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APRIL 2020

*THE STUFF THAT REFINES YOU

APRIL 2020 Global Interiors Australia, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland, Germany, Scotland | BIG’s watch museum | Yrjö Kukkapuro

GERMANY SPECIAL The new achievers, from Berlin to Munich LASTING LEGACY Modern treasures in Helsinki and Toronto

253 BLACK YELLOW MAGENTA CYAN

Global Interiors The best design from Australia, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland & Scotland

93WPR20APR905.pgs 20.02.2020 16:01


GREGOR SEATING SYSTEM— VINCENT VAN DUYSEN

MILANO PARIS LONDON NEW YORK ATHENS BARCELONA BEIJING BUDAPEST CHENGDU CHICAGO DUBAI GENEVA HONG KONG ISTANBUL JAKARTA LOS ANGELES MADRID MANILA MEXICO CITY MIAMI MOSCOW NANJING OSAKA SEOUL SHANGHAI SINGAPORE TEHERAN TOKYO TORONTO

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danish design by ¡ made by


APRIL

A PHOTOGRAPH FROM MICHAEL MACGARRY’S KILAMBA KIAXI SERIES, 2016, LARGELY SHOT IN A DESERTED ANGOLAN CITY OF THE SAME NAME, WHICH HAD BEEN THE BIGGEST SINGLE INVESTMENT PROJECT BY CHINA IN AFRICA, SEE PAGE 072

ARCHITECTURE

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Photography: Courtesy of Michael MacGarry

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Long stay Foster + Partners’ Turkish villa

ART

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Refined coil BIG’s watch museum for Audemars Piguet Water world A modernist treasure on Lake Ontario Shelf life Architect John Wardle’s Melbourne home

DESIGN

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High level A house interlocked with nature in Napa Off grid Maths inspires a unique Greek retreat

Continental shift Ekow Eshun on Africa State of Mind, his new photographic survey

Finnish lines Yrjö Kukkapuro, master of chair design Made in Africa Roo Rogers and Peter Mabeo on creating Founders Factory’s Johannesburg outpost FASHION

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Angle poise Tailoring takes a relaxed turn

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APRIL GERMANY REPORT 2020

FINNISH DESIGNER YRJÖ KUKKAPURO IN HIS ‘KARUSELLI’ CHAIR, CREATED IN 1964 AND STILL PRODUCED BY ARTEK, SEE PAGE 094

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Opening moves Statement fine jewellery for the contemporary gallerist

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DESIGN NEWS From desks to typefaces

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PATTERN PLAY Algorithm-inspired jewels

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UNITED FRONT Nomos’ neat new space

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SUPER SENSE Olfactory lessons in Berlin

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SPACE ODYSSEY Architectural round-up

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FAST TRACK Forward-looking autos

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CASTING CALL Best of IMM Cologne

Rear window We put S/S20 looks in the frame FOOD

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Artist’s palate Hugh Hayden’s cornbread pudding FRONT OF BOOK

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Newspaper Satoshi Kondo on his vision for Issey Miyake; the Campana brothers’ retrospective in Rio; a guest pod in Ghent; and Melbourne Design Week

The Audi A1:Trail, an off-road-inspired concept, is among our pick of new German cars, see page 160


Steven Meisel A Show of Hands, 2019

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jwanderson.com


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Subscribers since… 1996 Where Piero Lissoni keeps his Wallpaper* collection RESOURCES

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Stockists What you want and where to get it TRAVEL

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Checking in Tropical Modernist style in Sri Lanka Dep info Chinese-American food in San Francisco, natural wines in Prague and a pared-back hotel in Hangzhou

TROUSERS, £940, BY ISSEY MIYAKE, SEE PAGE 055

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The Vinson View Picky Nicky on the joy of a maniacally organised desk, and other fastidiousness INTERIORS

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Global interiors The most dynamic new design from Australia, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland and Scotland Lobby group Home comforts in hotel style MEDIA

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WallpaperSTORE* Refined design delivered to your door

THE CINESPHERE, PART OF THE 1970S ONTARIO PLACE COMPLEX IN TORONTO, SEE PAGE 112


Balloon Bag, 2020

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VDL Pavilion by Dion & Richard Neutra Molo Collection by Rodolfo Dordoni Band Collection by Patricia Urquiola Half Dome Lamp by Naoto Fukasawa Cala & Geometrics Rugs by Doshi Levien


DESIGNED TO BRING NATURE CLOSER | BM OUTDOOR SERIES |

BØRGE MOGENSEN | 1971

Originally designed for Børge Mogensen’s private balcony, the Outdoor Series is a testament to the beauty of simple, functional design. Now reintroduced by Carl Hansen & Søn, the foldable designs in untreated, FSC®-certified teak bring lasting beauty to outdoor spaces thanks to their considered combination of careful craftsmanship and lasting, high-quality materials.

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CONTRIBUTORS STUDIO LIKENESS Photographers Berlin duo Julia Classen and Magdalena Lepka formed Studio Likeness seven years ago and have developed a particular approach to still-life imagery, produced with minimal digital manipulation. They created surreal spaces for this issue’s newsstand cover and German interiors story (page 170), which they describe as an irreverent combination of ‘playing and painting’ and ‘a hybrid of Popeye and Picasso’. They are currently working on a project about plants and their global migration. JOHANN CLAUSEN Photographer

EKOW ESHUN Writer

This month, we asked Johann Clausen to apply his precise visual approach to a selection of the latest and greatest German cars (page 160). ‘I had the freedom to look at the cars from a purely aesthetic point of view and to fully devote myself to the nuances of forms, lines and materials,’ says the Berlin-based Clausen, who is currently collaborating with a Swiss designer on a multimedia project exploring the language of tech packaging.

The former director of London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, Ekow Eshun is championing a new generation of African photographers who are redefining their continent’s visual language (page 072). Having curated an exhibition on the same subject, currently showing at the Royal West of England Academy in Bristol, Eshun is now planning a major exhibition for Les Rencontres d’Arles. His book, Africa State of Mind, will be published at the end of March. CRISTA LEONARD Photographer After a nomadic childhood in France, Switzerland and Andorra, and years spent hopping from Barcelona to New York, Crista Leonard is now based between London and Paris. This month, Wallpaper’s Caragh McKay and Jason Hughes managed to catch up with her and join forces to imagine the considered, idiosyncratic jewellery choices of a gallerist (page 100). Still driven by wanderlust, next month Leonard will be travelling to Tibet on a photography trip.

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HUGH HAYDEN Artist

DAVE LEBLANC Writer

A rising star of contemporary sculpture, Hugh Hayden recently presented an installation at New York’s The Shed featuring an archetypal suburban home with protruding branches, mirrored to form an infinite, barren hedgerow. His exploration of the American dream and its limitations continues this month at London’s Lisson Gallery, where he’s presenting his first solo UK show. His cornbread pudding, a version of a family recipe, features in our monthly Artist’s Palate series (page 242).

A Toronto native, Dave LeBlanc is passionate about his culture-rich city. This month, he guided us through a crumbling architectural legend, Ontario Place, a bold 1970s structure rising up from Toronto Harbour (page 112). It is an unfortunate story of neglect, ‘as this once-amazing, futuristic complex is rusting away and doesn’t seem to be a priority to the government’. LeBlanc is currently developing a number of projects, including a book exploring Western Woods’ 1950s Trend House programme in Canada.

ILLUSTRATOR: ORIANA FENWICK WRITER: OYIN AKANDE


Spring Summer 2020

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EDITOR’S LETTER

A note on the numeric inspiration of Finnish designer Yrjö Kukkapuro and, from his 1986-1996 series, the ‘Nelonen Z’ chair. See page 094

The Magic Number

Newsstand cover Photography: Studio Likeness Interiors: Hannah Jordan ‘Foster 620’ table, £3,600, by Norman Foster, for Walter Knoll. ‘W1970’ chair, from €400, by Florian Kienast, for Wagner Living. See page 170

Welcome to the April issue! Our Global Interiors round-up hones in on six rising design powers: Australia, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland and Scotland; while our 48-page Germany Report promises horological, sensory and automotive pleasures, delivered in a typeface by Fabian Fohrer, an alumnus of Wallpaper’s 2018 Graduate Directory. We also head to Greece, for Deca Architecture’s mathematically inspired hideaway on Milos Island, and to Sri Lanka, for a contemporary take on Geoffrey Bawa’s modernism, by Zurich-based architects Daniel Abraha and Stephan Achermann. We check up on Toronto’s Ontario Place, a modernist marvel with an uncertain fate, discover a proudly made-in-Africa start-up accelerator in Johannesburg, and ascend the Swiss Alps to see BIG’s Audemars Piguet museum. Then it’s all the way back to our beloved Milan, for a private tour of Piero Lissoni’s living room and Wallpaper* collection, in the latest edition of our Subscribers Since... 1996 series. A real highlight for me is our Design Icon feature on Yrjö Kukkapuro, the maestro behind some of the most beloved and distinctive chairs of the 20th century. Wallpaper’s contributing editor Emma O’Kelly hopped over to Finland to interview Kukkapuro, now 86 and as sharp-minded as ever. Soon after, he asked his daughter Isa to share this story with us:

‘In the Finnish language, nelonen means number 4, and turned upside down it looks like a chair (in handwriting). Also, if you fail at school, you get a 4. When Kukkapuro was young at school, they used to say that you got a chair, if you failed. In his life, Kukkapuro just got a lot of chairs…’ Simple, honest and charming. Enjoy! Sarah Douglas, Editor-in-Chief

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Limited-edition cover by Michael MacGarry Johannesburg-based artist MacGarry’s digital illustration features a vision of Maputo, Mozambique, in 2050, part of his 100 Suns series. MacGarry is among the African photographers featured in our story on page 072 Limited-edition covers are available to subscribers, see Wallpaper.com


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Newspaper Wallpaper’s hot pick of the latest global goings-on

Set design: Katie Barclay

Jumpsuit, £2,205, by Issey Miyake

Issey Miyake welcomes a new head designer

Into the fold

Skateboarders in inflated parachute-like textiles, brightly coloured dresses floating onto dancers from the ceiling, criss-crossing models sporting painted coats and huge papery sunhats in abstract shapes: when Satoshi Kondo unveiled his inaugural collection as

PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM BARCLAY FASHION: MARIANNE KAKKO WRITER: DANIELLE DEMETRIOU

head designer for Issey Miyake at Paris Fashion Week last September, it was a smile-inducing spectacle filled with plenty of freestyle bouncing, twirling and laughing. We caught up with Kondo at the Issey Miyake HQ in Tokyo as he was preparing his »

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Newspaper Right, Satoshi Kondo photographed at the Miyake Design Studio in Tokyo in February Below right, dress, £2,070, by Issey Miyake

sophomore A/W20 collection (since shown in Paris in March). Leafing through early sketches in a bright white showroom (nearby rails of his collection provide splashes of colour), Kondo says: ‘The first idea I had for S/S20 was a group of people from different regions, ethnicities, generations, all enjoying themselves and having fun together. I saw each model as a flower, blooming at the show’s finale. I see this collection as a reflection of my feelings and emotions, expressed in the form of clothing. My designs are connected to a sense of sunao – the idea of being honest with yourself – as well as a touch of playfulness. That’s what I’m trying to add to the brand.’ Kondo joined Issey Miyake as a designer in 2007. He later became head designer for both its Pleats Please Issey Miyake and Homme Plissé Issey Miyake lines, before joining Miyake Design Studio three years ago. ‘At Pleats Please, I loved how much freedom there was in its material,’ he says. The ability to balance traditional craftsmanship and futuristic technical innovations is a quality that defines Issey Miyake, and is clearly set to continue under Kondo, who, indicating a pair of green and white S/S20 trousers on a nearby rail, explains how the fabric was first hand-pleated, in signature Issey Miyake style, by workers at a factory in Tohoku, in northeastern Japan, before being transported to Kyoto. Here, artisans specialising in itajime, a traditional Japanese dyeing technique, clamped and dyed the folded material, resulting in its geometric green lines. Kondo’s vision for the brand is not just fashion-focused. ‘It’s important to work with people who are not necessarily from fashion or design worlds. I remember Mr Issey Miyake telling me to look at many, many things, not just related to my world, but on a wider scale. I design clothes – but the message goes beyond fashion. There’s something positive I want to communicate, and clothing is just a means to express it.’ isseymiyake.com

PORTRAIT: GO ITAMI

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Newspaper A dental clinic that hasn’t turned out all white

Clean and polished

A trip to the dentist becomes a fun experience at this Barcelona dental clinic. Created by local architect Raúl Sanchez for healthcare brand Impress, the space was conceived to address the needs and expectations of a younger audience, putting the emphasis on new technologies and a fresh design approach. Moving away from the white, sterile and austere environment usually associated with dental practice interiors, Sanchez opted for bright colours and

playful geometries. The architect took advantage of the ground level property’s double-height ceilings to install tall, pine partitions whose strong shapes draw on the brand’s smile-shaped logo, while helping to maintain patient privacy. Examination rooms are placed on the ground and mezzanine level, while a triple-height void at the rear brings natural light into the basement that houses storage and facilities for the staff. raulsanchezarchitects.com

The material palette of the Impress dental clinic in Barcelona includes pine partitions set against red sheet metal cladding and grey beams

exhibition Celebrating the 35-year career of Brazilian design duo, the Campana brothers

The ‘Pirarucu’ armchair, by the Campanas, will be showing as part of their ‘35 Revolutions’ exhibition at MAM Rio

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A new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro (MAM Rio) pays tribute to Fernando and Humberto Campana, the Brazilian brothers whose works merge furniture, craftsmanship, social outreach, pop influences and the everyday vernacular to produce iconic contemporary designs. The comprehensive exhibition (designed by the pair in collaboration with the Spectaculu School of Art & Technology) chronicles their innovative 35-year career and features work from their archive, new pieces and immersive installations. ‘35 Revolutions’, 14 March-12 May, at MAM Rio, Rio de Janeiro, mam.rio

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSÉ HEVIA WRITERS: ELLIE STATHAKI, ROSA BERTOLI


Newspaper A bespoke back garden folly in Belgium is a bonus for house guests

Pod almighty We all hope our house guests have a memorable stay, but the owner of a home on the outskirts of Ghent took the concept one step further by commissioning a bespoke folly in the back garden just for visitors. The architects, Ghent-based Atelier Vens Vanbelle, headed up by Dries Vens and Maarten Vanbelle, worked closely with their client, a film producer, to create the sculptural extension, which serves as part-guest house, partscreening room and part-lookout tower. ‘The only criterion was that the guests had to remember their stay forever,’ say the architects. The team describes a walk through the addition as a ‘cinematic experience’. The standalone structure, which is clad in profiled Corten steel, is constructed in laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and was designed as a single piece of furniture. Inside, the guest area feels like a cosy log cabin or grotto, while a spiral staircase leads down to a dark and moody cinema and bar room, and up to a quirky watchtower balcony that overlooks the garden and surrounding foliage. vensvanbelle.be

incoming John Weich on the race to be the world’s first carbon-neutral city

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The folly, on the outskirts of Ghent, is clad in Corten steel and constructed from laminated veneer lumber, creating the feel of a cosy log cabin inside

Copenhagen wants to be the world’s first carbon-neutral city in 2025, but Melbourne, Reykjavik or The Hague might get there first. They are among 14 cities that have vowed to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050, and on the list of the 43 cities granted ‘A-list’ status by CDP, a not-for-profit ‘global disclosure’ charity. Labelling cities like refrigerators is a brilliantly simple way to influence

behaviour and strengthen city brands. The most sustainable vacation is a staycation, but if you must travel, heading to one of these 43 cities is a good plan B. When you’re there, don’t forget to thank the locals for eating less meat, swapping liquid shampoo for bar soap, and biking more. In this game, there are no losers, but the smart money is on Copenhagen to get there first. Game on!

PHOTOGRAPHY: TIM VAN DE VELDE WRITER: ELLIE STATHAKI


Joséphine Splendeur Impériale

C R O W N YO U R LOV E


Newspaper Chanel Fine Jewellery’s latest collection is inspired by the designer’s love affair with Scottish tweed

Highland queen

Model: Justine M at New Madison. Hair & make-up: Cyril Laine at Agence Saint Germain

Gabrielle Chanel’s style legacy owes as much to her cultured eclecticism as it does to her powerful reputation as a designer. So distinct were her likes and loves, from pearls and lions to Boy Capel and the Ballets Russes, that the brand she created is never short of inspiration. And so it is to the designer’s love of Scotland that Chanel Fine Jewellery has turned for its latest collection, Tweed de Chanel. The rough, woollen fabric, traditionally associated with rugged pursuits and appropriated for womenswear by Chanel in the 1920s, makes for a convincing high jewellery design blueprint. There’s the obvious graphic potential, but also the muted tones that reflect Tweed’s Highland provenance – much of the collection is created using coloured gemstones to depict the distinctive criss-cross. However, it is the dazzling, rhythmic patterns of the ‘Frange’ (fringe) pieces, like illuminated teased-out threads, that has drawn us into the warp and weft of this particular passion. chanel.com

Above and right, ‘Frange’ earrings and necklace, both part of the Tweed de Chanel collection, in 18ct white gold and diamonds, prices on request, by Chanel Fine Jewellery

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PHOTOGRAPHY: BENJAMIN VIGLIOTTA WATCHES & JEWELLERY DIRECTOR: CARAGH MCKAY


Composition cabinet with washbasin Elle Ovale + Dafne bath tub: Design Andrea Parisio, Giuseppe Pezzano. Cielo Hand made in Italy, Milano, New York, Miami. www.ceramicacielo.it


FLAGSHIP STORE - BÄRENGASSE 10 - 8001 ZÜRICH HIERONYMUS-CP.COM


Newspaper Arthur Seigneur (left) and Adam Goodrum with their pieces for the ‘Exquisite Corpse’ exhibition. From left, ‘Longbow’ credenza, ‘Talleo’ tallboy and ‘Archant’ console feature unconventional shapes and geometric patternwork, their parabolic tessellations inspired by lotus flowers

Three new marquetry pieces, inspired by a Surrealist parlour game, make their debut at Melbourne Design Week

Deadly duo

Taking inspiration from the Surrealist parlour game cadavre exquis (exquisite corpse), where a collection of words or images is collectively assembled, Sydney-based industrial designer Adam Goodrum and French straw marquetry artisan Arthur Seigneur collaborated to create three whimsical pieces. A tallboy, credenza and console, which have been three years in the making, will debut in their ‘Exquisite Corpse’ exhibition at Melbourne’s Tolarno Galleries during Melbourne Design Week. ‘We like to think of the new works as functional art pieces. The Surrealist reference relates to our working process,’ says Goodrum, who co-founded Adam & Arthur with Seigneur in 2015. ‘I come up with the shapes and surface patterns while Arthur applies their finish.’ Seigneur sources and hand-dyes rye straw from Burgundy, then flattens and deftly splices each stem, affixing the strands to the birch carcasses to realise intricate op-art motifs. The surfaces of the credenza comprise approximately 9,000-10,000 shards of straw. ‘In

PHOTOGRAPHY: VICTORIA ZSCHOMMLER WRITER: DIMITY NOBLE

labour terms, that’s approximately four intensive months,’ says Seigneur. ‘There are no shortcuts.’ Two pieces feature custom hinges and knobs machined from solid brass. The units are precision-carved by CNC machinery, boasting curved and faceted surfaces that enable light to pool and dart across their contours courtesy of the straw’s natural sheen. Even their undersides, drawers and cavities are covered. Intrepid colour combinations add a dimension of visual intrigue, as do Seigneur’s inclusion of pearlescent white straw elements that accentuate the other hues. Says Goodrum, ‘I usually deal with budget and design constraints to meet my initial vision, yet Arthur is preoccupied with pushing boundaries with shapes, patterns and colour schemes. He has a crazy drive to achieve new outcomes. We almost take for granted how amicable our relationship is.’ ‘Exquisite Corpse’, from 12-28 March, at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne, Victoria, tolarnogalleries.com, adamandarthur.com

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Newspaper

creative smalltalk Bodil Blain catches up over a coffee with Christina Seilern, the founder of Studio Seilern

The Brazilian architect branching out into organic furniture design

Natural selection Brazilian architect Gustavo Neves always struggled to find pieces that reflected his ambition and aesthetics, where materials are left in their raw state and their wild nature respected and enhanced. He started designing bespoke objects, featuring raw natural materials alongside manmade elements, for private clients, and these now form part of a capsule launched by The Invisible Collection. ‘Gustavo’s designs are powerful and raw, aesthetically compelling and utterly uncommon,’ say the brand’s co-founders Anna Zaoui and Isabelle Dubern. As well as launching the best pieces from his vast interiors archive, Neves has also designed a collection of lamps, tables and accessories in bronze and white selenite. In this collection, entitled Enso, two distinct aesthetics come together to create a tension between the rugged and the polished, a balance which he likens to the relationship between elements of a tree. ‘The bronze parts would be the trunk and the branches, while stones and crystals would be the fruits,’ he says. theinvisiblecollection.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: RUY TEIXEIRA WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI

Box; light sculpture; curved wall lamp; side table; table lamp, in bronze and white selenite, all part of the Enso collection, prices on request, by Gustavo Neves, for The Invisible Collection

BB: Do you drink coffee? CS: Yes. Were you a creative child? At school I was never part of any cliques. I wanted to be independent and not follow anyone else. I was terrible at art! I had a very structured Germanic upbringing, so the idea of ‘letting go’ was more difficult. When I started working with Rafael Viñoly in the US, that was a complete game changer for me as I was suddenly working on these enormous projects with a lot of responsibility. Who are your biggest influences? When I was studying architecture at Columbia, Kazuyo Sejima gave a lecture. She had very strong architectural ideas. Her projects weren’t trying to be beautiful, they just were. I also saw a lecture by Viñoly. I thought his work was fascinating. I’ve learned a lot from him. What was it like working for him? If you swim, and you swim quite well against the current, Viñoly picks up on it and gives you more and more responsibility. Being given tasks well beyond your ability was great in terms of forming you as an architect. On a personal level, he kept teasing me, saying I was ‘so Germanic’. He’d say, ‘Wonk it up a bit, relax a bit, don’t be so rigid’. One of Studio Seilern’s recently completed projects was the Andermatt Concert Hall. How did it differ from other projects? I love classical music and I went to a lot of rehearsals in order to understand how musicians think and why. We worked very closely with acousticians so the moments of silence and reflection are correct. One of the most important things is the intimacy between the performers and the audience. How does it feel being a female architect in a very male world? You have to be strong technically, I think even more than a man, to convince people that you have more than just a ‘nice pretty vision’. However, generally I think it doesn’t matter if you’re a man or a woman – you just have to do your job and not overthink it. You need to be resilient because there are a lot of knockdowns and disappointments along the way. If you can pick yourself up and keep going, then you’ll be able to convince people and yourself that you can do it. Bodil Blain is the founder of Cru Kafe

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born again A previously unreleased chair by the late Danish designer Nanna Ditzel sees the light of day Danish furniture brand Brdr Krüger is launching a previously unreleased work by Nanna Ditzel, who died in 2005. This new addition to Brdr Krüger’s collection, the ‘Arkade’ chair, was originally designed in 1983 during a decade-long collaboration between the company and Ditzel. The pioneering furniture designer’s commitment to traditional craftsmanship and new materials and techniques made her a perfect match with the furniture brand, originally founded as a woodturning workshop in 1886 and devoted to reinterpreting midcentury Danish aesthetics for a contemporary audience. Ditzel’s fondness for soft shapes and circular forms are expressed through her signature postmodern, elegant geometries in works like her ‘Hanging Egg’ chair, and the combination of materials and techniques in the ‘Arkade’ chair (woodturning, steam-bent wood, metal and upholstery) articulate the designer’s love for decoration and colour. The chair is available in Kvadrat’s ‘Hallingdal’ fabric, originally designed by Ditzel in 1965, but the material can be modified with different finishes to allow for customisation. ‘Arkade’ chair, price on request, by Nanna Ditzel, for Brdr Krüger, brdr-kruger.com

The child-safety car seat is recast with a new look

Heir defence

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BabyArk, an all-new child-safety car seat concept designed by Frank Stephenson, uses cutting edge materials, new technology and an organic simplicity. To automotive aficionados, Stephenson’s name is associated with BMW’s new Mini, the revived Fiat 500, and highprofile work for Ferrari, Maserati and McLaren. BabyArk is a new departure. The child-safety car seat market is relatively routine, with a plethora of products differing only in colour and trim. BabyArk combines natural forms with high-tech materials and techniques, such as seamless docking, lightweight plastics and 3D-printed carbon fibre. Everything on the seat can be recycled and reused, including the core technology, an impact-absorbing spiral tube that adds a hidden layer of protection. frankstephenson.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL RYGAARD WRITERS: IZY YAP, JONATHAN BELL


Outdoor furniture made for life

+33 1 4 7 03 05 0 5 – w ww.t ecton a . f r


Column

THE VINSON VIEW

Quality maniac and master shopper Nick Vinson on the who, what, when, where and why AN ORGANISATIONAL MANIAC... Takes pleasure in writing lists and takes even more in striking them off Experiences satisfaction in the sound the To Do app makes on a completed task Instructs post office staff where to attach stamps and stickers on parcels Fills the dishwasher in a regimented order to make emptying easier Has towels and tea towels ironed, folded and hung in a particular way Has only one type of coat hanger in all closets, which all face the same way Loves order in closets, cupboards, kitchens, drawers, pantries and luggage Has their preferences noted in hotels and restaurants Always arrives on time – never late, never early Is a Wallpaper* Subscriber Since 1996, but also personally selects newsstand issues so as not to miss out on acquiring both covers

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Perfect harmony

Wallpaper* readers know the joy of getting their freak on

I got talking to an investment banker at this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach who told me he’d been reading Wallpaper* since the very first issue. He always buys a newsstand copy, which he selects carefully, and a subscription one, and keeps them all in order in mint condition at his home in Vienna. I could so relate to his maniacal attention to detail. Over the years, I’ve paid close attention to the workspaces of Wallpaper* colleagues. There was the photography director whose desk only ever sported, aside from his computer, a bottle of water and his mobile phone, and the interiors director whose desk was piled high with brochures and catalogues that were perfectly aligned at right angles (whenever I deliberately meddled with his towers, they would be set right in the blink of an eye). Then there’s the fashion director with a thing for hiding cables, coiling them neatly behind phones and laptops, and a managing director with a low tolerance for coats on the back of chairs (offending garments were photographed and an email immediately fired off ). In my own office, three iMacs sit side by side, evenly spaced, with screensavers in the same shade as the pink paint on the walls and desktop files routinely policed. Everything at architect (and Wallpaper* subscriber) Glenn Sestig’s office in Ghent aligns; anyone leaving any paper on their

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desk at night is called back in, books must be straight, and all computer desktop filing must be in the same order on each and every device. Anya Hindmarch issues office rules that include desks being clear every night, a ban on Post-it notes on screens and walls, no coats on the back of chairs, and only white lever arch files and mugs. There is a similar maniacal obsession with the contents of fridges, both in my own house and Sestig’s, where all labels must face forward – although, he says, his fridge ‘still never looks like it does in the Gaggenau photos’. Bathroom products are another area to organise; thankfully, Chanel recognises this, producing magnetic lids so that the intertwined CCs can only be twisted to face forward in its Les Exclusifs and Bleu de Chanel ranges. I heard that, in the 1980s, Rei Kawakubo would place four fingers between hangers in her stores to make sure the rail spacing was uniform, behaviour that really appealed to me. On Giorgio Armani’s yacht Main, all sunloungers come with a basket so that guests’ suncream, bags, books, sunglasses cases and other paraphernalia can be kept tidy and out of Mr Armani’s sight. Never let it be said that the average Wallpaper* reader is an organisational maniac, but being neat, meticulous and obsessed with minute detail are qualities that refine us.

02 Fair and square First produced in 1918, Bottega Ghianda’s set square, handmade using dovetail joints in pear or walnut, is perfect for alignment fanatics. €180, bottegaghianda.com

03 Fantasy find Henning Koppel’s 1978 sterling silver and ebony desk set for Georg Jensen is the one of my dreams. It can still occasionally be found at auctions.

ILLUSTRATOR: DANAE DIAZ


Nature. Form ed. THE CURVE COLLECTION

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Continental shift Africa’s changing landscapes are beautifully captured by a new generation of home-grown photographers, introduced here and in a new book by Ekow Eshun

Mozambique: People washing their clothes in the swimming pool of The Grande, a once-luxurious hotel in Beira, 2013, by Guillaume Bonn

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Photography

Algeria: Rochers Carrés, 2008, by Kader Attia, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Nagel Draxler

In 1960, Nigeria declared independence, freeing itself of British colonial rule. At the time, Lagos, its main urban centre, was a modest coastal city. Cars were sparse on the road and you could drive out of town with ease, low buildings giving way to fields, forests and scattered villages as you went. Two generations on, Lagos has undergone a breathtaking transformation. Now one of the ten largest cities on the planet, it is a vast sprawling conurbation that covers more than 1,000 sq km, with a population that has expanded 100-fold, from under 200,000 in 1960 to over 20 million today. By 2100, it’s estimated Lagos will be the largest metropolis on Earth, with some 100 million people.

Breakneck growth, though, comes at a cost. As more and more people flood into the city, an already overwhelmed infrastructure system struggles to cope. Fewer than ten per cent of residents have access to public running water or sanitation. Two thirds live in slums. Traffic jams (‘go slows’) choke the streets and fill the air with noise and exhaust fumes. Yet life goes on. From the vast openair markets to the street vendors hustling their wares amid the stationary traffic, the city buzzes with barely containable energy. Photographer Andrew Esiebo was born in Lagos, and his pictures seek to capture the metropolis in all its cacophony and unlikely beauty. In his images, the city’s apparent

disorder of traffic and people, of construction sites and shantytowns, resolves itself into mesmerising shapes and patterns and colours. What emerges is a place of exhilarating, if exhausting, dynamism. A city making and remaking itself in the image of its growing population. As Rem Koolhaas once noted wonderingly, Lagos ‘inverts every essential characteristic of the so-called modern city. Yet it is still – for lack of a better word – a city; and one that works.’ Esiebo’s pictures of Lagos are featured in my latest book Africa State of Mind, which gathers the work of an emergent generation of photographers from across the African continent and its diaspora, each of whom È


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Photography

Nigeria: Tafawa Balewa Square bus stop, Lagos, 2015-19, by Andrew Esiebo

has a unique perspective on what it looks like, and how it feels, to live in Africa today. It’s a timely moment to be looking at Africa. Popular perceptions of the continent may still be dominated by stereotypes of war, corruption and starving children, as typified by photos of grinning celebrities posing with undernourished children for Comic Relief and Donald Trump’s dismissal of the place as a collection of ‘shithole countries’. But African photographers are increasingly telling their own stories of the continent and its people in compelling imagery rich with poetry and nuance. Contributors to the book include internationally celebrated figures

such as Hassan Hajjaj, Pieter Hugo and Zanele Muholi, the subject of a major solo exhibition at Tate Modern this April, as well as rising stars including Senegal’s Omar Victor Diop and British-Nigerian fashion photographer Ruth Ossai, who last year shot the campaign for Rihanna’s Fenty collection. With the share of the continent’s population living in cities set to pass 50 per cent by the end of this decade, Africa State of Mind devotes considerable space to the urban environment. Here we see a world in the midst of perpetual change. Photographers such as Michael Tsegaye and Hicham Gardaf chart the changing face of

cities such as Addis Ababa and Casablanca, amidst the wave of hectic development sweeping large parts of the continent. François-Xavier Gbré’s pictures of incomplete or abandoned buildings in West Africa illustrate how dreams of progress can be quickly stymied by sudden shifts in the economic or political climate. And in Angola, Michael MacGarry shows how the impact of oil wealth and foreign money is reshaping the urban landscape (see W*238 and overleaf ). His photos document life in Kilamba Kiaxi, a $3.5bn new city that represents the largest single investment by China in Africa. The site was built to accommodate a quarter of a È

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Photography

Angola: Kilamba Kiaxi, 2016, by Michael MacGarry, courtesy of the artist

million residents, but Angola’s petro-dollarfuelled economy has pushed rents beyond the reach of most ordinary people. The result is a ghost town of deserted roads and empty apartments, a place that looks like it’s at the end, not the beginning, of its existence. Inevitably the book also considers how colonialism and past independence struggles continue to impact the continent. Travelling the coastline of East Africa, Guillaume Bonn charts how regional battles have left their mark in burnt-out buildings. But Bonn grew up in Kenya and Djibouti, and even in the

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scarred environment he encounters, he finds his way to moments of transcendence: a joyously crowded beach in Mozambique; a woman draped in striking crimson robes entering the bombed out shell of a cathedral in Mogadishu. In Bonn’s pictures, and those of the other 50-plus photographers in the book, we see Africa through African eyes. The continent revealed as a place of paradox and possibility and everyday wonder.  Africa State of Mind (£40), available from 26 March, is published by Thames & Hudson, thamesandhudson.com

OUR LIMITED-EDITION COVER, AVAILABLE TO SUBSCRIBERS, FEATURES A VISION OF MAPUTO, MOZAMBIQUE, IN 2050, BY JOHANNESBURGBASED VISUAL ARTIST MICHAEL MACGARRY. A DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION, IT FORMS PART OF HIS 100 SUNS SERIES. FIND OUT MORE AT WALLPAPER.COM


Angle

poise Relaxed tailoring makes a stand PHOTOGRAPHY: CASPER KOFI FASHION: JASON HUGHES

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Fashion

THIS PAGE, JACKET, £350; SHIRT, £85; TROUSERS, £165, ALL BY REISS. SHOES, £675, BY CROCKETT & JONES ‘ANOTHER’ CHAIR, £495, BY ANOTHER COUNTRY OPPOSITE, FROM LEFT, XAVIER WEARS JACKET, £560; TROUSERS, £335, BOTH BY MSGM. SHOES, AS BEFORE ETHAN WEARS SUIT, £1,200, BY PAUL SMITH. SHIRT, £130, BY PINK SHIRTMAKER. GLASSES, £420, BY LINDBERG. SHOES, £170, BY GEOX TAKUYA WEARS SUIT, £3,150, BY BRUNELLO CUCINELLI. SHOES, £675, BY CROCKETT & JONES ‘LUCANO 3’ STEP LADDER, £299, BY METAPHYS, FROM THE CONRAN SHOP. CHAIR, AS BEFORE


making places colourful

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Fashion

TOP, FROM LEFT, XAVIER WEARS COAT, £740, BY HERNO. TROUSERS, £585, BY JIL SANDER. SHOES, £1,020, BY EDWARD GREEN TAKUYA WEARS JACKET, £385, BY OLIVER SPENCER. TROUSERS, £170, BY ACNE STUDIOS. SHOES, £675, BY CROCKETT & JONES ETHAN WEARS JACKET, £1,221; TROUSERS, £731, BOTH BY ROCHAS. SHOES, £170, BY GEOX BELOW, FROM LEFT, ETHAN WEARS JACKET, £1,580; SHIRT, £650, BOTH BY LORO PIANA XAVIER WEARS JACKET, £1,250, BY TOD’S

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Fashion

ABOVE, FROM LEFT, ETHAN WEARS JACKET, £695, BY GRENFELL. TROUSERS, PRICE ON REQUEST, BY DEVEAUX. SHOES, £170, BY GEOX XAVIER WEARS COAT, £1,900; TROUSERS, £625, BOTH BY DOLCE & GABBANA. SHOES, £1,020, BY EDWARD GREEN TAKUYA WEARS COAT, £13,900; JACKET (WORN UNDERNEATH), £2,200; TROUSERS, £595, ALL BY HERMÈS. SHOES, £675, BY CROCKETT & JONES ‘LUCANO 2’ STEP LADDER, £199; ‘LUCANO 3’ STEP LADDER, £299, BOTH BY METAPHYS, FROM THE CONRAN SHOP RIGHT, SHIRT, £285, BY MARGARET HOWELL. COAT, £375; TROUSERS, £335, BOTH BY MHL BY MARGARET HOWELL. SHOES, £675, BY CROCKETT & JONES FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 240

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Models: Xavier at Select Model Management, Takuya Ebihara at Models 1, Ethan at People File Casting: David Steven Wilton at East Grooming: Chris Sweeney at One Represents using Bumble and Bumble and Sisley Interiors: Mihaela Berbecar Photography assistant: Fola Abatan Fashion assistants: Aylin Bayhan, Josefin Forsberg


¨

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HAUTE NATURE

Quarzite Charme (Quartzite)

Antolini believes in the power of what is real. Mother Nature’s tremendous force distilled into astonishing creations. A fragment of the stream of life, the heartbeat of the ages, the skin of our planet. It is purity in its most perfect form: design, colors and pattern handed to us by history. Designed by nature, perfected in Italy. antolini.com


LONG STAY Foster + Partners takes an expansive approach to this Aegean-facing private holiday villa near Bodrum PHOTOGRAPHY: NIGEL YOUNG WRITER: CHARLOTTE MCMANUS

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n the coast of Turkey’s Muğla province, 30 minutes from Bodrum by boat, a sloping plot of rugged, sun-baked land, alive with greenery and bordered by beaches, runs down to the Aegean Sea. Approaching from the northern, land side, it takes a moment to spot the building that has recently been completed here, so artfully does it complement the landscape. Built between 2015 and 2019, SZ Villa is the work of Foster + Partners. The studio’s projects are typically large-scale and high-profile, making this holiday home, luxurious as it is, all the more intriguing (the firm’s »

The south, sea-facing façade with its dramatic, undulating roof. To the left are the living and dining areas, as well as a guest wing and office; to the right are family quarters, including a master bedroom, a family bathroom and a gym on the lower level, and children’s bedrooms upstairs


Architecture

Above, the main living space’s double-height glass doors pivot and fold away to let the sea breeze in during the summer Left, the spiralling Portuguese limestone staircase appears to float thanks to an innovative use of post-tensioned cables

last published private residence was Leedon Park House in Singapore, completed in 2006). When you arrive, a fragrant Mediterranean-styled garden, carefully cultivated with plants, herbs and olive trees, leads to what at first glance appears to be a single-storey building topped with a simple straight roof, almost hidden among the foliage. Crossing the main threshold reveals the structure’s true dimensions – two levels, not one – which follow the natural contours of the sloped terrain. While the west side contains areas for living and dining, the east is dedicated to family quarters. A spiralling central staircase connects the two aspects, in addition to an open bridge towards the back of the building. To the south lies the sea. ‘There’s a real split between the public forum and the private. Meanwhile, a sense of discovery – a richness of experience – comes through in the way the architecture changes as you walk through the site,’ says Foster + Partners’ Niall Dempsey, who, alongside the practice’s David Summerfield, acted as project architect. The pair designed SZ Villa around the idea of ‘opaque to open’. This is evident in their »

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Architecture

A Jaume Plensa sculpture overlooks the terrace, shaded by the 7.5m cantilever of the undulating roof, made from handcrafted, precision-engineered laminated solid oak beams by Swiss specialist Blumer-Lehmann, and supported by steel columns

conscious effort to blur interior and exterior space. Shaded courtyards effectively ‘bring the landscape into the house’, while the façade can be fully opened by manoeuvring double-height glass doors that pivot and fold away. ‘As it gets incredibly hot locally, we wanted the building to be able to breathe even if the air conditioning is switched off,’ says Summerfield, adding that other doors can be opened to the courtyards at the back, allowing cool air to flow from one side of the villa to the other. Such natural ventilation neatly enhances the villa’s green credentials. Outside, a spacious terrace offers panoramic coastal views. On the edge of the rectangular infinity pool, a sunken ‘conversation pit’ is designed to let the client enjoy a game of backgammon while surrounded on three sides by water. Looking back at the villa, the eye is drawn to the rooftop, which from this viewpoint is rippling rather than rigid. The undulating structure features handcrafted solid oak beams resting on steel columns, in turn supporting a substantial cantilever that is the same depth as the living room, reinforcing the inside/outside feel and offering pockets of exterior shade. Foster + Partners was also charged with the villa’s interior design and went to great lengths to procure the majority of materials, fixtures and features from within

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Turkey. The team took their lead from the location – specifically the landscape’s white-and-brown hued bedrock – and natural textures dominate inside and out. Tactile surfaces include stone walls, wooden flooring and the woven bamboo of the sunset pavilion roof. The hammam-style family bathroom, a soothing space with curved slabs of pale marble from Istanbul, is a highlight. The architects describe the ‘great fun’ they had sourcing the skills and pieces, including those from nearby Bodrum. As Dempsey puts it, ‘working with local people and developing bespoke items, from the internal joinery to the detailing of the doors – that’s been the most rewarding part of this project for me’. Accordingly, examples of Turkish artisanship can be found throughout the building, from clay pots and glazed tiles to hefty stone vanity units and wooden tables. But as sophisticated as the interiors are, Summerfield’s thoughts stray back to the initial beauty of the site. ‘We were fascinated by the landscape. The fact that it can flow through the project, and effectively disguise the building, has been very successful,’ says Summerfield. ‘Also the use of natural ventilation. These are simple ideas, put together in what we hope is quite an elegant way.’ fosterandpartners.com


BAIA

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Architecture

REFINED COIL

BIG’s watch museum for Audemars Piguet in Switzerland is a poetic glass swirl PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES REEVE WRITER: CARAGH MCKAY


Above, the spiralling museum coils up from the landscape in Switzerland’s Vallée de Joux Left, globe-shaped watch display cases in the central exhibition space

Designing a museum in the sublime form of a shimmering peel of glass unfurling from a mountain in a tiny Swiss village is one thing. But, as architect Bjarke Ingels now knows, actually building it in the remote Jura Mountains is most definitely another. Yet six years after his practice BIG won the competition to design the Audemars Piguet Founder’s House Museum in the Swiss village of Le Brassus, the doors are finally open. Created in association with museum experts HG Merz, engineers Lüchinger+ Meyer, and landscape specialists Muller Illien, BIG’s poetic glass swirl exists despite the fact that construction was predestined to be difficult: whipped by mean north-east winds, temperatures in the Vallée de Joux can fall severely in the long winter months. The glass used in the project was designed to withstand extreme temperature fluctuations, but also proved so tough that it is load-bearing enough to negate the need for other walls. ‘It’s a complicated building. At first, we thought it was crazy, then we just thought, let’s do it,’ says a smiling Jasmine Audemars, chairwoman of the board of directors at Audemars Piguet. ‘We make complicated watch designs and we like to complicate our lives.’ Now in her seventies, the greatgranddaughter of founder Jules Audemars has inherited the family knack for taking the long view and doing the wrong thing brilliantly. Her father, Jacques Louis Audemars, was, after all, the man who backed the most lauded watch designer of all time, Gérald Genta, when, in 1970, Genta proposed a new ‘luxury’ watch that eschewed gold in favour of steel but that was no less expensive. Beautifully finished and polished, the humble metal took

on a precious quality. The result was the groundbreaking Royal Oak watch. Initially derided, it is now hailed as a design classic and remains Audemars Piguet’s bestseller. The decision to build a world-class architectural structure in the protected environs of the watchmaker’s valley home, lay, ultimately, on Jasmine Audemars’ shoulders. A trained economist, and 12-year editor-in-chief of the Journal de Genève newspaper (now known as Le Temps), she took the helm of the family-owned business in 1992. Perhaps, then, it’s no surprise that she says the decision to invest in a specifically ambitious architecture commission was ‘simply because today we have the time and the means. The museum is an extension of my grandfather’s house, where the business was established in 1875. Yes, there have been problems, surprises, but this is our legacy for the next 200 years. And, if you divide the investment by 200 years – it’s cheap!’ When the yellow winter sunlight swathes the museum’s layers of thick glass in a reflective golden haze, illuminating its spaceship-like watch vitrines and architectural twists and turns, the effect is kaleidoscopic. But, while that otherworldly atmosphere, heightened by the museum’s quirky mechanical installations, is a magical visitor experience, the unhampered sunlight had threatened to overheat the on-site watchmakers. The solution was to wrap a steel-and-brass honeycomb veil around the exterior that provides shade at pertinent times in the day. ‘The shape and the glass of the museum design mean you immediately discover the landscape, the changes in the light across the valley – you can see where »

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Architecture the watches come from,’ says Audemars. ‘It really was love at first sight for BIG’s design. Bjarke got the spirit of what, who and where we are but in a global way. It’s a very distinct building but it’s discreet.’ What it does boast is a compelling interior design, where a carefully curated exploration of 145 years of Audemars Piguet’s horological and technical innovation gets the balance between its past and future vision just right. Another aspect of the brief was highlighting the work of the Audemars Piguet Foundation, established in 1992. And so, in one corner of the museum atrium, a carefully cultured linden tree grows. ‘The Vallée de Joux is surrounded by magnificent, protected forests, mostly untouched by civilisation, so tree and forest conservation were a natural subject for the Foundation back then. We wanted to contribute to and enable communities around the world to benefit from forests as beautiful as ours.’ The Foundation is also testament to the strong survival instincts of her family business. ‘We have strong roots in the valley – we have survived wars and crises, and this new museum is our vision for the future. The people of the valley deserve it. It’s a celebration of all our culture. It is not ruining the landscape but adding a new tradition.’ The Founder’s House Museum is accessible by appointment only, audemarspiguet.com, big.dk

Right, a brass honeycomb veil is wrapped around part of the structure to provide shade Below, Jasmine Audemars, chairwoman of the board of directors at Audemars Piguet

BIG on detail User movement, context and the site’s harsh climate were key drivers in the design development of the Audemars Piguet museum. By placing the new building as a separate – but visually linked – entity among the watchmaker’s existing campus, the architects were able to work with a spiral, low-profile form, which encourages a particular route through the museum, while also allowing for flexible, lateral movement, and referencing the hairspring – the coil that delivers constant energy – in mechanical watches. ‘Both with watchmaking and architecture, the form is the content,’ says Bjarke Ingels. ‘There is no separation between ‘software’ and ‘hardware’; that’s what makes them both intriguing. We are also both seeking to get the maximum amount of impact with the minimum amount of material.’ The façade’s carefully designed curvature ensures the super-insulated glass expanses (created by Frener & Reifer and SFL Technologies with Lüchinger+Meyer) are also load-bearing, impressively carrying the whole roof, even during the snow-heavy winter months. Meanwhile, strategically-placed gaps where different surfaces meet can absorb changes in temperature. A system of thin brass ribbons protects the makers’ workshops from the sun, but also discreetly ‘disappears’ if you look at it from different angles. So well received was BIG’s concept that the studio is now working on a further project for the brand: a hotel, currently in construction a few steps along the road. Ellie Stathaki

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THIS PAGE, FROM TOP, ‘COLOR EXPERIMENT’ CHAIR PROTOTYPE, 2016; ‘A500’ LOUNGE CHAIR PROTOTYPE, 1985; ‘NELONEN TITAN’ CHAIR, MADE WITH ICE HOCKEY STICKS, AND ‘NELONEN Z’ CHAIR, BOTH MADE IN KUKKAPURO’S WORKSHOP IN THE 1990S OPPOSITE, YRJÖ KUKKAPURO IN HIS KAUNIAINEN STUDIO, IN FEBRUARY 2020. THE UNIQUE SOFA WAS PAINTED BY HIS FRIEND PINO MILAS IN THE 1970S

Finnish lines Yrjö Kukkapuro’s studio near Helsinki is a temple to the art of sitting down PHOTOGRAPHY: FELICIA HONKASALO WRITER: EMMA O’KELLY

Dense rows of fir trees punctured by frozen lakes and oxblood red cabins; children in snow boots navigating icy pavements; crystaltipped grass that crunches underfoot. The journey to the studio of Yrjö Kukkapuro on the outskirts of Helsinki is fittingly Finnish. But once inside, all Nordic clichés end. Rows of chairs with colourful legs and graffitisplattered backs are stacked in seemingly random groups; books, paintbrushes, sketches and models occupy every surface; sunlit walls are crowded with images and cuttings, and in the middle of it all sits 86-year-old Kukkapuro in his canary yellow cap. If anyone has a design back catalogue that sums up the artistic movements and global economic shifts of the past century, it is Kukkapuro. He qualified as an industrial designer in the 1950s, a golden age in Finnish design thanks to Alvar Aalto, Kaj Franck and the like; he witnessed the plastic revolution of the 1960s, the postmodern rebellion of the 1980s, and the ascent of CNC-cutting technology in the 1990s – and embraced them all. In the 1990s, he saw his production shift to China, and found fame there from the 2000s onwards, reaping the benefits of the digital revolution and the onset of globalisation. Every new decade serves to further his reputation and cement his legacy as one of the grand masters of modern design. Almost every school, doctor’s surgery, museum and airport in Finland, at one time

or another, has featured Kukkapuro’s chairs. Some still do. Helsinki’s Central Library Oodi, completed by ALA architects in 2018, has his ‘CNC’ chairs and ‘A500’ rocking chairs in its second-floor reading lounge; his ‘Karuselli’ and ‘Moderno’ chairs fill the city’s Kaisa Library. That these live on, decades after they were first designed, is a source of great pride to Kukkapuro. ‘To create a bestseller, it’s the dream,’ he says. His daughter Isa sits next to him and guides us through the interview. His only child, she is tasked with documenting all her father’s work and assembling his archive – currently a pile of papers overflowing from box files behind his desk. His wife Irmeli, a graphic artist, plucks at her mood board on the other side of the studio, too sick to paint anymore. Her decline has been devastating. After an hour of conversation, the colour has drained from his face, and Kukkapuro apologises. He needs a rest. He signals Irmeli and they shuffle off, holding hands, to the house next door where they now live. ‘It is a very difficult moment,’ says Isa. Yrjö and Irmeli met when they were both students at Helsinki’s Ateneum art school and married in 1956. Kukkapuro was studying furniture design and was the only one on the course who knew how to make prototypes. This was thanks to a childhood in eastern Finland, building boats and bicycles with his father (a builder and a painter), and sewing »


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Design Icon LEFT, DETAIL OF ‘COLOR COMPOSITION’ CHAIR, 1993 BOTTOM LEFT, ORIGINAL MODEL OF ‘FYSIO’ OFFICE CHAIR, 1976, IN PRESSED BIRCH PLYWOOD AND FABRIC BELOW, ‘SCULPTURE LAMP BLUE SHADE’, 2019, UNIQUE PIECE MADE BY KUKKAPURO FOR AN EXHIBITION IN ESTONIA; AND ‘NELONEN PROFILE’ CHAIR, 1990S

with his mother (a tailor). On graduation, he set up a workshop, called it Moderno, and created range after range of settees, beds and sofas with a typically Nordic look. A commission from an architect to create a chair and footstool for a new shoe shop in Helsinki led to the Moderno series. Over the years, this stretched to six pieces and became Kukkapuro’s breakthrough collection. It is still produced today by Lepo Product in Finland and Avarte in China. ‘Sitting in a Kukkapuro chair is like therapy,’ says Juhani Lemmetti, Kukkapuro collector and founder of gallery Lemmetti in Helsinki. ‘He designs with the lower back in mind.’ Kukkapuro recalls that it was a lecture on ergonomics that influenced his approach. ‘It made me see that making furniture had a physiological and scientific dimension and

that has been part of everything I’ve done ever since.’ This obsession with posture, comfort and the body means that a chair can take years to fine-tune. While researching his ‘Karuselli’ chair, Kukkapuro wrapped himself in chicken wire, made a plaster cast of his body in a lounging posture, sculpted around it until he was satisfied with its form, and then built a prototype in glass fibre. The result of four years of experimentation, the ‘Karuselli’ chair went into production in 1964 and was an instant success. Terence Conran hailed it the most comfortable chair he had ever sat in, and it is still in production with the Finnish manufacturer Artek. Irmeli, too, has always been ‘a good testing model. She is smaller than me so we can compare how a chair feels,’ says Kukkapuro.

‘But it has always been important for me to be close to her, to see colour the way she does.’ The pair built the studio, with its concrete wave-like roof, in 1968, on a plot of land given to them by Irmeli’s father, and have worked together, side by side, for 52 years. Nowhere was Irmeli’s input more valuable than with the 1980s Experiment collection, a series of birch plywood and steel chairs, tables and sofas with armrests and legs in bold colours. Kukkapuro saw it as an exploration into ‘decorative functionalism’ and welcomed postmodernism as a joyous break from the functional, workspace trends of the 1970s. Since 2015, Kukkapuro has collaborated with Lemmetti to create limited editions of two chairs and a table for the new Color Experiment series. Lemmetti has been collecting Kukkapuro chairs for 30 years È

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Design Icon

FEATURING A CURVED CONCRETE ROOF, KUKKAPURO’S STUDIO ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF HELSINKI WAS BUILT BY THE DESIGNER AND HIS WIFE IRMELI IN 1968

Almost every school, museum and airport in Finland has featured Kukkapuro’s chairs and has amassed more than 40 prototypes, experimental and production pieces. ‘Yrjö thinks about everything – form, function, ergonomics, colour. He’s imaginative, but practical, too. For me, he is one of the most important designers in the world,’ he says. A fourth Color Experiment chair launches this spring at the gallery, and with such a wealth of prototypes in stock, it’s not hard to imagine future collaborations. In the middle of the studio is a unique three-seater sofa painted with a mountain scene. It is the result of a chaotic visit in 1972 from Pino Milas, a graphic design pal, in need of some R&R, who was tasked by Kukkapuro to decorate it. Life in the atelier was unconventional. Friends, assistants and collaborators came and went with frequency. Isa’s bedroom was a small annexe off the tiny kitchen; Kukkapuro and Irmeli slept in a bed partitioned off behind a bookcase and the bathrooms were two fibreglass pods with showerheads. Kukkapuro won many prizes, and trips abroad for lectures and exhibitions

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were also common; the three of them once piled into their Mini Clubman, packed a tent in the boot, and hit the road for four months. A prototype called the ‘Simple’ chair is wheeled in (we are its first audience). It has been shipped from China and is the first version of what Kukkapuro hopes will be ‘the simplest chair in the world’. It has a black leather seat, a black plywood back and a steel frame and looks suitably straightforward. Kukkapuro walks around it, shaking his head. It’s a bit too high, and, he thinks, the steel arms might be nicer in ash. It will go back to Avarte, which has produced his pieces for 20 years, to be tweaked. Kukkapuro first went to China in 1997, at the invitation of architect and scholar Fang Hai, to give lectures on contemporary design in universities. It was the start of a new chapter. There, he worked with master carpenter Yin Hongqian to create the East West Collection, a series of chairs that combine clean lines with lacquered bamboo and Chinese joinery. These, along with

historical pieces manufactured by Avarte, flooded the Chinese market and Kukkapuro’s fortunes were transformed. At the same time, Finland was recovering from the recession of the late 1980s and the focus at home had shifted to eco-design. Kukkapuro created a solid wood collection in unpopular, overlooked elder. It bombed. When he took it to a fair in Berlin, a visitor congratulated him on having such a strong Finnish style. ‘I was crushed. There I was, thinking I was an international designer!’ Thus, when Helsinki’s design museum invited him to create a series of ‘visually exciting’ chairs in 1993, Kukkapuro called on a friend, the late Finnish graphic designer Tapani Aartomaa, and together they created Tattooed, a collection of plywood chairs decorated with bold slogans and eye-popping motifs of trees, dragons and tigers. Colour also made it onto his ‘CNC’ chairs, designed in 2008 for his retrospective at the museum, to celebrate the potential of computer-controlled machinery. ‘The idea was to show how efficiently technology can be used on materials.’ How many chairs has Kukkapuro made in his lifetime? ‘I don’t know,’ he says. ‘Around 100? One day I shall have to count them.’ yrjokukkapuro.com


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Fine Jewellery

Opening

moves

Jewels drawing on ancient crafts and contemporary arts are a choice fit for the modern gallerist PHOTOGRAPHY: CRISTA LEONARD WATCHES & JEWELLERY DIRECTOR: CARAGH MCKAY FASHION: JASON HUGHES

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This page, ‘A Girl’s Best Friend’ gold, sliced- and beaded-diamond earrings, by Suzanne Syz. ‘Fouet’ gold, spinel and diamond necklace, by Hermès. Pair of horn, titanium, and diamond bangles; pair of buffalo horn, titanium, brown and white diamond cuffs, all by Glenn Spiro Dress, €1,280, by Atlein Ascender, 2019, price on request, by Christopher Kurtz, courtesy of Sarah Myerscough Gallery Opposite, gold, rubellite, black and white diamond necklace, by Ara Vartanian Dress, £750, by MSGM


Photo Andrea Ferrari

EDEN DESIGN RODOLFO DORDONI RODAONLINE.COM IG: RODA.OFFICIAL


Fine Jewellery

Gold, white, brown and black diamond, and warthog tooth necklace, by Fabio Salini. Cultured black South Sea pearl, fire opal, diamond and gold pendant, by Mikimoto. ’Bacchette’ bronze, leather and chalcedony bracelet, by Fabio Salini. Diamond, dumortierite and gold ring, by David Morris. ‘Niloticus Lumière Simple’ black jade, gold and diamond ring, £9,150, by Hermès. ‘Monochrome Y’ gold cuff; ‘Black Flats’ gold and onyx chain bracelet, both by Alexandra Jefford. Dress, £3,000, by Hermès. Sisal Bench, 2019, price on request, by Fernando Laposse, courtesy of Sarah Myerscough Gallery

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Fine Jewellery


This page, emerald, gold and diamond earrings, by Graff. ‘Calame’ necklace with blue chalcedony, diamonds, sannan-skarn and turquoise, by Cartier. ‘Reef’ coral, chrysoprase, onyx, diamond and gold necklace; ruby, diamond and gold ring, both by David Morris. Opal, diamond and gold bracelet, by Boghossian Dress, £2,840, by Akris Charred Pod I; Charred Pod II, both 2017, price on request, by Alison Crowther, courtesy of Sarah Myerscough Gallery

Opposite, ‘Fougère’ gold and diamond necklace, £270,000, by Boucheron. ‘Dragonfly’ platinum, diamond, emerald, ruby and gold brooch; South Sea pearl, diamond and gold belt, both by Hirsh London. Diamond Twister ‘RM 51-02’ tourbillon watch with alligator strap, £875,000, by Richard Mille. Gold, tourmaline, rubellite, and black and white diamond ring, £8,850, by Ara Vartarian Dress, £1,850; skirt (underneath), £545, both by Dolce & Gabbana Cocoon Cabinet, 2018, price on request, by Marlène Huissoud, courtesy of Sarah Myerscough Gallery

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SALONE DEL MOBILE.Milano 16.21 June 2020 hall 3 stand D23 E20 special opening Flagship Store: Via della Moscova, 53 MILANO 16.21 June 2020 10am_10pm

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Fine Jewellery

‘Medusa’ gold, carbon fibre, diamond and coral earrings, by Fabio Salini. Bactrian carnelian bead, diamond and gold necklace; gold, walnut and diamond ring, both by Glenn Spiro. ‘Trésors d’Afrique Ronde de Pierres’ gold, sapphire, garnet, spinel, emerald and diamond bracelet, by Chaumet. Roll-neck, £550, by Pringle of Scotland

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Fine Jewellery

‘High Jewellery’ titanium, and white and black diamond earring, by De Grisogono. Cultured Akoya keshi pearl, gold and diamond necklace, by Mikimoto. ‘Crush for You’ aluminium, gold and diamond bracelet, by Suzanne Syz. Sapphire cabochon, gold, diamond and opal ring, by Boghossian. Dress, £1,290, by Victoria Beckham. Flower Infused Vessel 06, 2018, price on request, by Marcin Rusak, courtesy of Sarah Myerscough Gallery

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Fine Jewellery Leather, gold and cornelian tusk choker, by Fabio Salini. ‘The Burmese Bouddha’ gold, amethyst, spinel and diamond brooch, by Suzanne Syz Jacket, £369; skirt, £219, both by Boss Untitled (Dish), 2019, price on request, by Jim Partridge and Liz Walmsley, courtesy of Sarah Myerscough Gallery All jewellery pieces are price on request unless stated. For stockists, see page 240 Model: Madeleine Blomberg at Established Models Casting director: David Steven Wilton at East Hair: Cathy Ennis using Bumble and Bumble Make-up: Mirijana Vasovic using Armani Beauty Manicure: Saffron Goddard at Saint Luke using Chanel Le Vernis Sargasso and La Crème Main Interiors: Olly Mason Photography assistants: Andreas Klassen, Louise Oates Fashion assistants: Aylin Bayhan, Kris Bergfeldt Production assistant: Josefin Forsberg Special thanks to Sarah Myerscough Gallery, London SW13, sarahmyerscough.com

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Architecture Icon Originally designed as an exhibition centre, Ontario Place is raised on pilotis in the calm of a man-made lagoon, specially created by sinking three freighters, at the edge of Lake Ontario

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WATER WORLD Ontario Place, Toronto’s lake-defying 1971 showpiece, is a modernist marvel with an uncertain future

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW ROWAT WRITER: DAVE LEBLANC

‘The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead / When the skies of November turn gloomy,’ sang Gordon Lightfoot in 1976’s ‘The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald’. Canada’s most famous living folkie (Leonard Cohen RIP) knew that November is not the best month to visit North America’s Great Lakes region. The first icy winds blow, battleship-grey clouds win the arm wrestle with the sun, and the five enormous lakes, so vast they’re ocean-like, churn up some very wicked weather. Indeed, the Witch of November (as locals call the strong wind across the lakes) can produce 140km/h gusts and 11m-high waves. And the SS Edmund Fitzgerald’s 29 lost souls – the boat had sunk a year before Lightfoot’s commemoration – was just the latest in a long list of the lakes’ casualties. The Great Lakes Storm of 1913, for instance, sent 12 ships and around 250 sailors to their watery graves. Inserting five futuristic pods and some artificial islands into the third deepest of those lakes might be seen as foolhardy. Bauhaus-trained Eberhard Zeidler (born 1926) and Briton Michael Hough (1928-2013), the two émigrés responsible for Ontario Place, certainly had buckets of nerve to think that they could drop something smack-dab into the choppy soup of Toronto Harbour back in 1968. ‘It’s crazy, Eb and Michael saying: we’re going to take on those forces and build something,’ laughs Toronto-based architect and heritage advocate Catherine Nasmith. ‘What were they thinking? People had so much nerve in that period.’ At the time, Toronto, then Canada’s second-largest city, was smarting over the fawn-fest that was Montreal’s Expo 67, a World’s Fair built on man-made islands in the St Lawrence River and which saw more than 50 million people seduced by Canada’s ooh-la-la  »


Architecture Icon Below, Ontario Place’s Cinesphere, a triodetic dome built to house the world’s first permanent IMAX movie theatre. The only part of the complex to have been renovated, it is still used for screenings

francophone city. In the summer of 1968, the Ontario government announced it would build a similar, albeit smaller, architectural showpiece in Toronto. Ontario Place would be home to Expo-like exhibits trumpeting the province’s achievements in technology, industry, and culture. Plans for a few water-facing pavilions on the grounds of the existing Canadian National Exhibition, however, soon morphed into a quintet of diamondshaped pods suspended over the water, along with the Cinesphere, the first permanent IMAX movie theatre, in a triodetic dome, as imagined by Zeidler. When Zeidler discovered that 90 per cent of his budget would be eaten up by the massive underwater pilotis required to withstand lake forces, the idea was almost abandoned. A holiday in the Bahamas alerted him to the wave-breaking action of barrier

Ontario Place should be to Toronto what the Opera House is to Sydney reefs. Placing his buildings in a calm, man-made lagoon would call for much slimmer pilotis, bringing their cost down to ten per cent of his budget; with columns so thin, a floating-over-the-water effect could be achieved by hanging some of each pod’s weight from steel cables. ‘It’s a glimpse into the future,’ wrote Zeidler in his autobiographical Buildings Cities Life (Dundurn, 2013), ‘like the Eiffel Tower in Paris, or the Crystal Palace in London were’ (while Zeidler is still alive, Alzheimer’s has robbed him of memory). When landscaper Hough and his staff were added to the team in 1969, only the decision to sink three Great Lakes freighters to create a breakwater had been made. Zeidler and government officials had ‘concluded that few people would visit the pavilions or Cinesphere

more than a few times a year’ unless there was more for families to do. The creation of two islands from subway-construction landfill, and the programming of those 21 hectares of new land fell to the expanded team, says Hough’s former partner, Jim Stansbury. ‘And so we began to develop a series of canals,’ Hough told a University of Manitoba landscape architecture class in 1979. ‘So at no point – and this became a basic design principle of the programme – would you be unaware of water; sometimes it would be noisy and very powerful, like on the outer edges, and in other cases it would be sheltered and protected.’ On a mild November afternoon in 2019, a meandering trumpeter swan illustrates Hough’s imagined idyllic setting perfectly as Hough’s widow, Bridget, along with Nasmith, architect William Greaves, and Zeidler’s oldest child, Margie, peer into one of those canals. The fallen tree trunk dipping its half-century-old branches into the murky water illustrates its current state of neglect. Built over two years for C$29m, Ontario Place, which included an open-air, 3,000-seat concert venue, The Forum, under a hyperbolic paraboloid roof, opened with great fanfare in May 1971. In 1972, the wildly successful Children’s Village playground opened. While attendance peaked at more than three million a year in the 1970s, that number was halved by the 1990s and plummeted to well under a million by the 2000s. This, our little group postulates, can be blamed on a loss of focus in Ontario Place’s offering, which shifted from Expo quality to carnival rides. Shut down by the provincial government in 2012, the grounds and its innovative, modernist buildings have faced an uncertain future ever since. The Children’s Village is gone, as is the beloved Forum, which was replaced by a behemoth called the Molson Amphitheatre. With government changing twice since – currently Doug Ford, brother of the late, notorious, crack-smoking Toronto mayor Rob Ford, is premier of Ontario – there has been no shortage of visioning exercises, committees, rumours of a casino, and a plan to finally bring a much-needed subway stop to the site, which today hosts events such as winter light shows and art workshops, as well as screenings at the Cinesphere, the sole part of the complex to be restored in 2017. ‘It’s unfortunate but we have no information to offer the public at this time,’ laments Eriks Eglite, Ontario Place’s director of special projects. ‘Everyone that I know, that I’ve had a beer with, asks: so what’s going on? And, unfortunately, we’re all waiting.’ Meanwhile, Ontario Place does the ‘listicle’ walk of shame: Heritage Canada Foundation’s Top 10 Endangered List in 2012; Docomomo US in 2014; and, thanks to the efforts of Greaves, the World Monuments Fund 2020 Watch. Ontario Place should be to Toronto what the Opera House is to Sydney. Under the surface rust, Zeidler’s jewel still shines. ‘And this is where we get back to the maintenance,’ says Margie as she ponders a temporary food service structure plunked right in front of one of her father’s small, crystalline-shaped restaurant buildings. ‘You need the same visionary people that designed it to be running it, you know?’ ‘That’s very hopeful, but yes,’ agrees Bridget. ‘It’s like Michael said in that lecture, once you hand it over to the client, it’s theirs.’  wmf.org/project/ontario-place

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Design ROO ROGERS, CEO OF FOUNDERS FACTORY AFRICA, AND BOTSWANA-BASED DESIGNER PETER MABEO. ROGERS COMMISSIONED MABEO TO DESIGN THE ACCELERATOR’S NEW JOHANNESBURG OFFICE AFTER A TIP-OFF FROM DAVID ADJAYE

MADE IN AFRICA

Entrepreneur Roo Rogers and designer Peter Mabeo on creating an of-its-place home for the Johannesburg arm of start-up accelerator Founders Factory

PHOTOGRAPHY: RUAN VAN JAARSVELDT WRITER: NICK COMPTON

Roo Rogers had a problem, an unusual disturbance in team cohesion. A problem that, given everything else he has to contend with, he could have well done without. Rogers is the son of architectural nobility, Richard Rogers and River Café founder Ruth Rogers. Tacking away from his bohemian upbringing, he has pursued a career in technology, serial entrepreneurship, social enterprise, and now acceleration and incubation. He was a partner in Yves Béhar’s Fuseproject, founded five successful start-ups, including a film production company and eco-friendly car service in New York, and established the Spring accelerator that has helped grow business across Africa and Asia. È

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Design

LEFT, MABEO’S TEAM HANDCRAFTED BLEACHER SEATING FOR THE OFFICE’S EVENT SPACE ABOVE, A SMALL TIMBER-BUILT MEETING ROOM IS CLAD IN SHEET METAL

Last year he launched an African offshoot of the UK-based start-up accelerator Founders Factory. Rogers and his team are committed to birthing and backing 140 new tech-based start-ups across Africa over the next five years. Founders Factory’s USP is its reliance on blue-chip corporate investment rather than funding from VCs and other smaller speculators. And tapping the corporate well in Africa means being in Johannesburg, the city where many of the international giants have established beachhead HQs. Rogers wants to provide hothouse conditions for his new businesses, drawn from across Africa. ‘We have a makers lab. We have technicians, designers, engineers, who can rapid-prototype ideas. And then we have space for the incubator. And we have space for all the other support people.’ For Rogers, it was important not just how Founders Factory operated but how it looked; how of its place it appeared, how much it was

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understood as rooted rather than an outside act of benevolence, or worse, opportunism. ‘You always ask yourself, what is a truly African approach to this? What does an African office look like? The answer here normally is glass and steel but I didn’t want to do that.’ Doing something different turned out to be more difficult than he imagined. The right location was important: ‘I didn’t want to be in some secure business park with a Starbucks. We need to be among the people we are trying to reach, to be built into the fabric of Johannesburg. We looked around and took 7,000 sq ft in this fantastic 1970s brutalist building in Braamfontein.’ An area in Johannesburg’s troubled CBD, Braamfontein is not the obvious spot to land a new beacon for emerging African businesses. But Rogers was making a statement and the space was relatively cheap. He then set out to find a designer for his new space. ‘I asked everybody in my

Johannesburg group to find me an interior designer. And the designers showed me their work. And it was all very nice, really well designed, but vanilla. I wanted the office to be aspirational, but to a lot of people aspirational means New York. We just said to them, “Come back and show something that feels like it is from here.” They returned with pictures of the same houses but with a zebra in the background. I was driving my team nuts because they wanted a decision, they just needed an office space. So I picked up the phone to David Adjaye.’ The British-Ghanaian architect is now largely in Accra, where he heads a 50-strong practice and is about to get Ghana’s National Cathedral out of the ground. And he is committed to the idea that better versions of everything from affordable housing to office buildings can be developed in Africa, if the time and space can be found for that process in the continent’s rush to develop. He was a »


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Design LEFT, MABEO COVERED THE WALLS OF THE OFFICE’S SERVER ROOM WITH HAND-CUT WOODEN TYPE THAT WAS THEN BURNED BELOW LEFT, A TEAM DINING TABLE WITH VARIOUS PIECES FROM THE MABEO RANGE, INCLUDING DESIGNS BY LUCA NICHETTO, AS WELL AS NEW PIECES MABEO HAS DESIGNED FOR FOUNDERS FACTORY

‘It’s not about new aesthetics; it is a way to give people an opportunity to be involved’

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smart option for advice. ‘David put me in touch with Peter Mabeo,’ says Rogers. ‘I called Peter and knew he was the right person within ten seconds. I told him what I wanted and he said, “I get it, I’ve always wanted a client like this.”’ Mabeo established his eponymous studio and brand in Gaborone in Botswana in 2006 after a decade of creating bespoke designs for commercial clients in the country. He works with a pool of local craftspeople, including carpenters, woodworkers and embroiderers, but has connected them with international designers such as Patricia Urquiola, Claesson Koivisto Rune and Luca Nichetto. For Mabeo, the Founders Factory project was not just about establishing some kind of new paradigm for African design but involving African craftspeople; it was a matter of inclusion: ‘It’s not really about a new aesthetic or new typologies, though that’s all important. It is a way to give people an opportunity to be involved.’ He brought craftspeople with him from Botswana, as well as a choice selection of existing Mabeo furniture and new pieces created specifically for the office, and commissioned a contractor from Soweto to work on the acoustic folding doors for a small auditorium. ‘It really adds to the conversation if you have craftspeople coming from Botswana working with a guy from Soweto who is a very technical kind of artisan. ‘We did pretty much everything. One of the meeting rooms is made out of a timberframe that is nailed together and outside it you have this metal sheeting that is beaten by hand. We’ve used hand-cut wooden type on the walls of the server room and then burned the wood using a Japanese method so it has this kind of three-dimensional topography.’ He still has to deliver some soft seating and padding for the walls of some the meeting rooms, incorporating embroidery. But Mabeo’s recruitment and perhaps more slow-moving methods brought to a head fundamental tension in Rogers’ team. There were those who insisted that for African businesses to compete internationally, they had to walk and talk international. And that the spaces they presented to clients should be glass, steel, marble, slick, generic, serious. And there were others who agreed È


MIL ANO DESIGN WEEK_21-26 APRIL HALL 24 | STAND E21/F14


Design

‘Instead of trying to measure up to some Western model, we can do things differently’

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE, ANOTHER MEETING ROOM WITH HAND-BEATEN SHEET METAL; A ‘LEBONE’ FLOOR LAMP (2018) BY MARSEILLEBASED DESIGNER INÈS BRESSAND FOR THE MABEO COLLECTION; THE FOUNDERS FACTORY OFFICE IS HOUSED ON THE 14TH STOREY OF A BRUTALIST BLOCK IN BRAAMFONTEIN

they should be distinctly, proudly African (accepting that this can never be one thing). ‘One guy said to me, “You are trying to build an internationally recognised African accelerator. To do that we need to get African entrepreneurs, and African entrepreneurs don’t find African design or African designers, like Peter, aspirational.” It just totally divided my group. It was intense.’ Mabeo is no stranger to large-scale projects. He has helped kit out hotels and HQs in Europe and Africa and he is a serious supplier of contract furniture. But he has also developed his business with an accent on craft and sustainability, on inclusion and on a serious questioning of the ways Africa pushes to ‘catch up’ with the developed world. Here that debate was raging around him. In some ways, this was a very local difficulty. Mabeo suggests that Johannesburg, in its rush and push to ‘measure up’ to the other financial powerhouses, is in danger of forgetting something fundamental, of potential getting lost in the process. ‘People have become so process-oriented that they’ve forgotten what the process is for. Timelines and project deliverables and all those things are important, but they’re not the end in itself. It’s more important to make sure that the vision is put across. And I think the young people who come here should get it, if we talk about the whole idea.’ Rogers knows that some of his corporate backers might question his commitment to, and investment in, truly African design. ‘They might walk into my office and say “What is this? I can’t believe you spent your money on this.” Or they might not. They might walk in and go, “This is brave and it’s amazing.” And I know I’m at a stage of my life where I would rather do something brave. ‘And, of course, you can go to Africa and say, “You have to work this way.” But if you want to do well, and I hope this is a lesson that comes off, you can’t impose process. Sometimes poetry comes out of serendipity and surprise. I think what we are doing here is going to be really beautiful.’ And for Mabeo, the Founders Factory office is part of a far wider project: ‘It’s about saying that instead of trying to measure up to some prescribed, pre-packaged Western model, we can do things differently and contribute something to humanity. We can do things that tackle ecological degradation and artificial divisions. We can put things back together again.’ foundersfactory.com

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In Residence

SHELF LIFE

Rebuilt from the ground up, Australian architect John Wardle’s Melbourne home is designed to accommodate and display his vast curio collection At the age of 12, John Wardle went exploring the banks of the Barwon River in New South Wales, Australia. He stumbled across a building site. An old farmhouse was being torn down. But, in the centre of the demolition stood, like an oasis, an ancient home. ‘I remember seeing, right in the middle, this beautiful, original, timber-shingled, single-room cottage,’ Wardle says. The farmhouse had been built in stages over generations around the timber cottage, like a Russian doll. ‘They must have been adding and building around it again and again over the generations.’ As the bulldozers and diggers lay hulking and dormant, the young Wardle crept into the building site to stand in the middle of the timber room. He spotted, still in situ, the lock to the door of the original cottage, and took it home with him. The lock remains in his newly refurbished home today – and marks the beginning of the great Australian architect’s lifelong personal collection of curios. Wardle founded the Melbourne-based practice John Wardle Architects (JWA) in 1986. He now employs more than 90 people, looking after a wide range of È

PHOTOGRAPHY: TREVOR MEIN WRITER: TOM SEYMOUR

Top, overlooking the leafy garden is a timber-lined study space. Its shelves are packed with Wardle’s collection of ceramics from Australia, Northern Europe and Japan Above, the Wardles commissioned local artist Natasha Johns-Messenger to create a horizontal periscope. The work plays with perception and space, allowing glimpses of the city beyond

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ph. marco ghilarducci

a.d. emiliana martinelli, massimo farinatti

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COLIBRI Q DESIGN EMILIANA MARTINELLI

LIGHT FOR LIFE

MARTINELLILUCE.IT


In Residence

‘I’m an avid and ill-disciplined collector. I enjoy finding commonality among things’

commissions, from private residences to office, cultural and educational works. His office is also where he used to keep what he calls his Museum of Stolen Objects, a collection of artefacts that have piqued his curiosity – mostly inexpensive, but all precious, each collected on his travels or gifted to him by fellow makers and artists. The Museum of Stolen Objects now has its own private gallery of sorts – Wardle’s newly completed home. ‘I’m an avid and very ill-disciplined collector of things,’ Wardle says. ‘But I’m interested in prototypes or experiments as much as finished objects.’ And with that comes a weakness for flea markets. Every Sunday morning, wherever in the world he finds himself, Wardle will be up at sunrise scouring the Formica tables for things some of us might think of as junk. His collection contains countless items found in markets from London to Ljubljana, São Paulo to Tokyo. At his new home in Melbourne, Wardle has fashioned spaces where such varied pieces can have a dialogue with each other. ‘I enjoy the process of finding commonality among things,’ Wardle says. ‘In how things can become associated through arrangement – even if, very often, they are disparate things.’ This, he says, speaks to his identity as a proud Australian: ‘We are very much a society of hybrids.’ An impertinent type might suggest Wardle’s collecting habits are eccentric to the point of obsessive. A fan of Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, Wardle developed an obsession with the moment Malcolm McDowell’s Alex jumps from a window to escape the torture of listening to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Kubrick filmed the scene 19 times on a Bolex movie camera. So, for a period, Wardle scoured the earth to collect Bolex cameras (he found 12). Ceramics also have a particular place in his heart. On a visit to the UK, he once took his two daughters and wife to Stoke-on-Trent, once a pottery powerhouse, to show them a bottle kiln used for traditional pottery (the kiln’s unique shape later influenced JWA’s design for Monash University’s Learning and Teaching Building). ‘I’m fascinated by the processes and the societies and the people that make important objects,’ Wardle says. ‘The skill-sets that were developed in a particular place at a particular time. I love to know who made things; when, how, where and why it was made.’ Wardle is walking through the foothills of Melbourne as we talk. Arriving home remains a novel experience; the renovations took more than 18 months, only reaching completion just before Christmas 2019. The house was first built in 1951 amidst three enormous Scottish Elms, planted in the 1870s. The home ‘threads and moves and merges around the trees’, says Wardle, who bought it with his wife in 1990. In 1999, Wardle ‘sliced the front third of the house off ’ È

Above, designed to sit between two ancient elm trees, the steel-andglass house cantilevers out over Wardle’s 1963 Lancia Flavia Zagato Below, custom-made Japanese Inax tiles and ‘Nivis’ washbasins by Benedini Associati, for Agape, in the en-suite bathroom

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In Residence

Above, the main living room, with a ‘Take a Line for a Walk’ armchair by Alfredo Häberli, for Moroso; ‘Bandas’ rug by Patricia Urquiola, for Gan; artwork by Australian artist Gareth Sansom; coffee table design by John Wardle; and ‘Gentry’ sofa by Urquiola, for Moroso Below, a Moon Jar sculpture by Japanese ceramicist Akiko Hirai is displayed in an alcove – ‘almost like a little gallery for one piece of work’ – in the Victorian ash staircase that leads to the main bedroom

during a major renovation. Eighteen months ago, ‘we pulled the whole lot out and started again’, he says. ‘There’s now nothing left of the original house.’ Wardle has not merely extended his home. He has created a unique architectural blueprint that provides a specific space for each component of his collection; bespoke corners, built-in shelving and niches for each and every thing he holds dear. An angular timber wall feature has been created as a home for a favourite painting – it’s a picture frame that also forms part of the architecture of the home. Wardle worked closely with Melbourne craftsman Chris Overend, who runs ‘a rare set-up’, Wardle says – a construction company, where joinery and fabrication is maintained in-house – and was employed to create the home’s cabinetry. ‘We worked to create areas of inventive precision and extraordinary quality,’ says Wardle. In the openplan kitchen, Wardle has designed a dining table, fabricated by Andrew Lowe of Lowe Furniture, of two interlocking circles – a tribute to his daughters, who recently left home to study and work abroad. The domestic designs and displays have been a long time in the planning. Wardle spends his summers at Waterview, a working sheep farm on Bruny Island, Tasmania, where he has turned an old shearing shed and an aged farmstead into Shearers Quarters and Captain Kelly’s Cottage. These two projects can be seen as drafts; practice runs before he took on the task of transforming the main family home in Melbourne. The house, in that sense, is a tribute to the life of a man now recognised as one of his country’s leading architects. Wardle has got there via a lifetime built absorbing, piece by piece, everything of interest he finds. Now he has melded them into one original, unique and beautiful space. johnwardlearchitects.com

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MUNICH JEWELLERS

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OLFACTORY TOUR

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OUTSTANDING AUTOS

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BEST OF IMM COLOGNE


Timeless by Tradition

The SieMatic style collection PURE has been enriched by an outstanding kitchen concept: the new SieMatic SLX, awarded with the ICONIC AWARD 2020, Best of Best. The focus is on the newly developed recessed grip, whose filigree design and the batten luminaire integrated into the shadow gap make the worktop appear to float.

SA LONE DEL MOBILE + EUROCUCINA | April 21 to 26, 2020 | starting daily at 10:00 AM SieMatic Monte Santo | Porta Nuova | Viale Monte Santo 8 | 20124 Milan SIEMATIC ST YLE COLLECTION PURE |

siematic.com/slx


THE M2

BY FUTURA 2000

BMW M2 Competition: Fuel consumption in l/100 km (combined): 10.0 [9.2]. CO2 emissions in g/km (combined): 227 [209]. The figures in brackets refer to the vehicle with seven-speed M double-clutch transmission with Drivelogic. The model shown includes optional equipment. The values of fuel consumptions, CO2 emissions and energy consumptions shown were determined according to the European Regulation (EC) 715/2007 in the version applicable at the time of type approval. The figures refer to a vehicle with basic configuration in Germany and the range shown considers optional equipment and the different size of wheels and tires available on the selected model. The values are already based on the new WLTP regulation and are translated back into NEDC-equivalent values in order to ensure the comparison between the vehicles. [With respect to these vehicles, for vehicle related taxes or other duties based (at least inter alia) on CO2-emissions the CO2 values may differ to the values stated here.]. The CO2 efficiency specifications are determined according to Directive 1999/94/EC and the European Regulation in its current version applicable. The values shown are based on the fuel consumption, CO2 values and energy consumptions according to the NEDC cycle for the classification. For further information about the official fuel consumption and the specific CO2 emission of new passenger cars can be taken out of the „handbook of fuel consumption, the CO2 emission and power consumption of new passenger cars“, which is available at all selling points and at https:// www.dat.de/angebote/verlagsprodukte/leitfaden-kraftstoffverbrauch.html. All vehicles, equipment, combination possibilities and varieties shown here are examples and can differ in your country. In no way do they constitute a binding offer by the BMW M GmbH. Visit your local BMW website or see your authorised BMW M Retailer for accurate details on the offers in your country. Link to our Magazine: https://www.bmw-m.com/en/topics/magazine-article-pool/bmw-m2-by-futura.html


Made in Germany

Rolf Benz VOLO | labsdesign German Design Award 2020 Winner

International Flagships: Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne, Zuerich, Vienna, Graz (April 2020), Tokyo, Beijing, Hangzhou, Shanghai, Taipei, New York, New Delhi


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wunder ba r.


DESIGN AND QUALITY MADE IN GERMANY

EDITION 90

www.keuco.com


DESIGN NEWS

Germany’s creative zeitgeist, expressed in chic desks, cubist chairs and bold type

‘UNIT’ DESK by Aesthek →

Aesthek’s new ‘Unit’ desk is a modern update of the secretary desk, a traditional staple of the early home office and study. The Cologne-based company has covered all bases with its reinterpretation, creating a desk that works in any space, office or domestic, while also serving as a room divider, or as part of a modular kit. Designers Sebastian Netz and Jochen Ruderer used power-coated or galvanised steel for the frame, wrapping the end result in a heavy-duty Kvadrat fabric for almost infinite customisation. The first five examples of ‘Unit’ (as pictured here) were developed in collaboration with the Berlin-based artist Michaela Zimmer. Limited-edition ‘Unit’ desk, €1,800, aesthek.com

‘EDITION 2020’ PLATES by New Tendency ←

WRITER:JONATHAN BELL

KPM Berlin is a porcelain manufacturer with centuries of history and a reputation for peerless quality. With a manufactory in the heart of the city and stores throughout the country, it has moved into contemporary work under the auspices of chief designer Thomas Wenzel. The company, also known as the Royal Porcelain Manufactory Berlin, has teamed up with local studio New Tendency to create the ultimate expression of modernist, minimalist porcelain design: a dinner plate. The ‘Edition 2020’ sees New Tendency’s Manuel Goller, Sebastian Schönheit and Christoph Goller applying their Bauhaus-inspired aesthetic to produce a plate that can be stacked on a simple base, formed from two semicircular ridges. Perfect geometry meets meticulous finish. ‘Edition 2020’ plates, price on request, kpm-berlin.com, newtendency.com

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‘N-04’ CHAIRS by Yellow Nose Studio →

The N-04 collection by Yellow Nose Studio has a monumental appearance that belies the peaceful, crafted approach of its designers, Hsin-Ying Ho and Kai-Ming Tung. The Taiwanese duo, who share a background in architecture, set up their Berlin studio in 2017. Their products are shaped by a love of raw materials and a desire to represent slow living through design; their ‘N-04’ chairs are the latest in a series of conceptual explorations of material combinations. Stone, raw clay and charred wood are combined to create pieces that are as much freestanding sculptures as chairs. ‘We want to show the calmness and simplicity of the objects we create,’ explain the duo. ‘N-04’ chairs, price on request, yellownosestudio.com

WG*

Spl Мn

❷53← SIDE TABLES by Max Neustadt ↑

Industrial designer Max Neustadt’s two new side tables, ‘Manta’ and ‘Pico’, offer dual functionality. The former is both furniture and tray – the folded sheet top can simply be lifted off its bent wire base with a subtle green finish that is both utilitarian and luxurious, while the latter features a circular steel top that sits above an ash support and a concrete base. The

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‘PLAID’ TYPEFACE by Fabian Fohrer ↑

support doubles as a handle, allowing ‘Pico’ to be carried around, even when laden with drinks. There are no permanent fixings, just four simple elements. Neustadt is based in Munich and set up his studio four years ago following a masters degree from ÉCAL, an apprenticeship as a cabinetmaker and a stint at Stefan Diez’s studio. Side tables, price on request, maxneu.com

Having first appeared in our pages as a talented Konstanz University alumnus in Wallpaper’s 2018 Graduate Directory, Fabian Fohrer now runs Tightype, a type collective, with his friend Fabian Huber. His 2018 ‘Plaid’ typeface, which gets wider as it gets heavier, has been used throughout our Germany section. tightype.com

GERMANY / DESIGN


TOUR DU MONDE

DEDON COLLECTION RILLY Design by GamFratesi

www.dedon.de


TURANDOT W

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PATTERN PLAY

A pair of Munich architects bring algorithms and artistry to jewellery design

STILL-LIFE PHOTOGRAPHY:ADAM BARCLAY PORTRAIT:HUDSON HAYDEN WRITER:HANNAH SILVER

Left, all in yellow gold, ‘Iva’ bangle (texture on outside), €2,600; ‘Avi’ bangle (texture on inside), €2,600; ‘Nio’ earrings, €1,400; ‘Nio’ rings (thinner), €900; ‘Iva’ ring (thicker), €1,400 Above, ‘Neta’ pendant in yellow gold, €2,400

As career changes go, a move from architecture to jewellery design is not as incongruous as it may first appear; and for Antonia Frey and Simon Vorhammer of Sian Design, it was a natural progression. Both disciplines are inextricably concerned with space and light, geometry and texture, and these are just as carefully considered in miniature as they are on a large scale. A move from Sydney, where they worked as architects, back home to Munich, where

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their jewellery is now crafted, sparked a desire to create on a smaller scale. ‘Complex geometries and structures are so much easier to implement in jewellery than in architecture,’ Frey and Vorhammer agree. ‘Also, there is no direct client. We can very much do what we are interested in.’ The pair’s architectural skills have been transposed and updated. They refer to themselves as ‘digital native’ designers and professionally they move between the »

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Left, Simon Vorhammer and Antonia Frey in their Munich studio Below, ‘Sana’ bracelet in black polyamide, €195

‘For each design, a computer algorithm is created, defining the geometrical dependencies between all elements’ virtual and physical worlds. Working with both 3D-modelling and physical prototypes, combining digital and analogue methods, is central to their creative process. And the use of digital technology goes deeper into the design process. ‘For each design, a computer algorithm is created, defining the logic and the geometrical dependencies between all elements,’ Frey says, giving them the opportunity to explore several potential geometrical formations. A negative mould, 3D-printed layer by layer in wax, then becomes a vessel in which to pour precious metal, which in turn is meticulously reworked by their goldsmith. Frey and Vorhammer focus on one material per piece, and emphasise the juxtaposition of textures. This approach is reflected in their first collection, where shells of intertwined webs twist on pendants, working together but never touching. Rings and bangles are a twist of smooth gold on the inside and tightly packed grids on the outside; sometimes, the jewellers reverse the smooth and the rough,

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so the bangle becomes a deceptively simple loop of gold. Only on closer inspection can thick bonds of an inner lattice be glimpsed, a teasing border of fine stitching along the edges the only clue to the delicate filigree detailing inside. The majority of the pieces are in gold, but the pair have experimented with light black polyamide and black PVD coating, hinting at future directions. The duo are revelling in the relatively rapid journey from idea to realised design that their technology allows. In traditional architecture, as they point out, concept to realisation can take several years – here, design variants and prototypes can be established very quickly. ‘It’s perfect timing that we now have access to a technology that gives us the opportunity to realise our ideas. This wouldn’t have been possible ten years ago,’ says Frey. Obstacles barely faze them, instead opening up new avenues of creativity: ‘Throughout our careers, we have learned that the one perfect solution does not exist, but many.’ ∂ sian-design.com

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“MO RE T H A N A FAUC E T, E AC H PRO D UC T IN THE AXOR EDGE COLLECTION IS A JEWEL, A MASTERPIECE, A UNIQUE A RC H I T E C T U R A L O BJ E C T.“

axor-design.com

― Jean-Marie Massaud

FORM FOLLOWS PERFECTION


Nomos Glashütte’s new building in Schlottwitz, just outside its main base in Glashütte, is designed to blend in with its surroundings. The facility centralises production of almost all components for the brand’s 13 movements, and enhances its integrated approach to watchmaking

UNITED FRONT Discreet and efficient, Nomos Glashütte’s new production facility reflects its founding values PHOTOGRAPHY:MAX CREASY

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WRITER:JAMES GURNEY


Talking about Nomos Glashütte, it’s tempting to start with the watch company’s design office, Berlinerblau, in Berlin’s Kreuzberg district. Located in a former button factory built in the early 1900s, the studio is all it should be: light flooding onto whitewashed walls covered in colour swatches, design details and mood boards, with Frank Gehry ‘Cloud’ lamps up above.

But, as Michael Paul, the company’s head of design, insists, everything here refers back to how the watches are made. So you really have to start in Glashütte, 230km south of Berlin. It’s here that the making happens and where the soul of the brand is found. A one-industry town, Glashütte is celebrating 175 years of watchmaking. Nomos Glashütte, 30 years old, is in storied

company. Glance out of its offices in the old railway station and see A Lange & Söhne and Glashütte Original across the road, while Moritz Grossmann’s atelier is up the hill. The town’s first wave of watchmakers was part of a government attempt to relieve poverty after the failure of the local silver mines. Nomos Glashütte was founded in 1990 by Roland Schwertner as »

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Left, the brand’s main office in Glashütte’s old railway station Below, Tangente Neomatik 41 Update, £3,200, in white and ruthenium dial versions with Nomos Glashütte’s DUW6101 self-winding movement. The movement

state-owned industries unravelled following the collapse of East Germany. It was a bold move for an IT expert and photographer from Düsseldorf with no prior experience of watchmaking (save for childhood visits to family in the town). Nomos Glashütte has since grown to become the town’s largest maker by volume, producing 20,000 watches a year. It has gained a strong following in the US, and won design and product awards including the Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève. The brand is built around an industrial design philosophy that traces its roots back, via the Bauhaus, to the Deutscher Werkbund movement of the early 20th century, modelled in turn on the British Arts & Crafts movement. The Deutscher

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Werkbund is still active and Nomos Glashütte joined in 1992, recognising shared values of honesty, quality, affordability and design that is detached from fashion. As the brand’s own tome, Nomos Glashütte - The Great Universal Encyclopaedia, puts it ‘the Werkbund aims to promote designers and use modern technology to create products that are both beautiful and affordable’. The movement also emphasises the interplay between art, industry and craft and the equality of value each should have. In practice, you can see this in both the details of Nomos Glashütte watches and the way they are made. ‘We work together at eye level,’ as a production manager puts it. Recent growth has seen the brand’s component production centralised in a new

shows the winding rotor, ‘three-quarter’ plate and Nomos Glashütte’s ‘swing system’ balance and escapement Below left, prototype dials at the Berlin design studio show a distinctive approach to colour

facility just up the road from Glashütte in Schlottwitz. The timber-clad exterior blends with the forested valley. Inside, the facility has everything needed to produce the whole suite of components that go into the brand’s 13 movements, save for the jewelbearings and balance springs, which are sourced externally (electro-plating also happens off-site, to avoid contamination of a nearby river). The staff can quickly react to feedback from the watchmakers back in Glashütte, a real advantage when working at tolerances measured in fractions of a millimetre. But the building also works as an expression of the Deutscher Werkbund approach: state-of-the-art, multi-axis cutting machines sit next to equipment from the 1950s; finishing is by hand, but quality control uses the latest optical gear; every last filing is recycled and the climate control employs heat exchangers. The brand’s movements are designed to get the best out of the production system; escapement components (the wheel, balance spring, pallets and anchors at the heart of a watch) are made in minutely different sizes, so a balanced assembly can be made from parts at hand, rather than through adjusting each part to fit. Back at the Berlinerblau, Paul emphasises the equality of production with design: ‘Design and mechanics have to be considered together.’ He says the Nomos Glashütte approach is to make watches for daily life, and in terms of design inspiration, ‘it’s not a question of looking for details to use, but of sensing the mood, what’s in the air. This is why the design office is in Berlin rather than Glashütte.’ That said, the watches still follow many design traditions of the brand’s hometown, such as the three-quarter mainplate and blued hands. ‘It is where we are from, our origins, and we must respect that,’ says Paul. ∂ nomos-glashuette.com

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PARROT Portable Light Battery 8 – 100 h Touch Control Smart Charge Height-Adjustable warmDIM tobiasgrau.com


Garden of Beauty by Michel Comte

Fashion and Lifestyle Shopping since 1881. It’s beautiful.


SUPER SENSE With a new work exploring togetherness through smell, Berlin artist Sissel Tolaas is leading us by the nose

PHOTOGRAPHY:ADRIAN ESCU WRITER:CHRISTOPHER STOCKS

Sissel Tolaas sniffs where others fear to tread. ‘When other people start throwing up,’ she says, ‘that’s when I start to work.’ The self-professed scientist of smell has created cheese from David Beckham’s sweat and finds the odour of ordure far more fascinating than what she calls ‘cover-up perfumes’. But she has also recreated the scent of extinct flowers and encapsulated the life story of a Douglas fir tree in a Dinesen plank. Though she’s long been based in Berlin, Tolaas was born on the west coast of Norway, where, she recalls, ‘we always looked west, to America’. The young Tolaas, by contrast, looked east. At 17 she left squeaky-clean Scandinavia, first for Poland and then for Russia, to study organic chemistry and linguistics. ‘I need to be somewhere I feel uncomfortable,’ she says, ‘so I had to get away from the safety of home.’ For this, she couldn’t have chosen a better time and place; she arrived just as the old Soviet Union was coming apart at the seams. ‘Everything in Russia was

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so political,’ she recalls. ‘Even in church, the priests would be preaching politics, not religion.’ It was partly to get away from the supercharged politics of the day that she started thinking about non-verbal communication, and that led, eventually, to her obsession with smell. Tolaas does mean smell, not perfume. Her view is that we now experience far too much via sight and sound, and that we’ve lost an essential component of our humanity as a result. ‘We breathe 24,000 times a day,’ she says. ‘Every breath tells us something about the world, yet we have, essentially, forgotten how to smell.’ Not only that, but over the last century a vast industry has grown to sell products that actively suppress what we’ve been taught to think of as dirty smells. The result is what Tolaas calls ‘blandscapes’ – sanitised cities, their natural odours scrubbed and sprayed to extinction. It may seem ironic that, since 2004, her work has been supported by International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF), one of the biggest global players in ‘cover-up »

Sissel Tolaas in her Berlin laboratory, where her research into smell spans science and art

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perfumes’, whose perfumers have had a hand in everything from high-end fragrances for Frédéric Malle to the stuff you squirt down your sink. Yet the hook-up makes sense, since in the end, Tolaas and IFF are interested in the same things. ‘When I first met their CEO I’d already been researching smell for years,’ Tolaas says, ‘but my research was completely hermetic: I knew nothing about the fragrance industry. Luckily, they saw the potential of my work, and that changed my life. Their support enabled me to set up my research studio in Berlin, and it’s been fantastic to have access to their R&D.’ Her research has taken her all over the world, and involved intriguing collaborations. Her ‘celebrity cheese’ project with synthetic biologist Christina Agapakis investigated the differences between ‘clean’ and ‘dirty’ smells. Based on the premise that the bacteria that turn milk into cheese are similar to those that live on our skin, Tolaas used sweat from David Beckham’s Adidas trainers to make cheese, which was served to VIPs at the London Olympics. More recently, she was commissioned by Balenciaga to create the smells of blood, antiseptic, petrol and money for its S/S20 show, and by Dinesen

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to help tell the story of its products through scent. She collected samples from Douglas fir trees in the Black Forest, as well as from the Dinesen sawmill at Jels in Denmark, including the workers. From this archive she developed a scent, DD-2, launched at the 2019 London Design Festival and shortlisted for a 2020 Wallpaper* Design Award. ‘It got people talking about people rather than just about planks,’ she says. For her latest collaboration, at London’s Science Gallery, she’s worked with audiovisual artist Jenna Sutela and New York-based writer Elvia Wilk on an installation entitled nnother, part of the exhibition, ‘Genders: Shaping and Breaking the Binary’ (until 28 June). The project, a take on the mother-child relationship, explores the effects of the hormone oxytocin, and includes a scent embedded in the walls, intended to give visitors a feeling of togetherness. Bringing people together is what Tolaas’ work is all about, and bringing us back to our senses. ‘People don’t use their noses, because marketing took over and science stood back,’ she says. ‘Relearning to smell is difficult, you have to work hard at it, but the moment I learned what the nose can do it gave me great joy and freedom.’ ∂ london.sciencegallery.com

Smell molecules soaking in nano beads (top left) and seaweed awaiting analysis (top right) are among the works in progress as Tolaas uses chemicals to recreate smells. Her shelves are lined with bottles containing diluted smell molecules (above)

GERMANY / ART


Discover clear, linear aesthetics: villeroyboch.com/memento2.0


SPACE ODYSSEY

We’ve roved around Germany in pursuit of inspired new architecture projects VILLA SCHATZLMAYR, PASSAU by Philipp Architekten →

This house for a fashion designer is an impressive study in framing space. Set on the banks of the Danube, the façade of this low-lying villa is rigorous but low-key, with little hint of what’s within. The accommodation is arranged horizontally, bisected by an infinity pool set at right angles to the house. A spacious master suite with courtyard garden lies at one end, while the living and dining area is the central focus. The other wing houses an office and two guest rooms. Finishes are largely minimal with white walls and dark wood; colour is saved for the shocking pink guest bathroom and the polychromatic walls of the underground garage that houses the client’s car collection. philipparchitekten.de

PHOTOGRAPHY:JUDY STOLL, BERNHARD TRÄNKLE, SEBASTIAN SCHELS, FLORIAN HOLZHERR. WRITER:JONATHAN BELL. ADDITIONAL WRITING:LEIGH THEODORE VLASSIS

EINFAMILIENHAUS, GARTENSTADT-TRUDERING by Studio Rauch ↓

In a leafy suburb east of Munich, this grey wood-clad house is placed end-on to its neighbours. Architect Stephan Rauch deployed this ‘narrow and reserved’ gabled façade to minimise the perceived scale of the property. The interior reveals complex spatial planning, with a light-filled ‘wellness centre’, complete with sauna and private high-level terrace, a split-level attic and an impressively soaring stair vault, which partly oversails the lofty living space. studiorauch.com FIRE STATION, KAUFBEUREN by Dasch Zürn + Partner ↑

ERKLÄRANLAGE CENTRE, BERNGAU by Max Otto Zitzelsberger ↑

This impressive new fire station in the southern German city of Kaufbeuren replaces an existing structure with the goal of futureproofing the service for many decades to come. Home to the local volunteer fire-fighting brigade, the 6,000 sq m station includes space for 15 vehicles, a control room, workshops, administration and training, all crowned by a prominent 23m-high hose tower. Concrete walls, as well as red metal cladding and doors, create a consistent sense of place. Green roofs collect rainwater, while a geothermal heat pump allows the station to minimise its energy needs – although it has its own emergency generator, just in case. dasch-zuern-architekten.de

This low-cost classroom, built on the site of a former sewage treatment plant, has transformed a ruin into a socially valuable space. The Bavarian town of Berngau has a policy of integrating those with learning difficulties into the wider community, and the classroom for local schools forms part of a new complex that includes facilities for pupils with special needs. Max Otto Zitzelsberger’s new timber pavilion is treated as the focal sculptural element, and the additional buildings are connected to an existing school via a new bridge. ‘The central idea is to celebrate the state of incompleteness,’ says the Munich-based architect. ‘Imperfect spaces are always more interesting for children.’ maxottozitzelsberger.de

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FAST

The futuristic Porsche Taycan 4S realises the marque’s electric ambition in distinctive style. Details include a seamless rear glass light strip (this page) and four-point LED headlights (opposite)

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TRACK

German auto brands are still the master crafters of conceptual promise, previewing the design and technology that’s just around the corner PHOTOGRAPHY:JOHANN CLAUSEN

WRITER:JONATHAN BELL

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THE POWER TO FIRE THE IMAGINATION The BMW Motorrad Concept R 18 blends the essence of the classics with a modern custom-build approach to create an exceptional concept bike. Discover what the future will look like at bmw-motorrad.com/conceptr18


The aerodynamic sports EV (above) doesn’t compromise on performance, while the interior (right) includes a number of touch screens and Porsche’s signature dash-mounted stopwatch

PORSCHE TAYCAN 4S The Taycan is a concept come to life, a pure electric sports car that’s probably the most significant statement of intent ever made by a traditional car company. Every manufacturer is feeling threatened by EV upstarts, most notably Tesla, whose market valuation recently exceeded even that of Volkswagen’s, at $100bn. Thus far, only Porsche has been able to muster the (significant) resources to create a credible challenger, one that doesn’t dilute any of the qualities that the sports car maker is famed for. The Taycan is an elegant four-door saloon that began life as the 2015 Mission E concept (even more kudos for Porsche for not taking the ‘easy’ route and creating an electric SUV). In production form it’s lost none of its svelte futurism and, most notably, the Taycan manages to blend Porsche performance with an impressive range. Porsche Taycan 4S, from £83,367, porsche.com

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BMW’s ‘i’ design team have given the Concept i4 a crisply detailed visual vocabulary, with facets and sharp creases and careful attention to functional detail. For example, the angular aluminium blades on the wheels (top right) improve aerodynamics

BMW CONCEPT I4 BMW’s recent conceptual forays have swung between wild visions and utterly practical design previews. The Concept i4 is more of the latter, a near-complete showcase of what will be the Bavarian company’s most significant launch of the decade. While the outgoing i3 and i8 electric models never lost their futuristic lustre, BMW believes that greater EV uptake will only come with familiar forms. Hence the i4, an electrified version of the upcoming 4 Series GT and coupé. These cars share a huge amount under the skin, with a big, bold reinterpretation of the kidney grille to draw attention. For the all-electric i4, the grille becomes an information centre that houses the copious sensors required for autonomous driving. The four-door fastback also features lighting, forms and detail design that is sufficiently distinct to keep the ‘i’ cars special. BMW Concept i4, production version due 2021, bmw.com

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MERCEDES-BENZ VISION EQS Mercedes has a long history of grandiose conceptual visions, many of which have paved the way for future models. With so much at stake in the industry right now, it’s not surprising to find the brand covering all bases, from far-out sci-fi visions and retro-inspired designs to proposals for tomorrow’s luxury. The Vision EQS, unveiled in late 2019, pushes the form of the marque’s traditional S-Class limo in new directions. Physically, there’s a different stance, a much longer wheelbase allowing for hugely expanded passenger space. The interior inspiration comes from yacht design, while the design team is proud to emphasise the use of recycled plastics and artificial leathers. Like all Mercedes concepts, the EQS is awash with light, inside and out, with front and back grilles shaped by a matrix of LEDs. The (hypothetical) electric powerplant has a proposed range of 700km. The current S-Class probably won’t have an all-electric successor, but there are clearly elements of this concept that are close to production. Above all, the EQS edges this legendary limo towards new proportions, lighting and interiors. Vision EQS, concept only, mercedes-benz.com

The traditional ‘three box’ form of upmarket saloons is gradually giving way to a more unified, one-box shape. The Vision EQS showcases these changing proportions, with its large passenger cell providing an ample interior for four, and lighting emphasising shape and form

GERMANY / CARS


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Below and left, with offroad sorties in mind, the semi-autonomous concept prioritises passenger experience, its wraparound, helicopter-style glass cabin maximising views. Copious storage caters to both rural and urban adventurers

AUDI A1:TRAIL The design team at Audi has a penchant for far-future ideas that shake up the conventional image of the automobile, and the A1:Trail is exactly that – an otherworldly, all-electric off-roader. Blending the company’s emerging ‘one-box’ design approach with chunky wheels and raised suspension, the A1:Trail is essentially a way to showcase a different take on packaging. Tomorrow’s small Audi will blend semi-autonomous driving with this kind of airy passenger compartment; the A1:Trail’s glassy interior is paving the way. Slim seats, copious places for storage, and an angular, wraparound glasshouse are all elements that signal the next generation of electric cars. The future Audi city car might not have this kind of high-riding ground clearance, but chances are it’ll be a big leap forward. Audi A1:Trail, concept only, audi.com

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GERMANY / CARS


by Stefan Diez Move your life.

THE INVENTION OF CASUAL SEATING

HOW DO YOU WORK TOMORROW? TORTONA DESIGN WEEK – MILANO 21.04. – 26.04.2020 visit Wagner at via Tortona 28, 20144 Milano

wagner_living

More information and a special support for professionals: www.wagner-living.com


‘Flying’ light (from above, framing main picture), £1,472, by Tobias Grau. From left, ‘Pilotis’ sofa, from €3,494, by Metrica, for Cor. ‘Leyasol’ bar stool, price on request, by Birgit Hoffmann and Christoph Kahleyss, for Freifrau

GERMANY  /   S PACE


CASTING CALL

We’ve pieced together our pick of star performers from the IMM Cologne fair PHOTOGRAPHY:STUDIO LIKENESS

INTERIORS:HANNAH JORDAN

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From left, ‘Taut’ table, €3,434, by Klemens Grund, for Zeitraum. ‘520’ chair, from £785, by Marco Dessi, for Thonet. ‘Liv’ sofa, from €8,577, by Luca Nichetto, for Rolf Benz. ‘Ayno’ light, price on request, by Stefan Diez and Lina Fischer, for Midgard. ‘Grace’ chair, from €2,395, by Gino Carollo, for Draenert

GERMANY  /   S PACE


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BAR

BAT H S E R I E S

ACCESSORIES

LIGHTING

Salone del Mobile Milan 21.– 26.4.2020 www.decor-walther.de

MIRRORS


From left, ‘Tado’ shelf, from €4,000, by Kaschkasch, for Interlübke. ‘Amanita’ table, from €985, by Christian Haas, for Schönbuch

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From left, ‘Sediment’ table, from €1,085, by Studio Besau-Marguerre, for Favius. ‘K5’ table, from €385, by Thomas Schnur, for Tecta. ‘Plissée’ floor lamp, €1,588, by Sebastian Herkner, for ClassiCon For stockists, see page 240

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GERMANY / SPACE


www.draenert.de ADLER - ESSTISCH AUS OROBICO BLACK (KALKSTEIN) I STUHL - DEXTER

MANUFAKTUR AM BODENSEE


„ LACQUER EPITOMISES HISTORY, CULTURE, AND STYLE; IT GIVES THE OBJECT DEPTH.“ SEBASTIAN HERKNER

CHAIR 118 SEBASTIAN HERKNER

thonet.de


Global Interiors

We’ve scouted and secured the standout successes from six design hotspots. Take a trip with this year’s all dark and handsome discoveries PHOTOGRAPHY: BAKER & EVANS INTERIORS: OLLY MASON

Above, from left, ‘Hex’ chair, C$2,800, by Geof Ramsay (Canada). ‘Mirrors for Gold’ mirror, price on request, by Simón Ballen Botero (Colombia). ‘Fold’ floor lamp, A$2,100, by Ben-Tovim Design (Australia). ‘Helmi’ side table, price on request, by Mikael Mantila (Finland). ‘Rare Earth’ sculptural object, from £500, by Mella Shaw (Scotland). ‘Hiding Behind Glass’ vase, price on request, by Yuxun Ye (China). Paint and flooring, see next page

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China

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Global Interiors From left, ‘Null’ bench, $10,000, by Studio Buzao, from Gallery All. ‘Mazha 2.0’ lighting system, £3,500, by Mario Tsai Studio. ‘Capture the Light’ candleholder, price on request, by Yuxun Ye. ‘Cradle’ armchair, £2,497, by Neri & Hu, for Arflex. ‘Xian’ vases, from $240 each, by Open Object. ‘Synthesis Monolith’ stool, $8,500, by Studio Hongjie Yang. ‘T’ floor lamp, CNY6,800 ($975), by Wuu. Paint in Off-Black (throughout), £48 for 2.5 litres, by Farrow & Ball. Vinyl flooring in Black (throughout), £29 per sq m, by The Colour Flooring Company


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From left, ‘Mers’ console, $4,350, by Henry Norris, for New Format. ‘Thread’ lamp, price on request, by Jamie Wolfond. ‘Compound’ bowl, C$450 (£261), by Geof Ramsay. ‘Nacre’ coffee table, £2,700, by Yabu Pushelberg, for Glas Italia. Encased neon lights, from £1,070, by Kemp London. ‘Aether’ shelving unit, C$4,500 (£2,612), by Origins. ‘Bead’ vases, from C$172 (£100), by Calen Knauf. ‘Atelier Sainte’ pendant lights, from €6,400, by Lambert & Fils and Rachel Bussin, for Lambert & Fils. ‘28t’ table light, £448, by Omer Arbel, for Bocci. ‘Column’ chair, $3,500, by Christian Woo. Paint; flooring, both as before


Global Interiors


Australia

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‘Everything is Golden No.7’ mirror, $11,550, by Hava Studio. ‘Sister Lounge’ armchair, A$2,970 (£1,543), by Tom Hancocks, for Dowel Jones. ‘Chameleon’ table, A$1,295 (£673), by Adam Goodrum, for Nau, from Cult Design. ‘Hemera’ lamp, price on request, by Ross Gardam, for New Volumes, from Dodds & Shute. ‘Soigne’ armchair, A$5,500 (£2,859), by CJ Anderson. ‘Formation’ linear pendant, A$2,760 (£1,435), by Ben-Tovim Design. ‘Yee’ storage system, £3,406, by Metrica, for SP01. ‘Good Morning’ board, A$230 (£120); cup, A$50 (£26); and vase, A$60 (£31), all by Daniel Emma, for Jam Factory. ‘Mies’ vase, £650, by Greg Natale. Brass vases, from A$240 (£125), by Kenny Son, for Studiokyss. ‘Scandal’ staggered wall sconce, £7,800, by Articolo. ‘Memento Mori’, A$2,300 (£1,196); ‘Render’, A$2,000 (£1,040); ‘Honne’, A$5,100 (£2,652), all part of the Objects for Self collection, by Callum Campbell. Paint; flooring, both as before


Global Interiors


Finland

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Global Interiors ‘Bastone’ sideboard, £5,800, by Antrei Hartikainen, for Poiat. ‘Leimu’ lamp, £416, by Magnus Pettersen, for Iittala. ‘Vieno’ vase, 450; ‘Pulmu’ vases, 280 each, all by Katriina Nuutinen. ‘Urna’ vase, £200, by Carina Seth-Andersson, for Marimekko. ‘Muddus’ mirror, price on request, by Studio Finna. ‘Atelier’ chair, £394, by TAF Studio, for Artek, from Viaduct. ‘Nude’ chair, 500, by Harri Koskinen, for Made by Choice. ‘Akademia’ chair, £436, by Wesley Walters and Salla Luhtasela, for Nikari, from Viaduct. ‘Linssi’ light, price on request, by Mikael Mantila. Paint; flooring, both as before


Colombia

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Global Interiors From left, ‘01’ chair, price on request, by Studio Sayso. ‘Banquito’ stools, from COP540,000 ($158), by Danilo Rojas, for Zientte. ‘Barichara’ table, $3,000, by David Del Valle for Tu Taller Design. ‘Nellim’ metal desk, $483, by The Blue House. ‘Suelo Orfebre’ vases, prices on request, by Simón Ballen Botero. ‘Andes Chamba’ vases, from $400, by David Del Valle, for Tu Taller Design. ‘Madrre’ chair and ottoman, 525, by Rafael Zuñiga, for Tucurinca, from Omarcity. ‘Foam’ coffee table, price on request, by Chris Wolston, from The Future Perfect. ‘Reflector’ floor lamp, $220, by The Blue House. Paint; flooring, both as before


Scotland

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Global Interiors

This page, from left, encased neon lights, from £1,070, by Kemp London. ‘Cùram’ chair, £395, by Namon Gaston. ‘Room for Irregularities’ mirror, £8,400, by C A Walac. ‘White Lies’ table, €6,400, by Nick Ross. ‘SX’ table, £385, by Daniel Brophy, for Studio Brophy. Paint; flooring, both as before

Opposite, from left, ‘Talking Time’ chair and table, £3,500, by Derek Welsh. Sycamore bowls, from £65, by Emily Stephen. ‘Lighthouse’ carafe, £60; ‘Crucible’ cups, £18 each, all by Scott Crawford. Wooden objects, from £8, by Daniel Brophy, for Studio Brophy. ‘Rare Earth’ sculptural objects, from £500, by Mella Shaw. ‘Contained Box (Soft Oblong)’, £6,250, by Andrea Walsh. Concrete and glass sculpture, £2,500, by Harry Morgan. Paint; flooring, both as before For stockists, see page 240


Bibendum’s multiple levels take advantage of the sloped site. Punctuated by monolithic pillars, the living room pavilion features uninterrupted red elm-clad ceilings that overhang to provide shade

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Architecture

HIGH LEVEL

Stone, wood and glass combine in a house at one with its natural setting in California’s Napa Valley PHOTOGRAPHY: JOE FLETCHER WRITER: SHONQUIS MORENO


N E W

E X P R E S S I O N S

F O R

I N T E R I O R

D E C O R A T I O N

adv D+ / ph Federico Ciamei

wallanddeco.com design Draga&Aurel.


Floating staircases and glazed hallways lead to the bedrooms and courtyard gardens. The landscaping, by Ground Studio, features granite slabs separated by thick pom-pom tufts of indigenous grass and carefully arranged Chinese pistache trees

T

he road to private house Bibendum narrows and winds uphill through California’s Napa wine country, past ancient oaks and green shoots coaxed to the surface by recent rains. Almost invisible during the approach, the house emerges suddenly, a study in counterpoint: its intersecting planes of low-slung stone contrast with the surroundings while, at the same time, appearing cradled by the slope and woven into its foliage. Designed by San Francisco-based architect Daniel Piechota during his partnership in Sagan Piechota (he has since founded Piechota Architecture), Bibendum is the home of two veterans of Silicon Valley venture capitalism. Piechota had previously renovated the couple’s copper-clad house in Big Sur, which is now their second home. Their new residence is a 12,000 sq ft five-bedroom house, with three linked pavilions – living, guest and private quarters – that step back diagonally to share their views of the wooded hills and valleys snaking into the distance. Inside, nature asserts itself through long, glazed corridors and treehouse-like offices, while an underground wine cave/entertaining space is accessed through a 265ft-long concrete tunnel. The architecture alternates between monolithic

and featherweight, opaque and transparent, intimate and expansive. ‘It creates many moments,’ Piechota says. ‘The house is not a one-liner.’ The architect favoured a limited palette, its tonal harmony making the richness of the house’s layered levels and views easier to absorb. Dramatic dark bronze panels clad a two-storey wall that supports a staircase and lift well, but the house otherwise employs a subdued range of stone, steel, glass and light woods, such as elm, teak, anigre hardwood and walnut. Wood artisan Evan Shively, of timber firm Arborica, salvaged diseased red elm trees for use in uninterrupted expanses across the ceilings; provided the claro walnut for a suspended walkway above the foyer; and created furniture from rescued wood, including a 5,000-year-old swamp tree. Inside, the warm tones of Peruvian travertine are cross-cut on the floors and vein-cut on the walls. Stonemason Edwin Hamilton used the same travertine for the interior and the exterior in a pattern designed by project architect Jason Greer, who perfectly aligned the seams on the outside with those on the inside, so that what are actually two-inch thick cladding tiles appear to be solid blocks of stone.  »

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Architecture

Above, in the main bedroom, Peruvian travertine floors and walls and a bed by Gregory Hay Designs Below, the plunge pool (the house also boasts a lap pool and a spa basin) offers views of the rolling hills and vineyards

The impression is that windows were built around the stone, rather than vice versa, giving the house some of its visual gravity. ‘I wanted the house to look like it was part of the land, like rock outcrops, and as if it had been there for a very long time,’ explains Piechota. The weight of the stone, however, is balanced by fields of glass that combine views with tightly framed detail shots. The brief evolved over the six years of design and construction, but the goal was always to capture the landscape: the clients said they wanted ‘to be in Napa and not let the house get in the way’. The studied integration of topography and architecture is a reminder that Piechota once worked for organic architect Mickey Muennig. Early in Piechota’s career, he lived in a converted school bus and worked in a glass teepee on Muennig’s land in Big Sur, before helping create the Post Ranch Inn’s cliffside boltholes. Most recently, he completed the rigorously sustainable Silver Oak winery near Healdsburg. Today, his work mimics the landscape somewhat less than Muennig’s and contrasts with it more. ‘Bibendum was about using the building as a foil against the landscape,’ he says. Where a typical person sees structure and nature, Piechota tends to see the seams where the two meet, the hard lines of the house against the soft filigrees of the site. Architecture and nature should ‘interlock’, he says, dovetailing the fingers of both hands as if they together could become a single seamless join. danielpiechota.com

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Taking care of light


OFF GRID

Green roofs, oculi and a maths-inspired layout add up to a unique retreat within a private estate on Greek island Milos PHOTOGRAPHY: YIORGIS YEROLYMBOS WRITER: ELLIE STATHAKI

A decade ago, the Athens-based practice Deca Architecture received an enquiry about one of its projects, a house on the tiny Greek island of Antiparos. A visitor to the island was looking for a holiday home in the Aegean, and was impressed by the design strength and quality of Deca’s work. It was the start of a conversation that would lead to one of the studio’s most extensive projects to date: a villa on an 87,000 sq m site on the Cycladic island of Milos. Based in Athens’ chic Kolonaki neighbourhood, Deca was founded in 2001 by Peru-born Greek Alexandros Vaitsos and Mexican Carlos Loperena, who met while studying architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. Their work is rooted in an intellectual rigour that means that even the most seemingly carefree commission – such as this holiday home – involves site-specific research and rich layers of conceptual narrative. Their plans for the Milos site drew on the Voronoi diagram, a mathematical formula,

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defined by 19th century mathematician Georgy Voronoi, that is used to partition geometric planes into organic grids. Using this method, the practice created the limestone-clad Immersion Corral residence for its client, and so the story of Voronoi’s Corrals, as the whole development is now known, began. Deca went on to add three other guest houses to the estate: Orchard Corral, set in the island’s largest olive grove; the bijou, hand-built Isolation Corral; and Preservation Corral, set in a fruit grove. The word ‘corral’ in the projects’ names signifies a sort of natural barrier, explain the architects. ‘The site is so extensive that it contained within it both areas of wilderness that have an incredible biodiversity, as well as productive agricultural land,’ says Loperena. ‘The corrals define the boundary between these two environments for their mutual protection.’ Three years ago, the client turned to Deca again, asking for a large guest house, the biggest building È

Above, the new Hourglass Corral villa features exposed concrete beams that cantilever beyond the stone façade to create shading canopies. Its gardens and green roofs are planted with a selection of Mediterranean species used to produce essential oils Right, a bird’s-eye view of the 87,000 sq m Milos site, with, from top, the Hourglass Corral, Isolation Corral, Preservation Corral and Orchard Corral guest houses, and the site’s main residence, the clifftop Immersion Corral


Architecture


Architecture

Top left, visible from the swimming pool terrace of Hourglass Corral, the planted roofs are dotted with oculi and feature exposed concrete outlines that clearly defined the programme’s sculptural cells Left, the open-plan living room and kitchen. Each space features a conical ceiling with, at its centre, a circular skylight and chandelier Top right and above, the oculi, which can be opened to help with natural ventilation, are also fitted with a bespoke blackout mechanism similar to the shutter of a camera lens

so far, on the northern part of the plot. He spends at least a quarter of the year in Milos, and all the guest houses, apart from his own villa, are used to accommodate his friends and extended family. For this latest project, Hourglass Corral, the architects followed the same principles in order to determine the structure’s layout and positioning. ‘We took the challenge to work rigorously with the Voronoi diagram logic. We composed the architecture through parametric design, creating each cell according to views and spatial needs,’ says Loperena. The house, conceived as a place for entertaining and socialising, includes a flowing living space, which spills out across extensive outdoor terraces, and three en-suite bedrooms. A swimming pool sits at the very top of the plot. While the structure seems low, nestled partially into the landscape in order to

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feel in harmony with the surroundings, the interiors are spacious and light-filled. A palette of exposed concrete, white plaster walls and stone from the nearby island of Sifnos creates a sense of uncluttered calm. This may be a house fully in tune with its environment, but make no mistake, it is also every inch the luxury property, featuring tailor-made details and bespoke fittings to respond to its unusual geometries. ‘Attention was given to everything from the scale of the landscape to the detailing of materials,’ says Loperena. Deca’s passion has paid off, as its long-term vision for the site is coming into fruition. ‘The olive trees have matured and provide excellent quality olive oil,’ he says. ‘The limestone has gained the patina of the local cliffs; there is a level of delight in the experience of the place, which has become amplified through time.’ deca.gr


Salone Del Mobile 2020 www.rossana.com

16 – 21 June 2020, Milan

Stand D21-E24 Hall 11


MOON SHINE A Sri Lankan beach hotel channels Tropical Modernist style with a hint of Swissness

WRITER: SOPHIE LOVELL PHOTOGRAPHY: RASMUS NORLANDER

Just above a beautiful little palm-fringed surfers’ beach on Sri Lanka’s southern coast, Mond (German for moon) is a new four-room hotel with real pull. Masterminded by Jessica Fernando and Renato Kümin, who upped sticks from Zürich to be closer to the ocean and to pursue a more socially and ecologically sustainable lifestyle, the property is, says Fernando, ‘a place for people to connect, experience and co-create. It is not an ordinary hotel.’ With that in mind, the duo tasked Zürich-based architects Daniel Abraha and Stephan Achermann to create a building that aligned with both their principles and their needs. The result is an interesting contemporary take on the Tropical Modernism style of legendary Sri Lankan architect Geoffrey Bawa. The challenge, say the architects, has been to ‘create an architecture that does not simply copy local building traditions, but understands and reinterprets the underlying architectural principles and translates them into a new, contemporary and independent architectural statement.’ The hotel was built using modern Swiss architecture staples – wood and exposed concrete – by local tradespeople, which meant the builders needed to learn as much about Swiss-style in-situ concrete casting as the architects did about local climate. The design ‘treats outdoor and indoor spaces equally’, says Abraha. It explores spatial thresholds and also reflects the local climate: there are openings everywhere to allow in the Indian Ocean breezes in summer, while in monsoon season, the rain flows through the little atria and terraces and away across the natural stone floors. There is no glass anywhere; instead of windows, there are floor-to-ceiling openings with wooden, wind-permeable shutters that can be closed for privacy. There are four guest rooms, which all come with private terraces and open bathrooms sporting rain showers. Mond supports an artists’ residency programme, and there is also a courtyard café and rooftop bar offering spectacular views of the bay, the sea and, at night, the moon, from which this little Tropical Modernist paradise takes its name. The public spaces double as co-working spaces and will, in the future, host workshops, performances and architectural experiments. ‘Mond is open to both visitors and the local community alike,’ says Fernando. Hiriketiya Beach, Dikwella, Southern Province, Sri Lanka, hello@mond.lk. Rates: from $80

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Above, Sri Lankan Tropical Modernist-style beach hotel Mond was crafted using modern Swiss architecture staples, including wood and exposed concrete. Floor-to-ceiling openings, clad with wind-permeable shutters, allow in the Indian Ocean breezes, while guest rooms sport open bathrooms with rain showers


Checking In


23— 26 April 2020 Tour & Taxis

23-26 04.2020

Main partner

by EASYFAIRS

Contemporary Art Fair


Travel

DEPARTURE INFO

Chic hotels in Tokyo and Hangzhou, a Chinese-American diner in San Francisco, and a Czech natural wine bar

Bank statement K5, TOKYO

It’s all about aimai (Japanese for ambiguity) at K5, a new Tokyo hotel housed in a former 1920s bank. An anomaly in a city of skyscrapers, the five-level building, which features parquet flooring, big windows and double-height ceilings, has had an industrial makeover courtesy of Swedish studio Claesson Koivisto Rune. Its buzzy ground floor is a cluster of loosely-divided venues, including restaurant Caveman; a branch of Switch Coffee; plant shop Yardworks; and Ao, a small library bar serving tea-inspired cocktails. Completing the offering is basement bar B at K5, Brooklyn Brewery’s first outpost outside New York. Copperlined lifts lead to corridors with geometric patterned flooring, curved cedar walls and retro window panels in leafy shades. The scene-stealers, however, are the 20 guest rooms, with their unusually high ceilings, indigo-dipped curtains encircling freestanding beds, washi lanterns, raw concrete walls, tatami-inspired Kasthall wool rugs and sculptural chairs. Danielle Demetriou 3-5 Nihonbashi, Kabuto-cho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan, k5-tokyo.com. Rates: from ¥20,000 ($182)

Above, the 80 sq m K5 Loft room features 4.5m-high ceilings, a seating area, a king-size bed hidden behind a central veil, and cedar wood partition walls Right, a Junior Suite’s bathroom is fitted out with graphic tiled floors, soft red lighting for night-time use, and a freestanding bathtub

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Shop now at store.wallpaper.com ‘Uten.Silo II’ wall storage, Vitra —— €289 ——

‘Make It Happen’ notebook, Smythson

‘W182 Pastille’ desk light, Wastberg

‘Brassing’ sketching pencil, Ystudio

—— €222 ——

—— €60 ——

‘Benicia Vase One’, XLBoom

‘Swirl’ bookends, Tom Dixon

—— €90 ——

—— €65 ——

—— €276 ——

‘Classic’ pen container, Ystudio

‘Cantili’ tape dispenser, Beyond Object —— €90 ——

—— €80 ——

Enamel mug, Hay —— €19 ——

‘Aalto’ table, Artek —— €877 ——

‘Roy Lichtenstein: The Impossible Collection’, Assouline

‘Lucy’ chair, Bend Goods —— €418 ——

—— €820 ——

‘360 ’ container, Magis —— €439 ——

‘Kazak Space Shifter’ rug, CC-Tapis —— €3,812 ——


Travel

Counter culture MAMAHUHU, SAN FRANCISCO

The new kid on the block in San Francisco’s culinarily diverse Inner Richmond district, Mamahuhu is the brainchild of Brandon Jew, the Michelin-starred chef behind Mister Jiu’s and Moongate Lounge, and Shanghai restaurateurs Anmao Sun and Ben Moore. Offering a modern take on casual Chinese-American fare, and reinventing classics such as mapo tofu with carefully sourced ingredients, the menu feels simultaneously familiar and elevated. That balance extends beyond what’s on the plate and into the dining room, a space with wooden booths, Hay chairs and custom-made art. Though this 38-seat, counter-service restaurant may be laid-back, Mamahuhu challenges the status quo when it comes to the Chinese dining experience. James Burke and Molly Mandell 517 Clement Street, San Francisco, California, US, eatmamahuhu.com

Happy doze LITTLENAP, HANGZHOU

For thousands of years, Chinese gentry and royalty alike descended on Hangzhou whenever they needed some R&R from the capital. These days, the city’s charms – among them scenic lakes and ancient monuments – remain very much extant, a fact seized on by the quaintly monikered Littlenap. Snuggling up against the Qiantang River and the forests of the scenic West Lake area, the 11-room hotel is the work of local studio Say. It has renovated a clutch of old red-bricked residences into a three-storey complex, dressing the interiors in an austere mix of black and white, low-slung furniture. Top-floor rooms have little terraces, while a first-floor suite comes with its own miniature pool. Daven Wu 56 Jiuxixu, Xihu District, Hangzhou, China, tel: 86.571 87033087. Rates: from CNY598 ($85)

PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES BURKE AND MOLLY MANDELL, MINJIE WANG

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Travel

Vaulting ambition AUTENTISTA, PRAGUE

On a narrow street in Prague’s Old Town, Autentista is the latest offering from wine gurus Bogdan Trojak and Antonín Suchánek. The pair are driving the city’s flourishing wine scene, having already launched Veltlín, a popular bar, as well as Prague Drinks Wine, a festival now in its seventh year. Local studio Formafatal has made the most of the building’s original 14th-century vaulted ceilings, layering the grey-patinated space with upholstered banquettes with cork detailing, &Tradition chairs, black hot-rolled steel wine displays, and standout pieces, such as wire mesh Moooi chandeliers and a bar emblazoned with an astronomy-themed print by graphic artist Jan Dočekal. This all comes together to form an atmospheric space in which to enjoy the bar’s menu of natural wines from the Czech Republic and beyond, alongside tasty nibbles like cheeses, pâtés and fermented vegetables. Adam Štech Řetězová 10, Prague, Czech Republic, tel: 420.602 587 827, autentista.cz

American dream BIGGY, WROCŁAW

For its latest Wrocław project, local studio Buck has mined the rich lookbook of 1990s Americana. The effect is startling, not least because Biggy’s pop art flash is such a contrast to the historic Rynek market square just outside. Steel mesh screens, in shades of electric pink, red and blue, demarcate zones, separating a sitdown section from counter seats lined with geometric tripod stools. Neon signs

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designed by Łukasz Wojciechowski shimmer with smart quips, and a vintage video game machine and hip-hop on the soundtrack keep customers suitably entertained while they work their way through Biggy’s craft beers and wait for head chef Paweł Bieganowski to send out fluffy slabs of Detroit-style pizza and burgers encased in a potato roll. DW Kuźnicza 10A, Wrocław, Poland, tel: 48.516 038 111, biggy.pl

Top, a pair of Rick Tegelaar’s ‘Meshmatics’ chandeliers for Moooi take centre stage in Prague’s Autentista Above, square tiles with contrasting grouting and mesh screens in bold colours at Biggy in Wrocław

PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM ŠTECH, PION STUDIO


Your passport to global style More than 60 compelling cities refined into essential travel-sized guidebooks and apps at www.phaidon.com/wcg


Travel

ARTFUL LODGER

We’re plotting our escapes, from a palm-fringed Maldivian island and a secluded Mallorcan hotel to a deluxe desert retreat in Utah

18,000: Number of bundles of cadjan (woven coconut leaves) used to construct the roof of the Four Bedroom Beach Pool Residence

20: Weight in kilograms of krajood and water hyacinth leaves used to weave seven of these decorative plates

5: Number of people it takes to make a set of three mango wood starfruits, which are handcrafted by local families in Chiang Mai

Wild pitch CAMP SARIKA BY AMANGIRI, UTAH

Eleven years after it opened Amangiri among the majestic slot canyons and flat-topped mesas of the Colorado Plateau, the Aman group has set up ten luxury tents a 30-minute hike away. Designed by Luxury Frontiers and Selldorf Architects, Camp Sarika makes the most of its wilderness setting with private plunge pools and canvas-shaded terraces offering stunning views of rust-hued sands and 55 hectares of dramatic topography. It might feel like there’s little point in leaving your tent, with its frontiers-lite palette of timber and comfy leather-stitched furniture, but the draw of excursions to the five surrounding national parks, national monuments and the Navajo Nation Reservation will probably prove too much to resist in the end. After a preprandial prickly pear martini by the firepit, settle in to head chef Anthony Marazita’s salad of charred corn, sweet onion, watermelon radish and Pacific crab, and grilled Wagyu ribeye served with cumincrusted heirloom carrots. Daven Wu Kayenta Road, Canyon Point, Utah, US, tel: 1.435 675 3999, aman.com. Rates: from $3,500

83: The angle of the central stone in one of the bedrooms that allows it to hold the arch together and bear the load of the building

CAN FERRERETA, MALLORCA

ANANTARA KIHAVAH, MALDIVES

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102: Age of the Araucaria tree still growing on the property

Golden star

Fantasy island For the past decade or so, Anantara has been luring sunseekers to its Maldivian property on Kihavah, a tiny speck of an island ringed by palm-fringed beaches and a sweep of turquoise-blue waters. Now, the property’s four Beach Pool Residences have just emerged from an update that firmly puts the resort back at the top of the game. Bangkok-based studio Soda has dressed the light-drenched rooms in natural materials and rich textures, from solid teak to woven rattan, alongside stone-cut tiles that line each of the infinity edge pools. With its own villa host, private chef and wine guru on tap, you might find it hard to leave, but if you do, the resort’s plethora of offerings includes an underwater restaurant, a dreamy spa, and breathtaking snorkelling and diving opportunities. Don’t miss a postprandial tipple at cocktail bar Sky, followed by a visit to the resort’s observatory for some late-night stargazing. Lauren Ho Kihavah Huravalhi Island, Maldives, tel: 960. 660 1020, anantara.com. Rates: from $650

280: Weight in kilograms of the sculpture by artist Jaume Plensa located by the outdoor pool

37.5: Total size in square metres of the camp’s bespoke, hand-chiselled timber headboards

3: Number of days it took to put up one tent membrane

15: Number of bespoke occasional chairs, with detailed leather straps, made especially for Camp Sarika

This newly opened hotel in Mallorca’s south-east corner has us seriously considering a permanent move to the island. In the small, golden sandstoned town of Santanyí, local architects Bastidas and interior designers WIT have breathed new life into a sprawling 17th-century townhouse. Both the public spaces and 32 guest rooms are swathed in a warm mix of linen-covered furniture, weathered timber, original stonework, and a curated collection of contemporary Spanish art and photography. And even though Mondragó Natural Park and a raft of white sandy beaches are nearby, there is little reason to ever wander offproperty, especially as Can Ferrereta offers a 25m outdoor pool (or, if it’s chilly, a 10m indoor spa pool), Anne Semonin facials and massages with organic olive oil, and head chef Alvar Albaladejo’s locally-sourced menu of fresh fish and prawns with rice, and burrata made from Mallorcan milk. Daven Wu Carrer de Can Ferrereta 12, Santanyí, Mallorca, tel: 34.971 495 000, hotelcanferrereta.com. Rates: from €315

ILLUSTRATOR: EOIN RYAN


YOU WON'T FEEL AT HOME WITH US, YOU'LL FEEL AT A FASANO.

Atual desde 1902 Hotel Fasano S‹o Paulo SÃO PAULO . RIO DE JANEIRO . PUNTA DEL ESTE . FAZENDA BOA VISTA ANGRA DOS REIS . BELO HORIZONTE . SALVADOR . RESIDENCE NEW YORK

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APRIL IS ALL ABOUTÉ

The inaugural Photo 2020, an international festival of photography in Melbourne Grand plans for our home away from home – p216 Cindy Sherman headlining a season of contemporary portraiture at Fondation Louis Vuitton Interior monologues and S/S20 looks – p228 The new Ace Hotel Kyoto, designed by Kengo Kuma and Commune Hugh Hayden’s cornbread pudding – p242 A journey into electronic music at London’s Design Museum, from Kraftwerk to the Chemical Brothers ∑

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LOBBY GROUP A hotel concept with staying power Photography Leandro Farina Interiors Amy Heffernan

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From left, ‘Sesann’ armchairs, £3,320 each, by Gianfranco Frattini, for Tacchini. ‘Tobia’ wall lights, £657 each, by Ferruccio Laviani, for Foscarini. ‘Rotazioni B’ rug, €7,260, by Patricia Urquiola, for CC-Tapis. ‘Ambiguous Objects’ stair-chairs, £1,100 each, by Ning Zhang. ‘Copernico 500’ pendant light, £1,740, by Carlotta de Bevilacqua and Paolo Dell’Elce, for Artemide. ‘Pressed Table No 5’, £1,665, by Studio Floris Wubben, for SCP. ‘Trafalgar Straight’ whisky tumbler, £100; ‘Trafalgar Square’ decanter, £595, both by Linley. Paint (on pillars) in Charlotte’s Locks, £47 for 2.5 litres, by Farrow & Ball. ‘Illusion’ wallcovering (on main wall), £173 per 10m roll, by Arte. ‘Du Jour’ wallpaper (centre), £100 per sq m, by Lorenzo de Grandis, for Wall & Decò. ‘Mystone Ceppo di Gré’ floor tiles in Grey, price on request, by Marazzi

Space


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Space This page, from left, ‘Pilot’ chair, £3,080, by Barber Osgerby, for Knoll. ‘Ziggy Night’ bedside table, £1,822, by Carlo Ballabio, for Porada. ‘Sabine’ key tassel, £24, by Samuel & Sons. Sleep Tight Rejuvenating Face Balm, from £33, by Amly. Beoplay A1 portable speaker, £230, by Cecilie Manz, for Bang & Olufsen. ‘Calebasse’ lamp,

£4,470, by Liaigre. ‘Days’ tumbler, £9, by Mist-o, for Ichendorf Milano, from The Conran Shop. ‘Stella’ bed, £19,265, by Nicole Fuller, for Savoir. Silk pillowcases, £52 each; duvet cover, £305; sheet, £250, all by Gingerlily. Paint in Charlotte’s Locks, as before. ‘Majestic’ carpet in Polished Silver, £80 per sq m, by Brintons

Opposite, from left, ‘Pilot’ chairs, as before. ‘XL Wu’ side table, $4,700, by Egg Collective. ‘Helix’ tray, £160; thermo jug, £170; teapot, £120; milk jug, £60; sugar bowl, £50, all by Bernadotte & Kylberg, for Georg Jensen. ‘Heron’ floor light, £1,600, by Michaël Verheyden, for CTO Lighting. Paint in Charlotte’s Locks; ‘Majestic’ carpet, both as before. ‘Kaleidoscope’ wallpaper, £77 per sq m, by Glamora


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Space This page, from left, ‘Coda’ lounge chair, $8,500, by Atelier de Troupe. ‘Terrazzo’ rug, £620 per sq m, by The Rug Company. ‘Diesis 40’ sofa, £19,702, by Antonio Citterio and Paolo Nava, for B&B Italia. ‘Vizio’ side table, from €470, by Leonardo Talarico, for Living Divani. ‘Distinct’ side table, £1,009, by Ferm Living. ‘Stub’ glasses, £50 for four, by Grethe Meyer & Ibi Trier Mørch, for Holmegaard, from Twentytwentyone. ‘Automatic MkII’ record player, £549, by Gearbox Records. ‘Du Jour’ wallpaper; ‘Mystone Ceppo di Gré’ floor tiles, both as before

Opposite, on side walls, ‘Contemporary’ door numbers, €47 each, by Letters from Sweden, from Habo. ‘Aura’ mirrors, €53 each, by Bjørn van den Berg, for New Works. From left, ‘Uovo’ door handles, £144 each, by Olivari. ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign, €113, by GioBagnara. ‘Ombra’ plate in Cielo, £41, by Laboratorio Castello; ‘Arles’ red wine glass, £18; linen napkin in Leaf Green, £12.50, all from The Conran Shop.

‘Deep Line’ rug, €7,350, by Jan Kath. ‘Malaparte’ console, €7,006, by Stéphane Parmentier, for GioBagnara. ‘Ott/Another Paradigmatic Ceramic’ high plate, €119; cup, €79; vase, €439, all by Yoon Seok-Hyeon. ‘Pond’ mirror, £239, by Ferm Living. Paint in Deep Reddish Brown (on walls), £47 for 2.5 litres, by Farrow & Ball. Paint in Charlotte’s Locks (on doors); ‘Kaleidoscope’ wallpaper; ‘Majestic’ carpet, all as before


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Space From left, ‘Nærvær NA9’ tables, £430 each, by Norm Architects, for &Tradition. ‘214’ chairs, 200th anniversary edition, £655 each, by Michael Thonet and Studio BesauMarguerre, for Thonet. ‘Stub’ glasses, as before. ‘Odeon’ cutlery, £85 for six pieces, by David Mellor.

‘Je te mangerais dans la main’ plates, £637 for six, by Prune Nourry and JR, for Bernardaud. Pastries, from Dominique Ansel Bakery. Planter, $175, by Norden. ‘Hayama’ sideboard, £6,500, by Patricia Urquiola, for Cassina. ‘PZ 05’ food boards, $92 each; ‘PZ 08’

food board, $221, by TF Design. Large glass jug, £39; small, £29, both by Hay, from Goodhood. ‘Barisieur’ tea and coffee alarm clock, £345, by Joy Resolve. Salt and pepper mills, €94 each, by Muller Van Severen, for Valerie Objects. ‘Kyoto’ acoustic divider,

£1,200, by Note, for Zilenzio. ‘Bicoca’ table lamps, £156, by Christophe Mathieu, for Marset. Mug, £22, by Hasami Porcelain, from Goodhood. ‘Illusion 99011’ wallpaper; ‘Kaleidoscope’ wallpaper; ‘Du Jour’ wallpaper; ‘Mystone Ceppo di Gré’ floor tiles, all as before


This page, from left, ‘Coda’ chair, as before. ‘Jacob’ desk, price on request, by Rodolfo Dordoni, for Minotti. Vintage desk calendar, £33; notebook, £25, both from Present & Correct. Guest book, £185, by Smythson. ‘Pico’ ballpoint pen, £89, by Franco Clivio, for Lamy. ‘Ring My Bell’, £107, by Olof Kolte, for Skultuna,

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from SCP. ‘Arch’ stand, £39, by Ferm Living. Leather tray with spheres, €632, by GioBagnara. ‘Sabine’ key tassel, £24, by Samuel & Sons. Brass key bottle opener, €343, by Carl Auböck III, from Werkstätte Carl Auböck. Flowers, from That Flower Shop. ‘Du Jour’ wallpaper; ‘Mystone Ceppo di Gré’ tiles, both as before

Opposite, ‘Sonar’ vanity unit, £2,037; washbasin, £870, both by Patricia Urquiola, for Laufen. Mirror in Phantom, €289, by Tine K Home. From left, Orange Ginger Clove dental floss, £17, by Officine Universelle Buly. Be You Pure Happiness Whitening toothpaste and toothbrush set, £19, by Curaprox. ‘Tann’ toothbrush, £4,

by Andreas Engesvik, for Hay. ‘Logis’ toothbrush holder, £88; ‘Metris’ tap, £335; ‘Logis’ soap dish, £88, all by Hansgrohe. Oriental Noir Luxury bar soap, £12, by Urban Apøthecary. Stardust perfume, £220 for 75ml, by MiN New York. ‘Ghiara’ floor tiles in Calcina Fumo, price on request, by Marazzi. Paint in Deep Reddish Brown, as before


Space


This page, from left, ‘Italic’ armchair, €2,925, by Fabio Novembre, for Driade. ‘Deep Line’ rug; ‘Aura’ mirror (on wall), both as before. ‘Polka Dot Cristal’ vase, £2,600, by Hanne Enemark, from Vessel. ‘Oblique’ stool, £205, by Ferm Living. ‘Contemporary’ door numbers, as before Opposite, from bottom left, ‘Swirl’ side tables, £1,300 each, by Tom Dixon. ‘Clive’ benches, price on request, by Rodolfo Dordoni, for Minotti.

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‘Garibabou’ mirrors, €1,580 each, by Margaux Keller. ‘Owen’ table, price on request, by Andrea Parisio, for Meridiani, from Tollgård. ‘Chromogen’ vases, price on request, by Cecilia Xinyu Zhang. Flowers, from That Flower Shop. ‘Carousel’ pendant light, £3,420, by Lee Broom. ‘Illusion 99011’ wallpaper; ‘Kaleidoscope’ wallpaper; ‘Mystone Ceppo di Gré’ floor tiles, all as before For stockists, see page 240


Space


Fashion

Rear window We’re putting S/S20 in the frame

Photography Julien T Hamon Fashion Isabelle Kountoure


This page, blazer, £860; trousers, £425, both by Paul Smith. Top, £80, by Intimissimi. Necklace, £540, by Hermès Opposite, dress, £11,940, by Chanel ‘Koam’ sideboard, £8,943, by Jean-Marie Massaud, for Zanat, from Viaduct. ‘Repp Stripe’ rug, from £11,369, by Thom Browne, for The Rug Company

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Fashion

This page, dress, £5,000, by Loewe. Earrings (throughout), £125 for pair, by Aeyde Opposite, jacket, £1,500; mini skirt, £625, both by Dolce & Gabbana. Shoes, £195; earrings, as above, both by Aeyde ‘Koam’ sideboard, as before. ‘Bai Lu’ chair, £810, by Neri & Hu, for Lema. ‘Loom’ fabric in Plaster, £149 per m, by Mark Alexander


Fashion

This page, dress, €1,290, by Balenciaga ‘Koam’ sideboard; ‘Repp Stripe’ rug, both as before

Opposite, trousers, £850, by Louis Vuitton. Necklace, £540, by Hermès. Corset, stylist’s own ‘Split’ mirror, £2,300, by Lee Broom


Top, £250, by Boss. Earrings, as before ‘Colonial’ sofa, £5,380, by Ole Wanscher, for Carl Hansen & Søn, from The Conran Shop


Fashion


Fashion

This page, tank top, €790, by Proenza Schouler. Trousers, £485, by Max Mara. Shoes, £300, by Dorateymur ‘Kya’ stool, price on request, by Neuland Paster & Geldmacher, for Freifrau.

‘Koam’ sideboard, as before. AT-LP5x turntable, £349, by Audio-Technica Opposite, top, £790; skirt, £825, both by Prada

‘Colosseo’ sofa, £13,000, by Mauro Lipparini, for Natuzzi. Wall clock, £175, by Mondaine, from The Conran Shop


Fashion This page, trousers, £785; top, £2,195, both by Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello ‘Colonial’ sofa, as before. ‘Classic’ radiator, from £424, by Bisque Opposite, dress, £935, by Kwaidan Editions. Shoes, £300, by Dorateymur ‘Koam’ sideboard, as before. ‘Raku’ vase, £2,100, by Joachim Lambrecht, from Willer. ‘Bai Lu’ chair, as before For stockists, see page 240

Model: Martina Boaretto at Viva London Casting director: David Steven Wilton at East Hair: Cathy Ennis using Bumble and Bumble Make-up: Mirijana Vasovic using YSL Beauty Set designer: David De Quevedo at Bryant Artists Interiors: Jacqui Scalamera Photography assistant: Joseph Conway Fashion assistants: Marianne Kakko, Josefin Forsberg, Aylin Bayhan Set design assistants: Aaron Vernon, Lauren McDonald Interiors assistant: Melissanthe Panagiotopoulou


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Stockists &Tradition Tel: 45.39 20 02 33 (Denmark) andtradition.com

C

F

Hirsh London Tel: 44.20 7499 6814 (UK) hirshlondon.com

Fabio Salini Tel: 44.20 7584 4639 (UK) fabiosalini.co.uk

Holland & Holland Tel: 44.20 7499 4411 (UK) hollandandholland.com

Cassina Tel: 44.20 7584 0000 (UK) cassina.com

Farrow & Ball Tel: 44.1202 876141 (UK) farrow-ball.com

CC-Tapis Tel: 39.02 8909 3884 (Italy) cc-tapis.com

Favius Tel: 49.941 6409 0730 (Germany) favius.de

I

Cecilia Xinyu Zhang Tel: 47.45 10 88 52 (Norway) ceciliaxinyuzhang.com

Ferm Living Tel: 45.7022 7523 (Denmark) fermliving.com

Amly amlybotanicals.co.uk

Chanel Tel: 44.20 7493 5040 (UK) chanel.com

Foscarini Tel: 39.04 1595 3811 (Italy) foscarini.com

Another Country Tel: 44.20 7486 3251 (UK) anothercountry.com

Chaumet Tel: 44.20 7495 6303 (UK) chaumet.com

Freifrau Tel: 49.5261 9713300 (Germany) freifrau.com

Ara Vartanian Tel: 55.11 3815 0200 (Brazil) aravartanian.com

ClassiCon Tel: 49.89 74 81 33 0 (Germany) classicon.com

Arte Tel: 44.800 500 3335 (UK) arte-international.com

Cor Tel: 49.52 42 41 02 0 (Germany) cor.de

Artemide artemide.com

Crockett & Jones Tel: 44.20 7839 5239 (UK) crockettandjones.com

A

Acne Studios acnestudios.com Aeyde aeyde.com Akris akris.com Alexandra Jefford alexandrajefford.com

Atelier de Troupe Tel: 1.323 870 5303 (US) atelierdetroupe.com Atlein atlein.com Audio-Technica audio-technica.com

B

Bang & Olufsen Tel: 44.20 3936 1483 (UK) bang-olufsen.com B&B Italia Tel: 44.20 7591 8111 (UK) bebitalia.com Balenciaga Tel: 33.1 56 52 17 17 (France) balenciaga.com Bernardaud Tel: 33.1 47 42 82 66 (France) bernardaud.com Bisque Tel: 44.20 7328 2225 (UK) bisque.co.uk Boghossian Tel: 44.20 7495 0885 (UK) boghossianjewels.com

Cartier Tel: 44.20 3147 4850 (UK) cartier.com

CTO Lighting Tel: 44.20 7686 8700 (UK) ctolighting.co.uk Curaprox curaprox.com

D

Georg Jensen Tel: 44.20 7499 6541 (UK) georgjensen.com Geox Tel: 44.20 7629 5681 (UK) geox.com Gingerlily Tel: 44.20 8877 9905 (UK) gingerlily.co.uk GioBagnara Tel: 39.01 0251 8989 (Italy) giobagnara.com

J

Joy Resolve joyresolve.com

K

Knoll Tel: 44.20 7236 6655 (UK) knolleurope.com Kwaidan Editions Tel: 33.1 44 61 53 60 (France) kwaidaneditions.com

L

Goodhood Tel: 44.20 7729 3600 (UK) goodhoodstore.com

Laufen Tel: 44.1530 510007 (UK) laufen.co.uk

Deveaux deveauxnewyork.com

Graff Tel: 44.20 7584 8571 (UK) graff.com

Lee Broom Tel: 44.20 7820 0742 (UK) leebroom.com

Grenfell grenfell.com

Lema Tel: 44.20 3761 3299 (UK) lemamobili.com

Boucheron Tel: 44.20 3936 9090 (UK) boucheron.com

Driade Tel: 39.05 2381 8618 (Italy) driade.com

E

Edward Green Tel: 44.20 7839 0202 (UK) edwardgreen.com Egg Collective Tel: 1.347 889 7594 (US) eggcollective.com

H

Habo Tel: 46.36 484 00 (Sweden) haboselection.com Hansgrohe Tel: 44.1372 472 056 (UK) hansgrohe.co.uk Hay hay.dk Hermès Tel: 44.20 7098 1888 (UK) hermes.com Herno Tel: 39.02 9443 2789 (Italy) herno.it

Mark Alexander markalexander.com Marset Tel: 34.93 460 2067 (Spain) marset.com Max Mara Tel: 44.20 7499 7902 (UK) maxmara.com MHL by Margaret Howell Tel: 44.20 7033 9494 (UK) margarethowell.co.uk

Mikimoto Tel: 44.20 7399 9860 (UK) mikimoto.com

De Grisogono Tel: 44.20 7499 2225 (UK) degrisogono.com

Dorateymur dorateymur.com

Margaux Keller margauxkellercollections.com

Jil Sander jilsander.com

Glenn Spiro Tel: 44.20 7135 3535 (UK) glennspiro.com

Dominique Ansel Bakery Tel: 44.20 7324 7705 (UK) dominiqueansellondon.com

Margaret Howell Tel: 44.20 7009 9009 (UK) margarethowell.co.uk

Midgard Tel: 49.40 35 777 444 (Germany) midgard.com

David Morris Tel: 44.20 7499 2200 (UK) davidmorris.com

Dolce & Gabbana Tel: 44.20 7659 9000 (UK) dolcegabbana.com

Marazzi marazzitile.co.uk

Jan Kath Tel: 49.234 9412344 (Germany) jan-kath.com

Glamora Tel: 39.05 3607 6403 (Italy) glamora.it

Draenert Tel: 49.7545 208 39 (Germany) draenert.de

Brunello Cucinelli brunellocucinelli.com

Gearbox Records gearboxrecords.com

Intimissimi Tel: 44.20 7495 3079 (UK) intimissimi.com

David Mellor Tel: 44.20 8050 4259 (UK) davidmellordesign.com

Boss Tel: 44.20 7734 7919 (UK) hugoboss.com

Brintons Tel: 44.800 505055 (UK) brintons.co.uk

G

InterlĂźbke Tel: 49.5242 121 (Germany) interluebke.com

M

Lamy lamy.de

Liaigre liaigre.com Lindberg lindberg.com Linley Tel: 44.20 7730 7300 (UK) davidlinley.com Living Divani Tel: 39.03 163 0954 (Italy) livingdivani.it Loewe Tel: 44.20 7493 1631 (UK) loewe.com Loro Piana Tel: 44.20 7499 9300 (UK) loropiana.com Louis Vuitton Tel: 44.20 7998 6286 (UK) louisvuitton.com

MiN New York Tel: 1.212 206 6366 (US) min.com Minotti Tel: 44.20 7323 3233 (UK) minotti.com MSGM Tel: 44.20 7581 6112 (UK) msgm.it

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Natuzzi Tel: 44.800 316 3044 (UK) natuzzi.it Neo/Craft Tel: 49.30 80 102 990 (Germany) neocraft.com New Works Tel: 45.7230 9999 (Denmark) newworks.dk Ning Zhang Tel: 44.7565 489046 (UK) ningzhangkiko.com Norden nordengoods.com

O

Officine Universelle Buly Tel: 33.1 43 29 02 50 (France) buly1803.com Olivari Tel: 39.03 2283 5080 (Italy) olivari.it Oliver Spencer Tel: 44.20 7269 6444 (UK) oliverspencer.co.uk

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Paul Smith Tel: 44.20 7493 4565 (UK) paulsmith.com


Pinch Tel: 44.20 7622 5075 (UK) pinchdesign.com

Xavier (left) wears suit, £525; shirt, £109, both by Boss. Shoes, £1,020, by Edward Green

Pink Shirtmaker Tel: 44.20 7930 6364 (UK) thomaspink.com

Takuya wears jacket, £1,150; trousers, £490, both by Holland & Holland. Shirt, £130, by Pink Shirtmaker. Shoes, £675, by Crockett & Jones

Porada Tel: 44.20 3155 3065 (UK) porada.it

‘Another’ chair (left), £495, by Another Country. ‘Avery’ dining chair, from £580, by Pinch

Prada Tel: 44.20 7647 5000 (UK) prada.com Present & Correct Tel: 44.20 7278 2460 (UK) presentandcorrect.com

See page 078

Pringle of Scotland Tel: 44.1450 360200 (UK) pringlescotland.com Proenza Schouler Tel: 1.212 420 7300 (US) proenzaschouler.com

R

Reiss Tel: 44.20 7486 6557 (UK) reiss.com Richard Mille Tel: 44.20 7123 4155 (UK) richardmille.com Rochas rochas.com Rolf Benz Tel: 49.74 52 60 10 (Germany) rolf-benz.com

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Saint Laurent Tel: 44.20 7235 6706 (UK) ysl.com Samuel & Sons Tel: 44.20 7351 5153 (UK) samuelandsons.com Sarah Myerscough Gallery Tel: 44.20 7495 0069 (UK) sarahmyerscough.com Savoir Tel: 44.20 7493 4444 (UK) savoirbeds.co.uk

TF Design Tel: 1.415 223 4710 (US) tinafreydesigns.com

Tom Dixon Tel: 44.330 363 0030 (UK) tomdixon.net

Viaduct Tel: 44.20 7278 8456 (UK) viaduct.co.uk

Schönbuch Tel: 49.9761 3962 0 (Germany) schonbuch.com

That Flower Shop thatflowershop.co.uk

Twentytwentyone Tel: 44.20 7288 1996 (UK) twentytwentyone.com

Victoria Beckham Tel: 44.20 7501 1122 (UK) victoriabeckham.com

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W

SCP Tel: 44.20 7739 1869 (UK) scp.co.uk Smythson Tel: 44.20 3535 8009 (UK) smythson.com Suzanne Syz Tel: 41.22 310 20 84 (Switzerland) suzannesyz.ch

T

The Conran Shop Tel: 44.20 7723 2223 (UK) conranshop.co.uk The Rug Company therugcompany.com Thonet Tel: 49.6451 508 0 (Germany) thonet.de Tine K Home Tel: 45.28 308380 (Denmark) tinekhome.com Tobias Grau Tel: 49.4101 3700 (Germany) tobiasgrau.com

Tacchini Tel: 39.03 6250 4182 (Italy) tacchini.it

Tod’s Tel: 44.20 7493 2237 (UK) tods.com

Tecta Tel: 49.5273 37 89 0 (Germany) tecta.de

Tollgård Tel: 44.20 7952 6070 (UK) tollgard.com

Urban Apøthecary Tel: 44.333 577 5288 (UK) urbanapothecarylondon.com

V

Valerie Objects Tel: 32.3 600 2143 (Belgium) valerie-objects.com Vessel Tel: 44.20 7727 8001 (UK) vesselgallery.com

Wagner Living Tel: 49.82 39 78 9 151 (Germany) wagner-living.com Wall & Decò Tel: 39.05 4491 8012 (Italy) wallanddeco.com Walter Knoll Tel: 49.7032 2080 (Germany) walterknoll.de Werkstätte Carl Auböck Tel: 43.1 523 66 3120 (Austria) werkstaette-carlauboeck.at Willer willer.co.uk

Y

Yoon Seok-Hyeon Tel: 31.6 25 43 68 85 (Netherlands) yoonseokhyeon.com

Z

Zeitraum Tel: 49.8171 418140 (Germany) zeitraum-moebel.de Zilenzio Tel: 46.19 672 1700 (Sweden) zilenzio.se Correction The mirror pictured on page 049 of Wallpaper’s February issue is ‘The Mirror’, €3,200 per pair, by Kunsik Choi, kunsik.com, and wins a 2020 Wallpaper* Design Award. See more about his design at Wallpaper.com.

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Artist’s Palate

HUGH HAYDEN’S Cornbread pudding Hugh Hayden’s first show in London, at Lisson Gallery, is an ode to Southern food: invented on plantations and intertwined with the history of slavery. The Texan sculptor’s meditation on identity and diaspora includes cast iron skillets overlaid with African masks, and a video piece showing him cooking and eating bacon. For our recipe series, he offers a twist on his mother’s quintessentially Southern cornbread, refined through months of ‘internet sleuthing and weekly recipe trials. I call it a pudding because it’s thick and moist, yet doesn’t need a spoon.’ ‘American Food’, 12 March–2 May, lissongallery.com. For Hayden’s recipe, see Wallpaper.com ∏

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‘Twig 450’ table, £1,320, by Russell Pinch, for Pinch. ‘Ombra’ dessert plate in Ardesia, £31, by Laboratorio Castello, from The Conran Shop For stockists, see page 240

PHOTOGRAPHY: OSKAR PROCTOR ENTERTAINING DIRECTOR: MELINA KEAYS INTERIORS: JACQUI SCALAMERA WRITER: TF CHAN


THE ITALIAN LIFESTYLE OF LIVING OUTDOORS.

Studiopiù International

Shared values have given rise to a cooperation between EMU and FAI Fondo Ambiente Italiano to protect and promote our natural landscapes and artistic heritage.

OUTDOOR DESIGN COLLECTION CAROUSEL by Sebastian Herkner

Villa e Collezione Panza, Varese The Slope by Bob Verschueren, work of Land Art emu.it

Hall 5 Stand C05 Milan 21-26 April

Official Sponsor Internazionali di Tennis d’Italia Rome 4-17 May

Emu Outdoor Interlude Venice 10-09 / 11-10 homofaberevent.com


Profile for wallpaper-magazine

The Global Interiors Issue  

Our April 2020 Issue is on newsstands now, honing in on six rising design powers: Australia, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland and Scotland

The Global Interiors Issue  

Our April 2020 Issue is on newsstands now, honing in on six rising design powers: Australia, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland and Scotland