Our major event partners, KPMG, Tourism WA and the City of Mandurah and their involvement and buy in into the event was unprecedented and it is probably why it was such a successful event because we had that buy in,” he said.

FAST FACTS FOR GAMES WEEK Participants from six countries. WA participants 2,095 Interstate participants 1,024 Overseas participants 222

50 Sporting Events 12 Social and Official Events More than 2,000 individual Competition Events

12 Full Time Games Management Team Staff 256 Volunteers working 803 shifts

Nine sea containers of sporting equipment, signage, food and beverage for all venues Transportation fleet of four trucks, three buses and six Nissan vehicles.

23 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


CARL GROSSETTI Field Officer

Putting Member welfare first AS MANY OF YOU KNOW, I AM A STRONG ADVOCATE OF MEMBER MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING. Some recent tragedies that our Members have attended, including the tragic loss of our colleagues both serving and retired, reinforce our frailties as humans. Despite the tough veneer and professional approach to policing, the cumulative negative effect that “our” chosen calling has upon us cannot be underestimated and should never be ignored. I often spend long periods of time on the phone or faceto-face with Members and their families who are feeling the effects of workplace pressure, psychological trauma and emotional stress. All the while trying to help put things into perspective and encouraging those Members to reach out for professional help. The importance of getting help cannot be understated, not only for our serving Members but for their family and support networks, who share the struggles of their loved ones and often don’t know where to turn. WAPU does not care where you get help, as long as you get the help. This article is intended not only to recognise your exposure to a barrage of physical and emotional trauma while policing the frontline, it also serves to highlight your responsibility to maintain a healthy workplace and to look after each other, regardless of rank, workload or KPIs. Do your job, do it professionally and to the best of your capability. But don’t do it at the expense of your relationships or essential duty of care to yourself and your workmates. Your staff, colleagues, family, and friends are far more significant. The WA Police Force is bound by occupational health and safety legislation, and its policy statement on the topic includes … enhancing the quality of life and wellbeing of our workforce through minimising the risk of injury and illness. Further, its underpinning principles comprise taking a risk management approach to activities considering health and safety in decisions and actions.

Do your job, do it professionally and to the best of your capability. But don’t do it at the expense of your relationships or essential duty of care to yourself and your workmates.

24 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

I propose that where an employee or employer creates or contributes to workplace injury, including psychological trauma, and liability for that action or inaction exists in legislation; then we should all be doing something to mitigate this. Health and safety is everyone’s responsibility. Where emotional and psychological injury, stress and trauma arises from an antiquated, cumbersome and punitive police complaints process connected with internal investigations, both criminal and managerial, perhaps we should be paying a bit more attention. This is not a slight on the Members who are duty bound to conduct these investigations, but a call towards reformation of the process. It is high time for a significant review and meaningful change. Emphasis on Member welfare must be paramount and not an Agency reputational risk and investigative process. Accordingly, if a Member commits unlawful criminal offences, then they should be afforded the same rights as any other person in those circumstances. Where such allegations arise from your duties as a police officer, Members should not be automatically removed from their workplace and local support networks, except in exceptional circumstances, whether those allegations are ultimately substantiated or not. The emotional impact of the current inequitable and inconsistently applied practice is enormous. For a moment, imagine including a bail condition on a civilian whereby they were prevented from attending their workplace or being in meaningful employment. Now imagine proposing the same restrictions on a suspect while you were conducting an investigation. The public outrage would be phenomenal, and rightly so. Yet these are the conditions Members face every day while under investigation. Subsequently, if those same criminal allegations cannot be sustained, the Member is subjected to a separate internal disciplinary process arising from the same set of circumstances, in accordance with the Police Force Regulations 1979.


FIELD REPORT

Time will tell if the inclusion of “welfare” in the new title stands to be more than just that, or whether an application of real empathy and genuine concern for our Members’ welfare will break down the suspicion and mistrust that presently exists.

This smacks of double jeopardy, a concept not founded in Australian law, but one I’m sure most of us are familiar with. Whatever the outcome, the expectation is that the Member merely dusts themselves off and continues to be a loyal and dedicated officer. Sure there is a “welfare” aspect applied to this internal process, but it’s primarily about Agency reputation and risk mitigation first, Member welfare second. The time for this to change is now. A mandatory and structured application of the Agency’s Psychology Services Unit for a Member throughout this process while on paid “administrative leave” needs to be developed. It needs to be a welfare-focussed process, as opposed to a Member being stood down or stood aside, then having to wait for the outcome of an investigation.

It is heartening that recent changes to the WA Police Force Health and Safety staffing and structure have resulted in the rebranding of the Division as Health, Welfare and Safety. Time will tell if the inclusion of “welfare” in the new title stands to be more than just that, or whether an application of real empathy and genuine concern for our Members’ welfare will break down the suspicion and mistrust that presently exists. Stay safe and well.

EMERGENCY 24/7 DIRECTOR

0438 080 930 639 Murray Street, West Perth WA 6005 PH: (08) 9321 2155 F: (08) 9321 2177

www.wapu.org.au admin@wapu.org.au

Mick Kelly

EMERGENCY DIRECTOR

WAPU

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POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


Criminal injuries compensation still a major issue BY JESSICA PORTER

Retired Sergeant Laurie Morley’s emotional an honest address was undoubtedly the highlight of WAPU’s 82nd Annual Conference.

M

r Morley spoke to a full house on the second day of Conference and earned a standing ovation after sharing his experiences with depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and a lack of any criminal injuries compensation following an assault he suffered in 2015. Delegates heard stories from Mr Morley’s 43-year policing career, including during his time as a cadet before being sworn in as a serving police officer. Mr Morley expanded on his story, as told in the August edition of Police News, where he spoke of the emotional turmoil he experienced along with a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. “In 2001 as a result of too many deaths and other traumatic incidents my mind succumbed,” he told Conference. Following an intense anxiety attack, Mr Morley saw a psychiatrist who diagnosed him with PTSD. “I was placed on a regime of anti-depressants which had a pretty damning effect on my life. I didn’t become violent but I became a different person,” he said. Mr Morley became visibly upset when he reflected on how his battle with PTSD affected his wife. “My wife could not look at me, breath, laugh cry or otherwise interact with me without me ignorantly demeaning her, criticising her… I was a fair dinkum wanker,” he said. “This went on for seven years.” Yet during this time, Mr Morley still went to work. But in 2007, things screeched to a halt when he expressed to his wife that he felt suicidal. “She stopped her life that day and took me to our GP who referred me to a psychiatrist at the Perth Clinic.”

“Having delivered on redress and having made changes to Section 8 progress, we are now working on the workers’ compensation scheme.” 26 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

Mr Morley told Delegates after intensive therapy, he was able to manage the symptoms of PTSD. “As a result, my medications were changed and to cut a long story short, a few months later my wife said the most wonderful thing… she commented to my psychiatrist ‘my husband is back after seven years of waiting.ʼ ” But an assault in 2015 awoke his PTSD again. Mr Morley was so severely assaulted trying to save a young man from being bashed to death, that he thought his life was about to end. He outlined a list of injuries as long as his broken arm to Delegates and reflected on the numerous surgeries he had to undergo as a result of this attack. Yet, despite being injured in a criminal attack, he was not paid a cent in criminal injuries compensation due to a legal precedent set buy Copper v Smith in the District Court last year. This legal decision now means that sick leave and medical benefits paid out by WA Police must be deducted from the total amount payable, which is capped at $75,000, meaning the most seriously injured officers get nothing. Mr Morley’s example highlighted how important it is to have this preposterous situation amended in legislation. Minister for Police Michelle Roberts said she had been in talks with the Union and Attorney General John Quigley about this issue. “It’s something the Government will respond to in due course,” she told reporters at Annual Conference. Mrs Roberts also used Annual Conference to announce that the McGowan Government would make changes to the Police Act 1892 to ensure officers who are medically retired will no longer be forced to leave under Section 8. “I was very pleased a couple of weeks ago… to be able to announce a Redress Scheme for those officers that have been medically retired and now we will be taking the next step,” she said. “We will have a separate section in the Police Act so our medically retired officers can go with dignity and not go out under Section 8, the same as those officers who are leaving under a cloud.” She then said a Police Compensation Scheme would follow. “Having delivered on redress and having made changes to Section 8 progress, we are now working on the workers’ compensation scheme.”


01

Mrs Roberts said a team selected by WA Police Force Commissioner Chris Dawson was working on drafting legislation and talks would be held with the Union in the coming 12 months. Another major issue supported by Conference was the decision to lobby the Federal Government to include GPS tracking and remote immobilisation in all new cars. Police Federation of Australia CEO Scott Weber told ABC Perth Drive there has been an increase in pursuits in WA and the use of technology could make the task of arresting offenders who evade police much safer. “The car will be immobilised and reduced down to a safe speed,” he said. “It won’t automatically brake, it will take the power out of the vehicle and once it gets to about 10 to 15km/h, it actually stops and police can lock up the offenders,” Mr Weber said. The idea was also supported by Mr Dawson. “The Police Commissioners have discussed this matter prior to the Police Ministers Council Meeting and together with the Police Union, I think this is a worthy initiative,” Mr Dawson said. “In terms of some tragic situations we’ve seen globally, as well as in Australia – such as crowded pedestrian malls – we would want the best possible opportunity to protect the public. Privacy must be considered but the overall scheme that is being contemplated is to provide a safer environment for our community. That’s why I think it’s worthy of exploring,” Mr Dawson said. Mrs Roberts agreed. “We have all seen the tragic results of the crashes that have occurred when someone is absconding from police; travelling at high speeds, going through red lights, travelling on the wrong side of the road,” she said. “When you’ve got a vehicle doing that, it’s a hazard for everyone. “Innocent lives have been lost because of that and it’s dangerous for police to pursue those vehicles. So technology is going to be a solution for safer policing and a safer community into the future.” A full list of motions and outcomes of the 82nd Annual Conference is available from page 30.

02 03

01 Directors, Directorselect and Delegates from the 82nd Annual Conference. 02 Laurie Morley's powerful address left some in tears. 03 Police Minister Michelle Roberts officially opened Annual Conference. 04 Police Commissioner Chris Dawson addressed the opening morning of Conference.

04

27 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


01 02

03

04 05 18 17

14 13

16 15

28 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


06 07

82nd Annual Conference Dinner

08 09

TUESDAY 20 NOVEMBER PARMELIA HILTON HOTEL 01 Angela Smith, Geri Porter, Crispin Gargan, Lisa Bayliss and Max Jackson. 02 Narelle Kiddey, Jason Mora and Jeanette Maddison. 03 Peter Potthoff, Gary Dreibergs, John Weaver and Harry Arnott. 04 Stuart Lapsley and Chris Dawson. 05 Michelle and Greg Roberts. 06 Joe Newbold, Paul and Angela Gale. 07 The crowd watching the 2018 Annual Conference video. 08 George Tilbury and Wendy Routhan. 09 George Tilbury receives a standing ovation after his final address as President. 10 Brandon Shortland presenting George Tilbury with his Director Recognition Award. 11 Retired Members Derrick Briggs and Graham Black were presented with their retirement plaques at the Conference Dinner. 12 The five-year WAPU Service Pin recipients with George Tilbury, Gareth Reed, Lance Munckton, Paul Burke and Paul Gale. 13 Clint Whalley, Jon and Michelle Groves and Scott Sulley. 14 Debra Hutchinson, Paul Burke and Rachel Rawlins. 15 Michael Paterson, Michael Henderson, Rod Harris and Carl Stewart. 16 Jo Kwok, Scott Weber and Shawn Taylor. 17 Grant and Janice Wilcox, Mick Gill, Gwynne Wanstall and Harry Russell. 18 Jason and Natalie Gentili. 12

11

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2018 ANNUAL CONFERENCE MOTIONS EXECUTIVE, COMMITTEE AND FINANCIAL REPORTS

1.0 PRESIDENT’S REPORT

reassigned Wheatbelt from the South to Central Region and update to contemporary titles.

That the President’s Report for 2018 be accepted. Moved: Mark Johnson Seconded: Jason Mora CARRIED

2.0 LEGAL REPORT That the Legal Report for 2018 be accepted. Moved: Dave Curtis Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

3.0 SECRETARY’S REPORT That the Secretary’s Report for 2018 be accepted. Moved: Harry Russell Seconded: Scott Sulley CARRIED

4.0 TREASURER’S REPORT That the Treasurer’s Report for 2018 be accepted. Moved: Mark Johnson Seconded: Stuart Lapsley CARRIED

1.0 CORPORATE

1.1 EXECUTIVE MOTION Conference directs that Rule 3 – Interpretation be amended to reflect alterations implemented in 2016 which reassigned the Wheatbelt from the Southwest Region to the Central Region, and update Region titles to those used by WA Police. Current Rule “Metropolitan Region, North (Kimberly/Pilbara) Region, Central (Midwest/ Gascoyne) Region, East (Goldfields/Esperance) Region and South (Southwest/Wheatbelt/Great Southern) Region” mean respectively the regions the boundaries of which shall be determined by the Annual Conference.

Moved: Mark Johnson Seconded: Mick Gill CARRIED

1.2 EXECUTIVE MOTION Conference directs that Rule 6.1 – Establishment of Board of Directors be amended to reflect the Region titles used by WA Police. Current Rule (b) The Board shall comprise 15 Directors, of which 11 who hold office shall be from the Metropolitan Region and one each from the Northern (Kimberley/Pilbara) Region, Central (Mid West-Gascoyne/Wheatbelt) Region, Eastern (Goldfields/Esperance) Region and Southern (Southwest/Great Southern) Region. Proposed Rule (b) The Board shall comprise 15 Directors, of which 11 who hold office shall be from the Metropolitan Region and one each from the Northern (Kimberley/Pilbara) Region, Central (Mid West-Gascoyne/Wheatbelt) Region, Eastern (Goldfields/ -Esperance) Region and Southern (South West/Great Southern) Region. Explanation This is an administrative change to the Region titles to bring them into line with current WA Police titles. Moved: Harry Russell Seconded: Peter McGee CARRIED

1.3 EXECUTIVE MOTION Conference directs that Rule 7.2(b) be amended to introduce email as a method of notification to Directors for proposals associated with the financial transactions referenced in the sub-rule.

Proposed Rule “Metropolitan Region, North (Kimberley/Pilbara) Region, Central (Mid West/Gascoyne/Wheatbelt) Region, East (Goldfields/ -Esperance) Region and South (South West/Wheatbelt/Great Southern) Region” mean respectively the regions the boundaries of which shall be determined by the Annual Conference.

Current Rule (b) to invest funds and to acquire, sell, lease, mortgage or otherwise dispose of any property for the purposes of the Union provided that the decision to do so is made by at least 10 Directors at an ordinary or a special board meeting and that all Directors were notified in writing of the proposal by registered mail or by personal delivery, at least 48 hours before the commencement of the meeting;

Explanation This is an administrative change to the regions, to correct an omission arising from changes approved to Rule 6.1(b) in Application 3 of 2016, which

Proposed Rule (b) to invest funds and to acquire, sell, lease, mortgage or otherwise dispose of any property for the purposes of the Union provided that the decision

30 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


to do so is made by at least 10 Directors at an ordinary or a special board meeting and that all Directors were notified in writing of the proposal by registered mail, email or by personal delivery, at least 48 hours before the commencement of the meeting; Explanation This amendment introduces the ability for modern communication methods to be utilised when notifying Directors of the relevant proposals to be considered at Board Meetings. WAPU already utilises remote access technology removing, the necessity for Directors to physically attend Special Board Meetings when practicalities and/or circumstance prevent physical attendance. Email communication is a cost effective and efficient method of communication, which will improve the efficiency of Board activities. Moved: Mick Gill Seconded: Jason Mora CARRIED

1.4 STATE TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to formalise a vote of no confidence in the McGowan Labor Government and its ability to negotiate a fair Industrial Agreement with our Members. We instruct the Board to put the Government on notice that we will not repeat the history of our last negotiations and will publically identify their failings. Explanation On the day of the WAPU rally at Parliament House in 2017, the Government was put on notice that WAPU Members were not satisfied with the McGowan Government and its ability to enter into and negotiate towards a fair Industrial Agreement outcome. An informal vote of no confidence was voiced by Members present. WAPU Members have lost confidence that this Government will actually deliver on its election promises or treat policing and this Union with the respect that the majority of the community show. Moved: Michelle Jose Seconded: Steven Kent CARRIED

2.0 INDUSTRIAL

2.1 EXECUTIVE MOTION Annual Conference directs the Board of Directors to advocate for WA Police to cease a one-contractor removalist system and instead use a per-tender transfer system utilising all of the available removalist suppliers. Explanation Regularly WAPU Members receive a transfer to or from a Regional WA location and are prevented from effecting the transfer or being deprived of their belongings for unacceptable periods of time due to the unwillingness or inability of the WA Police contracted removalists to collect and deliver their possessions. It is regularly reported that the Agency’s own policy in relation to timeframes of transfers are breached. In the interests of efficient transfer practices and with the best interests of their staff in mind, the single removalist contractor system should be

scrapped and replaced with a system that rewards innovative and motivated removalists who can do the job and do it right. The system could involve a liaison point within each quality assured and authorised removalist provider and details of each transfer with a due date noted. The first available removalist willing to effect the transfer should be given the job. This system would provide efficiencies for the Agency, certainty for OIC’s and District Managers along with certainty and peace of mind for Members affected. Costs reductions and price competitiveness may even result. Moved: Harry Russell Seconded: Matt Fogarty CARRIED

2.2 EXECUTIVE MOTION Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to ensure that any and all providers of transfer services for the WA Police Force are subjected to stringent criminal and security checks. Explanation Members have reported some workers involved in and effecting uplift, removal, transfer, storage and placement of both Member’s personal and the WA Police Force property (uniforms, files and papers etc.) have been of unsavoury character, have criminal history/associations and should be excluded from being involved in the transfer of Member’s property. A strict and stringent security vetting process of transfer contractors is required to ensure the safety and security of Member’s personal circumstances, family, property and residential locations. Moved: Harry Russell Seconded: Tim Saxon CARRIED

2.3 STATE TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors in the next Police Industrial Agreement negotiations to lobby for a 38-hour week for police officers, so as to accumulate 10 plus days annually to be taken as Accrued Time Off (ATO) in conjunction with leave or in hours. Explanation In the 1990s, WA police officers worked a 40/38-hour week, accumulating two hours per week or 92 hours per year. Since that time, when the provision was traded off, policing has become more demanding and stressful. Post-traumatic stress disorder and the general mental health of police officers is an increasing concern. Officers need additional time off to maintain a healthy work-life balance in order to prevent work-associated mental health issues. Premier Mark McGowan says that police officers are no different to other public servants, despite the high-risk exposure to officers in their daily work however, unlike public servants, police officers continue to work 40 hours per week. 31 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


The 38-hour week could be phased in over a number of years to ensure workforce numbers are increased compensatory. WAPU must continue to press the State Government for the 38-hour week for the long-term wellbeing of police officers in this State.

The 38-hour week could be phased in over a number of years to ensure workforce numbers are increased compensatory. WAPU must continue to press the State Government for the 38-hour week for the long-term wellbeing of police officers in this State.

Moved: Michelle Jose Seconded: Danny Richmond CARRIED

WITHDRAWN

2.4 MIDLAND BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors, in the next Police Industrial Agreement negotiations, to lobby for a 38-hour week for Police Officers, so as to accumulate 10 (plus) days annually to be taken as ‘Accrued Time Off’ (ATO) in conjunction with leave or in hours”. Explanation In the 1990s, WA police officers worked a 40/38-hour week, accumulating two hours per week or 92 hours per year. Since that time, when the provision was traded off, policing has become more demanding and stressful. Post-traumatic stress disorder and the general mental health of police officers is an increasing concern. Officers need additional time off to maintain a healthy work-life balance in order to prevent work-associated mental health issues.

2.6 MANDURAH BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors in the next Police Industrial Agreement negotiations to lobby for a 38-hour week for police officers, so as to accumulate 10 plus days annually to be taken as Accrued Time Off (ATO) in conjunction with leave or in hours. Explanation In the 1990s, WA police officers worked a 40/38-hour week, accumulating two hours per week or 92 hours per year. Since that time, when the provision was traded off, policing has become more demanding and stressful. Post-traumatic stress disorder and the general mental health of police officers is an increasing concern. Officers need additional time off to maintain a healthy work-life balance in order to prevent work-associated mental health issues.

Premier Mark McGowan says that police officers are no different to other public servants, despite the high-risk exposure to officers in their daily work however, unlike public servants, police officers continue to work 40 hours per week.

Premier Mark McGowan says that police officers are no different to other public servants, despite the high-risk exposure to officers in their daily work however, unlike public servants, police officers continue to work 40 hours per week.

The 38-hour week could be phased in over a number of years to ensure workforce numbers are increased compensatory. WAPU must continue to press the State Government for the 38-hour week for the long-term wellbeing of police officers in this State.

The 38-hour week could be phased in over a number of years to ensure workforce numbers are increased compensatory. WAPU must continue to press the State Government for the 38-hour week for the long-term wellbeing of police officers in this State.

WITHDRAWN

WITHDRAWN

2.5 MIDLAND WORKSHOPS BRANCH

2.7 SERIOUS AND ORGANISED CRIME BRANCH

Conference directs the Board of Directors in the next Police Industrial Agreement negotiations to lobby for a 38-hour week for police officers, so as to accumulate 10 plus days annually to be taken as Accrued Time Off (ATO) in conjunction with leave or in hours.

Conference directs the Board of Directors in the next Police Industrial Agreement negotiations to lobby for a 38-hour week for police officers, so as to accumulate 10 plus days annually to be taken as Accrued Time Off (ATO) in conjunction with leave or in hours.

Explanation In the 1990s, WA police officers worked a 40/38-hour week, accumulating two hours per week or 92 hours per year. Since that time, when the provision was traded off, policing has become more demanding and stressful.

Explanation In the 1990s, WA police officers worked a 40/38-hour week, accumulating two hours per week or 92 hours per year. Since that time, when the provision was traded off, policing has become more demanding and stressful.

Post-traumatic stress disorder and the general mental health of police officers is an increasing concern. Officers need additional time off to maintain a healthy work-life balance in order to prevent work-associated mental health issues.

Post-traumatic stress disorder and the general mental health of police officers is an increasing concern. Officers need additional time off to maintain a healthy work-life balance in order to prevent work-associated mental health issues.

Premier Mark McGowan says that police officers are no different to other public servants, despite the high-risk exposure to officers in their daily work however, unlike public servants, police officers continue to work 40 hours per week.

Premier Mark McGowan says that police officers are no different to other public servants, despite the high-risk exposure to officers in their daily work however, unlike public servants, police officers continue to work 40 hours per week.

32 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


The 38-hour week could be phased in over a number of years to ensure workforce numbers are increased compensatory. WAPU must continue to press the State Government for the 38-hour week for the long-term wellbeing of police officers in this State. WITHDRAWN

2.8 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police for a 38-hour week for police officers, so as to accumulate 10 plus days annually to be taken as Accrued Time Off (ATO) in conjunction with leave or in hours. Explanation In the 1990s, WA police officers worked a 40/38-hour week, accumulating two hours per week or 92 hours per year. Since that time, when the provision was traded off, policing has become more demanding and stressful. Post-traumatic stress disorder and the general mental health of police officers is an increasing concern. Officers need additional time off to maintain a healthy work-life balance in order to prevent work-associated mental health issues. Premier Mark McGowan says that police officers are no different to other public servants, despite the high-risk exposure to officers in their daily work however, unlike public servants, police officers continue to work 40 hours per week. The 38-hour week could be phased in over a number of years to ensure workforce numbers are increased compensatory. WAPU must continue to press the State Government for the 38-hour week for the long-term wellbeing of police officers in this State.

2.10 GASCOYNE BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to implement 10-hour shifts in larger regional locations and bring regional rostering in line with the metropolitan area. Explanation The Commissioner stated that he would bring 10-hour shifts in across the board but regional members are still working eight-hour shifts. Fatigue is a major issue in regional WA and 10-hour shifts will assist in reducing the impact of fatigue on police officers and their work location. Moved: Darren Wood Seconded: Matt Fogarty CARRIED

2.11 GASCOYNE BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to amend the military leave provisions and bring them in line with the Department of Defence in that the leave is accrued across the financial year and not the calendar year. Explanation Military leave is based on financial years, while annual leave is based on calendar years. This can cause issues in relation to what leave can be taken and when. Officers can be requested to attend to military requirements, when they still have outstanding annual military leave left however, have used up annual military leave, according to the WA Police Force. Moved: Darren Wood Seconded: Peter McGee CARRIED

WITHDRAWN

2.9 STATE INTELLIGENCE BRANCH That Conference directs the Board to lobby the Commissioner that a 38-hour week should be provided to police officers, so as to accumulate 10 plus days annually to be taken as Accrued Time Off (ATO) in conjunction with leave or in hours. Explanation In the 1990s, WA police officers worked a 40/38-hour week, accumulating two hours per week or 92 hours per year. Since that time, when the provision was traded off, policing has become more demanding and stressful. Post-traumatic stress disorder and the general mental health of police officers is an increasing concern. Officers need additional time off to maintain a healthy work-life balance in order to prevent work-associated mental health issues. Premier Mark McGowan says that police officers are no different to other public servants, despite the high-risk exposure to officers in their daily work however, unlike public servants, police officers continue to work 40 hours per week. The 38-hour week could be phased in over a number of years to ensure workforce numbers are increased compensatory. WAPU must continue to press the State Government for the 38-hour week for the long-term wellbeing of police officers in this State. WITHDRAWN

2.12 STATE TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to identify, develop and implement a strategy for workplace compliance of the Industrial Agreement. Explanation The Industrial Agreement is there to ensure that Members are treated fairly and provided their entitlements as agreed to by the WA Police Force and the State Government. Over many years of negotiation, the Board of Directors has encouraged Members to ‘work to rule’ putting the State Government on notice that doing so will cost the Government essential service standards and a financial impost. Once the Industrial Agreement has been signed off, workplaces and Members return to old habits of cutting Industrial Agreement corners to ‘get the job done’. All too often, this is a direct result of undue pressure being placed upon Members by middle and senior management to do so. Members should not be pressured into working outside the Agreement to accommodate grades of service and other benchmarks that the WA Police Force use to report to government. Moved: Michelle Jose Seconded: Steven Kent CARRIED 33 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


2.13 JOONDALUP BRANCH

2.16 MIDLAND BRANCH

Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to include the supplements listed below, which are not on the Pharmaceuticals Benefit Scheme (PBS), when prescribed by a medical practitioner, be claimable under Clause 38 Non Work-Related Medical and Pharmaceutical Expenses: - Magnesium - Melatonin

Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to order that “Medical Practitioners” as defined by Part 1 Section 5 of the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (WA) Act 2010; incorporated within Section 34 of the Industrial Agreement for sworn officers and Policy HR-07.04 of the Police Manual; and are approved by the WA Police Force to issue medical certificates to all police employees with regard to certifying absence, treatment and fitness to work.

Explanation With the unique work arrangements of being a police officer, there is a lot of stress and strain on our muscles and joints that an average person would not endure. Magnesium eases muscle pain, tension and stress and is prescribed by many physicians to assist with physio resulting from wearing kit belts and vests. It also helps reduce injury and aid recovery.

Explanation Although Part 1 Section 5 – Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (WA) Act 2010, Clause 34 - Industrial Agreement 2017 and Policy HR-07.04 - Police Manual all recognise, identify and include 22 ‘Medical Practitioners’ as being qualified and authorised to issue medical certificates, it is current WA Police Force practice to insist on medical certificates only being issued by a few of these authorised persons e.g. doctors, dentists and physiotherapists. As such Members can and are exposed to unnecessary financial, practical, physical and mental hardship by this practice.

Melatonin is useful for people performing shift work and is prescribed by many physicians but is not on the PBS, it can significantly help with sleep and would reduce fatigue-related sick leave. It will assist officers get a better night’s sleep, as well as reducing illness as we will be better rested and our immune systems would be more efficient, reducing sick leave. Moved: Ben Giff Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

2.14 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to include all contraceptives and contraceptive treatments, when prescribed by a medical practitioner under Clause 38 Non Work-Related Medical and Pharmaceutical Expenses. Explanation Contraceptive medication and treatment should be subsidised to avoid any unplanned pregnancies reducing officers on the frontline taking maternity/ paternity leave. Contraceptive medication is often prescribed by doctors to regulate hormones in women specifically performing shift work. Shift work has a negative impact on the body and subsequently affects women’s hormones. Contraceptive medications are often used to counteract the imbalances of hormones arising from shift work and should be claimable. Moved: Ben Giff Seconded: Dave Flaherty LOST

2.15 ACADEMY BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to enter into negotiations with health insurance providers to continue corporate discounts for health insurance, post-retirement for former Members. Explanation Currently, WA Police Force Members are entitled to a corporate discount for some health insurance. This entitlement ceases upon retirement. It should continue. Moved: Graham Daisley Seconded: Jason Mora CARRIED 34 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

Example - A member was unfit for work on a day shift due to an infection and notified that they would be unfit for duty. The Member was off sick for Monday and Tuesday but was unable to obtain an appointment to see a doctor during their two-day absence. They secured an appointment for the Wednesday and returned to work that day. On attending the doctor on the Wednesday, the doctor ‘prescribed’ a healthy diet and over-the-counter medication. Recognising that the Member was indeed unwell, the doctor offered to issue the Member with a medical certificate to cover the Wednesday and Thursday, but refused to issue a certificate for the Monday and Tuesday - the two days of actual absence. On returning to work and notifying their OIC and HR Directorate of this, the Member was instructed that Police Manual Policy would be applied and that they were required to apply for two days unpaid leave. Had the Member been permitted to see any of the 22 ‘Medical Practitioners’ authorised by legislation to issue a medical certificate, unnecessary financial, practical, physical and mental hardship would have been avoided. Moved: Narelle Kiddey Seconded: Jason Mora CARRIED

2.17 MIDLAND BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to amend Policy HR-07.04.1.1 of the Police Manual and the phrase “notify... an OIC/Manager/Supervisor...”, to define the word “notify” as meaning “to communicate by telephone call, radio, fax, email or any other form of electronic message including text”. Explanation Currently, the Police Manual directs that an officer must “notify...an OIC/ Manager/Supervisor...” of their absence from work due to being unfit for work however, the Police Manual is silent on the meaning of the word “notify”. Reference to dictionary meanings simply clarify that the verb means “to inform or warn... officially about something” and to “announce or report something officially...”


The current practice within the WA Police Force is to require Members to telephone call their OIC/Manager/Supervisor (where practicable) during the first hour of their intended absence from duty. Although it is cited that this is to provide the OIC/Manager/Supervisor the opportunity to explore options to assist the Member in the recovery and return to work, by forcing Members to telephone call only can and does lead to Members feeling that their personal and employee privacy is being infringed, and/or that they are being pressured into returning to work whilst unfit. There can be several valid reasons why a Member would prefer to communicate their absence from work to an OIC/Manager/Supervisor by a means other than verbally, one such example being mentally unwell. By adopting a more modern approach to how Members and OICs/Managers/ Supervisors can communicate in relation to notification of absence from work, the WA Police Force can foster a more supportive work environment for its Members in this area. Moved: Narelle Kiddey Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

2.18 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to include a definition of a weekend, to ensure police officers get a full weekend off duty. A weekend off only being counted as a weekend off, if the officer has a full day off duty and does not work part of the day into the early hours of the morning. Explanation Currently, there is no definition and officers may be rostered on an afternoon, evening or nightshift finishing in the early hours of the morning and the rest of that day can currently be counted as a weekend off work. It is unfair to include a day off after nightshift as your weekend off when officers have worked up to seven hours of the day and will be fatigued for the remainder of the day off duty. A weekend off should only be counted from a day when no hours are worked. Moved: Ben Giff Seconded: Graham Daisley CARRIED

2.19 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to pay overtime missed meal claims at the same rate of pay as the overtime rate. If an officer works 2.5 hours of overtime at a 1.5 pay rate the 30-minute meal period should also be paid at 1.5 pay rate so the officer will be paid for three hours of overtime instead of 2.5 hours. Explanation Often when working overtime, officers must account for every minute of overtime being paid and feel pressured by supervisors and State Control Centre to not take their overtime meal break that they are entitled to. Due to the unfair pressure put on officers, the missed meal claim should be paid to the officer at the same rate of pay they would be paid if they took the break. If the officer works 2.5 hours and does not take their meal break, they should be able to claim the 30 minutes missed meal as hours worked because if

they took the meal break as entitled they would have worked three hours overtime instead of 2.5 hours and should not be penalised for not taking the allocated break due to pressure from supervisors to finish overtime as quickly as possible. Moved: Ben Giff Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

2.20 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to pay missed meal breaks at the same rate of pay as their work rate for the allocated meal time. Explanation Currently, police officers are paid $6.35 per missed meal with a maximum amount of $31.75 per pay cycle. The officer who missed the meal, worked for their meal break instead and should be paid the same as their usual pay rate. Example: a 50-minute meal break not taken gets paid an allowance of $6.35, instead the officer should be paid for an extra 50 minutes of work to account for the work they did instead of having a meal break. If the officer were to take the meal break instead of continuously working they would most likely accrue overtime to complete the work they did during their meal break and they should be paid accordingly. An officer on a standard hourly rate of $44, working a 10-hour shift would therefore be eligible for a 50-minute missed meal allowance of $36.66, which accounts for the time worked by the officer instead of performing overtime to complete the tasks required. Moved: Ben Giff Seconded: Danny Richmond LOST

2.21 WEST PILBARA BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to allow/facilitate payment of the Annual Leave Travel Concession (Free Pass to the Coast) entitlement immediately upon submission of a claim by the employee. Explanation Currently, the employee is out of pocket for extended periods of time due to purchasing flights well prior to date in order to secure best costings. The employee must then wait until the pay period preceding or of the trip for the entitlement to be paid. Moved: Neil Vanderplank Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

2.22 WEST PILBARA BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to amend the OIC Allowance for Regional WA Officers In Charge to include Detective OICs, ensuring the same allowances and benefits of an OIC are paid. Explanation Currently, a Detective OIC does not enjoy the same benefits i.e. free rent etc. as their uniform/general duties counterparts. This is despite the fact the OICs 35 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


of Detectives’ Offices have a greater area of responsibility often being several sub-districts within their area of responsibility. Moved: Neil Vanderplank Seconded: Dave Groenenberg CARRIED

2.23 WEST PILBARA BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to amend the Country Deployment Allowance (CDA) for all staff who travel overnight away from their work location as part of their duties. Explanation Currently, it is paid to country Members who deploy at out stations and metropolitan Members who travel to the country for operational requirements. RWA officers such as Air Wing, traffic and detectives regularly travel to other locations and are unable to claim, they are often away from their work location more regularly than those deploying. Moved: Neil Vanderplank Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

2.24 GASCOYNE BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police and the State Government to increase the travelling allowance rates contained in the WA Police 2017 Industrial Agreement. Explanation The rates have remained stagnant for quite some time and no longer reflect the true cost of living in regional WA. Members are continuously exceeding the rates to purchase a reasonable meal whilst travelling or relieving at various locations. Moved: Darren Wood Seconded: Michelle Jose CARRIED

2.25 WEST PILBARA BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police that subject to an officer’s performance management reviews and meeting current KPIs that a Member, should it be required, can apply for up to double maximum tenure (eight years) in any one location, where tenure is applied. Explanation The reasons for extended tenure in regional WA can be for many and varied reasons including family, personal and professional reasons. This will also in turn save the WA Police Force a significant amount of money, being that each transfer costs an average of about $20,000 if the department can save 100 transfers that are currently being forced due to maximum tenure, there will be a saving of $2 million. Moved: Neil Vanderplank Seconded: Mark Johnson CARRIED

2.26 MURCHISON BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to amend the Deployment Policy to give officers preferential deployment to anywhere in the State upon completion of minimum tenure at a location that 36 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

is classed as ‘hard to fill’ in regional WA, these locations being: Coolgardie, Eucla, Kambalda, Laverton, Leinster, Leonora, Norseman, Fitzroy Crossing, Halls Creek, Wyndham, Cue, Mount Magnet, Mullewa, Marble Bar, Nullagine, Roebourne and Southern Cross. At the moment, these locations receive preferential deployment back to the metropolitan area upon completion of minimum tenure. Explanation Many of the positions above are deemed ‘hard to fill’ as they can be very busy and taxing on the officer’s physical and mental health and are often very remote from the central metropolitan area. Many officers have committed to deployment in these areas and upon completion of minimum tenure (two years) should be given a reward and the opportunity to be given preferential placement for any vacancy within the Agency, should they obviously be a suitable candidate. Many officers who complete minimum tenure have gained valuable experience and knowledge and many do not wish to return to the metropolitan area. They should be rewarded for going to a hard to fill location by being given the opportunity to pick their next position accordingly. Moved: Jake Hendry Seconded: Matt Fogarty CARRIED

2.27 ACADEMY BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to review the current Deployment Policy, Tenure Guidelines HR-14.07.1, to amend HR-14.07.9 Workforce Portfolio to create a new entry under the newly created portfolio of People Capability to classify Police Training Staff as a specialist position, similar to that of State Traffic Operations Division as per HR-14.7.3. Explanation The reason for this review is that currently the Deployment Policy does not identify officers engaged in training as having a specialist skill set, yet those engaged in traffic enforcement duties are. This results in officers attached to the Training and Development Portfolio having to move out of the portfolio after four years and does not recognise the investment in the training and development of officers required to become a skilled trainer. Currently, trainers gain the skills and experience required for their position. They are then forced to transfer due to tenure, risking the loss of the skills they have and the Agency has invested in. The Academy Branch suggest the Deployment Policy is amended to be consistent with the policy relating to State Traffic which allows for those in State Traffic to transfer from traffic unit to traffic unit at the end of their current tenure to maintain their skills set. This would enhanced the training within the WA Police Force by investing in its personnel to create enhanced, professional and capable internal police trainers. Moved: Graham Daisley Seconded: Dave Flaherty LOST


2.28 ACADEMY BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to start preparations for the 2019 Industrial Agreement negotiations, by preparing an advertising campaign which clearly details to the public the difference between the police and other public servants including the positives, negatives and benefits to the public. Explanation During the last Industrial Agreement negotiations, Premier Mr McGowan made it clear he believed the public sector and the WA Police Force were the same, which is why the police should receive the same pay increase as public servants. The Academy Branch propose the WA Police Union engage in an advertising campaign which explains that police officers are sworn into office and are police officers 24/7. The campaign should detail the extra responsibilities on police officers, the impact it has on the officer, their families and the public both negative and positive. The campaign should explain once we finish work we cannot ignore crime or vulnerable members of the public who are at risk, as we have a duty of care not just during our uniform rostered shift, but also when we are “off duty” and are with our family. If a police officer ignores a crime or public safety issue while off duty they actually breach legislation under the Police Act and can/ will be charged with an offence. This is specific to police, it does not apply to the unsworn staff we work with, the local rangers or any other public servant as applies to those employed under the Police Act, as well as under police regulations. It is important to distinguish ourselves from the other government sector employees during this next round. It is also important to make the public aware that just like the last “It’s Tough Enough” campaign, that police are 24 hours a day not just 9-5 police officers. Moved: Graham Daisley Seconded: Dave Flaherty CARRIED

2.29 WEST PILBARA BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to develop a new strategy if negotiations stall for the next Industrial Agreement. This should be done with consultation from Members and other police unions around Australia. Explanation The previous tactics are decades old, tired, dated and no longer seem to work, with the Government not taking any real notice of the same. Moved: Neil Vanderplank Seconded: Danny Richmond CARRIED

2.30 GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to pursue, during the upcoming and future Industrial Agreement (IA) negotiations, that Clause 24 “Disturbance Allowance” of the IA and the “log of claims” be amended to include internet connection under subclause 2b. Explanation Whilst historically it has been considered to be a personal choice and not a necessity to have internet availability at one’s residence this is no longer the

case. In regional WA, there are many locations and blackspots that do not have the mobility of wireless internet. Many Members conduct research and study of a work-related nature in their own hours at home which cannot be effectively completed without the internet. Further, the Department of Education is no longer issuing students with text books for study reference material, instead advising students to research it online. School communication with students and parents is often via the internet, specifically ‘Seqta Connect’. Repeated efforts by a Member in the Great Southern who resides in an internet blackspot to access student information, excursion details and school reports has resulted in the response that it is on ‘Seqta Connect’. When advised that there is no internet available to do so, school staff are unable provide alternatives. The connection to the internet for the education of Member’s families is now a necessity due to the Department of Education’s decisions in regards to requiring students to conduct research online and use the internet as the primary means of communication. The affected Member has as a result in this instance had to install a satellite dish at considerable expense to access internet at home. Moved: Danny Richmond Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

2.31 LICENSING ENFORCEMENT DIVISION BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to conduct a review of the current shift penalty allowances with regard to considering the social impact and work/life balance of Members. Explanation Remunerate officers whose 24/7 commitment to the community significantly impacts the quality time they can spend during the high-value social hours. The impact of the actual hours worked, and the flow-on effect of those hours (after night shift) on the work/life balance rather than the shift’s starting time ought to be the consideration. E.g. For when other friends and family members are free: Friday and Saturday nights; Saturday morning for kids sport, Saturday afternoons for sport, Sundays for family time. Moved: Michael Sedgman Seconded: Anntoinette Cashmore CARRIED

2.32 LICENSING ENFORCEMENT DIVISION BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police include in the Industrial Agreement to cover officers injured in the line of duty, the benefit of being paid all missed shift penalties during the time period of recuperation and/or light duties. Explanation Many officers rely on shift penalties to get by financially and go to specific positions that enable them to earn them. When they are injured in the course of their duties and they are not eligible for criminal compensation, these officers undergo not only the stress of recovering from the injury but the financial stress and burden of dropping back to their base wage through no fault of their own. Moved: Michael Sedgman Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

37

POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


2.33 UPPER GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH

2.35 SERIOUS AND ORGANISED CRIME BRANCH

Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to allow the employee to have the option to decline a WA Police Force provided meal and use the allocated rate in the Industrial Agreement in its place.

Conference directs the Board of Directors to continue to lobby the Commissioner of Police (himself) to abolish maximum tenure in the State Crime Portfolio, specialist units and traffic, in the Perth metropolitan area.

Explanation The meals that have usually been provided in the past are insufficient and of limited quality, choice and value.

Explanation Specialist knowledge is constantly being drained from within the WA Police Force due to staff being forced to leave upon reaching maximum tenure (four years). It is toward the end of this compulsory tenure period that officers have built significant specialist knowledge relating to their respective areas have to move and transfer to areas that have no or little relationship with that specialist knowledge.

Moved: Dorry Grzinic Seconded: Chris Patten CARRIED

2.34 SERIOUS & ORGANISED CRIME BRANCH Conference directs the WAPU Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police (himself) to abolish minimum tenure in the Perth metropolitan area, for officers who are not subject to promotional tenure or first i5 permanent placement. Explanation The WA Police Force currently has a minimum tenure in place which is predominantly two years at work locations for police officers. There is no financial reason to maintain this practice in the Perth metropolitan area which does not incur significant costs associated with transfer. In recent times, the WA Police Force indicated commitment to instigating measures to improve the mental health of police officers who have an extremely difficult job which impacts not only on themselves but on their home life as well. If an officer is truly unhappy at a work location, it is completely unacceptable to force them to remain in that environment. Minimum tenure also masks potentially unacceptable behaviour of supervisors or OICs, as unhappy staff are forced to remain creating a toxic workplace. If there was no minimum tenure, staff would be able to “vote with their feet” and a mass exodus from a work location would force the WA Police Force to properly identify and manage staff, OICs, supervisors and other ranks, behaving improperly. The argument that minimum tenure is required to maintain the stability of an office is flawed. In reality, many officers remain at work locations beyond the two years minimum tenure and where a person is not happy, they can become a disruptive element. WAPU should vigorously press the Commissioner of Police for the removal of minimum tenure requirements in the metropolitan area for the long-term wellbeing of police officers in this State. This motion relates only to the metropolitan area due to the costs associated with transferring police officers to country locations however, the Branch would satisfied minimum tenure to be removed for all positions.

Meanwhile, the continual loss of experienced staff adversely impacts the ability of police to maintain a high standard of service delivery and impacts on the development of officers. It also negatively impacts on the morale of officers wanting to remain and build on their expertise. With officers knowing they have to leave before maximum tenure, there is no way to adequately rotate staff to ensure experience/expertise is maintained. Movement through promotion, resignation and redundancies also adds to the difficulty of maintaining expertise and creates movement in itself. There is so much attrition within the Agency that expertise and experience cannot be maintained to sufficient levels. The natural attrition rate means that officer desirous of working at a particular area will have an opportunity to do so even if maximum tenure is abolished. Local knowledge is imperative due to the size of the metropolitan area and is being lost through forced movement of staff after completion of maximum tenure. Police stakeholders build a relationship with officers and are also adversely affected by movement of staff. It is fiscally irresponsible to move on staff who have received specialist training at this time of financial strain in government. Money saved in constantly retraining staff could be redirected to other areas in the police budget. Other police jurisdictions around Australia have recognised the deficiencies of maximum tenure and largely dispensed with it. The Branch respectfully requests a response directly from the Commissioner and not from his delegate. Moved: Melissa Staples Seconded: Simon Bowen LOST

2.36 WATER POLICE BRANCH The Branch respectfully requests a response directly from the Commissioner and not from his delegate. Moved: Melissa Staples Seconded: Peter Potthoff CARRIED 38 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

Conference directs the Board of Directors to seek clarification from the Commissioner of Police and Executive in regards to why Water Police is not considered a “Specialist Unit”. This includes the application process whether tenure is exempt or a condition of application for a future position at the Water Police.


Explanation Water Police undertake the following duties, as well as general policing: • Marine investigations, policing investigations, vessel / marine and safety compliance, general duties policing, liaising with community and marine stakeholders, police diving operations (commercial diving) including recoveries of deceased’s persons, searches for persons believed to be missing in the vicinity of water, searches for marine related crimes evidence / support to the respective policing districts. • Support to outside agencies such as Australian Border Force in the fight against drug importation and the coordination of running WA Police diving specific courses and continuation training. • Coordination of marine search and rescue incidents State-wide, requiring officers to obtain diplomas and advanced diplomas in both Land Search and Rescue and Marine Search and Rescue. • Instructing and the delivery of WA wide MARSAR courses to support the rural policing districts on how to deal with and take carriage of future incidents. • Commercial vessel operations, high levels of marine upkeep and maintenance, including marine engineering duties and the need to obtain further and relevant qualifications. The Branch is of the firm belief that Water Police as a whole should be considered a “Specialist Unit” given the amount of knowledge, work, time and experienced required to fulfil the above. The Water Police is still stipulated as a “Specialist Unit” on the WA Police Force internet page. Members would like to know the reasons why this is not the case. Moved: Brendan Packard Seconded: John Gobbels CARRIED

The Branch feels any tenure enforcement should be treated on a case by case basis, based on the individual’s attitude, performance, leadership and work ethic. Moved: Brendan Packard Seconded: John Gobbels CARRIED

2.38 WATER POLICE BRANCH Conference directs the Commissioner of Police immediately institute a Specialist Allowance for Water Police officers based on competency and qualifications held by officers to fulfil their duties. Explanation An allowance similar to the TRG 10 per cent allowance is sought for Water Police officers to remunerate them for conducting their unique and taxing roles. Example: A detachment of Water Police; the Water Police Diving Squad conducts on average 80 dive jobs per year, some lasting less than one eight-hour shift, some jobs lasting two weeks in length, from Esperance to Wyndham, from offshore locations to inland dams and mine shafts. The expertise and levels of risk associated with this role is inherently high, ongoing training and qualifications are intense not to mention an average of 3000 man hours per year is spent between eight full time divers to complete the (on average) 80 dive jobs per year. This example is in additional to the other duties and general water policing work our Members conduct. This places extra stress on officers at the unit, rosters, on call SAR roster and leave applications due to ensure minimum crewing of vessels and diving team requirements are met.

2.37 WATER POLICE BRANCH Conference respectfully directs the Commissioner of Police to abolish maximum tenure from all Water Police positions State-wide.

Other “Specialist Units” receive an additional allowance due to the role they fulfil and the Water Police Branch feels it should be the same.

Explanation In light of all the important points raised in the previous motion, the Water Police Branch feels it is in the best interests of the WA Police Force and the public to abolish maximum tenure from Water Police positions to enable officers the time and experience to receive adequate qualifications to fulfil their roles. These roles are diving operations, vessel operations, marine SAR operations and marine investigations.

A great deal of time and effort is spent maintaining physical and mental fitness standards to fulfil the role.

The above areas are subject to officers having qualifications of a commercial grade / standard. Officers are compelled under relevant national laws and safety standards to have enough “sea time” and relevant competency-based task books completed in order to be eligible to receive these qualifications. This of course takes a significant amount of time to complete, in many cases years. As it takes many years to be competent in the subject areas, we feel the WA Police Force and the broader WA community would benefit by having higher level of experienced and qualified police officers to fulfil these roles. By the time officers are receiving these qualifications they are only beginning know their craft and possibly forced to move on due to tenure.

Police divers do not receive an on call allowance but are expected to get a team together should a dive job arise. Australian navy / military divers receive upwards of $40 - $65 per dive per day in “danger pay” and in 2016, the Queensland Police Diving Unit (QPDU) was successful in gaining their police diving officers an approved diving allowance of more than $373 per fortnight under their new EBA award. A great win for their QPS Union. Both military divers and police divers from the other Australian policing states and jurisdictions are trained to the same commercial diving standards as the WA Police Force Diving Squad officers. The Water Police Branch would like to ask the floor, who is qualified and trained, if not us, to pull the bodies out of the Australia Day plane wreckage, the young boys from the river in September 2018, the Port Hedland pilot helicopter crash in May 2018, or search the hulls of 250 metre long ship on 39 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


behalf of Australian Border Force to look for drugs and contraband in all sorts of austere atmospheric conditions and then turn to work the next day and take a stealing IR for a stolen fishing rod from a complainant? Moved: Brendan Packard Seconded: John Gobbels CARRIED

2.39 COMMISSIONED OFFICERS BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to seek inclusion in the next WA Police Industrial Agreement to allow for the provision of pro-rata long service leave as follows: Early Access to pro-rata Long Service Leave (LSL) (a)

Employees within seven years of their preservation age under WA Government superannuation arrangements may, by agreement with their Employer, choose early access to their long service leave at the rate of : (i) 6.5 days per completed twelve (12) month period of continuous service for full time employees in their first period of long service leave accrual; or (ii) 9.28 days per completed twelve (12) month period of continuous service for full time employees in subsequent periods of long service leave accrual.

Part-time employees have the same entitlement as full-time employees, with their entitlement calculated on a pro-rata basis according to any variations to their ordinary working hours during the accrual period. Early access to pro-rata LSL does not include access to long service leave to which the employee has become entitled, or accumulated prior to being within seven years of their preservation age. Under these provisions, LSL can only be taken as paid leave and there is no capacity for payment in lieu of leave. Employees may, by agreement with their employer, clear LSL in minimum periods of one day. Explanation These provisions are as Section 38(12) a-f of the SSTUWA Industrial Agreement 2017, which I am advised were implemented across the education sector. I am currently awaiting additional information from SSTUWA, to get further detail. These provisions essentially allow early access to additional leave, from the age of 47 (if preservation age is 55), with the benefit to the WA Police Force of reducing LSL liabilities, particularly that of accumulated liability upon the retirement/resignation of an officer. An example is a person in my position, I have no annual or long service leave currently available, and my next LSL accrues in March 2019. These provisions would allow me access to almost the entirety of my next LSL today between now and 1 January 2019 when I become entitled to further annual leave. Moved: Noreen O’Rourke Seconded: Mike Daley CARRIED 40 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

2.40 CENTRAL GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police seek a Heating and Cooling Allowance, similar to the electricity subsidy given to staff above the 26th parallel, for all Members in Regional WA. Explanation Officers in the Great Southern are spending an ever increasing amount on heating and cooling their homes. The increase in electricity, gas or wood costs have resulted in regional WA officers spending inordinate amounts of money either cooling or heating their homes. With electricity prices increasing by another seven per cent, officers with reverse cycle air conditioning are paying upwards of $500 every eight weeks. Gas bottle prices cost on average $140 per bottle and wood prices are $650 per 7m x 5m trailer. This is significant cost for regional WA Members to bare when coupled with increasing rents, fuel and commodity prices. Regional WA Members in the north of State have enjoyed subsided energy bills for a long time and it is time Members in the Great Southern who are required to not only spend significant money cooling their homes in the summer months, but have to spend significant amounts in the winter months heating their homes, are compensated with an allowance. Moved: Matt Frankel Seconded: Dorry Grzinic CARRIED

2.41 CENTRAL GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to immediately demand the WA Police Force provide free rent to officers at the Gnowangerup Police Station, in line with other three person stations of similar size, infrastructure and amenity. Explanation Presently, Gnowangerup is one of five, three-person stations, the others being Leeman, Shark Bay, Augusta and Pemberton that are paying rent. With the exception of Gnowangerup those towns are in desirable, tourist orientated locations or on the coast. It appears staff at Gnowangerup are being discriminated against by WA Police Force policy as staff in Lake Grace and Ravensthorpe receive free rent and are very similar Great Southern locations. Further, towns of similar size and amenity that receive free rent include Brookton, Pingelly, Dampier, Three Springs, Yalgoo, Marble Bar, Nullagine, Boyup Brook, Dalwallinu, Wongan Hills and Leinster. Gnowangerup has very little in the way of amenity and the last bank in the town recently closed. There are no major supermarkets or entertainment options. Officers must leave the town to seek rest and relaxation. Further, the attraction and retention payments for the town are only $4000 and $6000 respectively. When the rent free policy was enacted, Gnowangerup had more FTE, believed to be four staff. This was changed by then Superintendent Leekong to three. As such, and considering Gnowangerup is now a three-


person town, it is unfair and discriminatory to expect staff at the station to pay rent, when staff immediately bordering the town (Lake Grace, Ravensthorpe) are rent free. The WA Police Force should immediately address this issue. Moved: Matt Frankel Seconded: Dorry Grzinic CARRIED

WA locations, other than designated regional cities or desirable locations (i.e. coastal), be provided subsided utilities (electricity/gas/water). Explanation Presently, there are officers working in regional areas like Narrogin, Katanning and Gnowangerup who are working in stations that are designated as hard to fill. These towns lack significant amenity and are over two hours from the nearest regional centre. Officers are currently paying top rate rent to reside in their Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) designated properties.

2.42 CENTRAL GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to examine the WA Police Force Rent Free policy regarding three-person stations and to ascertain if Gnowangerup Police Station meets the policy criteria. If so, and rent free status is not provided, Conference directs the Board to demand an explanation from the WA Police Force as to why they are being discriminated against with a view to taking further action. Explanation As per the previous motion, Gnowangerup staff are being discriminated against when towns of similar amenity and size enjoy free rent status. Moved: Matt Frankel Seconded: Dorry Grzinic CARRIED

2.43 CENTRAL GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to immediately demand rent free status for Katanning and Wagin Police Stations. Explanation Presently, both stations are considered hard to fill and attract high attraction and retention bonuses. However when vacancies occur, they remain unfilled for some time. In the case of Katanning, the last two sergeant positions were filled by promotion and the last two constable positions filled by probationary staff. This leaves the station’s operational safety levels low as well as reducing the experience level. Wagin presently has several vacancies and only recently filled on position. The lack of amenity, location and rent costs are seen as a significant deterrent for applicants along with not fit for purpose Government Regional Officer Housing. Katanning has been identified, along with Kellerberrin, as one of the two hardest towns to fill and is one of only two towns to receive the ‘Golden Ticket’ which promises staff who complete minimum tenure, access to vacant positions prior to any other class of employee (i.e. redeployee’ s/ priority placements etc.).

These officers do not have the benefit of living in the metropolitan area or in major regional cities that provide the lifestyle that comes with living in these centres. It is a travesty that these officers continue to pay spiralling rent while also incurring expensive energy bills due to the location they live in. An energy subsidy would take away some of the financial pressure presently being experienced. Such subsidies would also assist in attracting applicants and could be funded as a Royalties for Regions program. Moved: Matt Frankel Seconded: Dorry Grzinic CARRIED

3.0 LEGAL

3.1 EXECUTIVE MOTION Conference directs the Board of Directors lobby the Commissioner of Police to develop and consistently apply a WA Police Force Professional Standards Operating Procedure to notify all subject officers of a request for disclosure of audio recorded interviews, as “evidentiary material” pursuant to the provisions of Section 42 of the Criminal Procedures Act 2004 and that the subject officer be advised prior to the release of such “evidentiary material”. Explanation The Internal Affairs Unit preamble includes that interview/material shall not be released without notification to the subject member. Experience highlights that defence counsels are now frequently requesting such information and using it to discredit officers in court. Additionally, the material is usually not “evidentiary” The welfare of Members and impact of “ambush” tactics are not being considered and nobody appears to be doing anything in this regard and the issue has been known for an extended period of time. Moved: Mark Johnson Seconded: Peter McGee CARRIED

3.2 ACADEMY BRANCH Despite all of these bonuses, both locations continue to struggle in attracting applicants. Discussions with officers who have considered applying, has indicated the rent cost to be a significant disincentive to applying.

Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to review current policy and practise in relation to the disclosure of internal investigation files to defence lawyers.

Moved: Matt Frankel Seconded: Dorry Grzinic CARRIED

Explanation There appears to be a recent trend in criminal cases for defence lawyers requesting internal investigation files regarding police officers. This is to use the information contained within the internal investigation files to discredit the police officers involved in their case. 41

2.44 CENTRAL GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to demand that officers in Regional

POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


The Academy Branch directs that the policy is reviewed to ensure that stringent safeguards are in place to protect officers from malicious and frivolous allegations being disclosed to defence. That those who represent the WA Police Force in court are to challenge these requests, have sufficient training and understanding to challenge the request, and be professionally trained akin to a lawyer. This is not about withholding or hiding information, but instead, protecting police officers from misrepresentation and frivolous allegations, resulting in the unfair damage to the officer’s reputation. Moved: Graham Daisley Seconded: Brandon Shortland CARRIED

3.3 ACADEMY BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the State Government to amend legislation to ensure officers have sufficient protections to prevent malicious and frivolous allegations made against the officer being disclosed during criminal proceedings. Explanation There appears to be a recent trend for criminal defence lawyers to request internal investigation files on police officers. This is to use the information contained within the internal investigation files to discredit the police officers involved in their case. This is not about withholding or hiding information but protecting police officers from misrepresentation and frivolous allegations, resulting in the unfair damage to the officers’ reputation. Moved: Graham Daisley Seconded: Brandon Shortland CARRIED

3.4 MIDLAND WORKSHOPS BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby State Government to amend Section 137 of the Police Act 1892 to protect police officers from civil prosecution (as in 2017 motion). Explanation The drafting of Section 137 of the Act currently leaves individual police officers open to being held personally liable for acts or omissions made in the execution of their duties as an officer of the WA Police Force. Section 137 provides that an individual police officer can be held personally liable for a tort if the plaintiff can prove on a balance of probabilities, that the police officer performed or purported to perform the functions of a member of the WA Police Force, and did so with corruption or malice. This section was amended in 1999 to provide 'clear and unequivocal protection to members of the police service against civil action'. However, section 137 into the Act did not prevent the individual police officers from being sued and being held personally liable in the recent decision of Cunningham. Having carefully surveyed the respective provisions that exist around Australia, we have come to the conclusion Queensland is operating by far the 42 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

preferred model. Pursuant to Section 10.5 of the Police Service Administration Act 1990 (QLD), plaintiffs can only sue the State for alleged tortious activity by police officers and other police public servants acting in an official capacity, not the individual person. This approach has several benefits including certainty to plaintiffs as to whom to name as defendants to civil suits, and avoiding the need for individual police officers to be named as defendants when personal liability is never realistically at stake. The State is then afforded the opportunity to recover a contribution from the individual officer, if the officer acted other than in good faith and with gross negligence. In that way, the right of recovery of the State from an individual police officer in an appropriate case is preserved. Moved: Jeannette Maddison Seconded: John Escobar CARRIED

3.5 UPPER GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police and State Government to immediately seek changes to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Act by removing the maximum payout cap. Explanation Currently, the Criminal Injuries Compensation Act defines the maximum payout amount is capped at $75,000. This includes salary/sick leave and medical costs. If the claim goes over $75,000 then the victim of crime will receive no monetary compensation. This is unfair as the victim’s initial suffering, ongoing treatment and ongoing medical and mental anguish should be taken into account and the Member fairly compensated. Currently, a Member appealed this and lost, which will clearly affect everyone else who is unfortunate enough to suffer an injury that exceeds the cap. It would seem incomprehensible that a victim with a relatively minor injury may end up with some form of financial compensation when a significantly injured victim will have no compensation however, has no doubt suffered horrendously when compared side by side. Moved: Dorry Grzinic Seconded: Graham Daisley CARRIED

3.6 EXECUTIVE MOTION Conference directs the Board of Directors lobby the Commissioner of Police to develop and consistently apply a WA Police Force Professional Standards Operating Procedure that allows for investigating officers to be made aware of matters disclosed to defence and / or the accused when matters are going to trial. Moved: Ward Adamson Seconded: Harry Russell CARRIED

4.0 OPERATIONAL

4.1 EXECUTIVE

Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Federal Government to introduce new Australian Design Rules to require all new vehicles to be fitted with engine immobilisers and GPS tracking to minimise the need for police pursuits.


Explanation The Australian Device Rules should be amended to require all new vehicles are fitted with an engine immobiliser which can be remotely activated. Upon activation, the immobiliser should cause the vehicle to stop and prevent the engine from being restarted once the vehicle’s speed falls below 15 km/ hr. This will prevent the driver losing control of the vehicle in a high speed situation, or losing assisted braking at speed. The vehicle should remain immobilised until a “recovery code” is remotely sent to the unit. Additional to the immobiliser, the vehicle should include a GPS unit which is capable of advising its real time location after the immobiliser is activated. To avoid misuse or suggestions of privacy breaches, it is proposed the code necessary to activate the remote immobiliser and GPS locator be held by the vehicle manufacturer and owner, rather than police or transport authorities. This would mean police could not track a vehicle without the full knowledge, consent and cooperation of its owner. WAPU proposes any changes be implemented with an effective date of 1 January 2021 to allow industry time to adjust to the proposed changes. Moved: Harry Russell Seconded: Brandon Shortland CARRIED

4.2 SEX CRIMES DIVISION BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to provide funding for Varidesks for all personnel in order to prevent poor seating positions and associated long-term adverse health issues by assisting with posture, movement and not remaining seated for long periods of time. Explanation Currently Members in the Sex Crime Division spend considerable amount of time seated at their desks to carry out investigations and management of sex offenders. The chairs provided are not all the same, many are worn and no longer operate properly due to constant use leading to poor posture. Currently, only a Member with an injury and a medical certificate can obtain a Varidesk. It is noted that all members of the Executive of the WA Police Force have all been issued Varidesks thereby setting a precedent. The detrimental effects of sitting for long periods have now been well recognised. The Varidesks will encourage staff to break the sitting down periods, encourage movement, promote good health and increase productivity in an office environment. Moved: Cliff Daurat Seconded: Simon Bowen CARRIED

4.3 MIDLAND BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police and State Government to purchase and provide ongoing support to provision of ‘Body Worn Video’ (BWV) cameras to all frontline officers. Explanation Whilst other policing jurisdictions in Australia and overseas have introduced BWV cameras to provide officers, agencies and courts with the best possible video evidence of police officer interactions with the public; and to assist in the deterrence of unwarranted aggression and complaints towards officers; the WA Police Force and State Government have to date failed to provide access to such technology in an ongoing basis to Members in WA.

Moved: Narelle Kiddey Seconded: Jason Mora CARRIED

4.4 EASTERN GOLDFIELDS BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to increase funding and improve training availability for Members in regional WA, and to remove inequities imposed in funding travel to Joondalup Academy for courses. Explanation It is well known that Members in regional WA are disadvantaged by virtue of their location to access training opportunities in Perth. The main reason given is that there is no funding available, particularly with respect to courses where attendance is funded by districts. If district level funding is used, there is sometimes inconsistencies in the method of travel between nearby stations. In one example, a Member in Kalgoorlie was instructed to attend Joondalup using train travel from Kalgoorlie to Perth. This involves a six-hour and 40-minute journey, with taxi travel on top of that from East Perth to Joondalup. A Member from Kambalda was attending the same course, and was permitted by the district to travel by vehicle to Kalgoorlie (30-minute journey) and then fly to Perth and taxi to the Academy, approximately a two-hour 30-minute travel time. Effectively, the station loses a Member for two days in the case of Kalgoorlie travel and only one day in the case of Kambalda travel (return journeys). A Member attending a separate course that was funded by Professional Development Division was allowed to travel from Kalgoorlie to Perth by air travel, as specifically mentioned in the joining instructions. This shows the differences between some courses that are district or centrally funded. It is this Branch’s opinion that travel for all courses should be funded centrally, with an increase in the funding amount to allow for the quickest available means of transport to be used by all Members to reduce the time away from the workplace and family. By districts having to fund attendance at some courses, restrictions are being placed on numbers able to attend and the means of transport. Moved: Kevin Guy Seconded: Dave Curtis CARRIED

4.5 GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to ensure the standardised matrix for medium / high risk planned warrants be utilised accurately and the appropriately trained Members be deployed utilising the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). Explanation Utilising the appropriate trained officers and PPE will reduce the amount of serious injuries sustained by personnel. Moved: Danny Richmond Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

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4.6 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to implement uniform options of polo shirts. Explanation When arresting people, becoming involved in a scuffle or foot chase the current blue dress shirts immediately untuck, show up every tiny sweat patch, get crinkled and make officers look incredibly dishevelled and messy. The navy undershirts are more comfortable and don’t normally untuck. However, for Members who are unable to wear load bearing vests due to back issues, polo shirts are not an uniform option. The navy polo shirt does not show sweat patches, does not crinkle up in dynamic situations, is more comfortable, cooler in summer, does not untuck and looks neater on a frontline officer performing functions of their job. They look more professional on officers who often have to perform strenuous activities during their shift where the blue dress shirt is not practical for those functions. The polo shirt being the same colour as the undershirt would create a uniformed appearance across the WA Police Force. WITHDRAWN

4.7 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to implement operational frontline shorts. Explanation Many other agencies like the Department of Fisheries have operational shorts available to officers. Water Police and other areas in WA Police have operational shorts and this Branch believes access to shorts should be extended to all frontline officers. The cargo pants do not breathe in summer and cause officers to overheat and become sweaty. Moved: Ben Giff Seconded: Tim Saxon CARRIED

4.8 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to allow all frontline officers to choose to wear their operational overalls in lieu of cargo pants and shirts. Explanation The operational overalls are more comfortable than the blue dress shirt and cargo pant combination for many Members. They look more professional in a frontline role as there is no shirt that can untuck, they do not get wrinkled or show sweat patches. Currently, officers’ shirts untuck during arrests, foot chases and searching while bending down, often showing the public their bare skin on backs or stomachs. It is messy and unprofessional. Other agencies like SJA allow their officers to wear either operation overalls or a combination of a top and pants. Many areas, police officers already wear overalls as uniform of the day and it should be extended to 44 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

all frontline officers. The overalls would match the operational undershirt in appearance and colour and create a more uniformed appearance on the frontline. Moved: Ben Giff Seconded: Jade Shepley LOST

4.9 JOONDALUP BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to review in car TADIS, AVL and mapping and provide software updates to bring the WA Police Force in line with other modern policing jurisdictions. Explanation Current TADIS, AVL and mapping are unreliable and not accurate. Many streets are not on TADIS maps which makes it difficult to locate jobs and police officers who request urgent backup. TADIS searches often don’t work or run too slowly for officers to search the backgrounds of POIs so they do not receive all the security and pertinent information, putting their safety at risk. AVL has shown vehicles in completely different suburbs to where they are actually located and shown officers at travelling at high speed when they are stationary. This is an extreme safety risk for officers requesting backup or urgent backup if they are not in a position to advise of their location and AVL locations. It is putting officers and members of the public’s lives at risk by delaying appropriate resources to respond where and when they are required. Mapping on mobile phones can pinpoint locations to an accuracy of two metres while AVL mapping has been getting entire suburbs wrong. Moved: Ben Giff Seconded: Tim Saxon CARRIED

4.10 MIDLAND BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police and State Government to purchase and provide ongoing support to provision of portable smart devices/technology to frontline officers that will provide them with the real-time information that they require to do a dangerous job as safely as possible. Explanation Other policing jurisdictions in Australia and overseas have introduced both in-car and portable smart device technology such as tablet devices and TADIS to provide officers with real-time access to information and systems to enable them to do their jobs efficiently and as safely as possible. The WA Police Force and State Government have to date failed to provide access to such technology on an ongoing basis to Members in WA. Moved: Narelle Kiddey Seconded: Jason Mora CARRIED

4.11 UPPER GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to reinstate or be given an allocation to a tunic uniform for (not limited to) special events and officer funerals.


Explanation Currently, when attending funerals for our fallen colleagues all manner of uniform and plain clothes dress is worn by serving and retired Members. This looks shabby and appears disrespectful to our fallen colleagues. Moved: Dorry Grzinic Seconded: Matt Fogarty CARRIED

4.12 UPPER GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the board of directors to lobby the Commissioner and the Minister for Police to immediately implement a formal funeral protocol and protocols for receiving fallen Members when their bodies arrive at airports from rural areas (or from interstate or overseas). Explanation When one of our Members dies suddenly in regional WA, often their body is transferred to Perth by plane. There is no formal acknowledgement of their arrival. The Branch is not suggesting marching bands however, a salute from the appropriate Assistant Commissioner (or higher) in the previously mentioned dress uniform is appropriate. The general public would be disappointed to learn that the WA Police Force do not respect its workers enough to see them out in an appropriate fashion. Evidence of other police jurisdictions (e.g. USA) and the manner in which their fallen comrades are received should highlight the disparity. Moved: Dorry Grzinic Seconded: Graham Daisley CARRIED

4.13 WATER POLICE BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to re-introduce an Agency wide swim test for all operational frontline WA police officers. Explanation The WA Police Force used to require a swim test Agency wide for its frontline officers. The Water Police Branch feels that being a large coastal state with over 13,000kms of coastline it is important from a duty of care perspective that police officers have the ability and option to render assistance where appropriate “to save a life”. By no means is the Branch compelling officers or directing them to place themselves at risk however, having the capability is only a positive initiative and a reasonable public expectation. Currently, the WA Police Force does not require prospective applicants to the Agency to be proficient in any aquatic life saving skills. Water Police Branch believe this to be inadequate given that the Agency is the SAR authority in relation to marine search and rescue incidents. Under these recruitment arrangements it is possible for a current police officer to be recruited to Water Police without having to prove any swimming or aquatic life saving capabilities (non-swimmer). There have been instances where a Water Police asset/s or volunteer asset is some time away from an incident location where a frontline unit could be available to attend the coastal or river area but instead waits for Water Police to attend. It portrays public confidence and may remind officers that

the Agency supports them if they conduct a reasonable risk assessment they have that capability to assist to “save a life”. An envisaged swim test would be similar to that of a “Bronze Medallion” accreditation standard which could incorporate a three-minute tread water, 100 metre swim and a 50 metre tow with a victim. Moved: Brendan Packard Seconded: Neil Vanderplank CARRIED

4.14 MANDURAH BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to request the Commissioner of Police to amend policy and make it a mandatory requirement that police are provided with a WA Police Force utility knife and pouch for the operational belt. Explanation On 6 September 2018, Mandurah police officers attended an incident where an overweight woman was attempting suicide by hanging. Officers arrived to find that she was hanging by the rope and was barely clinging to life. Due to her weight, one officer alone was not able to hold her up to relieve pressure on her neck. Luckily one of the officers carries a utility knife on his person and was able to hold the woman up and cut her free saving her life. Had he have to run back to his vehicle to retrieve a knife from his kit bag or did not have a personal knife with him at all then this woman would likely have passed away. Traffic officers have also noted that they require access to knives in traffic crashes to cut people free from seatbelts. It appears to be a massive oversight that a utility knife is not deemed a basic and necessary tool for all officers to be provided and carry at all times. We direct the Board to change this policy for the safety and wellbeing of officers and members of the public immediately. Moved: Jade Shepley Seconded: Scott Sulley CARRIED

4.15 NORTH EASTERN GOLDFIELDS Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to approve the use of flexi-cuffs in regional WA, particularly in remote areas, in the event that sufficient handcuffs are not available at the time of use. Explanation Officers in regional WA, particularly in remote areas, frequently conduct patrols where there is no, or minimal, backup to assist in a timely manner, leaving the Members to deal with sometimes large and unruly groups with no assistance. Should the Members be faced with more than two persons requiring the use of handcuffs, for officer safety or to prevent harm to the persons, they are hamstrung and potentially at risk in not being able to restrain additional persons. The provision of flexi-cuffs (with requisite training and cutters) will enhance the ability of Members to safely gain control of a situation requiring the restraint of multiple persons. Police Manual FR-01.07.1 provides the ability for the Corporate Use of Force Committee to approve the use of approved flexi-cuffs to business units however, they seem to be restricted to some units based in the metropolitan area (TRG) and not out in regional areas where they would be of most benefit. Moved: Kevin Maguire Seconded: Dave Curtis CARRIED

45

POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


4.16 MANDURAH BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to immediately provide additional customer service officer (CSO) coverage for Mandurah Police Station on Sundays to bring us into line with other 24hour stations in the district. Explanation Currently, Mandurah Police Station does not provide CSO coverage for Sundays. The other 24 hour central stations such as Fremantle, Joondalup, Armadale, Cannington, Midland, Mirrabooka and Perth all have some level of CSO services be it a day shift, afternoon shift or both. Mandurah Police Station needs to be provided with the same level of coverage as other stations to ensure fairness and equal opportunities. This is also a safety issue as Mandurah runs a 24-hour front counter which is known to be very busy on weekends. Additional staffing is required to maintain station security and the ability to provide a timely and appropriate level of service. Moved: Jade Shepley Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

4.17 AVON BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to ensure all business units have sufficient resources to undertake their duties. Explanation Wheatbelt DSU which entails the district prosecutors, district FPU, district LEU and district YCIO’s until recently they had no vehicles assigned to their business unit. Now the situation is all the business areas share one vehicle that was taken from another operational area. When the district prosecutor is away undertaking circuit duties, the other business units have to borrow a vehicle from elsewhere or alternatively reduce their productivity until the vehicle returns. Moved: Dave Flaherty Seconded: Mike Daley CARRIED

4.18 AVON BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to ensure all frontline vehicles are fitted with a secure area for the safe transport of offenders. Explanation A recent event in Toodyay saw a male person arrested and due to the offender’s behaviour, the attending officers had to struggle to restrain the offender on the roadside, applying handcuffs whilst waiting for a second vehicle with a secure pod to arrive. The prolonged struggle and risk of injury could have been avoided if their patrol vehicle was equipped with a secure stop screen or similar. Officer safety is being jeopardised. Moved: Dave Flaherty Seconded: Mike Daley CARRIED

4.19 AVON BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of 46 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

Police to immediately review and introduce an Emergency Driving Policy that protects our Members that are going about their sworn duties in good faith. Explanation The current Emergency Driving Policy fails to protect Members who go about their duties in good faith. An intercept of a vehicle can change to a pursuit without any change in circumstances. Example: A recent incident on Great Eastern Highway, a VKI BOLO, resulted in a marked police vehicle attempting to stop (intercept) a suspect/offending driver who was endangering other drivers. The offending vehicle did not stop and continued on its path, the operational officers advised VKI of the vehicle not stopping. The vehicle’s manner of driving didn’t change and the on duty police continued to follow. In short, the officers where subject to an internal complaint, for breaching the pursuit guidelines as they were now involved in a pursuit whilst not having the appropriate qualifications. Moved: Dave Flaherty Seconded: Mike Daley CARRIED

5.0 WELFARE

5.1 EXECUTIVE Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the State Government to urgently increase staffing numbers at the Sex Offender Management Squad (SOMS) to allow the Squad to safely manage its increased case load after the implementation of the proposed High Risk Offenders Act and changes to Community Protection Offender Reporting Act. Explanation Currently, SOMS only has 48 FTE even though the Minister of Police Michelle Roberts said in 2004 the Squad would have up to an additional 90 staff by 2012. The proposed High Risk Offenders Act and changes to Community Protection Offender Reporting Act will increase the workload for the Squad and so far there have been no additional resources allocated. Additionally, no additional resources have been allocated to regional WA to manage the increase workload expected by these changes. The recommended case load per officer is 40 medium risk offenders and current actual case load is approximately 100 per officer in some cases. This is putting additional workload and stress onto each officer in the Squad and is ultimately putting the public at potential risk as the officers are struggling to cope with the workload. Moved: Brandon Shortland Seconded: Peter McGee CARRIED

5.2 EXECUTIVE Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the State Government to urgently increase staffing numbers in regional WA to safely manage its increased case load after the implementation of the proposed High Risk Offenders Act and changes to Community Protection Offender Reporting Act. Explanation Currently, there are no staff allocated in regional areas to manage nearly 1,000 registered sex offenders. This task is being managed by frontline officers in an ad-hoc capacity on top of their general day-to-day duties.


The proposed High Risk Offenders Act and changes to Community Protection Offender Reporting Act will increase the workload for officers in regional WA and so far there have been no additional resources allocated. Moved: Mick Gill Seconded: Dave Flaherty CARRIED

5.3 EXECUTIVE Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to develop and consistently apply a new alternative to the current practice of stand aside and stand down options for Members who have been involved in a Critical Incident Involving Police (CIIP). An alternative option would consist of “Administrative Leave” or similar, at full pay. During this leave, Members would be required to meet with Health, Welfare and Safety psychiatrist. The psychiatrist would then make a determination when the Member can return to active duties. In the case of a firearm incident, the Member would be required to complete critical skills training prior to returning to duty. In the case of an Emergency Driving/Pursuit resulting in serious injury or death, the Member involved is required to complete the requisite driving qualification course. Explanation Stand down, stand aside or the removal of Members from operational tasking has a significant and enduring impact on the Members’ physical, emotional and mental wellbeing. This is particularly evident where a Member is stood down and effectively removed from their support network by preventing contact with other officers and attendance at police premises. The welfare aspect of the Member being subject to the investigation, is frequently given less consideration that the investigative process, procedure and requirements. Members are treated vastly different from any other person subject to allegations/investigation. Consideration of the Members’ emotional and physical wellbeing must be a significant contributing factor to determine action to stand aside or informally remove them from operational duties. The relevant district superintendent’s advice to accept “management responsibility” of the affected Member (stood aside or removed form operational tasking) in the workplace, must be the influencing factor in such action being taken. The utmost importance should be placed upon getting the Member back to active duties in as small a timeframe as possible, to limit the emotional and psychological impact experienced. Far more stress is endured by Members post-event from the Agency’s treatment and extended timeframes for investigation, than the trauma of the event itself. Moved: Mark Johnson Seconded: Jason Mora CARRIED

5.4 EXECUTIVE Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to develop and consistently apply a WA Police Force Professional

Standards Policy/Procedure to adhere to the principles of natural justice and procedural fairness and that a subject officer should be served with a Notice of Complaint in writing. The notice articulates the allegation(s) and will contain sufficient information for the subject officer to know what is to be investigated, by whom and a definitive timeframe to be provided, allowing the Member to appropriately respond. Explanation Allegations against police do not always arise from complaints from the public and there are instances where officers may be suspected of having committed a criminal or disciplinary offence either as a result of a complaint, an allegation from a fellow officer or from some other source, which may result in a formal investigation. In any such case, officers may be subject to both a criminal investigation and an internal managerial / disciplinary investigation. Where there is a criminal investigation an officer has the same rights as any individual who is investigated for an alleged criminal offence under the provisions of the Criminal Investigation Act 2006. Currently, the extent of the allegation of complaint may not be known until the subject officer is requested to undergo a criminal or managerial interview. This may be several weeks/months after a complaint was received and an internal investigation commenced. And the request for interview may come only a few days prior to an interview being scheduled. To adhere to the principles of natural justice and procedural fairness a subject officer should be served with a Notice of Complaint in writing. There are documented instances where Members subject to allegations have formally requested and been declined any particulars of allegations levelled against them until they are present and interviewed by investigating officers. The physical and emotional welfare of Members are not properly considered and such actions against “suspects” or civilians personnel subject to allegations border on criminal and breaches of civil rights. Disciplinary investigations undertaken in other Government and WA public sector jurisdictions adhere to procedural fairness and natural justice principles where the Internal Affairs Unit does not. Moved: Mick Gill Seconded: Harry Russell CARRIED

5.5 EXECUTIVE Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to develop and consistently apply a WA Police Force Professional Standards Operating Risk Matrix to reflect the nature of offences (allegations), criteria and requirements for utilising Police Force Regulations powers when determining action to stand down or stand aside a Member subject to a criminal investigation, while the criminal investigation is undertaken. At such time when a criminal investigation is concluded, and the Member (if stood down during the investigation) is charged criminally, should then be stood aside and allocated duties, other than the Members’ usual duties until the prosecution case is concluded. 47 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


Further, where a Member is subject to a disciplinary (managerial) investigation, the Member only ever be: (i) Informally removed from operational tasking (remaining at their station or office) by the district superintendent; or (ii) Stood aside and allocated duties, other than the Members’ usual duties, until the disciplinary matter is concluded. Explanation Examples of the inconsistent application of the above power to stand down, stand aside or remove Members from operational tasking has a significant and enduring impact on the Members’ physical, emotional and mental wellbeing. Various allegations against Members, of differing severity, are not treated consistently but professional conduct and the welfare aspect of the Member being subject to the investigation, is frequently given less consideration than the investigative process, procedure and requirements. Members are treated vastly different from any other persons subject to allegations/investigation. Acceptance that during the separate criminal investigation phase (from the managerial process to come), an officer may be stood down and removed from his/her workplace while the inquiry is undertaken so as not to “contaminate or interfere” with the other witnesses. Following conclusion of any criminal investigation where criminal charges are preferred, the Member be afforded the “presumption of innocence” and be stood aside and allocated duties, other than the Members’ usual duties, until the matter is concluded. Where a member is subject to managerial/disciplinary investigation and allegations are sustained, the Member only be: (i) Informally removed from operational tasking (remaining at their station or office) by the district superintendent; or (ii) Stood aside and allocated duties, other than the Members’ usual duties, until the disciplinary matter is concluded. Consideration of the Members’ emotional and physical wellbeing must be a significant contributing factor to determine action to stand aside or informally remove them from operational duties and that the relevant district superintendent’s advice to accept “management responsibility” of the affected Member (stood aside or removed form operational tasking) in the workplace, be the influencing factor in such action being taken. Moved: Jason Mora Seconded: Harry Russell CARRIED

5.6 EXECUTIVE Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the State Government to introduce presumptive legislation for police and other emergency service workers with respect to a range of specific illnesses, including post-traumatic stress disorder. Explanation Police officers face a range of hazardous and life-threatening situations on a daily basis. They not only attend fire sites but may also be exposed to clandestine drug labs and bodily fluids through frequent interactions with drug-affected individuals. In addition they are exposed to the aftermath of murders, suicides, sudden infant deaths, fatal traffic accidents and other 48 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

traumatic incidents. Repeated exposure to these types of incidents can induce post-traumatic stress disorder in some individuals. There is an undeniable correlation between mental illness and the repeated exposure to traumatic incidents. This must be recognised and included in presumptive legislation for police officers. Currently, Tasmania is the only jurisdiction in Australia that reverses the onus of proof and presumes PTSD in emergency service workers is work-related. Presumptive legislation for PTSD exists in Canada, which has led the way in this field. Moved: Brandon Shortland Seconded: Anntoinette Cashmore CARRIED

6.0 GOVERNMENT REGIONAL OFFICER HOUSING (GROH) 6.1 EASTERN WHEATBELT BRANCH

Conference condemns the State Government for its poor treatment of regional WA police officers through the continued increased Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) rents. Explanation The State Government’s GROH rent increases for regional WA officers continue to be greater than the $1,000 pay increases. While rents are decreasing in the metropolitan area, regional WA officers are continuing to be discriminated against through the unjustified increase of rents. Many regional WA officers are considering obtaining private rentals to ‘guts out’ their tenure, before returning the metropolitan area. Attracting officers to regional WA is becoming a significant challenge and will continue to be so. Moved: Dayna Rigoir Seconded: Mike Daley CARRIED

6.2 EASTERN GOLDFIELDS BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to insist to Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) that the practice of tradespersons, or other persons not authorised by the tenant, letting themselves into Member’s residences using keys (provided by either GROH, or if a leased property, by the rental agent), cease forthwith, unless arrangements have been made with the Member/tenant direct. GROH is also to be asked to communicate this to lessors and real estate agents that have control over property maintenance in the case of leased properties. Explanation Although this is allowed for under Section 46 of the Residential Tenancies Act, the Act also states that 72 hours’ notice be given to the tenant, which does not frequently occur. Policing in the current world’s political climate, is a dangerous job and we are frequently reminded to take care of our personal security. Instances occur frequently, particularly with leased premises, where tradespeople are attending to affect repairs without any advance notice. While we do want repairs affected in timely manner, the fact that they are provided keys by real estate agents and let themselves in is a huge breach of our personal security. Not every tradesperson has been security vetted, and could have affiliations to organisations that would be of risk to police officer tenants (outlaw motorcycle gang or other criminal/political/interest motivated groups).


Police officer’s homes have all manner of uniform items present which would identify them as such, or that could be used by some other person for nefarious purposes. We do not want people, who we do not know, in our houses unsupervised. Moved: Kevin Guy Seconded: Dave Curtis CARRIED

6.3 EASTERN GOLDFIELDS BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to liaise with Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) to establish what rights a tenant has, in respect to maintenance timetables not being kept, to have emergency or urgent repairs carried out and reimbursed, and to discuss compensation if these maintenance timetables are not kept. Explanation A normal public tenant has the rights under Section 43 of the Residential Tenancies Act to arrange repairs in the event they cannot contact the lessor, or repairs are not conducted in a timely fashion. Quite often in remote areas, it is not for urgent repairs to wait several days, if not weeks. This also occurs in major regional areas, despite the various trades being ‘on tap’. Section 43 in part provides a definition as: urgent repairs , in relation to residential premises, means repairs to the premises that are necessary — (a) for the supply or restoration of a service prescribed in the regulations as an essential service; or (b) to avoid — (i) exposing a person to the risk of injury; or (ii) exposing property to damage; or (iii) causing the tenant undue hardship or inconvenience The Department of Commerce website, when talking about rights of a tenant, mentions that a temporary rent reduction may be a means of compensating a tenant for undue delay in effecting repairs, and this should also be available to GROH tenants. If the Government’s aim is for GROH tenants to pay market/ near market rents, then we should be getting the same benefits as private tenants can have. Moved: Kevin Guy Seconded: Dayna Rigoir CARRIED

6.4 UPPER GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to implement a form of Housing Allowance for officers who have purchased their own property instead of utilising Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) exclusively.

The current rent increases are not consistent with rental prices in the public domain, which have fallen substantially with the decline in real estate market, throughout the State. Notwithstanding the recent spate of automatic rent increases, this now diminishes the ‘real’ value of subsidised rental benefits to an officer. These increases coupled with stagnant and decreased interest rates don’t actually equate to “subsidised rent” any longer as the monetary difference in officer purchase versus GROH rent is much smaller and more attractive considering housing availability and choices to suit each officer’s personal needs. Regional WA is saving a tremendous amount of money by not fulfilling their housing obligation and this Branch would like to see an allowance paid to offset some of the costs that are associated with own purchase due to the reasons officers choose to purchase their own residence. Ultimately, consideration should also be given to allow a Housing Allowance that allows the officer themselves to choose a private rental, GROH “subsidised” rental or their own purchase. NT Police currently utilise a similar allowance that places the choice with the individual officer and pays an allowance to cover either some, part or all of the housing costs. In essence, it is the officer’s individual choice and personal circumstances that dictate which option they will choose however, the underlying ingredient is their ability to receive an allowance to assist in that decision making process. This in turn benefits the employee/employer relationship by strengthening the important family home situation which is seen as a core element for modern policing. Moved: Dorry Grzinic Seconded: Glenn Wishart CARRIED

6.5 AVON BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to provide an alternative system to Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) in regional WA. The system proposed is to provide officers with an opt-in program where a weekly $300 allowance (or a rate relevant to the local rental market) be provided in lieu of GROH. Explanation The WA Police Force pays exorbitant amounts of money to GROH for what is, in many cases sub-standard, inadequate or poorly maintained housing. Officers opting to avail themselves to the allowance will source their own housing solution. This will ensure that officers live in a home/unit they choose at a suitable standard. This will reduce the conflict and stress caused, save the WA Police Force money and many work hours currently directed to housing issues. WITHDRAWN

6.6 MIDLAND BRANCH Explanation Several officers in regional WA have purchased their own properties instead of renting in provided GROH accommodation. Some of the reasons officers have done this is (not limited to): • excessive delays in housing availability; • the supplied GROH is of poor standard; • poorly located; • poorly maintained; and • the housing is impractical and inadequate to the officer’s lifestyle.

Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the State Government to reverse the recent $30 per week increase to Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) rental costs for regional WA officers. Explanation The Federal Government has announced an increase in percentage share of GST revenue to be allocated to WA from 30 per cent to a minimum of 70 per 49 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


cent (on the dollar) per annum. In addition, State Government continues to refuse to back down on the $1,000 pay increase per year to all public service personnel. The increase of $30 per week equates to $1,560 per year which is greater than the pay rise adopted in the 2017 Industrial Agreement, leaving Members worse off financially. Moved: Narelle Kiddey Seconded: Danny Richmond CARRIED

6.7 LEEUWIN NATURALISTE BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to amend the restriction on obtaining Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) from owning a house within a 50km radius to owning a property accessible by road within 50kms. Explanation A Member recently appointed to Busselton Police Station was prevented from obtaining a GROH property by the fact that he owns a house in Donnybrook. Whilst this property fell just within the 50km radius, it is a 67km drive by the most direct route which includes low quality, unlit country roads which are frequently subject to wildlife and cattle on them. The safety of Members should be a paramount consideration and the radius test does not take into consideration the actual distance required to be travelled by Members, nor the country driving conditions they are subject to. Similarly, fatigue management issues should be considered, with Members often subject to shift work and overtime prior to having to undertake such a drive. Moved: Tim Saxon Seconded: Dave Curtis CARRIED

6.8 EASTERN WHEATBELT BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Commissioner of Police to ensure that any rescinded Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) properties, are not to be re-used again by the WA Police Force until the particular GROH property is improved to a minimum standard. Explanation As demand for GROH increases, regional WA officers are dealing with an increase is in the WA Police Force re-using GROH properties which have previously been rescinded. Often these houses have not been improved to a minimum standard. These houses are been allocated to incoming new staff, who are unaware of the previous housing issues, until they actually move in. Moved: Dayna Rigoir Seconded: Mike Daley CARRIED

6.9 CENTRAL GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs that the Board of Directors demand the WA Police Force absorb in full the Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) rent increases in 2018 and 2019. Explanation In the last 12 months, GROH rents have increased by $60 per week, while at the same time, rental values in the Perth metropolitan area have declined. Further, the rent increases are unfairly disadvantaging regional WA officers as the pay rise provided does not cover the rent increase, leaving officers $560 a year worse off. If this and the next rent increase are passed on, this will leave officers $1120 a year worse off in 2018, and $1680 a year worse off in 2019. This significantly disadvantages those officers when compared to officers in free rent locations or metropolitan Perth. This financial impost will serve as a deterrent to police applying for locations where GROH rent is paid, increasing vacancy numbers at those stations and in turn, increasing officer safety in those locations. Furthermore, regional WA officers in GROH payable locations do not have access to the same level of infrastructure and amenities as those in Perth, yet will be paying almost Perth level pricing which further disincentives when considering whether to apply for a regional WA position. Any decision to pass on the increase is an unfair method of fiscal equalisation against a small number of officers. Moved: Matt Frankel Seconded: Dorry Grzinic CARRIED

6.10 CENTRAL GREAT SOUTHERN BRANCH Conference directs the Board of Directors to lobby the Regional WA Portfolio for better housing conditions and parity with other Government departments regarding Government Regional Officer Housing (GROH) and decisions made with regard GROH issues. Explanation Too often, decisions on GROH properties are taken by the Executive Manager with an unfair emphasis towards the financial cost as opposed to the interests of RWA members. Recent newly built housing is not suitable for families with little to no backyard and RWA officers when transferring are given NO say with regards where they will live. While the Branch understands financial implications need to be considered, a particular decision is made to the detriment of officer comfort or suitability of housing. There is a strong feeling amongst the Branch that the current Executive Manager of Regional WA has little to no regard for the impact his decisions have on individual Members and that he focusses to heavily of the financial aspects of individual decisions. It is felt there is an unfair bias in his decision making and the Branch wanted to move a vote of no confidence in the Executive Manager. Moved: Matt Frankel Seconded: Dorry Grzinic CARRIED

50 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


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HEALTH

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Take it to heart AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE Association General Manager Vince Kelly is urging middle aged cops to keep an eye on their health – particularly around heart health and brain health. Here is his story: A little inconvenience is better than ending up dead in your 50s when you could have lived until you were 70 or 80.

I was at home in bed one Sunday evening and thought I’ve got chest pains. I couldn’t figure out why. I thought I’m fit and healthy now, I don’t really need to worry about it but I said to my wife we’d better go, just in case. So we went. I got checked out. I spent the night in hospital – but what’s one night in hospital? If you’ve got persistent headaches, knowing the amount of people who die from stroke and heart disease, if you’ve got those problems, go to the doctor or go to the hospital, get it checked out. There was a police officer that died recently and, without knowing the full circumstances, I know the guy and I think he sacrificed his own health for the benefit of other people in the community regularly for over 20 years. That’s why I really want to encourage middle aged cops – particularly the male cops, because they’re the problem most of the time – to be conscious of your own health and not ignore the warning signs. In 2017 alone, Police Health paid out $4.28 million in Cardiac related claims.

If I have a problem in my chest and I’ve got a chest pain, I go to the doctor or go to the hospital. Not to do that is just foolish. The good thing about going in with chest pain to an emergency ward is you don’t wait. Males made up 64 per cent of Police Health members who made a Cardiac related hospital claim last year. After the night I went to hospital with chest pains, with the follow up treatment, they did detect that I’ve got a murmur in my heart. It’s no big deal and it’s not an ongoing medical issue, but I would never have known unless I’d gone and got checked. I said to my wife on the way to the hospital – if we hadn’t gone and I hadn’t woken up in the morning, and it had been something that was treatable and preventable, that she’d probably never forgive me. It seems inconvenient at the time but a little inconvenience is better than ending up dead in your 50s when you

KNOW THE SIGNS Dial triple zero (000) and ask for an ambulance if you suspect that you, or someone you know, is having a heart attack. Heart attack warning signs can vary from person to person, and they may not always be sudden or severe. According to healthdirect.gov.au, symptoms of a heart attack can include: • Chest pain – the chest can the jaw, neck, arms, shoulders • Feeling weak or light-headed. feel like it is being pressed and back. • An overwhelming feeling or squeezed by a heavy • Shortness of breath. of anxiety. object, and pain can • An awareness of you heart • Nausea. radiate from the chest to beat or 'palpitations'. • Cold sweat. If you have any of the symptoms above, you could be having a heart attack. If your symptoms are severe, get worse quickly or last longer than 10 minutes call triple zero (000) immediately and ask for an ambulance. If calling triple zero (000) does not work on your mobile try calling 112. Early treatment could save your life. For more information see: • Health Direct: www.healthdirect.gov.au/heart-attack • Heart Foundation: 13 11 12 or www.heartfoundation.org.au

could have lived until you were 70 or 80 with just a small amount of treatment. Just go to the hospital straightaway. I also encourage all my staff, any cop that I meet, to join Police Health. I actively promote it all the time. I try and push people into it for everyone’s benefit, because I do understand Police Health more than most and the fact that they turn their money back into member benefits. I mean, a lot of other health funds don’t do that. I’ve been involved in negotiations with Police Health about how they provide support. When it comes to the relationship with the cops and the cop unions, they’d do it anyway, irrespective of whether they’re going to get a new member out of it. So I’m a 100 per cent supporter of Police Health and particularly the benefits that are returned, and I know this is a promotion for Police Health now, but the benefits from Police Health in terms of the treatment that you get is just extraordinary. The other extraordinary thing was when I was getting my follow up checks with a very highly qualified cardiologist, he told me about the amount of heart doctors who get found in their beds with a glass of Mylanta in their hand, because they presume they know enough and think they're just having indigestion then die from a heart attack. It just goes to show, if cardiologists can’t self-diagnose at home the difference between a heart attack and indigestion, then someone like me, or cops generally, haven't got a chance. So if you’re in any doubt just go to the hospital. Inconvenient, but just go. If you’ve got a pain in your chest, just go. 51 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


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Is your family ready for anything? BECOMING A PARENT IS ONE of the most magical moments of your life, but with all the joy a newborn brings comes a weight of responsibility. You are now a mum or dad – responsible for making sure your little one is taken care of, no matter what. Do you have a clear plan in place if you or your partner dies unexpectedly? Who will look after and raise your child as their legal guardian? Do you know for sure that your partner and child will be taken care of financially after your death? Will your assets be distributed to the people you want?

Do you know for sure that your partner and child will be taken care of financially after your death?

The only way you can be sure of all of these things is to have a valid, up-to-date Will. Having a Will is one of the kindest things you can do for your family, while the consequences of not having one are many. Whether it’s your first child or the latest member to an already growing family, we want to help you get set up for the future. Starting a family brings significant change, and is a time when many people re-evaluate their Will and estate arrangements. John Pitman, head of Tindall Gask Bentley’s Perth Wills and Estates team, answers common questions asked by couples who are about to start a family. Q: I’m pregnant, do I need a Will? A: Absolutely. One of the main reasons people have a Will is because they have dependants who they want to look after when they pass away. A Will ensures that a trusted individual (or individuals) is given the role of Executor, who manages the assets and arrangements according to the person’s wishes. There’s probably no better time to prepare your Will than when you are pregnant and about to bring a dependant into your life. Q: What should I think about putting in my Will? A: When you prepare a Will, you need to decide who your assets will be given to. Consideration also needs to be given to what your assets are, including superannuation and life insurance entitlements. Also, assets that you might think are yours may

not actually be part of your estate, such as a house which is in joint names. It is important to get legal advice about this. The other main decision is who to appoint as your Executor. That is a person (or people) who administers your Will and ensures that your assets go where you want them to go. This is a particularly important role if you have young children, because that person acts as their trustee and looks after their inheritance until they become adults. People often appoint guardians for their children in the Will, and other wishes including whether they would like to be buried or cremated. Q: I did a Will a few years ago, do I need to update it? A: You may need to. It is important to turn your mind to the provisions in your Will, because circumstances may change along with your wishes. If the Will was prepared prior to marriage or divorce then it needs to be renewed. If you have had children, then it needs an update to include these family members. It's also quite possible that you may have prepared a Will that already contemplates the fact that you might have children in the future, but it is important to review your situation and make any necessary amendments. Should you have a blended family then you might want assets to go to specific beneficiaries.

Q: Can I make my Will while I am pregnant, or do I need to wait until after my baby is born? A: It’s actually preferable to make the Will while you are pregnant because you will naturally have more time on your hands to prioritise it. It doesn’t matter if you don’t know the gender or name of the child, because the person in charge of drafting the Will can write it in a way that allows for your baby, along with any other future children. Q: How do I make a Will? A: It is always best for a lawyer to prepare a Will, to ensure that it has been produced correctly and that it will be legally valid. If you prepare a homemade Will or use a Will kit you cannot be certain that it has been correctly completed to comply with the relevant legislation. Making a Will usually involves just two appointments that take less than an hour each, and is often not as costly as most people expect. Q: Is there anything else that I need to consider? A: In addition to preparing a Will, you may wish to prepare an Enduring Power of Attorney and Enduring Power of Guardianship documents, which allow you to nominate who would make financial, medical and lifestyle decisions for you if you were to become incapacitated.

If you want to ensure your loved ones are taken care of, and your wishes are honoured after your death, it is vital you get legal advice. WAPU, through Tindall Gask Bentley Lawyers, provides a free standard Will service for WAPU Members and a discounted rate of $110 for their spouses. Make an appointment today by calling 9211 5800 or visit www.tgb.com.au 53 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


RAYMOND PECOTIC

FINANCE

Managing Director Empire Financial Group

Beware the “bush advisers” – 8 financial planning myths busted 1. Super is an investment class. How many times have you heard people say “I don’t believe in super?” The fact is that super is just a holding structure. And what is there not to “believe in” about a holding structure that saves you tax on money going in, and will provide most people an environment where they will never pay tax on their income from the time they retire until their last days? If the value of your investments rises or falls, it has nothing to do with it being in super, and everything to do with how that particular investment has performed.

For the average punter, building wealth doesn’t come from some supposedly amazing investments or the double digit returns they make.

2. Tax deductions are a good reason to make an investment. Having your investment decisions driven by the tax benefits they derive is a shaky foundation for anyone wanting to build a solid and sound investment portfolio. A sk yourself whether the investments meet your short and long term requirements for income and capital growth, whether they are accessible when you need them, if the entry and exit costs are prohibitive for your investment time frame – and if all else adds up, and the tax deductions are an added bonus, then things start to look more promising. 3. You only need enough life insurance to cover your mortgage. Granted, some insurance is better than none, but in all my years I’m yet to see a grieving widow or widower happy that their mortgage is paid off, but with no prospects of feeding and supporting a young family. In addition to covering debts, a lump sum made available to provide an ongoing income stream to dependents is vital, and that’s not even mentioning the importance of proper, comprehensive income protection and other lump sum insurances like Total and Permanent Disability and Trauma.

4. Bricks and mortar investments are “safe as houses”. The Australian love affair with proper ty runs deep. But not all properties are the same. And this fact is often overlooked by rookie (and sometimes seasoned) investors. They get sucked in on big yields (such as the boom in rents in the WA mining towns over the last decade), or the location of a new set of apartments, or the great tax incentives on that house and land package on the outskirts of some regional Queensland town. Stick to the basics – limited supply, steady demand and value add opportunities. 5. Investing in shares is “gambling”. Investing in small, tightly held, obscure start-ups can provide a big pay off if you choose the right one. But so can putting $100 on 17 Black. Contrast this to investing in big, stable, established companies with a track record of producing good, in demand products, with a profitable business model. No, you won’t see a doubling of these stocks over the next month, but neither are these companies going to disappear overnight, and they instead provide a solid foundation for some good, long term portfolio and wealth building. 6. This amazing investment I’ve made will solve all my problems. There is no silver bullet, quick fix to building wealth (apart from perhaps a big business sale, the lottery or an inheritance).

For the average punter, building wealth doesn’t come from some supposedly amazing investments or the double digit returns they make. They build wealth by limiting their spending, paying off debts and investing wisely, regularly and conservatively. This requires a plan and developing new habits and disciplines to stick to it. 7. The wealthiest people are the ones who earn the most. Some of the wealthiest clients I’ve worked with over the years have been very modest wage earners. But they’ve followed the principals outlined in point 6, and have been disciplined, brave with borrowing to buy assets and diligent in paying them off as soon as possible. On the other hand, some of our supposed “high flyer” clients have become victims of “lifestyle creep”, where the luxuries they allow themselves as pay back for the hard work they’re doing become the new norm. Big houses, nice cars, private schools and expensive holidays. The lifestyle is there, but the savings are not. These people can often be incredibly vulnerable and exposed, while their more modest income earning counterparts sleep easily at night. 8. Financial planning fees are expensive. If you think hiring a professional is expensive, just wait and see what an amateur will cost you. This is one of my favourite sayings, and it’s pretty self-explanatory. Good quality advice doesn’t come free, but the value it can add to your end result can be tremendous. 55 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


MEMBER BENEFITS

Receive a minimum discount of 40% off RRP at Esteˉe Lauder Companies Perth Corporate Store. Not open to the general public, Esteˉe Lauder Companies Corporate Stores are outlets for invited customers to shop at discount prices. Stores sell excess and promotional stock from across all of the Esteˉe Lauder brands. Show your WAPU membership card to store staff on entry for access. Please shop wisely – no exchanges or refunds. Further terms and conditions apply. Go to www.wapu.org.au for details before visiting the store. ESTEˉE LAUDER CORPORATE STORE Level 1, 278 Railway Parade, West Leederville, Perth WA 6007.

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MOTORING

FLEET NETWORK

All-new Holden Acadia, redefining the 7-seat SUV THE MUCH AWAITED LAUNCH of the new Holden Arcadia is finally here. It’s the first Holden model to land in Australia from overseas sisterbrand GMC, and it’s ready to challenge the seven-seat large SUV segment head-on. Australia’s large SUV market isn’t the biggest new car sales segment, but it’s still a crucial one, making up just over 10 per cent of new car sales in Australia.

To help stand out, the Acadia is longer than Kluger – but, while external dimensions are slightly smaller than a CX-9, Holden claims to have a more spacious second and third row.

Not a replacement for the Captiva, the Acadia is rather an all-new model that repositions the brand into a more semi-premium place, simply by being a larger and more high-tech offering than the Captiva could ever hope to be. Despite GMC’s more industrial origins, the Acadia is a fully-fledged family hauler, with a petrol V6 engine driving either the front or all wheels. With a more urban focus, the Acadia lines up against petrolpowered rivals like the Mazda CX-9, Nissan Pathfinder and the segment’s best-selling Toyota Kluger. To help stand out, the Acadia is longer than Kluger – but, while external dimensions are slightly smaller than a CX-9, Holden claims to have a more spacious second and third row.

TECHNOLOGY & SAFETY Loaded with smart technologies, the Arcadia is the most tech-heavy vehicle in the Holden range, with a strong suite of safety and convenience technologies offered as standard. In a first for the Australian market, the all-new seven-seater features intelligent speed assist with traffic sign recognition that was "carefully calibrated" for local conditions. Other advanced driver assistance systems include active trailer assist, auto emergency braking (AEB), forward collision alert, lane keep assist with lane departure warning, rear cross-traffic alert, automatic high beam assist and rear parking assist.

INTERIOR SPACE

FEATURE HIGHLIGHTS

Interior space is a genuine Acadia highlight. Where some seven-seat SUVs pay little attention to third-row occupants, this one manages a pair of adult-sized seats in the third row that should comfortably accommodate passengers just shy of the six-foot mark. Second row space is even more generous, and the seats can slide to create more cargo or passenger space as required. Clever “smart-slide” access is also featured, allowing the base and backrest to tilt forward for third row access, potentially allowing child seats to remain in place (depending on the seat type). The two rear rows are catered for with USB charging points, roof-mounted air-con outlets and climate controls mounted in the rear of the centre console in all trim levels. Boot space measures 292 litres behind the third row, or 1042 litres to the second row.

The Acadia arrives in Australia with a three-step range of LT, LTZ and LTZ-V available in front or all-wheel drive. It comes with a 3.6-litre V6 engine producing 231kW and 367Nm, connected to a nine -speed automatic. Fuel consumption is rated at 8.9 L/100km on the Acadia 2WD and 9.3 L/100km for Acadia AWD. All variants come with: • 18-inch alloy wheels • 8.0-inch infotainment system with satellite navigation • Rear privacy glass • Apple CarPlay and Android Auto • Six-speaker audio system • Auto headlights • Proximity key with push-button start and remote engine start capability • Active noise cancellation • Leather steering wheel and gear knob • Tri-zone climate control

TIME FOR A NEW SET OF WHEELS? If you are interested in learning more about the new Holden Arcadia, or any other vehicle, the team at Fleet Network have extensive experience in negotiating, procuring and salary packaging vehicles across Australia. Speak to one of Fleet Network’s expert Consultants for an obligation-free quote on a novated lease today. Let us show you how to best use your pre-tax salary and save thousands on your next new car. It’s one of the benefits of being a WAPU Member. Call Fleet Network on 1300 738 601 or visit www.fleetnetwork.com.au/wapu 57 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018


RETIREMENTS & RESIGNATIONS

VALE

RETIRING MEMBERS 4862 Alexander TIMMS 5092 Robert SCOTT 5878 Neil REGAN 5913 Peter BAHEN 6057 Gregory SAVAGE 6183 Michael WELLSTEAD 6240 Peter RICHARDS 6328 Barry FEASY 6667 Godfrey HARMER 6680 Adrian HISCOCK 6752 Kevin BUTLER 6813 Trevor CRUICKSHANK 6825 Damian SHERIDAN 6993 Murray WEBSTER 7138 Andrew McRAE 7239 David TADIC 7333 Jo-Anne ZILKO 7359 Gary McKAY

7363 Mark GANNAWAY 7383 Craig HAVEN 7519 Barry PHELPS 7890 Malcolm LEE 7917 Warren MUNNS 8204 Michael MULDOON 8362 Lynette GILYEAD 8391 Paul CARRIER 8595 Peter HUMPHREY 8746 Mark MARSHALL 9924 Francis RYAN 9935 Peter MALINS 10241 Peter JANJIS 10362 Graham WHITE 10769 Anthony WALLACE 12031 Michelle GLOVER 12866 John GARLETT 13076 Larry BLANDFORD

RESIGNING MEMBERS 7262 Lynly McINTOSH 8137 Karen CLARKSON 8317 Terri LOBO 10291 Andrew MAHER 11346 Bruce PATERSON 11677 Nicole NOBILE 11942 Dee SIMPSON 12547 Ian DAVISON 12830 Richard TOLLEY 13123 James WELSH 13651 Mary EDGAR

58 POLICE NEWS DECEMBER 2018

13999 Dean EDWARDS 14026 Jason SINKER 14187 Colin MELVILLE 14426 Simon HANN 14543 Fiona MOOR 15349 Stuart MENZIES 15552 Latisha SANDERS 51151 Trenton MILLER 51161 Cain HOLBREY 99557 Andries PRETORIUS 99844 Jessie PARRY

SERVING 14703 1/C Constable DARREN IGGLESDON Aged 50

TWO JIMMYS

RETIRED 5844 Senior Sergeant SCOTT RAYMOND HALVORSON Aged 59 9337 Senior Constable BOBBI DEBORAH WETNALL Aged 56

November 22, 2018 marked the 30th anniversary of the passing of the “Two Jimmys”. On that day, Detective Senior Constable Arthur James “Jim” Douglas 6050 and Senior Constable James “Jim” Oswald 5906 from 79 Division were driving Delta 6, when they were tragically killed in a motor vehicle accident at Kings Park, whilst on duty. From that date onwards, the Delta 6 vehicle call sign was never used again, as a mark of respect for the passing of the Two Jimmys. We will remember.

THE DEN

Members of TEG 3 at the Warwick Police Complex have honoured their fallen colleague with a new area outside the traffic office. First Class Constable Den Green was tragically killed last December and there is now outdoor area named “The Den” in his honour. WAPU was proud to donate two large heavy duty picnic tables for use by Members at the Warwick Police Complex and the area was officially opened by Den’s wife, Michelle and her two sons as a place of serenity, entertainment and remembrance for all.


FROM THE ARCHIVES

AUGUST 2012

New WAPU President George Tilbury tackled several key issues in his first month in the job in 2012. A push for ‘offender onus’ legislation, proposed changes to the Road Traffic Act to better protect officers involved in escorts and the appointment of a new police minister were just three of the key issues facing the new Board of Directors. “The next three years will be an exciting period of change for the WA Police Union. I understand there is a lot of work ahead of us, and I am committed to doing everything in my power to ensure we get good results for Members,” Mr Tilbury said in his President’s Report in the August 2012 edition of Police News. “I know it will be a challenge, but armed with a hard working Board of Directors and WAPU staff, I’m confident we will make a big difference to the lives of hard working police officers.” Mr Tilbury said he was firmly focused on increasing the political strength of the Union to effect change for Members. “We have the potential to be a very influential Union within the State and it’s important we target all players in the political arena, and more importantly the Government,” he said. “With just nine months until a State election, this is the best time for us to achieve results by influencing law reform and policy changes. We believe it’s time for the Union to step up, and really make a difference for Members.”


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