Walter Magazine - October 2018

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GARDEN WISDOM from Helen Yoest

GUEST HOUSE Home-style hotel

THE GHOST GUILD investigates Mordecai

OCTOBER 2018

waltermagazine.com

Home& Garden ISSUE


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FEATURES

Volume 7, Issue 2

96

80

66

WALTER PROFILE Guest House Raleigh by Iza Wojciechowska photography by Justin Kase Conder

74

AT THE TABLE Local Cheesemakers by Colleen Thompson photography by Madeline Gray

80

STORY OF A HOUSE Living Color by Catherine Currin photography by Catherine Nguyen

88

THROUGH THE LENS OMstead by Laura Petrides Wall photography by Jillian Clark

96

STORY OF A HOUSE Custom Concept by Catherine Currin photography by Catherine Nguyen

111

GIVERS Made4Me by Addie Ladner

88 On the cover: Matt Tomasulo and Nicole Alvarez at their new boutique hotel, Guest House Raleigh; photograph by Justin Kase Conder

10 | WALTER

Catherine Nguyen (OUTDOOR LIVING ROOM); Catherine Nguyen (DINING ROOM); Jillian Clark (FAMILY)

OCTOBER 2018


D e s i g n i n g a n d B u i l d i n g t h e We l c o m e H o m e s i n c e 1 9 8 4

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DEPARTMENTS

52

60

OUR TOWN The Usual: Ghost Guild Game Plan: GoKart Kids Shop Local: Runaway Clothing On Duty: Margaret McFarlane by Katherine Poole, Samantha Gratton, and Catherine Currin photography by Eamon Queeney AFIELD Q&A with Helen Yoest photography by Juli Leonard

130 END NOTE Fair Play

by Katy Kohut

IN EVERY ISSUE 14

Letter from WALTER

18

Contributors

20 Your feedback 22 The Mosh 24 Raleigh Now

56 12 | WALTER

107 QUENCH Lonerider Spirits by Jason Frye photography by Smith Hardy 117 EVENTS WINnovation 2018

38 Triangle Now 123 The Whirl

Juli Leonard (GARDEN); Eamon Queeney (RUNAWAY CLOTHING)

60


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LETTER FROM WALTER

43rd Anniversary Sale

SALE 30-75% OFF* Thru November 2018 *regular prices, excludes consignment

H

ome: one’s place of residence; the place where one lives permanently. Sure, this defines it simply, but it just doesn’t seem to suffice. Home is so much more. I’m encouraged to think beyond the confined wall of a home with bricks, siding, and shingles. We see two stunning houses in this month’s pages (p. 80, p. 96), but it’s the people residing within the walls that make it a home. We have a pair of friends in Wake Forest who make home more enjoyable for children with special needs (p. 111), and two Raleigh women are taking childcare to the next level (p. 54, 58). We see a labor of love on Bloodworth Street with a new boutique hotel, Guest House (cover, p. 66). Feeling at home is infused throughout our community. It’s oddly fitting that we’re finishing up WALTER’s Home & Garden issue on the tails of Hurricane Florence, during a time when home is arguably more important than ever. It’s inspiring to live in a city where people jump at the chance to help one another, even strangers, in a time of dire need. Raleighites have opened their homes, schools, businesses, and hearts to Eastern North Carolina, with no explanation needed other than, ‘It’s just what we do.’ Home is a support system. I’m confident when I claim most of us have found it here. In North Carolina. In Raleigh.

Catherine Currin Interim Editor

919-489-8362 PERSIANCARPET.COM 5634 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd. Durham, NC Corner I-40 and 15-501



Raleigh’s Life & Soul EDITORIAL

PUBLISHING

VOLUME VII, ISSUE 2

Creative Director LAURA PETRIDES WALL

Advertising Sales Manager JULIE NICKENS

OCTOBER 2018

Interim Editor CATHERINE CURRIN Editorial Assistant KATHERINE POOLE WALTER Intern KATY KOHUT Contributing Writers JASON FRYE, SAMANTHA GRATTON, HAMPTON WILLIAMS HOFER, ADDIE LADNER, DAVID MENCONI, ERIN MCPHERSON, COLLEEN THOMPSON, IZA WOJCIECHOWSKA Contributing Photographers JILLIAN CLARK, JUSTIN KASE CONDER, MADELINE GRAY, SMITH HARDY, JULI LEONARD, CATHERINE NGUYEN, EAMON QUEENEY

Senior Account Executive & Operations CRISTINA HURLEY WALTER Events KAIT GORMAN Advertising Coordinator ROBIN KENNEDY Advertising Design and Production DENISE FERGUSON Circulation JERRY RITTER, BRIAN HINTON Brand Strategy @ McClatchy VP Partnerships: ANNIE ALEXANDER Regional Sales Director: ERIC DIDAWICK

Published 10 times a year by The News & Observer Publishing Co. A McClatchy Company WALTER is available by paid subscriptions for $14.99 a year in the United States, as well as select rack and advertiser locations throughout the Triangle. For customer service inquiries, please email us at customerservice@waltermagazine.com or call 919-836-5613. Address all correspondence to: WALTER Magazine, 421 Fayetteville St., Ste. 104 Raleigh, NC 27601 WALTER does not accept unsolicited manuscripts. Please contact Catherine Currin at ccurrin@waltermagazine.com for freelance guidelines. ©The News & Observer. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the express written consent of the copyright owner.


2004 Y ONKERS R D ., R ALEIGH , NC 27604 | (919) 754-9754 | G REENFRONT . COM


Creating Inspiring Interiors

CONTRIBUTORS

OCTOBER 2018

JULI LEONARD / P HOTO G R A P HE R Leonard has been a photojournalist for 18 years and has spent the majority of her career at The News & Observer in Raleigh. She resides in Raleigh with her daughter, partner, and two naughty dogs. She enjoys photographing people passionate about their work and personal spaces such as Helen Yoest’s lovely wildlife garden.

Frye is a travel and food writer who calls Wilmington home. He travels the state extensively researching his travel guides—Moon North Carolina, Moon Blue Ridge Parkway Road Trip, and Moon Great Smoky Mountains National Park—and hunting for the stories people need to hear. A longtime fan of Lonerider Brewery, he was excited to learn about Lonerider Spirits and was absolutely delighted to discover just how easily it drank.

Photo by Surya

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IZA WOJCIECHOWSKA / W R I TE R Wojciechowska grew up in West Texas and now lives in Durham, where she works as a writer and copy editor. When she’s not working, she goes hiking with her hound, cooks, and translates Polish poetry. After touring the Guest House for this profile and seeing how much thought and passion went into it, she’s now in love with skylights and is seriously considering a staycation in Raleigh.

JUSTIN KASE CONDER / P HOTO GR A PH ER A California native, before settling in Raleigh two years ago Conder’s work had taken him to every state in the U.S. and to 43 countries around the world. A commercial and editorial photographer says his love of people fuels his passion, his assignment to photograph Guest House Raleigh proved to be a wonderful opportunity. “It’s 5 a.m. and I’m ringing the doorbell before sunrise for the first day of our shoot, and I know they’re just thinking ‘What on earth have we gotten ourselves into?’ but after two weekend shoots together and a third weekday, I’d say we’re friends.”

Bruce Keene (LEONARD); courtesy contributors (FRYE, WOJCIECHOWSKA, CONDER)

JASON FRYE / WR I T ER


MAKE THIS YOUR VIEW MAKE THIS YOUR DOWNTOWN MAKE THIS MODERN LANDMARK YOUR HOME

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YOUR FEEDBACK

@waltermagazine Zest is THE BEST! —@markus.gold (Shop Local about Zest Cafe & Home Art, July/August, p. 56) I’m so proud of our museum!!! —@sellsraleigh (Through the Lens about Public Art, July/August, p. 86) I still have mine Mike gave me at our last oyster and fish stew!!! I love it —Donna MarshburnJohnson (Artist in Studio about Carolina Shuckers, July/August, p. 80) Great photos! Great story! Magnificent performers!! —Matthew Brown (Through the Lens about Imagine Circus, September, p. 72) Went last weekend - what an experience! —Kathryn Langley Anderson (Destination WALTER about Chihuly at Biltmore, September, p. 102)

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“I dropped the candies into the children’s bags, thinking: You small mortals don’t realize the power of your stories.”

HURRICANE HELP Spending Spree Shop ‘til you drop October 18-21 at the Junior League of Raleigh’s annual A Shopping SPREE! The Convention Center will be brimming with vendors for one-stop holiday shopping. General admission tickets are just $10, or avoid the crowds at the Preview Party or Merry Morning Shopping. jlraleigh.org/fundraising/a-shopping-spree/

The clean-up efforts for Hurricane Florence have just begun. Be a part of the healing process by giving your time and resources. Activate Good is a great online hub for volunteer opportunities in the area, such as The American Red Cross and the Food Bank of Central and Eastern N.C. Activate Good also has a sister organization on the coast—the Cape Fear Volunteer Center. activategood.org; capefearvolunteercenter.org

Pumpkin Spice Create a lovely, lasting fall centerpiece with succulents. Take a white styrofoam craft pumpkin and carve out a hole large enough to accomodate a small terracotta pot. Fill the planter with soil, an assortment of succulents and top with moss. Pick up your plants at The Zen Succulent on Wilmington Street. No trick to this treat.

Spook-ticle WHIMSIES... Get your just desserts at N.C. Sugar Rush Halloween Edition, the all dessert food event in downtown Raleigh October 28. sugarrush.com...visit the N.C. Museum of History and view The Sugar Shack, part of the exhibit: The North Carolina Roots of Artist Ernie Barnes...enjoy the fall weather at Dix Park’s FallFest October 27...pick up killer costume supplies from The Tilted Stage, formerly Hughie & Louie’s...try a limited edition Oktoberfest beer from a local brewery...

22 | WALTER

Don a mask and cape, straighten your wig and monster mash it up at Marbles Kids Museum’s Kooky Spooky Halloween Party. Kids can research like a mad scientist or earn a degree from Ghoul School— with their adult in tow, of course. October 27; 6-8:30 p.m.; marbleskidsmuseum.org/KookySpooky

Getty Images (GIFTS, HANDS, PUMPKIN ASTRONAUT, CANDY CORN); Ernie Barnes The Sugar Shack

—Karen Russell, Vampires in the Lemon Grove


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FEMININE FORM Georgia O’Keeffe and Candida Höfer take over NCMA

T

wo unique women will show their diverse work at the North Carolina Museum of Art starting this month. Opening October 13 and running until January 20, 2019, the work of American modernist Georgia O’Keeffe and German photographer Candida Höfer will be on display in the museum’s East building. The Beyond: Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Art and Candida Höfer in Mexico will be ticketed together, and

24 | WALTER

curator Linda Dougherty says the museum is thrilled to have the two simultaneously. “We’re happy to have two really prominent female artists at the same time.” Dougherty says Höfer and O’Keeffe “have really different media during really different time periods,” yet their impact as females seemed to work together. “The Beyond is a twofold show. It’s a chance to see really iconic works by Georgia O’Keeffe, and also another side of O’Keeffe that people might


OCTOBER

not be familiar with,” she says. “The exhibition also includes 20 contemporary artists that are exploring similar ideas. Her innovation and legacy have continued to influence artists generations after.” Candida Höfer’s photography focuses on a 2015 project in Mexico City where she captured cultural spaces like libraries, churches, and museums. “These may be some of the most important photographs in the 21st century,” says Dougherty. —Catherine Currin Opposite page: Museo Nacional del Virreinato Tepotzotlán V, Candida Höfer This page, from left to right: Flying Backbone, Georgia O’Keeffe; Deer Skull with Blue Vase, Anna Valdez

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Schedule a playdate for Marbles Kids Museum’s annual Big Idea Forum October 3, a luncheon for business and community leaders. A definite departure from the typical buttoned up corporate event, the big idea is that play is as important to a professional’s success as spreadsheets and business speak. Dr. Stuart Brown, founder and president of the National Institute for Play (best job ever), is the keynote speaker and will share his research on the power of play and how it can transform corporate culture. Play hooky for the afternoon with your work buddies and discover the joys and bottom line benefits of having fun. 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.; see website for tickets and sponsorship opportunities; 201 E. Hargett St.; marbleskidsmuseum.org/BigIdea

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STAGE FRIGHT Three mysterious strangers are trapped in a deserted honky tonk riding out a windstorm. The real turmoil, however, takes place indoors in It Is Done, Theatre in the Park’s newest chill-inducing, adults-only production. When it is done, the skeletons will have come out of the closet. See website for show dates and times; $24 general admission, $18 seniors/students/military; $16 for groups of ten or more; 107 Pullen Rd; theatreinthepark.com/whats-on/it-is-done.html

Getty Images (BIG IDEA, STAGE FRIGHT)

HEY, WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA?


SEPTEMBER 14 — DECEMBER 30

R E Y NO L DA H OU S E MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART W I N S TO n - SA L E M , NC

reynoldahouse.org/america

All works are from the collection of Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg. This exhibition was organized by art2art Circulating Exhibitions. Image: Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, LC-DIG-fsa-8b29516.


RALEIGH NOW

HAUNTING. SEDUCTIVE. THRILLING.

6

Tomato or vinegar? It will be the question on the tip of every tongue when the 2nd annual Sir Walter Smoke Off gets cooking October 6, pitting the state’s best barbecue chefs against one another for the coveted Golden Pig Medallion. Dix Park is the site for over two dozen BBQ teams to gather, season, baste, grill, and smoke to raise money and provide toys for the Capital City Clauses and The Children of The Wake County Salvation Army. It’s not all about pigging out—enjoy live music from local bands, root around with the littles in the KidZone, then cap it all off with a refreshing adult beverage or two. Purchase a Pork Passport to sample barbecue from each team and be eligible to vote for the People’s Choice Award or bring an unwrapped toy of $20+ value to receive free general admission. Take your ‘cue and go whole hog. 12 noon - 6 p.m.; $5 general admission, $30 or $60 for Pork Passport packages; 101 Blair Dr.; sirwaltersmokeoff.com

6 GOOD OLD TIMEY

1 1 28

OCTOBER OCTOBER

PROGRAM SPONSOR:

MEDIA SPONSOR:

2018

SPONSORED BY:

Hitch a wagon and trot on over to Historic Oak View Park for Heritage Day, a celebration of Wake County’s agricultural and rural past. Harken back to the days of county fairs with live animals to ride, pet, and point to; antique automobiles and farm equipment to marvel at; traditional crafts and handmade items to ooh and aah over; and traditional music to tap a toe to. Perambulate the grounds or take the express—a horse drawn carriage ride. Lads and lasses can take a turn making a craft or fish with cane poles. There will be plenty of fare to purchase and enjoy as well. Heritage Day is also pleased to host the Wake County 4-H Youth Fair Day. Fair play, indeed. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.; free; 4028 Carya Dr. wakegov.com/parks/oakview/ events/Pages/heritageday.aspx

courtesy Sir Walter Smoke Off (‘CUE); News and Observer archives (OLD TIMEY)

ON ‘CUE


News and Observer archive (ALICE); Rachel Neville Photography (DANSE)

OCTOBER

11-28 8

GO ASK ALICE School’s out, metalheads. Pay your respects to the godfather of shock rock: A Paranormal Evening with Alice Cooper is coming to The Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts October 8. The infamous, yet beloved rock legend is on the road to promote his 27th studio album, Paranormal, which accurately sums up any Alice Cooper stage experience. 8 p.m.; $47 - $152; 2 E. South St.; dukeenergycenterraleigh.com/event/ alice-cooper-9761

DANSE MACABRE The Carolina Ballet is not all sugar plums and white swans. Enter the prince of darkness in the ballet’s latest production, Dracula. Principal guest choreographer Lynne Taylor-Corbett’s haunting show returns to the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts after four years, back by popular demand. The evening is fleshed out by artistic director Robert Weiss’ interpretation of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Masque of the Red Death. Both pieces feature original scores by J. Mark Scearce played live by a chamber ensemble. See website for show dates and times; $34 - $93; 2 E. South St.; carolinaballet.com


RALEIGH NOW

SPOTLIGHT

Journey with us on a tour of gastronomic proportions at the 2018 Culinary Adventures dining series. Experience delectable cuisine created by our award-winning chef, Rich Carter, served at our exclusive venue, the Laurelbrook. Full course dinners inspired by intriguing destinations, paired with unique libations, and served by our exuberant team of tour guides. Charter your voyage at 919.828.5932 or cateringworks.com/culinaryadventures. Group tickets available, please inquire.

November 9, 2018 | 6:30 pm old-world culinary roots, seasonal and pristine fresh, nouveau dining from Napa to Sonoma Individual Ticket $95 includes dinner with wine pairing package

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SUNDOWN SHOPPING Raleigh Night Market pops up downtown

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here’s a new market in town, and it’s lighting up City Market. Raleigh Night Market is popping up every third Thursday near Moore Square, showcasing local artists and vendors. The market celebrates local wares by providing an opportunity for customers to directly interact with business owners and makers. There will be LED stilt walkers, beer from R&D brewing, and live music including jazz and ukulele jams. After visiting other countries around the world that host night markets, founders Sara Buxton and Lauryn Colatuno say they wanted to bring a similar feel to Raleigh. “Whether stopping by for a drink after work, picking up dinner to-go, or going out to dinner as a family, people can stroll the streets of City Market while enjoying live music and entertainment. People are able to walk through an open-air market with a drink in their hand, which gives you the feel of a European atmosphere,” says Buxton. Not only can you shop and drink October 18, you can also learn a new skill. “We’ve incorporated SkillPop to host classes during the market—having locals who are interested in arts and crafts creating during the market adds something extra.” —Katy Kohut 6—11 p.m.; 215 Wolfe St.; raleighnightmarket.com

courtesy Raleigh Night Market

California Wine Country


OCTOBER

12 Getty Images (OYSTER); Joan Marcus (HEIGHTS)

SHUCK AND JIVE Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina for the State Capitol Foundation’s Shuckin’ and Shaggin’ Oyster Roast. The event is a fundraiser for the foundation benefiting education and restoration programs at the Capitol. Grab your sweet Carolina girl or guy and head to the Capitol grounds for the ultimate Old North State lawn party. Enjoy beverages and a seafood dinner, then hoof it to the dance floor for the smoldering sounds of The Embers. Not schooled in shag dancing? Local pros will be on hand for demonstrations. Those wanting to show a little more state pride can bid on items and experiences during a silent auction. Really, what could be more N.C. than seafood and beach music? Aw, shucks. 7 - 11 p.m.; $75 - $100; 1 East Edenton St.; ncstatecapitol.org

16-21 REACH NEW HEIGHTS Before the Broadway show about a certain founding father made theater history, Lin-Manuel Miranda penned another Tony Award-winning musical and the North Carolina Theatre will debut it at the the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts October 16-21. In the Heights captures three days in the lives of a group of vibrant characters in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. The score is rooted in the neighborhood’s Latino culture and features hip-hop, soul, salsa, and merengue, sure to give Raleigh audiences a heightened experience. See website for show dates and times; $23 - $84; 2 E South St.; nctheatre.com/shows/in-the-heights

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SPOTLIGHT

GET YOUR FILL Morgan Street Food Hall opens

O

ne of downtown Raleigh’s most anticipated restaurant projects, Morgan Street Food Hall, opened in August after nearly a year of delays. You’ll hear the music as soon as you land on the sidewalk or turn the corner onto West Street, which runs adjacent to a large, pet-friendly patio rich with seating and community atmosphere. The indoor-outdoor Arbor Bar and Garden anchors the 22,000-square-foot space, which is located in the Warehouse District and is now home to 19 dining vendors, including Raleigh’s first rolled ice cream maker Raleigh Rolls, as well as Morgan Street Java and Creperie, Oak City Fish and Chips, Curry in a Hurry, Wicked Taco and (coming soon) Auntie Betty’s gin and cocktails bar. “I’ve seen places like this in cities like Baltimore and Atlanta,” says guest David Fratto of Durham, “But there hasn’t been anything like this here.” Don’t make the mistake and call it a food court. The space is intended to evoke the public market vibe found in European and Asian cities, and the food hall model serves as an incubator for local chefs and makers dedicated to quality food and service. The space encourages community among patrons—with long tables, couches, and episodes from the Food Network projected on the wall—as well as between businesses. In addition to the food stalls, where visitors can order meals from early morning to late night (as late as 2 a.m. on weekends), the establishment also houses 15 retailers, selling everything from beef jerky and loose leaf teas to fresh-cut flowers and candles. —Erin McPherson Visit website for hours and vendor information; www.morganfoodhall.com

courtesy Morgan Street Food Hall

RALEIGH NOW


OCTOBER

24 courtesy UB40.com (UB40); Beth Welsh (FUNNY GUY)

THEY B 40 Audiences can chant “UB40” and mean it. The world-renowned Reggae band UB40 is marking its 40th anniversary with a tour that will make a stop at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts October 24. Drink in a little red, red wine to make you feel so fine. (We bet you can’t get the song out of your head now.) 8 p.m.; $33 - $62; 2 E. South St.; dukeenergycenterraleigh.com

25 FUNNY GUY Neal Brennan may be the funniest guy you’ve never heard of, but that may soon change. Brennan began his career as a writer on hit shows like Singled Out and Kenan and Kel before co-creating Chappelle’s Show with comedian Dave Chappelle. Since then, the Emmy nominated writer, director, and producer has worked with the best in the business, including Amy Schumer, Chris Rock, and on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. Brennan stepped out from behind the camera in 2015 with his comedy show 3 Mics and will return to the spotlight with his new act Here We Go October 25 at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts. 7 p.m.; $29 - $33; 2 E. South St.; dukeenergycenterraleigh.com

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RALEIGH NOW

Creative Landscaping Solutions for Fine Properties Since 2002

MR. ROBINSON’S NEIGHBORHOOD What began as a lark for Chris Robinson, the frontman of the blues rock band The Black Crowes during the group’s hiatus in 2011, has turned into a lasting gig. The Chris Robinson Brotherhood remains tight and will play the Lincoln Theatre for a special two-day engagement. Join the brotherhood by going for a V.I.P. experience. Lincoln Theatre offers several packages that include everything from early admission and collectible merch to meet and greets with the skinny man himself. Rock on. 8 p.m.; $20 - $249; 126 E. Cabarrus St.; lincolntheatre.com

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Enhance your worldview at the 33rd International Festival of Raleigh. The Raleigh Convention Center is the site for a world party hosted by International Focus to celebrate the culture and cuisine of the over 50 international groups represented in the Triangle. International Focus is a local organization that promotes a mutual understanding with the international community through education; cultural and economic exchange; and the arts. The event opens with a naturalization ceremony where candidates from over 40 countries take their oath of citizenship. Other highlights include: global dance and music performances; the World Bazaar marketplace; cooking demonstrations; and sidewalk style cafes. The International Festival is a trip—no passports required. See website for event dates and times; free admission; 500 S. Salisbury St.; internationalfocus.org

Jay Blakesberg (ROBINSON); Getty Images (INTERNATIONAL)

Backyard Oasis

25-26


OCTOBER RUN, RALEIGH, RUN! On your mark, get set, go! October is the month to get moving. Lace up your sneaks and sign up to walk, run, jog, trot, or stroll one of Raleigh’s many road races. BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD OF NC RACE 13.1 October 6 race131.com 20th ANNUAL TRIANGLE RUN/WALK FOR AUTISM October 13 support.autismsociety-nc.org THE CUPCAKE RUN AT BRIER CREEK October 13 fsseries.com/event/brier-creek-cupcakes-run/ AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY’S MAKING STIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER October 13 main.acsevents.org THE THAD AND ALICE EURE 30TH ANNUAL WALK AND RUN FOR HOPE October 14 walkforhope.com AIDS WALK AND 5K RUN October 20 aidswalkand5krun.itsyourrace.com NOG RUN CLUB OKTOBERFEST 4 MILER October 20 nogrunclub.com/oktoberfest/ SAFE HAVEN RUN FOR THEIR LIVES 5K October 20 runfortheirlives5k.itsyourrace.com JDRF ONE WALK October 27 jdrf.org, select events DAY OF THE DEAD 5K PRESENTED BY CENTRO October 27 dayofthedead5k.com GAIL PARKINS MEMORIAL OVARIAN CANCER WALK AND 5K RUN October 27 ovarianawareness.org


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SPOTLIGHT

SLAM DUNK

CAM opens Above the Rim

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AM Raleigh is getting sporty this month with their newest exhibition, Above the Rim. The exhibition that’s two years in the making is focused on basketball, and the community that it fosters. Above the Rim will bring many firsts to CAM. It’s the first time there will be a full-sized basketball court in the main gallery. It’s the first time they’ve had an advisory committee for a show, and this one includes iconic Raleigh athletes like Chris Corchiani and Dereck Whittenburg. CAM has also enlisted the expertise of guest curator, Phil America, to assemble the lineup. The Los Angeles native is not a newcomer to the Triangle, as he created Failure of the American Dream, a 2016 exhibition at CAM. America is known for his thought-provoking public art and graffiti—and he’s recruited numerous contemporary artists to CAM this month, like photographer Estevan Oriol and digital artist Hueman. America says he has a special connection to this show in particular. “We are in a time where everything is politicized, even art and sports. So with my love for both basketball and contemporary art, and the point where those two things inter-

courtesy CAM Raleigh (JERSEY); Estevan Oriol (HOOP, COURT)

RALEIGH NOW


OCTOBER

MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL, RALEIGH

FRI/SAT, OCT 12-13 | 8PM Grant Llewellyn, conductor Makoto Ozone, piano Eliza Bagg, soprano Cherokee Chamber Singers Friday Concert Sponsor: Hampton Inn & Suites Boone Saturday Concert Sponsor: Galloway Ridge at Fearrington

Gershwin captures the soul of the Roaring 20s in his sweeping Rhapsody in Blue for piano and orchestra, while Copland evokes idyllic country life in Appalachian Spring. The Cherokee Chamber Singers join NCS to share music reflecting the Cherokee culture, making this program an unforgettable tribute to America’s rich heritage and future. This concert is made possible in part by support from the Cherokee Preservation Foundation.

YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT

Halloween Spooktacular Over 15 diverse artists will have their work on display at CAM’s Above the Rim, including two works pictured here. Opposite page: Jerseys, 2018 by Hueman: large scale digital image Above: Gladys Park by Estevan Oriol, photograph; pictured below: Venice Beach, Estevan Oriol, photograph

sect, really makes this show an important one for me. It’s bringing together works that examine the joy and accompanying hardships of basketball, and create a narrative that transcends the sport itself.” There’s pop art, fine art, and street art, and the team at CAM hopes that the diverse exhibition will bring new visitors through the museum’s doors. “The sociopolitical ramifications of an exhibition like this are so much bigger than just showcasing a sport,” says America, “this is showing youth in America an aspirational mirror of themselves.” All exhibition labels will be in English and Spanish, in addition to various bilingual events and programming. There will be a family day one Saturday each month during the exhibition, and busing is available to and from the museum. “There are quite a few Spanish-speaking artists in the exhibit, so it was a natural evolution,” says Eric Gaard, CAM exhibitions director. “We hope to cross all types of boundaries with this exhibition. We’re treating sport and art equally within the community. Basketball is inherently part of North Carolina culture. Our hope is that the subject and art are both accessible.” —Catherine Currin The exhibition is open to the public from October 5, 2018—February 3, 2019. You can also catch the exhibition when chefs from Heirloom, Brewery Bhavana, and Garland join WALTER at our exclusive gallery dinner, Art Fare, October 18.

Mystery at the Symphony SAT, OCT 27 | 1PM & 4PM Wesley Schulz, conductor Gregory Smith, composer & narrator Series Sponsor: WakeMed Children’s

A comical sleuth investigates a concert where major suddenly became minor. Come early to enter our costume contest!

Tchaikovsky “Pathétique”

FRI/SAT, NOV 16-17 | 8PM

Joshua Weilerstein, conductor Michelle Cann, piano

Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3 Price: Piano Concerto in One Movement Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 6, “Pathétique”

Mozart Mass “The Great” FRI/SAT, NOV 30-DEC 1 | 8PM

Grant Llewellyn, conductor Joélle Harvey, soprano Anya Matanovic, soprano Nicholas Phan, tenor Federico De Michelis, bass-baritone North Carolina Master Chorale

Experience the expressive power of the human voice when spectacular vocal soloists and the North Carolina Master Chorale join NCS for the purely magnificent Mozart Mass.

Tickets on sale now! ncsymphony.org 919.733.2750


Triangle

Travis Long

Spott ligh

TRICKED OUT TREATS Frightfully fun Halloween outings

I

t’s scary how much fun can be had celebrating Halloween in the Triangle. Here are some alternative activities to the usual costume and candy corn for the brave and the bold to consider this month. – KP

ALL MONTH Visit Raleigh’s favorite haunts on the Haunted Footsteps Ghost Tour (kid friendly) or Pub Crawl and Haunted Adventure (beer friendly) by Tobacco Road Tours. tobaccoroadtours.com

38 | WALTER

ALL MONTH Get corny in miles and miles of maize mazes at Ken’s Korny Corn Maze. kenskornycornmaze.com

show at the Morehead Planetarium in Chapel Hill. moreheadplanetarium.org

OCTOBER 13, 20, AND 27 ALL MONTH Experience all the thrills and chills at the Triangle’s only scream park, Clayton Fear Farm. claytonfearfarm.com

All aboard the Track or Treat Halloween Express, a wild and wacky family friendly train excursion on New Hope Valley Railway the New Hill. triangletrain.com

ALL MONTH

OCTOBER 26

Nothing could be finer that to experience Scare-olina, the Halloween-themed star

Here’s a stranger thing: The Upside Down Halloween Party part of the Adult Nights


OCTOBER series at the Museum of Natural Sciences. naturalsciences.org

OCTOBER 27

Getty Images

Phantoms at the opera house? Find out at Halloween Spooktacular—the North Carolina Symphony Young Peoples Concert at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com

OCTOBER 27 Enjoy an afternoon of Halloween fun for all ages at the Haunted Mordecai Festival. The brave of heart won’t want to miss The Ghost Guild’s reveal of their 2018 paranormal investigations of Mordecai Historic Park. (See p. 52 for more about the Ghost Guild.) facebook.com/events/1955204234790636/

OCTOBER 27

OCTOBER 31

Check in to Hotel Horror 4 A Haunted Halloween Party at the Aloft Hotel in Raleigh sponsored by Triangle Game Night facebook.com/events/40227926360714

Join First Lady Kristin Cooper on A Neighborhood Halloween Parade through the streets of downtown to the Governor’s Mansion for tricks and treats, sponsored by North Carolina Museum of History. ncmuseumofhistory.org/events/neighborhoodhalloween-parade

OCTOBER 30 The finest pumpkin carving skills will be on full display at Fearrington Village’s Pumpkinfest. fearrington.com/pumpkinfest/

OCTOBER 31 Los Angeles filmmaker Jodi Wille documents American subcultures and will be on hand at the Gregg Museum of Art & Design for a special Halloween screening of: The Source Family, Welcome, Space Brothers, The Arrival, and We Are Not Alone. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu/programs/

OCTOBER 31 Actually do the time warp at the Rocky Horror Picture Show Ball at the Carolina Theatre in Durham. carolinatheatre.org


TRIANGLE NOW

all month

7

CANDID CAMERA Celebrate the medium of photography all over the Triangle this month during the Click! Photography Festival, one of the premier photo festivals in the United States. The quick snapshot: The festival partners with every major museum and gallery in the Triangle to bring you 25+ venues, 70 events, influential keynoters, workshops, classes, art walks, and exhibits. Highlights include Across County Lines: Contemporary Photography from the Piedmont at the Nasher; murmurations, an experimental installation at VAE Raleigh; and one-of-a-kind outdoor events at Historic Stagville Plantation and the FENCE in downtown Durham.See website for a full schedule of events; clickphotofest.org

3and9 7 PLAY DOUGH

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Lionel Vatinet is a master baker recognized by the James Beard Foundation and one of the country’s highest quality bread producers. And, he’s right here in Cary. Learn at the master’s hand at one of La Farm Bakery’s fall classes for home bakers running through December 6. Two classes are offered in October. Work with North Carolina grown grains to make a whole wheat bread bowl and yeasted cornbread at Fall Breads on October 3. Scare friends and family with your amazing dessert skills picked up at “Boo”-tiful Halloween Desserts on October 9. What you knead to know: don’t wait for the bread to rise, classes sell out quickly. 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.; $85; 4248 NW Cary Pkwy, Cary; lafarmbakery.com/ shop/classes

Keith Carter, Bubble; courtesy La Farm Bakery (DOUGH)

ONE RALEIGH LOCATION


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SPOTLIGHT

HOME BOUTIQUE & INTERIORS

FRESHEN UP Durham company launches a safe home fragrance

Martha J. Schneider, Owner/Designer 4209 Lassiter Mill Road, Suite #132 Raleigh, NC 27609 919.324.2310 www.lamaisonraleigh.com

FURNISHINGS • ACCESSORIES • GIFTS • INTERIOR DESIGN

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ou can spruce up the scent of your home without worry of toxic ingredients. Durhambased Grow Fragrance launched earlier this year with its line of plant-based air and fabric fresheners, after founder Dan Swimm wanted something that smelled natural and couldn’t find it on the market. “I thought it was crazy that there wasn’t an all-natural brand for air fresheners and home fragrance. Plant-based materials

smell more ‘real’ to me, more like nature. Using only plant-based materials also sidesteps a lot of dangerous synthetic chemicals that are in air fresheners on the market,” he says. The refreshing sprays come in three permanent scents, Lavender, Bamboo, and Citrus Cedar, and the company plans to create seasonal products, like this fall’s Apple Pomander. Grow is also a certified B-corp, and Swimm says he wouldn’t have it any other way. “I grew up in a


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OCTOBER

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3-4 Go down to the Haw River Ballroom for An Evening with Gillian Welch. Folk, Americana, bluegrass, country … Welch lends voice to each of these musical forms with a sound that is rooted in traditional, old-time music. With her long-time musical partner David Rawlings, the singer-songwriter will perform for two nights at the ballroom, a fitting venue for a revival of Welch’s celebrated catalog. Doors open at 7 p.m. to enjoy a craft beer on the riverside deck and to take in the ballroom’s history as a cotton mill. 8 p.m.; $35; 1711 Saxapahaw-Bethlehem Church Rd., Saxapahaw; hawriverballroom.com

5-6 RIFF OFF The Marsalis family name is synonymous with jazz and we are fortunate that brother Branford makes his home in Durham. The saxophonist, composer, producer, and bandleader has won Grammy awards, written for Broadway and collaborated with everyone: Sting, Harry Connick Jr., DJ Premier, Béla Fleck, the Grateful Dead, and Jay Leno (leading The Tonight Show band). Currently, his best collaborations are with his bandmates and Triangle audiences can catch them—the Branford Marsalis Quartet—at Baldwin Auditorium, a Duke Performances event October 5-6. Marsalis, pianist (and Durhamite) Joey Calderazzo, bassist Eric Revis, and drummer Justin Faulkner will deliver two high octane sets sure to have fans bebopping in the aisles. 8 p.m.; $10 Duke students $50 - $62 general admission; 1336 Campus Dr., Durham; dukeperformances.duke.edu/events

Henry Diltz (WELCH); courtesy branfordmarsalis.com

OH, SISTERS LET’S GO DOWN


5-6 courtesy Naked Magicians

NOTHING UP HIS SLEEVE

There is no telling what the Naked Magicians will pull out of their hats. The pair of Australian illusionists (and exhibitionists) have received exposure on network television and the London’s West End. This month, they are bringing their titillating R-rated trunk show of cheeky humor and stripped down magic to the Durham Performing Arts Center for two nights. A VIP experience is available that includes premium seating (egads!) and a meet and greet with the magicians (eyes up). Warning: the sesame will be wide open for this show. It is for ages 18+ and contains naughty language and bits. Now you see it. Wink wink. Nudge nudge. 8 p.m.; $35 - $55 general admission, $75 VIP package; 123 Vivian St., Durham; dpacnc. com/events/detail/the-naked-magicians-1

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SPOTLIGHT

Sweet RELIEF Music Maker Relief visits the Gregg

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A

s head of Music Maker Relief Foundation, the Hillsborough-based nonprofit that helps down-on-their-luck blues musicians, Tim Duffy is the ultimate multi-tasker. It’s a gig that involves photography, artist management, record production, fundraising, bookkeeping, playing music in a sideman capacity—and most of all, evangelism. It doesn’t take much to get Duffy to start preaching the gospel of the blues, and the necessity of supporting the people who play it. “The roots of anything interesting in America are in the American South,” he says. “Predominantly the black American South. America’s best export has always been our music, invented by people whose identities were stripped as they came off the ship. Their great grandsons and granddaughters are keeping the language alive.” Duffy does what he can to help keep those grandsons and granddaughters alive, too. Since the mid-1990s, Music Maker has helped a range of artists including Durham bluesman John Dee Holeman, Piedmont guitar legend Etta Baker and Winston-Salem soul crooner Luther “Captain Luke” Mayer. That aid takes the form of everything from management and show-booking services to checks to cover rent, prescriptions, groceries, or car repairs. Along the way, Duffy has taken a lot of photographs of Music Maker artists, too, forging an iconic visual style for album covers and posters. Many of them are on display through November 25 at N.C. State’s Gregg Museum of Art & Design, in a show titled Our Living Past. But the art and the music are both very much present-tense. —David Menconi

Timothy Duffy

TRIANGLE NOW


courtesy celebratefv.com (FUQUAY); courtesy Comedy Central (SERVO)

OCTOBER

17 6

WALK THIS FUQUAY

Fuquay-Varina is not only fun to say, but it is also fun to visit, especially October 6 for the Celebrate Fuquay-Varina Festival. Stroll the city’s charming downtown with stops along the way including an Artist Village, a Kid Zone, a BMX bike show, and an acrobatics show by Lux Performance Arts. Or, get the VIP tour with Mayor John W. Byrne on the Mayor’s Walk. Enjoy live music in the Beer Garden Performance Area and have a craft brew or two while you are there. Hit up the Main Stage for a variety of acts including a magician, storyteller, and more music. Plenty of food vendors will be on hand for a bite to eat, but save room for chili from the festival cook off. Fuquay-Varina has much to offer, it is, after all, the city with a dash more. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.; free; downtown Fuquay-Varina; celebratefv.com

SERVO UP THE LAUGHS The cult comedy series Mystery Science Theater 3000 (MST3K) is celebrating 30 years of adventures in space with a tour that crash lands at the Durham Performing Arts Center (DPAC) October 17. Book passage for Mystery Science Theater 3000 Live! Feat. Deathstalker II. For the uninitiated: a mild mannered space janitor is held hostage and forced to watch schlocky B movies. As the movie is screened for the television audience, he interjects humorous commentary along with his robot companions crafted from random parts including a gumball dispenser, a face mask, and an infant car seat. The tour brings original cast member and show creator Joel Hodgson back to riff with current cast member Jonah Ray and the bots Tom Servo, Crow T. Robot, and Gypsy. It may be a B movie, but it will be an A+ evening. 7:30 p.m.; $39 - $49; 123 Vivian St., Durham; dpacnc.com

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F I E L D

F A L L

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SPOTLIGHT

HEIRLOOMED Bespoke rugs by June St. George

A

lly-Catherine Trenary wants you to tread all over your family heirlooms—at least the ones she designs. Trenary is the founder of June St. George, a Carybased custom rug company. Trenary graduated from High Point University in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in interior design. She says she had a passion for custom textile design, but was reluctant to launch a brand in such a crowded market. Trenary then set her sights a little lower—to the floor to be exact. In college, she was part of a collaborative student project with a High Point manufacturer to design and oversee production of a custom rug. Inspired by this experience, Trenary paired up with a specialty manufacturer in California, and launched June St. George in February 2018. The rugs are made in the United States, with imported

wool from New Zealand. Trenary says that wool is environmentally friendly, and the natural fiber is soft, easy to clean, and durable. Each fully customizable rug is constructed to last, an heirloom to be passed down for generations. With a user-friendly online design tool, customers can select size, shape, pattern, and color combination. To make it truly personal, shoppers have the option to add a one-of-a-kind monogram designed by Trenary herself. She says her aesthetic is influenced by her travels abroad and reflects her love of home and family—including four legged members. It’s even in the name: June is June Sailor Pansy, her furry sidekick, and St. George is the patron saint of England, a nod to her time studying abroad. Trenary believes a rug is an important element in a room, so why not put your mark on it.” —Katherine Poole

junestgeorge.com

courtesy June St. George

TRIANGLE NOW


THE CYPRESS IS GETTING BETTER WITH AGE.

The Cypress of Raleigh is celebrating ten years of scenic strolls, bike rides, great dining, and compelling conversations. We’ve been proud to provide a great place to live, a beautiful private lake, cuisine that’s the envy of many chefs, and even excellent on-site healthcare. But it’s the folks who live here who make this such a special place. Won’t you join them?

Opportunity knocks, again

Be part of a fun-filled future at The Cypress of Raleigh. Learn about New Phase III Villas! Beautiful residences available in 2020.

Join us for the decades of good times to come. Learn more at cypressofraleigh.com or call 919-518-8918.


SPOTLIGHT

18-21 VENI, VIDI VIETRI

Shop until you drop (cash, not dinner plates) at the Vietri Fall Warehouse Sale October 18-21. Vietri is a high end line of handcrafted Italian dinnerware, glassware, and decor for the home and garden. The semi-annual sale is legendary among collectors, home entertainers, table top enthusiasts, and gift givers who queue up for great deals on merchandise that is discontinued or slightly flawed. Also featured at the sale are paper products from Caspari; fine linens and sleepwear from Allegria; home fragrance and personal care items from Erbario Toscano; and luxury candles and diffusers from LAFCO. Warning: This china shop sale is not for the casual browser or bulls. 2 p.m. - 6 p.m. Thursday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday - Sunday; 343 Elizabeth Brady Rd., Hillsborough; vietri.com

The Garden Center that GROWS with you.

26-27 TIME WARP

Hey hot patooties, put your hands on your hips and take a step right towards Koka Booth Amphitheatre for Theatre Raleigh presents: The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The kitchy cult movie comes to life for one deliciously wicked night of high jinks with Dr. Frank-N-Furter and his collection of ghoulish goths, including Riff Raff, played by local celeb Penn Holderness in a decidedly un-rakish turn. Be time warp ready: pets, coolers, blankets, drones, and grills are prohibited. And as any Rocky Horror devotee knows, toilet paper, toast, playing cards, water pistols and rubber gloves, are de rigueur, so be sure to purchase a voucher for the show’s fun pack when buying tickets. Gates open at 6 p.m. for science fiction double feature pre-gaming. October 26-27; 7:30 p.m.; $22.50 general admission, $35 reserved seats; 8003 Regency Pkwy, Cary; boothamphitheatre.com

courtesy Vietri (CHINA); courtesy 20th Century Fox (WARP)

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OCTOBER

27 courtesy Lizz Wright (WRIGHT)

THE WRIGHT STUFF

Lizz Wright grew up playing the piano in her father’s church in rural Georgia. Her Southern roots run deep and inform her career as a vocalist, blending jazz, blues, folk, and gospel. With six critically acclaimed albums, Wright is considered one of the most versatile singers of her generation. She brings her vocal stylings to the Carolina Theatre October 27 as part of the Duke Performances series. Grace is the title of her latest album and aptly describes this soulful performer. 8 p.m.; $10 Duke students, $35 - $55 general admission; 309 W. Morgan St., Durham; dukeperformances.duke.edu

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Inquire to whether there is required by federal law a property report as to any lot of interest to you. If such a report is required, procure and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offering to residents of New York, New Jersey nor other jurisdictions where prohibited. This drawing is for illustrative purposes only. All lot lines, dimensions, vegetation and areas shown are subject to change without notice at the developer’s discretion. Lots subject to prior sale.


THE USUAL

Our

“We try to make paranormal approachable, not a scary thing.” —Nelson Nauss, executive director and co-founder, The Ghost Guild

T

he Ghost Guild is out to investigate Raleigh’s paranormal activity in some of the city’s oldest locations. The group began in 2017 and became a nonprofit this year with two main goals: to research paranormal activity, and to involve and educate others in the process. The team, which has conducted over 40 investigations, consists of five primary members as well as a few consultants. Each member has had a personal experience with paranormal activity, many from a young age. “We are very skeptical, and we approach every investigation that way. We don’t go in wanting to find something, we actually go in trying to debunk anything that someone might have reported as something happening at that location,” says Nelson Nauss, executive director and co-founder. “We are certainly not a team that wants to fabricate anything.” The group focuses on historic locations, specifically in the Raleigh area, but travels for a few investigations each month. Each investigation begins with preliminary research on the

location, what happened there, and who may have lived there in the past. On the night of the investigation, the team will stake out with various tools and devices to learn more. The team records everything from the temperature and barometric pressure to the slightest sound, paranormal or not. Audio recorders as well as full-spectrum video cameras with night vision, infrared, and UV filters are distributed throughout the location. These tools are key to supporting what the investigators see, hear, and experience throughout the night. They then spend hours going over recorded data and review the audio and video files to find a connection. “It’s nothing like the TV shows,” says Nauss. “To me, paranormal investigating is similar to fishing…it’s a lot of patience.” Among ongoing investigations, The Ghost Guild was chosen by City of Raleigh Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources to investigate happenings at the Mordecai Historic House. The public is invited to learn more about the guild’s findings from eight investigations during the Mordecai Paranormal Reveal October 27. —Samantha Gratton photograph by EAMON QUEENEY

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OUR TOWN

GAME PLAN

“You really get to know these kids. They respond well in that environment, even the hesitant ones.” —Stacy Shannon, founder of GoKart Kids

I

t was one of those lightbulb moments for Stacy Shannon. A single mother at the time, she was mentally strategizing how to get from her office to her son’s school to drop him off at practice—in a span of 30 minutes. She says she thought, “Why isn’t there a car service for kids? Like if Care.com and Uber had a baby.” The mother of three added a fourth, and GoKart Kids was born. Shannon launched the ridesharing service in 2016, for children between the ages of six and 17. Today, GoKart kids are catching rides to and from school, practice, dance, and appointments in Wake, Durham, Orange, Alamance, Johnston, and Franklin counties. Shannon and her business partner, Carly Hemminger, are driven by their desire to help families. She says that for single parents, working parents, and families with multiple children, it can be exhausting to coordinate reliable and safe transportation. Safety is her main priority. Each driver must be interviewed in person, have at least five years of childcare experience, and submit to a thorough background check. There are 50 drivers in the area, mostly moms themselves.

A few dads are on the roster too, as well as retired police officers and special education teachers. Booking a trip for your child is much like other ridesharing services, with the option to book a ride in advance. Once a driver selects the ride, the parent receives a confirmation along with the driver’s photo, car information, and phone number. Parents can also download the FamilyMap app to track the ride. Shannon says her favorite part of the job is the relationships she forms with her riders. “You really get to know these kids,” she says, “they respond well in that environment, even the hesitant ones.” One mom says her daughter was nervous about her first ride, but later reported, “Mom, it’s like one of your friends picked me up.” In the two years since GoKart Kids began, business has boomed, with a small expansion in Charlotte, and requests coming from as far as Tampa, Florida, and Houston, Texas. Shannon says she’s just happy growing her business at home while spending quality time with her three children and —Katherine Poole husband. That’s how she likes to roll. gokartnc.com photograph by EAMON QUEENEY

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OUR TOWN

SHOP LOCAL

“I believe Durham’s inclusive community has helped us get through the hard times and to shine bright.” —Gabe Eng-Goetz, founder, Runaway Clothing

G

abe Eng-Goetz is taking his creativity to the next level with apparel business Runaway. Eng-Goetz says his love for fashion began while spending time in New York City during college, and he later returned to Durham to execute his ideas. “Upon returning to North Carolina, I started making clothing in my basement for my friends and it just grew from there. Today, we have a flagship store in downtown Durham and sell internationally online. I wanted to start something from scratch with as few limitations as possible and a strong direction.” Eng-Goetz designs each collection on his own, with the exception of collaborations. Since its inception in 2011, Runaway has collaborated with organizations like the

Carolina Hurricanes, Lululemon, the Durham Bulls, and Hopscotch Music Festival. The brand direction is clear, and its gaining traction outside of Durham, too. Their classic DURM slogan continues to pop up on hats and tees throughout the Triangle—the company’s campaign to celebrate the city and ‘say it like you’re from here.’ The Durham native says he started the company in the Bull City to give back to his community. “I’m from Durham, this city has given me everything: its people, its schools, its resources. I came back after college to give back in the only way I know how, through the arts,” he says. “Runaway was founded on the idea of ‘running from convention’. Everything we do is to further a lifestyle that we want to live.”—CC runawayclothes.com photography by EAMON QUEENEY

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OUR TOWN

ON DUTY

“If we’re supported in our professions, we tend to be happier in them.” —Margaret ‘Austin’ McFarlane, founder and CEO, My Girl Friday

M

argaret ‘Austin’ McFarlane was a seasoned nanny when she founded My Girl Friday. Her business is a matchmaking service of sorts for nannies and families in the Triangle—and provides support to both in the process. “What started in 2011 has been growing every year. We have 450 active clients in the area,” says McFarlane, who began the endeavor while continuing to nanny on the side. “When I was a nanny, I worked for these incredible families that were very dynamic and busy in the Triangle,” she says. “I love the act of helping these families and being there for the kids, and we’re also able to give resources I didn’t have as a nanny.” What began as a one woman show has grown to a company with multiple employees, including Director of Recruitment, Leanne Wells. “I couldn’t do it without her,” McFarlane says, “she’s a huge part of this agency. She’s intuitive, kind, thorough, and an excellent judge of character.” While nannies are the largest portion of the business,

My Girl Friday also places personal assistants, tutors, house managers, and chauffeurs. My Girl Friday provides everything from a sounding board for both nanny and family to sick day replacements, “providing an extra layer of security and commitment to the family,” says McFarlane. There are also industry speaking events, cooking classes, and community building activities for nannies, a bonus that most in the field do not have access to. McFarlane says their client base is diverse, but a favorite among physicians in the Raleigh area. “We pack in so much value that’s made us a favorite” says McFarlane. “We began as an on-call system for families, but have grown to a close-knit network of high-quality caregivers.” Each family is promised a one-year guarantee, and McFarlane says that retention is their main focus. “At My Girl Friday, we support the nannies, but it benefits the families as well. We want to keep the nanny in the same place as long as possible because that’s what’s best for the kids.” —Catherine Currin photograph by EAMON QUEENEY

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Ethan Hill

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AFIELD

Q& A HOME In the garden with Helen Yoest

photography by JULI LEONARD

GROWN

H

elen Yoest knows her way around a garden. A North Carolinian since 1988, Yoest says she couldn’t be happier with the terroir of the Old North State. She began her career as an air pollution engineer, and is the founder and current director of nonprofit Bee Better, which encourages backyard planting for wildlife and ecosystem benefits. Yoest is also a gardener at Fearrington Village in Chapel Hill, and if that wasn’t enough— she is a guest columnist for Country Gardens magazine, has written three books, and is the recipient of the 2015 City of Raleigh Sustainability award. Intrigued by the bonafide garden expert, WALTER visited her garden this month, where Yoest shared her green thumb secrets. —CC

OCTOBER 2018 | 61


You’ve been gardening for decades now! What initially sparked your interest? My love of gardening is an extension of my desire to be outdoors. Gardening is my sport, my church, my refuge. There is no problem I can’t solve by being outside with nature all around me. As a child growing up on the coast of Virginia, there was always something to explore. It’s the same in North Carolina. Why is North Carolina an ideal spot for gardening? Well, I can’t answer for all of North Carolina, but the Piedmont and Coastal regions have so much going for them. Where to begin: we can garden year round and after our first frost, we are also tick and mosquito free! If you don’t like our heat and humidity, there are a

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full nine months to build the garden to suit your best season. The Triangle area is a horticultural hub! We have three of some the world’s most respected botanical gardens, including Duke Gardens, JC Raulston Arboretum, and the North Carolina Botanical Garden. N.C. State is one of the best universities producing the next generation of horticulturists and landscape architects— many of these graduates stay in our area and create world-renowned businesses like Hoffman Nursery, or run garden centers like Garden Supply in Cary. Speaking of Garden Supply, they are a good example of garden centers doing so much more than selling plants. Other garden centers have branched out to be more than a garden destination, such as Atlantic Gardening Company, with a friendly bar selling

local craft beers. Garden centers are also great places to go for seasonal holiday decorating. Tell me more about the Bee Better garden. I started the nonprofit Bee Better in 2016 to help homeowners build better backyards for birds, bees, and butterflies. Our focus is on the plants. Many homeowners express interest in wanting to help the bee or the monarchs or some other celebrity insects. If we gardened more sustainability, we can save even more species. We don’t need to keep bees to help the bees—instead, plant the pollen and nectar-rich plants that satisfy their needs. For example, there is such an emphasis on native plants, but since the European honeybee isn’t native to North Carolina, they


have adapted to plants native to their origin of species. We help teach homeowners to plant the best flowers for their allowed space that will benefit the European honeybee that are also not invasive. Same with the butterflies. It’s wonderful to have beautiful flowers, but if you are trying to fully sustain the life-cycle of the butterfly, one needs a diversity of plants, and most certainly a host plant on which to lay their eggs, so the caterpillar stage can feed. What prompted you to branch out into growing microgreens? Where do you sell them? As a gardener at Fearrington Village, we would buy our microgreens from a local grower. As she was winding down towards retirement, she gave the culinary gardener and me the opportunity to learn how to grow our own for the restaurant. As I began to learn the nutrient benefits of microgreens, I was hooked. While their nutrient contents vary slightly from one type to another, most varieties are rich in potassium, iron, zinc, magnesium, and copper. Microgreens are also a great source of beneficial plant compounds like antioxidants. The concentration level of these nutrients is much higher than when the plant is mature. I realized that Raleigh didn’t have a reliable source of locally grown microgreens, so I branched out to serve the Raleigh market. While my family benefits from these nutrient flavors, I cater to Fearrington Village and it is my hope to soon sell to some of the leading chefs in the Raleigh area. They are locally grown and freshly cut for a weekly delivery. I sell to individuals, particularly vegetarians and vegans, who understand the value of added nutrients, as well as anyone wanting to have a better tasting experience. What are some of your favorite plants native to the area? Cardinal flower, Lobelia cardinalis, as a hummingbird favorite. Coneflowers, Echinacea spp. for native bees, butter-

“Gardening is my sport, my church, my refuge.”

flies, and goldfinches, yaupon holly, Ilex vomitoria, for our winter resident native birds, and milkweed, Asclepias spp., is the only host plant for the Monarch and Queen butterfly. It’s important for me to know and share with others the benefits of native plants for our wildlife, not just because they are pretty.

Plants will die and it isn’t necessarily your fault! Know your sun. If the plant tag says shade, full sun will not be suitable, no matter how badly you want it. This may seem logical but it’s a mistake made often, by novices and even experienced gardeners.

Most of us can barely keep a succulent alive—what’s your advice to a beginner gardener?

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H O S P I TA L I T Y

RESTORED Local couple relocates and revamps a downtown home by IZA WOJCIECHOWSKA photography by JUSTIN KASE CONDER

T

wo years ago, an old house in downtown Raleigh was slated for demolition, with a big development planned to go in its place. But with the help of a historical commission, a remote control, and long nights and weekends filled with blood, sweat, and tears, that old house got a second chance. Moved a few blocks down and transformed into a boutique hotel, Guest House Raleigh

now offers visitors a unique experience, blending history with bright, minimalist rooms, a downtown view, and distinctive Raleigh accents. Guest House is the project of local husband-and-wife team Matt Tomasulo and Nicole Alvarez, who wanted to give back to the city that brought them together and gave them a community. The eightroom home is Raleigh’s first boutique hotel, but as Alvarez puts it, “it’s not your grandma’s bed and breakfast.” With a big porch and charming exterior, the house

fits right in on S. Bloodworth Street, which is largely residential, though it’s just a five-minute walk from downtown’s Moore Square and City Market. As visitors enter, they first walk into the 1,218-square-foot historic home, which has been lovingly restored and furnished while retaining its original structure, wood floors (preserved for more than a century beneath carpet, linoleum, and layers of newspaper!), windows, now-exposed ceiling joists, and fireplace. The first floor is common OCTOBER 2018 | 67


“The Parlour was completely restored from it’s original form,” says Tomasulo. The Skyline King Suite, pictured below, is complete with a 16-foot private balcony and a double rain head shower.

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In February 2017, the Gorham house was lifted off its foundation, mounted on wheels, and in a surreal scene, maneuvered the few blocks through downtown Raleigh using a remote control.

space, and the entire second floor of the historic house is a two-room guest suite. The original back door now leads into the Guest House’s 2,775-square-foot modern addition, which Alvarez, an architect at Clearscapes, designed herself in collaboration with the firm. The place is flooded with natural light, and the clean white lines, ubiquitous green plants, and thoughtful decor make it soothing and welcoming, not to mention Instagram-ready. The first floor of the addition has three guest rooms and a large, open kitchen. The second floor has four more rooms, including another large suite with a balcony, double shower, and skyline view. A garden out back features outdoor furniture, an imposing 125-yearold pecan tree, and a patio made of bricks repurposed from a chimney that collapsed in the house’s move. The Guest House opened its doors in September, and it’s clear that the hotel has been a labor of love for Tomasulo and Alvarez—love for the project, for each other, for Raleigh, and for the guests they get to share it with. “The idea of being

hosts really excited us,” Tomasulo says. “We want to share Raleigh with people who aren’t from here.” Alvarez agrees. “We want to be able to give personal recommendations on how to have a unique experience when you come. It really is a guest house for Raleigh residents, whose guests are in good hands if they come and stay here.”

Old History and New Ideas Tomasulo, 36, and Alvarez, 32, met as graduate students at the N.C. State College of Design. Alvarez, originally from Cary, recently worked on projects in Raleigh such as Brewery Bhavana and Bida Manda. Tomasulo’s background is in landscape architecture and city planning, and he’s worked on a number of walkability and bikeability projects in the Triangle. In 2015, he ran for Raleigh City Council, and Alvarez worked as his campaign manager. Although he didn’t win, the experience made the couple think harder—and more enthusiastically— about what it means to live in Raleigh. “Running for Council, we got to meet

a lot of people who really love and care about and are invested in Raleigh as a place and a community,” Tomasulo says. “It expanded our community and excited us to double down on Raleigh.” After the election, Tomasulo and Alvarez were keeping an open mind about how to engage with their passion for the city. When they learned that the Raleigh Historic Development Commission and Preservation North Carolina were fighting to save two century-old houses on Lenoir Street, they got to thinking. The commissions won, and the houses would eventually be moved to empty lots on Bloodworth Street to be sold as single-family homes. The house that is now Guest House was built in the 1880s and owned by Arthur and Annie Gorham. Arthur Gorham was Raleigh’s first African American mail carrier, and Annie Gorham was a teacher. Their daughter, Addie, inherited the house and lived in it her whole life, housing Shaw University students. “There’s so much history already behind the house, and we started to see OCTOBER 2018 | 69


that it would be a shame for it to only be a house, this big property, really close to downtown in a thriving historic district,” Alvarez says. “So we put our heads together and tried to see what Raleigh didn’t have.” The answer was a boutique hotel. Tomasulo and Alvarez travel a lot—and more often to cities than to beaches or mountains, they say. For them, staying in a carefully curated, thoughtfully built hotel makes sense—and they could see that Raleigh would benefit.

From Gorham House to Guest House For nearly a year, Tomasulo and Alvarez told themselves that if they received this approval, or passed that hurdle, they’d keep going. In fall 2016, all the agreements fell into place, they were given the house, and they purchased the Bloodworth property with restrictive covenants. “We were laughing, like, ‘Great, we own a piece of property and a house. Now we’ve just got to put them together,’” says Alvarez.

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The hotel showcases collaborations with local artists and businesses, and is studded with accents that bring the city to life. “This is almost like our love note to Raleigh,” Tomasulo says.


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tioned light switches, and an outdoor watering system that uses diverted stormwater. But even though the addition is quite modern, Tomasulo and Alvarez have taken care not to lose sight of the historic aspect of the Gorham house, softening detailing around doors and windows, for instance, or furnishing it simply. During the restoration process, Tomasulo and Alvarez found bundles of postcards and Christmas cards hidden in the fireplace. They hope to exhibit them, along with newspapers that had preserved the wood floors and a brief history of the Gorhams and their house.

In February 2017, the Gorham house was lifted off its foundation, mounted on wheels, and in a surreal scene, maneuvered the few blocks through downtown Raleigh using a remote control. (The second house was also moved and now sits next door to the Guest House.) The next year and a half was spent settling the house onto its new foundation, acquiring permits, restoring the house, and building the addition. Though neither Tomaluso nor Alvarez had hotel experience, they approached the project methodically. They traveled to comparable hotels in similar cities to figure out what was important to them: minimalism, functionality, and plants and natural light in every room. “We really wanted it to be the quality of a hotel, where we took a lot of care with the construction,” Alvarez says. “But we still wanted it to feel like a home, since it is a house at the end of the day.”The care and detail comes across in elements like skylights, shock- and sound-absorbent ceilings, well-posi-

A Love Note to Raleigh It’s been a long two years for Tomasulo and Alvarez, and they can’t wait to share the Raleigh they love. In addition to offering something of a Raleigh concierge service, the hotel showcases collaborations with local artists and businesses and is studded with accents that bring the city to life. “This is almost like our

# !

love note to Raleigh,” Tomasulo says. The local touches are everywhere: custom railings and a kitchen island by Tactile, a dried branch installation by Wylde Flowers, a large-scale painting by Jason Craighead, and decor from Port of Raleigh and Holder Home. “We wanted to be able to add to Raleigh, to round out the experience, and to be able to collaborate with our friends,” Alvarez says. “That’s part of what inspired us.” The kitchen will also be stocked with local goodies, including Benchwarmers bagels from Transfer Co. Food Hall, Videri chocolates, and coffee from Counter Culture and Slingshot. After sharing the journey and process online for the past couple years, Guest House opened its doors to a booked-solid first few weeks. “All the hard work has kind of paid off. The greatest compliments are when people are like, ‘It feels like this has always been here,’” Tomasulo says. “We’re excited to share it with people.”

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Cultivating

CULTURE

Local creameries make a name for themselves by COLLEEN THOMPSON photography by MADELINE GRAY

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at the TABLE

A

ccording to Arabian legend, cheese was created by accident. A merchant put his milk into a pouch made from a sheep’s stomach, and set out on a journey across the desert. The rennet in the pouch’s lining combined with the sun’s heat separated the milk into curd and whey. That night, he discovered that the whey satisfied his thirst, and the curd satisfied his hunger. Centuries later, gourmands and foodies have seasoned their palates from the mundane of Monterey Jack or mild cheddar and expanded to include the delights of bold, stinky, and nutty flavors. Terms like ‘washed-rind,’ ‘alpine,’ and ‘mold-ripened’ have crept into our lexicon. North Carolina is getting cheesier thanks to a

number of artisanal farmhouse operations. As new farms pop up each year, the region is quickly occupying more counter space nationwide. To celebrate and support the local dairy, makers throughout the state formed the North Carolina Cheese Trail. The trail encourages visitors to spend an afternoon, weekend, or an entire vacation tasting local cheese, connecting with cheesemakers, and enjoying the state’s scenic farmlands. There are currently 29 cheesemakers along the trail—each creating different products, carving out a niche for themselves, and gathering a loyal following along the way.

For the love of cheese “I believe true artisan cheesemaking is when a skilled cheesemaker creates and ages small batches of cheese from a local dairy herd (cow, buffalo, sheep, or goat), allowing seasonal and environmental

variations in milk composition and flavor to be expressed,” says Richard Nathan, founder of Raleigh’s Second Act Artisan Cheese. Nathan began his career as a certified public accountant and portfolio manager before taking a sharp turn to cheesemaking. “I started making cheese in my spare time as a serious hobby, with the expectation that it might become a second career once I retired from my day job.” He began taking a few weekend cheesemaking workshops, completed an intensive program at the Sterling College Artisan Cheese Institute in Vermont, as well as an advanced program at Westminster Artisan Cheese Making. Three years ago, Nathan founded Second Act Artisan Cheese, with the goal of offering workshops to hobbyists, foodies, and any Raleighite interested in learning more about the craft. It turns out that you don’t need expensive equipment to make really good cheese in your own kitchen. SEPTEMBER OCTOBER2018 2018| |00 75


All you need is a little motivation, knowledge, and practice, he says. “My goal is to raise awareness in the area about all the cheeses made by local producers in North Carolina,” Nathan says. “I’ve found that once people try making cheese for themselves, they develop a new appreciation for what’s available locally.” Second Act mainly produces hard cheese, and Nathan says he likes the control he has over a longer-aged product. “I also like to make cheeses that are difficult to find in the stores, like English clothbound cheddar, English Red Leicester, and Stilton styles. Our Dry Aged Jack is special because the rind is covered with an olive oil, crushed coffee, black pepper and cacao rub—it’s extremely complex and flavorful because of the rind,” says Nathan. “The true cheesemaker will tell a culinary story of the local terroir in their cheese, including the forage on which the animals graze.” Each cheese is an expression of the farm it comes from—that link between flora, fauna, soil and milk is integral to cheesemaking. “Artisan cheesemakers let the milk dictate how the cheese will be made and aged which invariably leads to variations in taste across the seasons,” says Nathan.

Content cattle Happy cows produce better milk. Better milk makes better cheese. That simple belief prompted North Carolina natives Flo Hawley and Portia McKnight to purchase 37 acres of land in West Chapel Hill and launch Chapel Hill Creamery. They cleared the land, converted 28 acres to pasture with a grassy mix, and purchased nine Jersey cows—a smaller breed that generally produce rich, creamy milk. McKnight says the care and dedication to raising happy, healthy cows has always been the driving force behind the creamery’s ethos. “We are certified by Animal Welfare Approved, which is the most stringent of the farm animal welfare certification programs. We committed to healthy, happy cows from the beginning,” says McKnight. “My favorite cow—don’t tell the others—is Andrea. She is named after Andrea Reusing of Lantern Restaurant 76 | WALTER

Farming formaggio

Each cheese is an expression of the farm it comes from— that link between flora, fauna, soil and milk is integral to cheesemaking.

and The Durham Hotel. She was born in March of 2007—daughter of Audrey, granddaughter of Allison, and great granddaughter of Miss Ada, our original cow. Andrea has been affectionate and playful since she was a calf and she’s especially photogenic,” says McKnight. The herd has since grown to 30 grassfed, happy cows that have rewarded the creamery greatly—their selection of seven cheeses a testament to that. “We have a core list of four cheeses: Carolina Moon, a Camembert-style cheese; Calvander, inspired by Asiago; Hickory Grove, a silky, meltable cheese; and fresh Mozzarella, which is a summertime feature,” says McKnight. Calvander, named for a crossroads where a nineteenth-century schoolhouse sits, has gone on to win three Best in Show prizes at the North Carolina State Fair, as well as a World Jersey Cheese Award and a North American Jersey Cheese Award. “Cheese is an incredibly fascinating food, because milk is almost 100 percent of the composition, but there are so many different cheeses that can be made from that one ingredient,” says McKnight. “As we explored the possibility of cheese making, we found it compelling to start from the ground up—from the sun and soil, building our herd health and creating outstanding milk quality to ultimately make great cheese.”

The unconventional life of owning a cheese farm—a life of seemingly calm sunshine days, bleating goats, and an endless supply of chevre—is a reality for brother and sister duo Austin and Samantha Genke. Just north of Hillsborough stretches Carr Store Road in Cedar Grove, N.C., where the Genke siblings co-own and operate Boxcarr Handmade Cheese. Born and raised in Vero Beach, Florida, Austin Genke attended the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, while Samantha Genke headed to North Carolina and spent a decade learning at Goat Lady Dairy in Climax, as well as Chapel Hill Creamery. Longing for country life and hoping to move closer to family, Austin Genke and his wife Dani bought a small farm to raise chickens and plant vegetables. Samantha Genke already lived across the road, and raised a small herd of goats. “We moved to North Carolina to be closer to family, to sit around the dinner table and share meals,” says Austin Genke. The idea of starting a creamery and making cheese came afterwards. They started a Kickstarter campaign in 2015 to raise enough funds to build a creamery on the farm.

THE PROCESS clockwise from top left: Marlene McCauley, Maggie McDowell, Lisa Richardson, and Gail Webster make queso fresco in a beginners cheesemaking workshop; Richard Nathan, founder of Second Act Artisan Cheese, leads cheesemaking workshops for all skill levels in Raleigh and drains a batch of fromage blanc; Melissa Dollman chops up chives to add to the queso fresco; Richard Nathan ties up a batch of fromage blanc to drain; Richard Nathan spreads a piece of butter muslin over a bucket to drain cheese curds; Cheese curds for queso fresco are strained through butter muslin before being mixed with various ingredients and pressed into a wheel; Cheese curds are tested for making queso fresco; Rachel Clark, left, spoons curds for queso fresco into a press as Melissa Dollman, right, holds the butter muslin; a finished block of cheese


OCTOBER 2018 | 77


They arranged to source milk from other small farms: Jersey and Holstein cow’s milk from a neighbor as well as Alpine and Nubian goat’s milk from a friend’s farm. Inspired by their family roots in the Piedmont and in Sicily, they set out to make Italian-inspired farmstead cheeses. They recruited the expertise of longtime friend Alessandra Trompeo, a cheesemaker from Northern Italy, and traveled to Trompeo’s birthplace to study the different styles of cheese, spending months experimenting and taste testing. Samantha Genke now produces cheese modeled on those from Northern Italy, like Robiola and Taleggio using a unique selection of cultures. The handcrafted cheeses are catching the attention beyond the Tar Heel State, finding their way to New York, Chicago, and San Francisco. Boxcarr now produces nine varieties of cheese, with additional seasonal flavors. Cottonseed is one of Boxcarr’s top sellers and uses a blend of milks that results in 78 | WALTER

a creamy, decadent cheese. There’s also Rocket’s Robiola, named after one of their goats, and made from a silky cow’s milk with an ash-dusted rind and hints of almond and mushroom. “Consumers want better tasting, unique products, and this desire has created a real demand for artisanal and local products,” said Austin Genke. “It’s affected the cheese business as well as craft beer and other specialized food products. With initiatives like the N.C. Cheese Trail, it helps promotion and awareness.” A deep love for cheese motivates these cheesemakers to continue the process and promote the delicious product. “As consumers we have the ultimate power to decide which cheesemakers thrive and which ones eventually fade away,” says Nathan of Second Act Artisan Cheese. “My hope is that at the very minimum, we seek out locally made artisan cheeses to help support our emerging cheesemakers.”

SPREADING THE LOVE Richard Nathan hosts a beginner cheesemaking workshop at his home in Raleigh.

CHEERS to CHEESE FEST OCTOBER 7 The N.C. Cheese Trail is celebrating Southern cheesemakers October 7 at the Grove Winery & Vineyards in Gibsonville, North Carolina. Sample and purchase cheese as you talk with cheesemakers— Grove’s tasting room will also be open for tasting, shopping, or to enjoy a glass of wine on their patio. Learn more about the N.C. Cheese Trail and pick up free brochures or dairy-themed items for adults and children alike. The event is free, complete with live music and local food trucks. grovewinery.com


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Bold colors in Fallon Park balance clean lines by CATHERINE CURRIN photographs by CATHERINE NGUYEN

H

omeowners Adam Vester and Bobby Upchurch are drawn to more than just a pop of color. Their Fallon Park home is bursting at the seams with eclectic art, fabrics, and objects. “My personal theory is our homes should be a reflection of ourselves. I love color and I personally feel too many people are afraid to use color. I appreciate all design, so if we love it, I’ll find a way to make it work,” says Vester. The pair moved into the custom-built home in 2011, with the help of designer Susan Tollefsen. “We turned to Susan to get the designer pieces that were only available from interior

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LIVING COLOR

STORY of a house


OCTOBER 2018 | 81


designers. It has been a great collaboration over the past seven years as our style has continued to evolve,” Vester says. Tollefsen says she's happy with how the space has unfolded, as well as the friendship she's formed in the process. “They're a pair of guys that will be lifelong friends,” she says. She added balance to the striking colors with gold accents, and brought in the pair's collected art pieces to make the rooms more personal. “We warmed up the space with textures: the cowhide ottoman, throw pillows, wallpaper,” says Tollefsen. “I wanted to make the space a mix of the two personalities. Adam [Vester] loved mid-century modern, and 82 | WALTER

Bobby [Upchurch] likes clean lines and simplicity. I put both styles together.” The result: a funky space filled with comfortable and intimate accents. Tollefsen used a mix of designers when decorating each room, including Kelly Wearstler for Lee Jofa fabrics and Jonathan Adler. Tollefsen, Vester, and Upchurch certainly have an affinity for Jonathan Adler. “I LOVE everything he represents,” says Tollefsen, “kitchy glam and sometimes completely inappropriate items. Everyone needs a little humor in their decor.” “We've really stepped up the space,” says Tollefsen. “Little bits that we've done have really changed the whole look.”

Opening page: Adam Vester and Bobby Upchurch fell in love with the Jonathan Adler foot as their dining centerpiece. “‘Keep your foot off the table’ is a saying we all grew up with and the giant purple foot plays homage to that saying,” Vester says. Above: Susan Tollefsen added texture to the living room with a cowhide ottoman and plush pillows. Adam Vester and Bobby Upchurch purchased a pair of unconvential paintings by Raleigh artist Shaun Richards. The bright orange duo, which Tollefsen refers to as 'the kids,' were split up between the living and dining areas.


WILD WELCOME The entryway provides a glimpse into the eccentric home. Designer Susan Tollefsen added textured wallpaper throughout the home. Both the metallic purple paper, this page, and sunburst pattern, at left, is from Cole and Son.

OCTOBER 2018 | 83


ECLECTIC ACCENTS Above: The master bedroom maintains the home's juxtaposition of traditional decor with bursts of color, along with whimsical patterns like the custom drapery panels from Highland Court. To add three-dimensional art to the study, at right, Susan Tollefsen added colorful bowls to the wall. “I like to hang some sculptural elements in most homes,” she says, “I thought these bowls from Global Views looked different.”

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DELICIOUS DESIGN Painting of Peace Street's Krispy Kreme Doughnuts by homeowner Adam Vester. “It’s mixing the old and new pieces that make it fun and interesting,” he says. “I’m sure my affinity of pop art has shaped our home along way.”

OCTOBER 2018 | 85


OUTDOOR ESCAPE Homeowners Adam Vester and Bobby Upchurch extended their personalities outdoors. Bright, patterned pillows accent classic chairs among the backyard foliage in the Fallon Park neighborhood.

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THROUGH the LENS ANIMAL HOUSE Homeowners Molly McKinley and Stacey Gibbs enjoy a laugh at their chicken coop.

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OM sweet OM A couple finds their perfect farmhouse in Cary photography by JILLIAN CLARK words by LAURA PETRIDES WALL

P

artners Molly McKinley and Stacey Gibbs searched for their dream home for nearly six years. They were on the hunt for a large piece of land—land with room for farm animals, and to grow some of their own food. McKinley, a marketing executive and yoga teacher, created a Pinterest page with ideas for their dream home. After offers on three different properties fell through, although heartbroken, they continued the search and finally found a place they believed too good to be true. “For us, once we decided to live in trust and faith. Everything started to snap into focus and our story really started to unfold in exactly the way that we wanted it to,” says McKinley. OCTOBER 2018 | 89


SUBURBAN OASIS Clockwise from top left: Visitors are greeted at the OMstead with a sign designed by Beth Brant of Three Moon Collective; a gravel road leads to the house; an inviting, screened-in porch; the large backyard sprawls over four acres

Late in 2017, a home went on the market that peeked McKinley’s interest. At first Gibbs refused to go see it. “We had looked at so many houses and I told her I was not going. It would be heartbreaking. It won’t have enough bedrooms. I just did not want to go,” she says. She was finally convinced, and after taking a gravel road to the property and seeing the home, they realized it was exactly what they hoped for. It was in their school district and price point. They called it the ‘unicorn project.’ It was a rare find. As expected, the house received multiple offers. McKinley and Gibbs were outbid by developers who saw the potential opportunities for the land. However, the sellers wanted the property to remain essentially unchanged, and accepted their bid. “We believe that we willed this home into existence,” says McKinley. “If you saw my Pinterest board, you would realize this is the home we envisioned.” Since moving in this past January, McKinley and Gibbs are creating what they’ve aptly named the ‘OMstead,’ an homage to their love for yoga. They are trying to live intentionally by using available resources. Almost every piece of furniture is second-hand, donated, or repainted—reusing things instead of buying new. They are learning to grow food without chemicals or pesticides, and 90 | WALTER

have planted pro-butterfly and bee plants. “We’re trying to make sure that we make decisions that reflect us and not just the standards and norms of what everyone else is doing,” says McKinley. The pair says they both can’t wait to share their home with others. “When you have a lot, you have a higher obligation to give back,” says McKinley. They have big

plans for the OMstead, like yoga classes with Republic of Yoga in Cary and Yoga Garden in Apex. Other future plans include glamping tents, where McKinley can teach onsite marketing workshops. For now, they are happy sharing their home with three kids, 14 chickens, three ducks, three goats, and three dogs. There’s no place like Om.


“We’re trying to make sure that we make decisions that reflect us and not just the standards and norms of what everyone else is doing.” –Molly McKinley

OCTOBER 2018 | 91


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INTENTIONAL LIVING Opposite page clockwise from top left: Painting by local artist Danielle Baker sets the stage for the dining room; a tiny Buddha and crystal reflects the zen feeling of the home; the light and natural of the kitchen ties to the outdoor landscape. This page: Painting by Hillsborough artist Kelly Dew hangs above the kitchen table; the master bedroom echoes loving sentiments; freshly canned pickles, Italian-style pickled eggplant, and fresh eggs; comfortable seating welcomes visitors into the home.

OCTOBER 2018 | 93


EGGS IN ONE BASKET Clockwise from top: Molly McKinley’s daughter, Cate, collects eggs from the chicken coop; the Omstead is home to 14 chickens


“BRMC has it all: new amenities, great views, and an awe-inspiring setting near Blowing Rock.” Kim & Tony Lancaster BRMC homeowners & Greensboro, NC residents

Blue Ridge Mountain Club (BRMC) has been recognized by ideal-LIVING for “Best Outdoor Living,” offering an endless array of natural wonders to delight and energize one’s soul. And this summer, they introduced three world-class amenities: Ascent Wellness & Fitness, Jasper Club House, and Lookout Grill, all located together at Watson Gap Village, boasting some of the most jaw-dropping views in all the High Country. “The level of detail and craftsmanship and hospitality that these amenities offer is top notch. We are thrilled. Plus, they are one of the few communities up here that offer UTV trails, which is huge. That’s just one more thing that made BRMC the perfect mountain community for us.”

Homes & Condominiums from $430k. Homesites from $80k. To learn more or plan your visit contact Team BRMC: 828-414-4261 or online at ExploreBRMC.com 6I[HPU [OL 7YVWLY[` 9LWVY[ YLX\PYLK I` -LKLYHS 3H^ ILMVYL ZPNUPUN HU`[OPUN (SS PUMVYTH[PVU PZ ILSPL]LK [V IL HJJ\YH[L I\[ PZ UV[ ^HYYHU[LK ;OPZ PUMVYTH[PVU ZOHSS UV[ JVUZ[P[\[L H ]HSPK VɈ LY PU HU` Z[H[L ^OLYL WYPVY YLNPZ[YH[PVU PZ YLX\PYLK ;OPZ information and features and information described and depicted herein is based on proposed development plans, which are subject to change without notice. Actual development may or may not be as currently proposed. No guarantee is made that the features, amenities, or facilities depicted by an artist’s rendering or otherwise described herein will be built, or, if built will be the same type, size, or nature as depicted or described. © 2015 Blowing Rock Resort Venture, LLC.

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STORY of a house

96 | WALTER


CUSTOM CONCEPT

Traditional home in Budleigh entertains family of four by CATHERINE CURRIN photography by CATHERINE NGUYEN

O

lga and Web West joined in early on the process for their customized Budleigh neighborhood home. With the help of Dixon Kirby, they were able to make it work for their family, especially two daughters Liliana, 15, and Lucia, 11. “The house was partially framed. We had the opportunity to revise the floor plan to add the downstairs office and playroom,” says Olga West.

OCTOBER 2018 | 97


For the home’s design, the family partnered with Ashley Thompson of Dixon Kirby and interior designer Brittany Roux at Design Lines, who recently founded RouxMacNeill Studio. Roux branched out on her own with partner Robert MacNeill in 2o17. She says she loved collaborating with the homeowners to fit their personal style and needs. “We curated a collection of art and accessories that felt personal, meaningful, and added soul to the space,” she says. Olga West agrees, and says the couple couldn’t be happier with the home, which includes outdoor living, an expansive gameroom, and comfortable dining spaces. “We knew we wanted a combination of contemporary and traditional. More than anything, we wanted the house to feel like a home and not a museum. Ashley and Brittany were instrumental in helping us achieve that goal.”

98 | WALTER


WOOD WORK “We came in at the early stages of the process. The house was partially framed,” says Olga West. Dixon Kirby was able to customize the home for the West family with intricate door details, this page, dining room builtins, and floor-to-ceiling windows, at left.

OCTOBER 2018 | 99


84 | WALTER


KICK BACKSPLASH Homeowners Olga and Web West have comfortable seating throughout the home, from the breakfast nook, at left, to their outdoor chaise (opposite page). The kitchen’s backsplash tile, pictured above, is a focal point of the home. “The backsplash was a custom design,” says Olga West. “The pattern and the colors were custom for the kitchen. It started with a line drawing, then we added the color combinations, a sample was made for us, and from there, the entire concrete tile was handpainted one by one.”

OCTOBER 2018 | 101


SUNNY RETREAT Clockwise from left: Olga and Web West’s master suite gives way for natural light; Colorful, handpainted tiles add vibrant detail to the clean lines of the master bath; The West family enjoys floor-to-ceiling windows in their custom Dixon Kirby home.

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QUENCH

OUTLAW SPIRIT Raleigh brewery launches its own whiskey by JASON FRYE

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umor has it that Sumit Vohra and Chris Mielke were sipping a dram of small batch whiskey in their favorite saloon when they decided to expand Lonerider Brewing Company into craft-distilled spirits. While questions surround the origin story, fans of Shotgun Betty Hefeweizen and Sweet Josie Brown ale, as well as fans of boutique bourbon have been asking questions since word of Lonerider Spirits hit

the streets. What does it taste like? Where can I try it? And, how do I drink it? Thirsty folks across the Triangle have been plagued by questions, but the cure has arrived in the form of Lonerider’s Sherry Cask Finished Bourbon Whiskey. Vohra, Lonerider CEO and Chief Drinking Officer, says he chose to expand into the world of whiskey in part because he likes to drink it himself. “Bourbon is a true craft drink. It’s a personal favorite of

mine, and it can stand alone or in a cocktail. I also see the craft whiskey business attaining new heights like craft beer was able to do.” This rye-forward bourbon comes in hot at 90 proof, meaning it can stand up and stand out in a cocktail, but the sherry cask finish helps each dram deliver big flavors. Open the bottle and you’ll sense toffee followed by notes of spices like cinnamon and clove, and on the first sip photography by SMITH HARDY OCTOBER 2018 | 107


Sumit Vohra, CEO and Chief Drinking Officer at Lonerider Brewing and Lonerider Spirits.

FEMME FATALE Ingredients: 1.5 ounces Lonerider Bourbon Whiskey 2 ounces Lonerider Sweet Josie Brown Ale 1 ounce brown sugar syrup .75 ounce simple syrup 1 egg white Cinnamon Combine all ingredients into ice-filled shaker. Shake vigorously until egg white is frothy. Double strain into a coupe glass. Add a dash of cinnamon for garnish.

there’s a richness of cacao or custard. The sherry cask really kicks in and you find buttery vanilla reminiscent of stroopwafels. The finish is toasted oak with a peppery kick. The blend of flavor makes for a fine

sipping bourbon, and that’s only one way to enjoy it. Now that Lonerider Bourbon Whiskey is on the shelf, pick up a bottle at your neighborhood ABC store, head to the nearest cocktail lounge, or mix up your own drink at home.

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GIVERS John Mainey, co-founder of Made4Me, works on a demonstration furniture piece.

courtesy Made4Me

by ADDIE LADNER

Local nonprofit builds adaptive furniture

CARING with CARDBOARD

P

acking boxes, spaceships for kids, winter storage— it’s hard to conjure up more uses for cardboard than this. For Megan Vasko and her son Darius, three, who has autism, a certain chair made out of tri-wall cardboard has been life-changing. “You think it’s just a chair, right? But this chair has been miraculous for us and I can’t imagine our life without it,” says Vasko. The chair is a custom-made “floor sitter” painted to look like a John Deere tractor. It provides Darius with a secure, yet cheerful place to play, draw, watch a movie, or just calm down. Vasko says since the first day Darius sat in the chair, he’s been a different child. And according to Vasko, even though it’s technically made from cardboard, it’s in about the same condition as the day it was received. “If we introduce new toys or he needs to wind down, he wants to get into his chair,” she says. “We actually take it to church, and it’s the first thing he does every morning. He gets in his chair—it’s been through a lot!”

Lauren Zick and her mother Kati feel similarly about another cardboard chair that was made specifically to fit into a sled. Lauren, nine, has cerebral palsy. One of the only ways for her to experience the joys of sledding was to be on the sled lying down or with someone behind her. “She doesn’t quite have the core strength to sit on a sled on her own but she wanted to be able to sled independently,” Kati Zick says. Lauren’s brother, inspired by a school project, had the idea to build her a customized chair that could fit into the sled and hold his sister up straight. “We used it the first time it snowed that year. She got to go on her first solo sled down a hill and she was smiling and laughing. It was so amazing,” says Zick. These custom-made cardboard creations can be found throughout various homes in the Triangle and are all thanks to two Wake Forest neighbors and friends Jim McAgy and John Mainey. In March 2015, they founded the Triangle-based nonprofit, Made4Me. The two are on a mission to help any child or

OCTOBER 2018 | 111


adult with special needs by providing them access to specialized adaptive furniture and equipment. All 70 plus pieces of equipment and furniture they’ve designed and built since the organization’s inception have been done out of home garages and are derived mainly from a strong try-wall type of cardboard. Modeled off of a nonprofit McAgy discovered in New York City, the adaptive furniture ranges from easels for kids with visual impairment, to step stools, exercise benches, chairs, sleep wedges for babies to prevent reflux and floor sitters to help with core stability. “Mobility is key for us. We want to make people’s everyday living a little easier and to feel included in society,” says Mainey. Both Mainey and McAgy have children with special needs, and the two know how financially and emotionally draining caring for those loved ones can be. They wanted to give back. “A lot of these types of items are hard to find and are expensive. Private insurance doesn’t cover it and it can take months to get, and then you get it

and it doesn’t fit the need,” Mainey says. What Mainey and McAgy do through Made4Me is address those needs directly. “We come to them, we meet on their turf and we don’t ask for money except for a donation if they want to,” McAgy says. McAgy, originally from Detroit, Michigan, has an extensive background in the architectural woodworking business. Mainey, originally from New York, is an industrial engineer. The duo is a textbook pair for executing the build of this custom furniture and equipment. Each piece is made different for each person based on their individual needs and all the materials used are donated, allowing them to provide to families at no charge. “These families go through enough, how can we charge them? We can’t,” McAgy says. Making things from cardboard may seem simple, but Mainey says that these aren’t your run-of-the-mill cardboard makings. “It’s a fourweek process and everything is built from scratch. We take about twenty measurements of our clients and decide on an item that will make their life or their

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caregiver’s life easier,” he says. Though they don’t turn anyone away, all their work so far has been done for youth, ranging from age seven months to 18 years. The two like to take the time to make the pieces appealing to the child or teen and will often add their favorite colors, patterns or characters to the finished product. They involve therapists in the process as well, and each item is designed with safety as a priority, incorporating elements such as rounded corners, straps for security and non-skid bottoms. The benefits of building adaptive equipment and furniture from this type of cardboard are tremendous. Its lighter, making it easier on the user and caregiver, and it costs significantly less. “What they make is very durable and lasts a long time. We like to use them to show patients what they can have at home,” says Jennifer Mock of Abilitations Children’s Therapy. Mock, also a Made4Me board member, says often times insurance doesn’t cover adaptive equipment because it might not be “medically necessary.” “We often have kids and families that have regular insurance but it doesn’t cover what they need so families are spending an arm and a leg trying to find lending and a loan for this equipment. They [Mainey and McAgy] have really carved a niche for people who can’t afford these things and they customize it so nicely so patients always really love it.” McAgy says they’ve received 100 percent client satisfaction and hope to attract more volunteers and donations to expand their reach. The duo says they hope to help the 1 in 5 individuals living with disabilities in the state. Word is spreading much farther than the state though; they’ve had requests come from as far as Haiti and Africa. At the same time, the two continue to perfect and expand their portfolio. McAgy says, “Each piece we try to do a little better, we like to over-engineer. And we always get a tear on that third and final meeting when we deliver the finished product, that’s my favorite part. That’s the most rewarding.”

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Mark your calendar for these upcoming experiences… ART FARE October 18 CAM Raleigh Local restaurants Heirloom, Garland, and Brewery Bhavana collaborate for a memorable meal inspired by art. Each chef’s team will draw from the latest exhibit at CAM for an intimate 3-course dinner with wine pairings in the gallery. Sponsored by: Bailey’s Fine Jewelry Renewal by Andersen

TALES FROM THE WILD October 25 Milburnie Fishing Club A spirited evening of good-natured sport. Participate in interactive stations including fly fishing, oyster shucking, and knife skills while enjoying local beer and Southern fare. Sponsored by: Great Outdoor Provision Co. Support from: Johnson Subaru


For tickets and more information:

waltermagazine.com/savethedate A DAY WITH VIVIAN HOWARD November 3 Kinston, N.C. Spend the day with award-winning chef Vivian Howard. Enjoy brunch at the Boiler Room followed by a gallery tour at Art 105, a brewery tour at Mother Earth, and a 4-course dinner at Chef & The Farmer. Sponsored by: Great Outdoor Provision Co. Support from: Bailey’s Fine Jewelry & River Dunes

CELEBRATE THE SEASON November 28 Merrimon-Wynne House Join WALTER for an exclusive holiday shopping event. Enjoy cocktails and hors d’oeuvres while shopping. Each guest will receive a limited edition WALTER tote bag with special offers and gifts. Sponsored by: Virtue Labs


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WALTER events

WINning! WALTER hosts 4th annual WINnovation event

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Top to bottom: Attendees enjoy a three-course dinner; Katy Knox, president of U.S. Trust (the Private Wealth Management Group of Bank of America) leads the introductory Q&A; WINnovators make new connections.

ver 200 Triangle area professionals joined WALTER magazine and presenting sponsor, Bank of America, at The Umstead Hotel and Spa September 7. The fourth annual WINnovation celebrated women and innovation in the local comunity. The event kicked off with startup workshops led by Inspiring Capital and StartingBloc, followed by a cocktail reception for networking with fellow innovators and entrepreneurs. The presentation began with a delicious three-course meal with wine pairings provided by The Umstead Hotel and Spa, while the panel of honorees w gave TED-talk style presentations. Each panelists discussed the various successes and challenges they have experienced in their personal and professional lives. The evening concluded with a panelist Q&A and a special presentation from supporting sponsor, Diamonds Direct. WALTER was joined by an engineer, a scientist, an entrepreneur, a creative, and a strategist. But, no one title applies here. Each of the speakers is all of these—creatively strategizing, breaking new ground, engineering change. And as they proved that evening, they’ve just about got it down to a science. —KP

photography by MADELINE GRAY

OCTOBER 2018 | 117


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Clockwise: Panelists Sepi Saidi, Cicely Mitchell, Lindsay Zanno, Emily Sexton, and Melisse Shaban; panelists with WALTER staff Katherine Poole and Creative Director Laura Wall; attendees give a round of thanks; Kristine Sloan from StartingBloc; Katherine Poole with Bank of America’s Virgina Parker and Kari Stoltz.

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WINnovation was made possible by presenting sponsor Bank of America with support from Diamonds Direct and The Umstead Hotel and Spa. +) < 6#19 691 < ,> 6+ 3 9) < , 6+ + 6 $) 6# #$26+1$ <2$ 91)$691 '' 1< 9$' $)" !8 $''2 +1+9"# 61 6 ' $"# *,*.!73.!>>3 ;;;.-$" $2#' ) . +(


;I VIGSKRM^I SYV QSWX TVIGMSYW VIWSYVGI ȅ XLI TISTPI MR SYV GSQQYRMX] Thanks to you, things are getting done. Thanks to you, our community is a better place and the lives of real people are being changed for the better. Bank of America recognizes our community’s female entrepreneurs for helping to make a lasting difference where we live and work. Thank you for being an inspiration to us all. Visit us at bankofamerica.com/local 0MJIȈW FIXXIV [LIR [IȈVI GSRRIGXIHq ©2018 Bank of America Corporation | SPN-128-AD | ARRYK5V8


courtesy Marjorie Hodges

The

Larry Wheeler celebrates in New York City.

The Whirl is WALTER’s roundup of local happenings. From store openings to big galas, fundraisers, intimate gatherings, and everything in between, The Whirl has got it covered.

PARTIES 124 Triangle Wine Experience at Garland 126 Preview of Vita Vite Midtown 128 A Celebration of Larry Wheeler

Submissions for upcoming issues are accepted at WALTER’s website: waltermagazine.com/submit-photos

OCT.18–21

Raleigh Convention Center Find gifts for everyone on your list while giving back to our community! Stylish jewelry. Fashionable apparel and accessories for men, women and children. Seasonal home decor. $10 one-day general admission ticket. Don’t miss our special events!

ashoppingspree.org FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA SEPTEMBER 2018 | 123


ONE NIGHT ONLY WITH RAMIN KARIMLOO, JOE KWON, AND CHEETIE KUMAR Triangle Wine Experience hosted Broadway star Ramin Karimloo and Joe Kwon of The Avett Brothers August 5 for an intimate dinner by James Beard semi-finalist Cheetie Kumar at Garland. The dinner was followed by an unforgettable concert at Kings. All proceeds from the event benefitted Frankie Lemmon School & Developmental Center. Tania Elizabeth Stack, Ramin Karimloo, Joe Kwon

Steve Daniels, Kristen Daniels, Dale Carey

Pam Gardner, Rhonda Weaver, Sheryl Gotilly

You already

have talent. Now you want to develop it.

At Saint Mary’s School, you can explore your creative side as you build a solid liberal arts foundation. Our integrated approach in the classroom means the arts find their way into almost any subject and enrich life across campus. Our unique location offers easy access to Raleigh’s cultural scene—and endless inspiration and opportunity. Your ideas matter. We can help you express them. Find what you need at sms.edu.

Kate Pope Photography

the WHIRL


Kathleen Warren, Paul Warren

Bill Allen, Denice Allen, Angie Wright

12th annual

Celebrating the impact of past WGN Grant Recipients and welcoming new Nonprofit Partners making a difference in the lives of women and children in Wake County

Thursday, November 8 11:30am - 1:30pm • NC State Park Alumni Center Joyce Carlough, Don Carlough

With Special Guest KRISTIN COOPER, First Lady of North Carolina and Emcee DEBRA MORGAN, WRAL anchor Presented by

Limited tickets available at http://bit.ly/WGNImpact


PREVIEW OF VITA VITE MIDTOWN Vita Vite and owner Lindsay Rice hosted a preview party August 9 to share a first glimpse of its second location in Midtown. Nestled in North Hills, Vita Vite Midtown welcomes guests to a comfortable atmosphere complemented by wine and craft beers, small plates, Southern art, and local goods for purchase. Vita Vite Midtown opened in September.

Todd Jones

Nancy Thapa, Lindsay Underwood, Holly Kelton

Lindsay Rice, Andrew Keravuori, Ashley Freeman

courtesy Vita Vite

the WHIRL

Jay Holland

Great cocktails start with great spirits. Let’s celebrate together.

Proudly made right here in Nor th Carolina and available at your local ABC store. Learn more at www.topodistiller y.com.


the WHIRL

Lindsay Rice, Karla Battillo, Dylan Bouterse

Dudley Flood, Ron Marcotte, Ann Goodnight, Gordon Grubb, Ed Fritsch, Peter Williams

Taylor Wood, Sarah-Butler McKinney

7581. 6+2: 7 + 856'$< 2&72%(5 ® 6$7 85 '$< 1257 + + ,/ / 6 0$,1$1'7$</256+ 2(6 &20

Chana Lynn, Felicia Trujillo


Linda Dougherty, Anthony Goicolea, Paul Kelterborn, Marjorie Hodges

Dan Estabrook, Allen Thomas, Megan Boone, Carlos GarciaVelez, Yancey Richardson, Marjorie Hodges, Julie Saul

Dan Estabrook, Chandra Johnson, Carlos Garcia-Velez, Marjorie Hodges

A CELEBRATION OF LARRY WHEELER Chandra Johnson, owner of Charlotte’s SOCO Gallery, and NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson hosted a party at their New York City home this August, celebrating Larry Wheeler’s retirement from the North Carolina Museum of Art. The event was attended by art dealers, artists, and friends from the New York area that work closely with NCMA.

Dan Estabrook, Hank Willis Thomas, Jeff Whetstone

courtesy Marjorie Hodges

the WHIRL

Marjorie Hodges, Larry Wheeler, Marianne Mebane

KEEP YOUR HOME IN YOUR FAMILY, AND YOUR FAMILY IN YOUR HOME. Stepless Entryways Accessible Bathrooms with Curbless Showers Multigenerational Kitchen Design First Floor Master Suites Elevators These features and more for space, accessibility and comfort. CAPS certified home builder focused exclusively on designing, renovating and constructing barrier-free, accessible homes.

sadlerconstructionNC.com | 919.678.0313


Raleigh’s Life & Soul Learn more at MartasofRaleigh.com

North Hills Raleigh Adjacent to Renaissance Hotel

919-788-4200

“Giving back to our community is both a responsibility and an honor. Uplifting missions of importance is a part of the incredible service core our community needs. Marta’s is a place that celebrates that service! Marta’s gives us the chance to make a difference in our community, while celebrating the best in ourselves! And for that – Marta’s matters.”

CO MING IN

NOVEMBER 2018

Kristye Brackett, Transitions LifeCare and Marta’s customer

S

Art Fare

Bon appétit Thanksgiving with Scott Crawford

Ready for takeoff Airport design

On stands now

SPONSORED BY

WALTER’s art collaboration Join WALTER Magazine for a memorable evening inspired by art. Enjoy a one-of-a-kind collaborative menu from

Heirloom, Garland, & Brewery Bhavana

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 TICKETS & MORE INFORMATION waltermagazine.com/savethedate


END NOTE

Chuck Liddy

Fair Play

I

t’s that time of year again—the N.C. State Fair is here October 11-21. Can’t you smell the ham biscuits? Enjoy your favorites: visit the Village of Yesteryear, ride the ferris wheel, or indulge in a turkey leg. Or, check out brand new attractions like the Canine Stars Dog Show—featuring rescued and adopted pups competing in freestyle frisbee disc, high jumping, and dog agility. New ticket packages are also available: Snag a Kegs and Corks Pass, which includes a FastTrack Gate ticket and access to the Our State Public House to sample a brew or two. Enjoy the charm of this N.C. tradition, of fried oreos, tractor pulls, and pig races. —Katy Kohut See website for hours amd ticket information; 1025 Blue Ridge Road; ncstatefair.org

130 | WALTER


2IĆFLDO -HZHOHU 4401 Glenwood Ave, Raleigh, NC 27612

(919) 571-2881

www.diamondsdirect.com Proud Sponsor


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