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WALLACE STATE HANCEVILLE March 3, 2014

I hereby confirm my approval of the Academic Program Outcomes Assessment, 2012-2015.

Lisa German, Dean of Health Science


WALLACE STATE HANCEVILLE .

... ......

MEMORANDUM

Date:

March 3, 2014

Memo to:

Johnny McMoy, Jimmy Hodges, Beth Bownes-Johnson, Lisa German

On behalf of the Assessment Council, I hereby confirm approval of the Academic Program Outcomes Assessment, 2012-2015. Sincerely,

•


Members of College Assessment Council, 2013-2014

Dr. Teresa Ray-Connell, Dental Faculty, Chair Johnny McMoy, College Dean, Advisor Dr. Mary Barnes, English Faculty Carrie Bentley, Transitional Faculty Connie Briehn, Biology Faculty Dr. Suhana Chikatla, Instructional Designer Cheri!Grimmett, Computer Science Faculty Todd Hardman, Program Coordinator, Engineering Deborah Hoover, Chair, Nursing Sharon Hoover, Success Coach/Advisor Allen Keener, OTA Faculty Gail Ledbetter, Speech Faculty Jennifer Malcolm, Recruiter Renee Quick, Chair, Mathematics Dr. Rebecca Reeves, Chair, Social Sciences Jeremy Smith, Program Coordinator, Collision Repair


Academic Program Outcomes Assessment 2012-2015

Wallace State Community College—Hanceville

Rev. 3.14.14

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Introduction

Wallace State Community College is committed to planning and assessment practices that reflect the dictates of the principles of accreditation of its primary accrediting authority, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. To this end, the college supports a program of institutional planning and assessment that represents a cycle of identifying intended outcomes, assessment measures and schedules, recording actual results, and developing and implementing plans for improvement based on these results. Decision-making is informed by an optimal analysis of institutional data, environmental scanning, and best practices. The college’s planning and assessment program is broad-based and collaborative. Specifically, the college’s assessment and planning efforts are guided by its institutional mission, vision, and Five-Year Strategic Plan (adopted 9.17.12 following the expiration of its previous five-year plan). The theme of the new strategic plan, Readiness3, provides a framework for the academic, student development, and administrative programs and services offered by the institution. The college annually publishes an Academic Program Outcomes Assessment (APOA) and Assessment Plan for Academic Support and Student Development (ASSD). This document, the APOA, addresses program-level planning and assessment for each of the college’s twenty-nine academic programs as well as for the General Education Core. It is organized by division: Applied Technologies (13), Health Science (17), Academic Career/Technical (6), and the General Education Core (6 competencies). For each unit, faculty have identified student learning outcomes specific to their program. Each unit’s planning and assessment is arranged into four columns: • • • •

Intended Outcomes Assessment Measures (with a schedule for completion) Actual Results Analysis and Use of Results.

The Student Learning Outcomes for each program are aligned with five over-arching student learning outcomes adopted in 2009. These appear in the 2012-13 Catalog on page 70 and are listed below: 1. Learns Actively. The engaged student participates directly in learning activities. 2. Thinks Critically: The critical thinker uses reason, ingenuity, and knowledge to examine relevant issues or ideas. 3. Communicates Clearly: The effective communicator demonstrates the ability to articulate and exchange ideas using multiple forms of expression. 4. Uses Technology Effectively: The 21st Century learner accesses and utilizes relative information effectively and responsibly.

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5. Interacts in Diverse Environments: The responsible citizen develops awareness of the diversity of human experience, understanding and responding to interpersonal, historical, cultural and global contexts. These outcomes are referenced parenthetically for each SLO in this document, e.g., (LO 1) for “Learns Actively.” Program outcomes have been standardized at Wallace State and are consistent across all programs. Each section concludes with a summative program review. Supporting documentation is referenced in the APOA to Appendices bound separately by division. All Student Learning and Program outcomes are aligned with the Mission, Vision, and strategic directives included in the Five-Year Strategic Plan. Strategic Directive Three, for example, reflects the goal of the college’s academic programs to respond quickly and positively to the present and future needs of its students, business and industry, and other stakeholders: To enhance workplace preparedness through programs and services that broaden vocational engagement, that improve in vital, innovative ways the institutional response to the present and future needs of business and industry, that represent synergistic partnerships that promote the college’s mission and vision, and that produce graduates with the adaptive skills and training needed to succeed in the millennial workplace environment. To support academic planning and assessment, the college has a foundational budgeting process that is strongly linked to its outcomes. The academic year 2012-2013 marks the tenth year of annual budget hearings for discretionary spending, presided over by the college’s Administrative Council, a body comprised of ex officio and elected representatives of administrators, faculty, and staff. It culminates in the submittal of prioritized funding recommendations to the president for consideration for inclusion in the budget presented annually to the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education. Planning and assessment processes are guided by the Office of the College Dean, the Executive Cabinet, and a standing committee, the Assessment Council. The Assessment Council is chaired by a senior faculty member and its membership represents faculty, administration, and staff.

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Table of Contents Applied Technology HVAC (Certificate)

6

Collision Repair (Certificate)

16

Cosmetology (Certificate)

23

Culinary Arts (Certificate, AAS)

31

Diesel Mechanics (Certificate)

39

Drafting and Design Technology (Certificate, AAS)

49

Flight Technology (Certificate, AAS)

57

Machine Tool Technology (Certificate, AAS)

64

Welding (Certificate)

73

Upholstery (Certificate)

81

Agriculture and Horticulture (Certificate)

89

Automotive Manufacturing Technology/Electronics (Certificate, AAS)

97

Automotive Servicing Technology (Certificate)

105

Health Science Nursing (Certificate, AAS)

114

Clinical Lab Technician (AAS)

126

Dental Assisting (Certificate, AAS)

135

Dental Hygiene (AAS)

143

Diagnostic Imaging (AAS)

151

Diagnostic Medical Sonography (AAS)

158

Emergency Medical Services (Certificate, AAS)

165

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Medical Assistant (AAS)

173

Child Development (Certificate, AAS)

181

Occupational Therapy Assistant (AAS)

189

Pharmacy Technology (Certificate)

199

Polysomnography (Certificate)

206

Respiratory Therapy (AAS)

214

Health Information Technology (AAS)

222

Human Services (AAS)

228

Physical Therapy Assistant (AAS)

235

Therapeutic Massage (Certificate)

242

Academic Programs Business Education and Office Administration (Certificate, AAS)

250

Business Management and Supervision (AAS)

257

Computer Science (AAS)

266

Criminal Justice (AAS)

275

Paralegal (AAS)

281

Visual Communications (Certificate, AAS)

288

General Education Core (AA, AS)

295

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HVAC The HVAC program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates with a certificate (60 credit hours). Program Description: This curriculum is designed to prepare students for a career in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry. Students learn skills that are compatible with in-field practices and will be able to identify and use the specialized tools and testing equipment associated with the servicing and installation of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration equipment. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level employment in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry. To achieve this mission, the HVAC faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness:

1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate an understanding of the basic fundamentals that make up HVAC/R theory (LO 2).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on the departmental basic competency exam (administered at the completion of 24 core curriculum hours).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

Upon completion of the basic competency exam (Spring 2013), 83% of students scored a 70% or higher on the examination. The prescribed benchmark was met for this assessment. Students were weakest on comprehension of scientific principles, including scientific laws of electricity and pressures, mathematical relationships in electrical science and physics, and units of measure.

Although the benchmark was met, a departmental meeting was held to discuss ideas to improve the basic competency of students. The following program modifications are being implemented: • Provide Students with a comprehensive reference to all basic theory. • Increase the “out of class” assignments in related subject matter. • Slightly increase the


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate the ability to use accepted industry equipment and tools to safely and properly perform non-electrical diagnostic analysis and repair of HVAC/R systems and equipment (LO 4).

80% of students will achieve a score of “Satisfactory” or higher on the first attempt on the simulated use of tools and equipment to perform nonelectrical diagnostic analysis and repair when measured against a departmental rubric (administered after completion of 24 core curriculum hours).

SLO (3): The student will

80% of students will achieve a

level of difficulty of course level examinations to be comparable to standard industry certification examinations. Upon completion of a set of Although the benchmark practical exercises (Spring was met, a meeting of the 2013), 81% of students advisory committee was displayed “Satisfactory” or held to discuss steps to higher on the simulated use of improve the practical skills tools and equipment to perform of students. The following non electrical procedures and modifications have been repairs. The benchmark was implemented: met for this assessment. • Acquisition of new Students were weakest on tools and equipment exercises that typically require through a budget repetition in order to reach committee hearing. higher levels of skill. These • Implementation of activities include brazing, smaller lab groups to tubing construction, quality of increase individual construction of arrangements of student involvement. devices and neatness. • Requirement that students keep a practical journal recording lab procedures and safety standards to be used as part of a laboratory assessment. Upon completion of practical Due to the failure to meet the

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demonstrate the ability to perform diagnostic analysis and repair of electrical circuits that are associated with HVAC/R systems (LO 4).

score of “Satisfactory” or higher on the first attempt on a simulated repair of electrical circuits when measured against departmental rubric (administered at the completion of 36 core hours).

assessment, 72% of students displayed “Satisfactory” or higher on the simulated use of procedures, tools and instruments to perform electrical diagnostics and repairs. The benchmark was not met for this outcome. Students performed poorest on activities that involved electrical troubleshooting, including struggles with uncertainty on proper protocol, misunderstanding of electrical principles and laws that govern troubleshooting as well as the misuse of the many various electrical diagnostic devices that are required.

SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

90% of students participating in 2013-2014 departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring

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benchmark as set by the department, priority status has been given to this area for immediate improvement. An advisory committee meeting with department members discussed means to improve the outcome. The following modifications have been implemented: • Acquisition of electrical trainers and electrical diagnostic tools through a budget committee hearing. • Incorporation of “in class” practical exercises by use of circuit building exercises and drawing electrical diagrams. • Incorporate Electrical Diagram and circuit training with software and computer based resources 2013-2014


PO (1): HVAC faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): HVAC faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

matrix (each spring semester) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities. On campus activities included workshops on the use of Tegrity to record and deliver lectures online. External activities included OSHA training at the University of Alabama and Gadsden State and a geothermal certification class at Calhoun Community College. 80% of graduates will report On the most recent graduate satisfaction with the quality and survey (2012), of three efficacy of instruction, graduates responding, one was curriculum, assessment, negative across most technical teaching pedagogies, and dimensions measured, instructional resources (each including overall rating of spring semester). quality of “poor.�

As a result of these activities, several changes occurred. The four OSHA workshops served to reinforce current practices directly related to construction industry and strengthened safety precautions in labs. The certification in geothermal science has led to the inclusion of more comprehensive treatment in HVAC/R curriculum.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a

As a result of industry discussion and review of resources, faculty requested

The Advisory Committee met February 19, 2013. Among the items discussed were the

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To increase graduate satisfaction, faculty have requested funds through budget hearing process to replace current lab equipment, tools, and trainers with superior resources indicative of industry standards; have enhanced curriculum to encompass improvements and changes in industry; and utilizing new model of assessment and analysis.


minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

optimal split between classroom instruction and laboratory practicums, outdated labs and instructional resources, and the need for students to stay current with new technologies (while electrical troubleshooting is still greatest informational need for students.

$255K in new equipment and updated labs. Proposal was presented in budget hearings conducted by Administrative Council in April.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, 2010 cohorts were 33%, 44%, and 24% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have broadened student engagement in the classroom through the use of Internet informational sources, minor certification exams, and traditional practices, such as more worksheets. Faculty also have increased “completion talk� throughout the program to keep students focused on obtaining an industry credential.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 33% and 30% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 79% and 64%.

In addition to the changes above, faculty have enhanced communication with students on non-program issues, such as financial aid, work challenges, etc. Faculty have also

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implemented a mentorship program, pairing beginning students with advanced students. 90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

100% of graduates are employed or pursuing higher degree. 95% are employed infield or pursuing higher degree.

To sustain these rates, faculty have enhanced curriculum to better reflect workplace conditions and expectations and have strengthened industry contacts. Faculty have also begun a database of potential employers.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty submitted three-page review of facilities, personnel, and instructional resources. Needs identified for program improvement includes updated computer lab for online certification tests and other uses, and modern diagnostic test equipment.

As a result of analysis, new equipment in the amount of $255K requested and $85K approved through institutional budget hearing process in spring 2012.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

Most recent employer survey (2012) had low response rate (N=1). Repeat in spring 2014. Overall rating from respondent was “Very Good� on quality of program.

To improve employer satisfaction, more emphasis has been placed on soft skills, such as integrity, punctuality, and responsibility in the workplace. Faculty are intervening more vigorously when unacceptable

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behaviors are observed in the classrooms and labs. Faculty are continuing to emphasize the development of skills and knowledge that increase employer satisfaction.

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Analysis and Planning: HVAC Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3. Facilities: The HVAC area consists of a large classroom, a small classroom, a computer lab, a laboratory, a tool room, a storage room, and three offices. Large Classroom: The large classroom accommodates many students comfortably. It has wall space and utilities that would allow for laboratory expansion. It has a dry erase board and a new computer with an overhead projector. Needs: Laboratory equipment and training simulators. Small Classroom: The small classroom is a “safe room.� It holds only a small class (eight students) and is not ideal for most classes. It has no technical resources but does have a dry erase board. Needs: technical resources (computer, projector) Computer Lab: The computer lab has several outdated computer systems. A couple of these computers serve as testing computers but most are not very functional. Needs: new computers (8) to administer online certification test and other computer based activities Laboratory: The lab has several pieces of outdated equipment. Faculty are able to carry out lab activities in a limited way. The tools, instruments, and equipment are also limited and outdated. The consumable items are in short supply and need to be increased in quantity and variety. The immediate improvement of the lab is the greatest need of the program. A lab photo is included as Attachment 1.4. Needs: Several new systems that are useful in demonstration and diagnosis, trainers, updated tools and machines to carry out HVAC/R procedures, and also many consumable supplies. Tool Room: The tool room contains shelving and tool boxes. It is locked behind a cage system. It is adequate for present needs. Storage Room: Contains lessor-used display objects and housekeeping supplies and is adequate. Offices: The offices are largely adequate. Needs: An additional telephone on the other side of the building and an updated computer system.


Personnel: The HVAC program is staffed by a full-time instructor, a part-time lab assistant, and an evening adjunct instructor. All members of the staff are motivated, student oriented and positive contributors to the program. The personnel meet the needs of the program at this time. The program chair has been in this position for 2.5 years, and has worked in the industry for 21 years. A vita is included as Attachment 1.5, and professional development record as Attachment 1.6. Equipment: The equipment that is useful in carrying out academic and laboratory instruction within an HVAC program is necessary to provide students with “hands on� activities while training in the program. The equipment that is necessary to properly carry out the goals of the program is separated into three categories: (1) Variations of HVAC systems that allow students to perform diagnostic checks and monitor system operations, make repairs and alterations that simulate actual field work, perform installs and set-ups, and also serve as visual aids in learning systems components, wiring arrangements, and operations; (2) Trainers that are designed to simulate operations of systems and offer students with opportunities for monitoring system operations and interactions; and (3) Tools and machines that are necessary in performing repairs and diagnostics of HVAC/R systems, which include, but are not limited to, recovery machines, vacuum pumps, electrical diagnostic meters, and refrigerant gauge devices. The program is in need of many more of these types of devices in order to achieve program objectives. As the program moves forward it will make these acquisitions a high priority. Other Academic Resources: Due to the high level of academic based learning that is required within this field, the program has a need to spend the maximum time permitted in the class environment in addition to laboratory time. The conceptualizations are very demanding and often very difficult to master for most students. The use of optimal instructional resources makes learning goals more attainable. Computer-based resources are essential and offer students additional avenues to achieve critical comprehension. The use of internet videos, interactive software, and informational websites is very helpful to students who may lose focus in lecture sessions and have a wide range of learning styles. The program needs to maintain technological resources in multiple areas of the facility. At this time the small classroom needs a computer system with a projector and screen. The computer lab needs eight new computers with HVAC/R interactive software. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 1.7. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 1.8, and the presidential response is Attachment 1.9 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 1.10. Program Highlights: Within the program, students are exposed to the foundational principles of the sciences that shape HVAC/R theory and practice. These concepts are academically challenging

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and require much study and practice. Electrical comprehension is a high priority focus within the program. A good understanding of electrical technology is the best way to be successful within the HVAC/R industry as a technician or engineer. Electrical issues account for almost 90 percent of HVAC/R issues and account for a tremendous portion of the design processes. To truly educate a student in electrical comprehension requires the department to work diligently. The highest level of classroom academics is required as well as much time spent in the lab constructing circuits and performing diagnostics. This must all be done while not abandoning other areas of the HVAC skill sets. The program at Wallace State believes that this is the best way to approach HVAC/R training and gives the students the best possible chance at success. Also, the program offers multiple certifications that prepare the students for future higher-level certifications and also aid students in entry-level employment. The certifications are offered through our accreditor, “HVAC Excellence,� (ESCO Institute) and are recognized by the industry. These certifications include the mandated EPA Section 608 Certification and various other specialized areas. Future Plans: The department must continually evolve in a positive direction to become the best and remain the best. The industry is continually in a state of change and demands higher levels of achievement and comprehension from its work force. Moving forward, the department will continue to encourage high levels of academic achievement in order to meet workplace needs. Students will be exposed to the traditional scientific principles that are the foundation of the industry. Faculty will make electrical technology a focus of the program as it is the greatest need of the industry and also the greatest deficiency. Students will be trained in the use of all the required tools and equipment to perform tasks in a manner that meets all requisite standards. In addition, the program will move into new areas of science that are becoming a part of the industry. These areas include energy conservation, health, standard of living issues, and environmental concerns. The program will begin to teach these areas as part of current curriculum and then develop new curriculum to support advances. Also, the program will begin to acquire new equipment and trainers that will aid in practical learning within these special areas. It is a goal to train students to be prepared for immediate entry into the industry workforce as qualified technicians by offering them a basic education that will support them in specializing in many different areas. In addition, the program intends to guide students toward further educational attainment, encouraging them to pursue careers in fields such as engineering, education, and business.

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Collision Repair The Collision Repair program is housed in the Division of Applied Technology and terminates in a certificate (60 credit hours). Program Description: The Collision Repair program is designed around I-Car, NATEF, and ASE industry standards. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level employment in collision repair and related industries, including body shops, collision centers, painting and polishing plants, insurance companies, restoration shops, and dealerships. To achieve this mission, the Collision Repair faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness:

1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to properly diagnose and perform non-structural analysis and repair (LO 1,4).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on the diagnosis, analysis, and repair of a non-structural automotive item when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

50% (9 of 18) of students met benchmark. Faculty noted that students needed more lab experience to increase understanding and skills and more intensive advising.

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate the ability to properly diagnose and perform structural analysis and repair

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on the

84% (21 of 25) of students met the benchmark. Students performed well in analyzing damage on automobiles, but

As a result of analysis, faculty have increased work orders on non-structural repair jobs. Faculty have also restructured and increased the number of lab assignments in ABR 111, required that students complete a research assignment on careers in collision repair, and increased advising to improve student engagement. As a result of analysis, faculty have increased work orders on frame and structural-related repair jobs. Faculty have also


(LO 1, 4).

diagnosis, analysis, and repair of a structural item when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a painting and refinishing exercise that simulates industry conditions (each spring semester).

were weakest on the thorough and speedy repair of vehicles.

added activities that focus on completion of work orders and estimates.

100% (8 of 8) students in ABR 123 met the benchmark. Faculty noted weaknesses in color variances and hand-eye coordination in painting.

SLO (4): The student will demonstrate proficiency in mixing sealer, primer, and paint to match paint formulas on automotive surfaces (LO 1).

80% of students will achieve a passing score on the first attempt on an exercise that requires the accurate mixing of sealer, primer, and paint to match an existing automotive surface (each spring semester).

100% (8 of 8) of students in ABR 123 met the benchmark. Although benchmark met, faculty noticed weakest areas were in analyzing surface area and mixing ratios.

SLO (5): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

90% of students participating in 2013-2014 departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester)

As a result of analysis, faculty noted that increasing the number of work orders taken on non-structural jobs will also increase student exposure to automotive painting. Faculty developed additional projects and activities to improve handeye coordination and color variances/matching. As a result of analysis, faculty noted that increasing the number of work orders taken on non-structural jobs will also increase student exposure to mixing sealer, primer, and paints. Faculty also incorporated online repair videos and additional activities in analyzing surface areas and mixing ratios. 2013-2014

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate the ability to properly paint and refinish automotive surfaces after repair (LO 1,4).

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PO (1): Collision Repair faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Collision Repair faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including coursework at Athens State and 15-hour technical workshop on Snap-On scan tool training, torch safety, nitrogen plastic welding, and weld and river bonding. Attended O’Reilly’s Auto Parts Real World Training in March2013 and 18th annual Technical Update Workshop in February 2013 at Wallace State. 80% of graduates will report No graduate surveys returned satisfaction with the quality and for 2012-13. efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

As a result of professional development activities, curriculum has been enhanced through exposure to latest industry trends and equipment, which helps faculty identify budgetary needs for 13-14 AY. Industry professional development enhanced faculty professional skills.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional

As a result of the meeting, connection with regional employers and practitioners was strengthened. Secondary educators present realized stronger link with program. Faculty have made agenda

The Collision Repair Advisory Committee met 4.30.13 with eight members in attendance. Among the items discussed were recap of WSCCsponsored Skills Invitational for area high schools, faculty

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To improve graduate satisfaction rates, faculty have begun providing graduates with a survey to give to employers. Faculty have also improved tracking of graduates for continued input.


development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

professional development results, and team-building initiative in the classroom.

items for future meetings the need for sponsorship of industry visits for students and more discussion of trends shaping the industry.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, 2010 cohorts were 13%, 33%, and 29% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, students area assigned career research projects. Faculty have arranged opportunities for hands-on experience and possible employment through Carmax and New Breed Archery. Faculty have committed to more focused student advising.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 42% and 36% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 73% and 54%.

To improve graduation rates, students area assigned career research projects. Faculty have arranged opportunities for hands-on experience and possible employment through Carmax and New Breed Archery. Faculty have committed to more focused student advising.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be

90% of 2013 graduates are employed; 80% in field.

To improve job placement rates, faculty have strengthened links with industry through

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pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

active advisory board and new experiential learning opportunities through businesses such as Carmax.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Overall, faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and resources. Identified particular need for Squeeze-Type Resistant Spot Welder.

As a result of analysis, faculty have prepared a request for an updated welder for the 2014 institutional budget hearings.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

Two industry certification exams were offered, OSHA (10 hour) and Area Source Rule Certification. Pass rates were 90% for the first and 100% for the second.

To sustain these rates, faculty have continued to offer the Area Source Rule training through PPG Industries, which forces students to meet workforce regulations. PPG establishes a competition that reinforces productivity and increases understanding of wages, which encourages students to meet workforce regulations.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

No employer surveys deployed in 2012-13 due to no graduate surveys returned.

To improve employer satisfaction, faculty have identified equipment upgrades, such as the welder, to make graduates more aware of workplace expectations. To

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better understand employer needs, faculty have committed to stronger links with business and industry through the advisory committee, personal survey follow-up, and better tracking of graduates after placement.

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Analysis and Planning: Collision Repair Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4. Facilities: The Collision Repair lab, classroom, break area, and restrooms are currently adequate for student needs. Needs: Another classroom for the Collision Repair class to offer flexibility of use at any time instead of having to share this space with AUM. Lab Area: Recently renovated and serves students needs well. A lab photo is included as Attachment 2.5. Computers: Recently updated most computers. Tool Storage: The tool storage area is currently adequate for our storage and student needs. Equipment: Program has most of the equipment and tools needed to meet student needs in lab. Needs: Lab is in desperate need of a Squeeze Type Resistant Spot Welder. Most vehicle manufacturers today are recommending this welder for repairs. Faculty are currently in the process of replacing a few of the old sanders. Office: Office was currently renovated to meet program needs. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 2.6. Personnel: The program chair has been in this position for 16 years, and has worked in the industry for 21 years. A vita is included as Attachment 2.7, and professional development record as Attachment 2.8. Education: Faculty are always looking into the latest technology to help meet industry and student needs. They are currently reviewing two other potential credentials for students: the Hunter front-End Alignment and the Hunter Road Force Balancer certificates.


Cosmetology The Cosmetology program is housed in the Division of Applied Technology and terminates in a short (27 credit hours) or long (60 credit hours) certificate. Program Description: The Cosmetology program prepares students for the real world of beauty by helping them attain a high degree of professionalism, a positive attitude and demeanor, and specialty skills. Students practice all phases of salon services on clients by using creativity in design techniques to give each client a personalized appearance. Instruction is competency based and derived from occupational analysis and recognized national standards. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level jobs in the personal appearance industry. To achieve this mission, the Cosmetology faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness:

1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate proficiency in administering client facials, including client preparation, proper facial massage techniques, cosmetic application, following all standard safety and sanitary protocols (LO 1,4).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a simulated client facial that incorporates client preparation, proper facial massage movement and techniques, cosmetic application, and following all safety and sanitary protocols when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

80% meet expectations. Students performed well on movements and techniques, but faculty noted need to slow down on application rhythm.

As a result of analysis, reinforced proper techniques using all safety and sanitary protocols through frequent lab simulations, following departmental rubrics in accordance with the Alabama Board of Cosmetology.


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate proper manicure technique in accordance with safety and infection control protocols (LO 1,2).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate proper and safe station set up in a simulated salon setting (LO 1,2).

SLO (4): Graduating students will execute a haircut in accordance with State Board specifications and in compliance with all safety and infection control protocols (LO 2).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a simulated client manicure in accordance with safety and infection control protocols when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on the proper and safe station set-up exercise in a simulated salon setting when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt of a haircut in accordance with State Board specifications and in compliance with all safety and infection control protocols when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

80% meet expectations. Students performed well following safety protocols, but faculty noted need for more practice on polishing of nails.

As a result of analysis, concentrated more in all labs on demonstrating proper manicure techniques in following safety and infection control protocols, in accordance with departmental rubrics aligned with requirements of Alabama Board of Cosmetology.

75% meet expectations. Students excelled at having required emblements ready and sanitized, but some failed to set up hand sanitizer, record card, and release statement.

As a result of analysis, added more discussion in all labs of risk factors and slides of what can result in an unsafe salon environment.

80% meet expectations. Students did well on parting sections, but faculty noted need to practice elevations consistently throughout haircut.

As a result of analysis, increased both technical demonstrations and student hands-on practice in COS 111 and 112, following the departmental rubrics aligned with requirements of Alabama Board of Cosmetology.

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SLO (5): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Cosmetology faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): Cosmetology faculty

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester)

75% meet expectations. Students appeared on time for interviews, but weak on maintaining proper eye contact, speaking clearly, and being prepared for typical interview questions. In any two-year period, all full- 100% of fulltime faculty time faculty will attend a completed multiple minimum of two internal or professional development external professional activities. Chair serves as development activities that Executive Director, Region 2, address industry trends and best of National Interstate of Boards practices (data collected each of Cosmetology (NIC) and spring semester). Regional Chair (16 states) of American Association of Cosmetology Schools. Also serves on Alabama Board of Cosmetology. Activities included attendance of Premiere Hair Show in Birmingham and regional annual meetings of NIC in Denver and Seattle. Pivot Point, a textbook publisher representative, met with fulltime faculty to provide presentation material that amplifies specific textbook chapters. 80% of graduates will report 100% of respondents rated

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As a result of analysis, faculty realized value and have incorporated more mock interviews and role playing to reinforce the importance of being “personal� while seeking employment. As a result of these activities, several program changes have been implemented. The presentation material demonstrated by Pivot Point enhanced curriculum in more than 10 chapters of the textbook used in COS courses. Attendance of the NIC school review has enabled faculty to better communicate to students the changes in licensure testing. NIC involvement has enabled faculty to better understand and remedy weaknesses in student performance from a regional and national perspective in addition to recognizing and addressing new trends in the field.

As a result of analysis, to


will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

satisfaction with the quality and program quality as “Excellent.� efficacy of instruction, However, sample size too small curriculum, assessment, for significance. teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

sustain results faculty have committed to greater utilization and incorporation of technology. For example, added slides on risk factors associated with unsafe clinical practices.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Cosmetology Advisory Committee met June 10, 2013 with seven industry representatives in attendance. The scheduled grand opening of the new classroom and lab facilities was postponed indefinitely. Focused on job placement. Employers reported better preparation from Wallace graduates compared with other graduates.

As a result of the meeting, faculty able to reinforce to students seeking employment the importance of being on time for interviews and work, dressing appropriately, and mastering soft skills, such as providing quality customer service.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts was 33%, 33%, and 30% respectively.

As a result of analysis, to promote completion, faculty have begun to reinforce the importance of staying in class at least 92% of required hours each semester to meet current requirements for federal financial aid eligibility.

Retention as measured both

Fall-to-fall retention rates for

To improve retention, faculty

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from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 52% and 29% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 58% and 59%.

have begun to reinforce the importance of staying in class at least 92% of required hours each semester to meet current requirements for federal financial aid eligibility.

90% of graduates will be 100% of 2013 graduates known pursuing a higher degree or are employed in-field. Two are employed and 75% will be unknown. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

Faculty have begun collecting better contact information to improve tracking.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources.

As a result of analysis, despite newly renovated facilities, faculty noted the need for ongoing commitment to ensuring that computers and labs are running optimally

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

100% of graduates passed both certification exams on the first attempt (Practical and Theory).

Faculty have committed to staying current with evolving requirements of Alabama Board of Cosmetology. This process will be advanced by faculty positions on state and regional boards.

80% of employers will report

Only one response on latest

To improve employer

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satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

employer survey. Results (N=1) show overall quality of program to be “Very Good�. Response rate too small for significance.

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satisfaction rates, faculty have committed to continuing strong network of industry contacts and regularly identifying resources that will advance student learning and programmatic goals. Adding slides on clinical safety in 2012-13 is example of this process.


Analysis and Planning: Cosmetology Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4. Facilities: The Academy Of Cosmetic Arts area consists of a large theory classroom, a large facial room, a large manicure and pedicure room, a large lab room, a large locker room, men and women’s restrooms, men and women’s handicap restrooms, a large storage room, three faculty offices, and a small vending area. Large Classroom: The large classroom accommodates 64 students comfortably. It has two large TVs and a large projector. Needs: Working computer to operate the TVs and projector. Also Heating and Cooling unit only works part-time. Large Facial Room: The large facial room has six facial beds, five towel warmers, a micro machine, a light therapy machine, and five streamers. Needs: Meets the needs because all the equipment is new. Large Manicure and Pedicure Room: The large manicure and pedicure room have 12 manicure stations and four large pedicure chairs. The department also has six nail dyers, two gel light systems, and a towel warmer. Needs: Meets the needs because all the equipment is new. Large Lab Area: The large lab area has 64 double-sided styling stations, five hair dryers on the wall, and nine shampoo bowls, and two large TVs. A lab photo is included as Attachment 3.5. Needs: Computer to operate TVs. Large Locker Room: The large locker room contains 120 lockers. Needs: Meets the needs Storage Room: Contains our supplies, towels, washer, and dryer. Needs: Meets the needs Offices: The offices are large and adequate. Needs: Meets the needs Small Vending Area: Small vending area has a coke machine and a snack machine. Needs: Meets the needs


Personnel: The Academy Of Cosmetic Arts program is staffed by two full-time instructors and an evening adjunct instructor. The program chair has been in this position for 10 years, and has worked in the industry for 34 years. A vita is included as Attachment 3.6, and professional development record as Attachment 3.7. All members of the staff are motivated, student-oriented, and positive contributors to the program. The personnel meet the needs of the program at this time.

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Culinary Arts The Culinary Arts program is housed in the Division of Applied Technologies and terminates in a certificate (60 credit hours) or an AAS degree (76 credit hours). Program Description: The Culinary Arts course of study offers organized, specialized learning experiences as they relate to nutrition, planning, selection, purchasing, storing, preparing, and serving food and food products. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level employment in food planning and preparation. To achieve this mission, the Culinary Arts faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate knowledge of the theory and practice associated with catering, including food production and the logistics of delivery (LO 1,2,5).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a simulated catering activity that reflects workplace conditions when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

82% of students met or exceeded benchmark. Students did well on teamwork and communication, weakest on the role of microbiology in food service.

As a result of analysis, upgraded rubric to better pinpoint what needed to improve. Requested $430K in budget hearings in April, 2013, including a major upgrade/comprehensive redesign of facilities and equipment to better prepare graduates for entry-level employment, including baking and pastry construct, additional kitchen technology, Bistro/Hotel room training model, and culinary/hospitality emporium.


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate fundamental knowledge and skills associated with food preparation and service for diverse populations, including high quantities, healthcare populations, and other specialized groups (LO 1,2,5).

SLO (3): The graduating student will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the principles of nutrition, food preparation, food safety, culinary specialties, service, and logistics (LO 2).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a simulation project that focuses on one or more special populations when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

85% met or exceeded benchmark. Students did best on creative thinking and were weakest on time management.

As a result of analysis, instituted more appropriate inclass and off-campus projects to better gauge student retention outcomes. Faculty have added more team based projects with time limits to better gauge student master. Requested $430K in budget hearings in April, 2013, including a major upgrade/comprehensive redesign of facilities and equipment to better prepare graduates for entry-level employment, including baking and pastry construct, additional kitchen technology, Bistro/Hotel room training model, and culinary/hospitality emporium. 80% of graduating students will 77% of students met or As a result of analysis, added a achieve a passing score exceeded benchmark. Students hand’s-on practical exam, (defined as “Meets performed best on “Mystery Basket,” to improve Expectations” or better) on the understanding industry need for graduate preparedness. first attempt on a capstone quality and nutritious food. Requested $430K in budget project requiring the Students were weakest on hearings in April, 2013, preparation and service of a comprehension of including a major meal that reflects recommended balance of upgrade/comprehensive comprehensive use of culinary caloric intake based on activity redesign of facilities and skills and practices when level. equipment to better prepare

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measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Culinary Arts faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): Culinary Arts faculty

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester)

92% of students met or exceeded benchmark. Recreated “real life� scenario with three-person panel of interviewers and required that applicants apply for one of three jobs with resume submitted in advance. Mock interview and feedback process energized students before, during, and after exercise. Process enhanced student understanding of importance of appearance and eye contact. In any two-year period, all full- 100% of faculty attended time faculty will attend a multiple professional minimum of two internal or development activities, external professional including pedagogical as well development activities that as industry-specific events. address industry trends and best Participated, for example, on practices (data collected each Alabama Cattleman’s Industry spring semester). Tour September 2013. 80% of graduates will report

In most recent graduate survey

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graduates for entry-level employment, including baking and pastry construct, additional kitchen technology, Bistro/Hotel room training model, and culinary/hospitality emporium. As a result of analysis, made mock interviews a permanent feature of program assessment (not used previously). To improve student preparedness, faculty allowed students to interview them, showing how to best convey knowledge of food preparation and service industry.

As a result of professional development activities, faculty became more adept at incorporating use of Excel and Tegrity in program instruction and management. Faculty will place greater emphasis on discipline-specific activities in 13-14 AY. To improve graduate


will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

(2013), satisfaction was measured across 23 dimensions of performance. Overall ratings were “Good” or “Excellent”.

satisfaction rates, faculty have re-written all syllabi and outcomes and corresponding assessment measures.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Culinary Advisory Committee met 4.18.13. Primary topic discussed was sustainable green technology in the food service industry.

As a result of the meeting, faculty became more aware of how sustainable green technology is impacting local culinary and food service businesses, awareness communicated to students in labs.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 25%, 43%, and 25% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have updated all course content to Blackboard, which provides students with better understanding of completion landscape.

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Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 58% and 57% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 78% and 89%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have implemented improved advising measures and procedures to provide students with a better snapshot of their future in this field.

90% of graduates will be 100% of 2013 graduates are pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field. employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have implemented comprehensive interview preparation packages and mock interviews (Chair presented on this topic at faculty meeting.) New advising folders have been implemented to help students prepare for entry-level employment.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities, labs, and instructional resources. Faculty reported need for major upgrade in next five years and second fulltime faculty member.

As a result of analysis, faculty have developed comprehensive long-term plan for complete upgrade to state-of-the-art facilities. Submitted proposal at budget hearings in spring 2013. Program has been approved for second fulltime faculty member for 13-14 AY.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation

On 2013 employer survey (N=3), all respondents scored quality of program as

To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty have greatly expanded role of area

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of graduates (data collected each summer)

“Excellent�.

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practitioners in measuring the responsiveness of program to industry needs.


Analysis and Planning: Culinary Arts Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, and 4.4. Facilities The Culinary Arts program currently occupies two classrooms. One is a kitchen used for lab. A lab photo is included as Attachment 4.5. Faculty are working towards upgrading facilities over the next five years. The classroom was just upgraded with six new computers for students to use for assignments. Need: It would benefit students and faculty to have a more state-of-the-art kitchen to replicate an industry-like experience. Faculty feel the climate at WSCC is welcoming. They also feel that they are respected, supported, and valued. Services offered by the college, such as the library and student support services, are adequate. Audiovisual and computer equipment are available for students for class activities or assignments. Student support services are readily available to all students. Faculty agree that clinical facilities offer an adequate number and variety of learning opportunities for students to meet program objectives. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 4.6. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 4.7, and the presidential response is Attachment 4.8 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 4.9.

Personnel The culinary program currently employs one full-time faculty and one lab assistant. The program chair has been in this position for 10 years, and has worked in the industry for 23 years. A vita is included as Attachment 4.10, and professional development record as Attachment 4.11. The current faculty is not adequate for both the classroom and lab. A faculty job announcement for a fulltime instructor has been posted. Equipment


Faculty agree that the current lab equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives is available. Faculty also agree that the Culinary program has access to the supplies needed to teach labs appropriately. Program Highlights The Culinary program participates in multiple public venues to achieve the college’s mission of public outreach.

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Diesel Mechanics The Diesel Mechanics program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates in a certificate (60 credit hours). Program Description: The college offers a certificate in Diesel Mechanics and provides CDL training and testing for students interested in a career in diesel mechanics or truck driving. The program prepares students for work on light, medium, and heavy vehicles and mobile equipment, including bulldozers, cranes, motor graders, industrial and agricultural equipment, and combines. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level positions as diesel service mechanics, a field that includes work as bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine and electronic specialists. To achieve this mission, the Diesel Mechanics faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate foundational knowledge of electronic engine systems, including testing and adjusting diesel engines in accordance with manufacturers’ specifications (LO 1,2,5).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on an electronic engine system simulation exercise that requires testing and adjusting an engine in accordance with manufacturers’ specifications when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

88% of participating students scored a 70% or better on the assessment. Benchmark was met. Students performed well on actually adjusting engine components but were weakest on operating scan tools and analyzing data collected from their use.

Although benchmark met, the following program modifications were made to increase and support student success: • New lab task assessment grids were developed to increase student accountability for lab tasks (see attachment). • Hybrid learning modules on scan tool analysis were developed


SLO (2): The graduating student will demonstrate proficiency in advanced diesel electrical system diagnostics, maintenance, and repair (LO 1,2,5).

80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on an electrical system repair exercise that requires diagnostics, repair, and maintenance recommendations when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

82% of participating students scored a 70% or better on the assessment. Benchmark was met. Students performed well on multi-meter use and ohm’s law within the circuits, but were weakest on use of oscilloscope.

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to better meet industry needs • Provided YouTube videos focused on electronic injector repair to maintain accreditation requirements for NATEF • Initiated CDX Online Training, an additional audio visual online supplement to instruction Although benchmark met, the following modifications were added to increase and support student success: • New lab task assessment grids were developed to increase student accountability for lab tasks (see attachment). • Hybrid learning modules on scan tool analysis were developed to reinforce student learning and success rates and meet industry


SLO (3): The graduating student will demonstrate proficiency in power-train diagnostics, maintenance, and repair (LO 1,2,5).

needs • Provided YouTube videos focused electronic injector repair to maintain accreditation requirements for NATEF • Initiated cross-training with the electronics department • Initiated CDX Online Training, an additional audio visual online supplement to instruction. 80% of graduating students will 68% of participating students As a result of analysis, the achieve a passing score scored a 70% or better on the following modifications were (defined as “Meets assessment. Benchmark was made: Expectations” or better) on the not met. Students performed • New lab task first attempt on a power-train well on their knowledge of assessment grids were repair exercise that requires theory and basic hydraulics, but developed to increase diagnostics, repair, and were weakest on schematics student accountability maintenance recommendations and diagnostics of the hydraulic for lab tasks (see when measured against circuits. attachment). departmental rubric (each • Hybrid learning spring semester.) modules were developed to reinforce student learning and success rates and meet

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SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Diesel Mechanics faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each

2013-2014

industry needs • Initiated CDX Online Training, an additional audio visual online supplement to instruction • 3 new training aids were added [give specifics here] • Provided YouTube videos focused on transmission rebuilding to support student learning and maintain accreditation requirements for NATEF 2013-2014

100% of full-time faculty reported multiple professional development activities, including key industry certifications, including wheel end maintenance, seal installation, and wheel bearing

As a result of these activities, enhanced classroom instruction with latest information and developments in engine maintenance and repair, particularly in areas of hydraulics and troubleshooting.

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spring semester).

PO (2): Diesel Mechanics faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

adjustment by SKF Corporation. Also certified as OSHA 501 and 511 trainer at the University of Alabama. Certified in Basic Hydraulics and troubleshooting by Alabama Technology Network and four hours of training with Bio fuel through Tennessee Clean Cities. 80% of graduates will report On most recent graduate survey satisfaction with the quality and one respondent rated overall efficacy of instruction, program quality “fair.” All curriculum, assessment, others rated program “Very teaching pedagogies, and Good” or better. instructional resources (each spring semester).

OSHA certifications enhanced student awareness of safety procedures and protocols.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends

As a result of discussion, items of equipment in the amount of $157K were identified and requested in April, 2013 through the budget hearings administered by the Administrative Council. Also, faculty are now able to show prospective students state-of-

The advisory committee met 1.15.13 with fourteen present, including four members of local legislative delegation. Members discussed such items as recent changes to curriculum, the identification of equipment, including trucks, needed for program growth,

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To improve graduate satisfaction, faculty have expanded the delivery of content by adding online portions of curriculum in Blackboard for assignments and audio visual training to supplement traditional theory in class. Faculty have also added more lab task sheets to reinforce content.


and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

and the projected new computer lab to be shared with Electronics.

the-art trucks displayed by local businesses.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 28%, 59%, and 50% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have strengthened student engagement through the acquisition of hand tooling resources for student use as well as additional training aids in CDL and hydraulics.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 43% and 28% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 47% and 67%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have strengthened student engagement through the acquisition of hand tooling resources for student use as well as additional training aids in CDL and hydraulics. Faculty have also expanded online content to reinforce classroom instruction.

90% of graduates will be 100% of 2013 graduates are pursuing a higher degree or employed in field. employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

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To sustain high job placement rates, faculty have added additional partnerships with local and regional business and industry and have strengthened program advisory committee. (Faculty noted that demand for technicians is still increasing.)


80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources. However, faculty identified needs for additional classroom space and more hand tools, transmission specialty tools, engine and HVAC specialty tools, jacks, and other items looking at growth over the next three years.

As a result of analysis, faculty have identified specific items targeted for acquisition in 1314 AY budget hearing process.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

On most recent employer survey, 100% rated overall quality of program “Good� or better. No area rated negatively.

To sustain high job placement rates, faculty have added additional partnerships with local and regional business and industry and have strengthened program advisory committee.

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Analysis and Planning: Diesel Mechanics Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 5.1, 5.2, and 5.3. Facilities: The Diesel Mechanics area consists of a large classroom, a small classroom, a computer lab, a laboratory, a tool room, a storage room, and two offices. Large Classroom: The moderate-size classroom accommodates students comfortably but capacity is limited to thirty or less. It contains a dry erase board, a computer with an overhead projector, and four student computers. Needs: More space for students. Small Classroom: The small classroom is used for electronics and hydraulics training. It can accommodate ten students at a time with training aids. Computer Lab: The computer lab is new to the program this year. It is a joint effort between diesel and welding. The lab has thirty student computers and an instructor computer with an overhead projector. Laboratory: The lab has ten full service and training bays for equipment and vehicles to perform student lab tasks. The lab has new lighting, a water treatment center, full size parts washer, overhead cane system, and fume extraction. A lab photo is included as Attachment 5.4. Tool Room: The tool room contains tool carts and tool boxes. It is locked behind a cage system, and currently meets departmental needs. Storage Room: Contains less frequently used display objects and housekeeping supplies and currently meets departmental needs. Offices: Faculty offices are adequate for current needs. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 5.5. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 5.6, and the presidential response is Attachment 5.7 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 5.8. Personnel: The Diesel program is staffed by a full-time instructor and a part-time lab assistant. The program chair has been in this position for 5 years, and has worked in the industry for 17 years. A vita is included as Attachment 5.9, and professional development record as Attachment 5.10. All members of the staff are motivated, student-oriented, and


positive contributors to the program. The personnel meet the needs of the program at this time. Equipment: Having the right equipment is critical to provide students with “hands on� activities while training in the program. The equipment that is necessary to properly carry out the goal of the program is separated into three categories: (1) Variations of diesel systems that allow students to perform diagnostic checks and monitor system operations, make repairs and alterations that simulate actual field work, perform hands-on lab tasks meeting industry standards. These items also serve as visual aids as students learn systems components, wiring arrangements, and operations; (2) Program-sponsored live trainers that are designed to simulate operations of systems and offer students opportunities for monitoring system operations and interactions; and (3) Tools and machines that are necessary in performing repairs and diagnostics on diesel/equipment systems, including, but not limited to, hand tools, transmission specialty tools, engine specialty tools, electronic specialty tools, steering and suspension specialty tools, brakes specialty tools, HVAC specialty tools, jacks, pneumatic tools, and tool carts. Needs: The program is in need of many more of these types of devices in order to facilitate our learning and program objectives. As the program moves forward it will make these acquisitions a high priority. Other Academic Resources: Due to the high level of academic knowledge required within this field, the program has a need to spend the maximum time permitted in the laboratory environment to supplement class time. The conceptualizations are very demanding and often very difficult to master for most students. The use of contemporary resources enhances student learning. Computer-based resources are essential as these offer students additional avenues to achieve the requisite levels of comprehension. The use of Blackboard, internet videos, interactive software, and informational websites is very helpful to students with a wide range of learning styles, particularly those students who tend to lose focus in lecture sessions. The program needs to maintain current technological resources in multiple areas of the program’s facilities. A larger classroom appears to be the greatest need in the near future as the program continues to grow.

Program Highlights: Within the program, students are exposed to foundational principles of the entire diesel industry. Students have multiple types of training aids to benefit from. Students are expected to be able to work on each type of training aid they are exposed to before completing an area of training. Mastering these skills is academically challenging and requires much study and practice. Electrical/electronic comprehension is a particularly high-priority focus within the program. Demonstrating a high level of understanding of electrical/electronic technology is the best way to be successful within the diesel industry as a technician. Electrical/electronic issues account for almost 75 percent of diesel issues. To truly educate a student in electrical comprehension requires much faculty commitment. The highest level of classroom academics is required as well as much time

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in the lab constructing circuits and performing diagnostics. This must all be done while not abandoning other areas of the diesel skill sets. The diesel program at Wallace State believes that this is the best way to approach diesel training and gives the students the best possible chance at success. Student outcomes are a high priority for the diesel program. Upon completion, students have the ability to work as light truck technicians, heavy truck service technicians, heavy equipment technicians, operators, service managers, service writers, parts inventory clerks/managers, commercial truck drivers, and business owners. Future Plans: The department must continually evolve in a positive direction to become the best and remain the best diesel program in the state. The industry is continually in a state of change and demands higher levels of skill and comprehension from its work force. As the program moves into the future, the department will continue to encourage high levels of academic achievement in order to meet the needs for adaptive, well-trained graduates. Faculty will continue to expose students to the traditional scientific principles that are the foundation of the industry, and will continue to make electrical/electronic technology a focus of the program. Faculty will train students to use all the required tools and equipment to perform tasks in a manner compliance with industry standards and workplace expectations. In addition, the program will move into new areas of science that are becoming an integral part of the industry. These new areas include energy conservation, hybrid technology, bio-fuels, and green environmental technology. The program will begin to teach these areas as part of current curriculum and then develop new curriculum to support new advances. At the same time, the program will begin to acquire new equipment and trainers that will facilitate learning in these new areas. It is a goal of faculty to train students to be prepared for immediate entry into the workforce as qualified technicians by building upon a basic education that will support them in specializing in many different areas. Faculty will also continue to encourage students to strive for higher levels of educational attainment after earning credentials at the college.

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Drafting and Design Technology The Drafting and Design Technology program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates in a certificate (57 credit hours) and an AAS degree (73 credit hours). Program Description: Drafters prepare technical drawings and plans used by production and construction workers to build everything from manufactured products to structures. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level positions as drafters in industrial production, manufacturing, and construction. To achieve this mission, the Drafting and Design faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate knowledge of fundamental principles of drafting and design in diverse industry settings, using manual and computer-assisted skills in accordance with ANSI standards (LO 1,2).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students completing 9 hours of instruction will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on an examination addressing fundamental principles of drafting and design in diverse industry settings, using manual and computer-assisted skills in accordance with ANSI standards (each spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

Upon completion of the Although the benchmark was examination addressing met, faculty made the following fundamental principles of modifications: drafting and design and of a set • Providing students with of practical exercises, 83% of a comprehensive students scored a 70% or reference to all basic higher. The prescribed theory. benchmark was met for this • Increasing the assessment. Students performed “research” assignments well in line type identification in related subject matter but were weak on line type by requiring students to usage and implementation. identify industryspecific line types • Increasing the level of difficulty of course


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate understanding of architectural design principles and practices, including: foundation, floor, electrical and roof plans (LO 2).

90% of students completing the architectural class sequence will achieve a passing score (defined as 70 or higher) on the first attempt on a simulated client architectural presentation when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

Upon completion of a set of simulated house plans that had to be submitted encompassing all building codes and regulations, 92% of students scored a 70% or higher. The benchmark was met for this assessment. Students mastered concepts in wall layout and code requirements, but were weak on roof plan calculations and diagrams.

SLO (3): The graduating student will demonstrate

80% of graduating students will Upon completion of student achieve a passing score portfolio to give a visual

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examinations to be comparable to industry certification examinations. Although the benchmark was met, faculty made the following modifications: • Increasing the “research” assignments in related subject matter, such as a roof design project with extra class time and handouts • Incorporating group discussion and peer review of practice presentations to improve soft skills. Included group discussion and peer review, for example, on roof design and calculations • Providing students with a reference to all basic theory. Although the benchmark was met, a faculty review


comprehensive knowledge of the principles and applications of drafting and design, multipurpose drawings, technical illustrations, renderings using a computeraided software and/or 3dimensional BIM software (LO 1, 4).

(defined as 75% or higher) on the first attempt of a capstone project that incorporates advanced software applications in mechanical, civil, electrical, structural or architectural engineering context when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

demonstration of all skills learned throughout the program of 25 Autodesk software files of their work with a job ready resume for assessment 95?% of the students scored a 75% or higher. The benchmark was met for this assessment. Students performed well providing Autodesk software files, but were less productive using other software packages.

meeting was held and faculty made the following modifications: • Acquisition of new equipment through a budget committee hearing request, including computers with dual monitors and diverse advanced industry software packages • Requiring students to keep a practical journal recording design steps and software applications.

SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester)

Upon completion of requirements and a practical assessment, students exceeded the benchmark established. 100% of the spring 2013 graduates have successfully gained employment in field.

Although the benchmark was met, a faculty review meeting was held and faculty made the following modifications: • Requiring students to keep a drawing portfolio of multiple drafting disciplines. • Providing students with mock interview opportunities with

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PO (1): Drafting and Design faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Drafting and Design faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, focused largely on teaching pedagogies. Activities included participation in Alabama’s Master Teacher program and more effective use of data and analytics in program improvement. 80% of graduates will report In the most recent graduate satisfaction with the quality and survey (2011), all respondents efficacy of instruction, rated overall program quality as curriculum, assessment, “Excellent.” No negative teaching pedagogies, and ratings reported. (Note that instructional resources (each sample size was small: N=4.) spring semester). An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The advisory committee met 7.29.13. Much of the meeting was devoted to explaining to the members the shift in focus from drafting to engineering. In addition to the AAS degree in Engineering Technology, the department will now offer short certificates in Mechanical/Civil Engineering Technology, Building Construction

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WSCC faculty outside the DDT department. As a result of activities, use of technology increased to enhance student learning experience in the classroom. More discipline-specific activities are targeted for 13-14 AY.

As a result of the survey and feedback from industry, the curriculum has been substantially realigned and revised under the aegis of new program title, “Engineering Technology.” As a result of the comprehensive coverage of the program by faculty, industry representatives became aware of state-of-the-art technology and facilities in transition from drafting to pre-professional engineering. The election of a senior designer from Southern Synergy as Advisory Committee chair will


Management, Architectural Engineering Technology, and Building Construction. Faculty also informed industry and educational representatives of new equipment acquisitions and new lab equipment.

strengthen links with industry for students and faculty. Members became aware with links between program growth and changes in focus to college-wide Five Year Strategic Plan.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 29%, 39%, and 15% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty are spending additional time explaining the Degree Works portal on Banner.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 43% and 49% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 78% and 71%.

To improve retention, faculty have restructured class layout, times, and schedules to keep students on track with core courses and graduation requirements.

90% of graduates will be 100% of 2013 graduates are pursuing a higher degree or employed; 71% employed inemployed and 75% will be field. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

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To improve job placement rates, faculty have set up a protocol through which advisory members send notification when job opening occur. Faculty will also strengthen links with industry through more disciplinespecific professional development.


80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty completed a review of facilities and instructional resources in July, 2013. Some outdated lab and other equipment noted.

As a result of needs analysis, program has been approved for $116K upgrade of computer lab. The acquisition of new 3-D printer is currently in bid process.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

Most recent employer survey (2012) had low response rate (N=1). Repeat in spring 2014.

As a result of feedback from advisory committee, faculty have proceeded with full implementation of shift in program focus from drafting to engineering. Revitalization of advisory committee will strengthen program review by employers.

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Analysis and Planning: Drafting and Design Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 6.1, 6.2, and 6.3. Facilities: The DDT area consists of two classrooms, a computer lab, a storage room, a break room and two offices. The building is one of the original buildings on campus. It was renovated in 2007 to its current condition and configuration.

Classrooms: Each of the two classrooms will seat 36 students comfortably. Each classroom contains a dry erase board and a computer with an overhead projector. Needs: Sound systems Computer Lab: The computer lab has 40 stations equipped with 2007 computer systems. A lab photo is included as Attachment 6.4. Three of the workstations are currently out of service and in need of repair. Needs: New computers—current computers are inadequate to efficiently run the latest software applications Storage Room: The storage room contains supplies and teaching aids that are regularly used.

Break room: The break room contains a full size refrigerator, sink, microwave oven, vending machines and a toaster. It has a dining table that seats four people. It serves as a social gathering area for our students. Needs: Could be larger to accommodate more seating. Offices: The offices are adequate.

The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 6.5. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 6.6, and the presidential response is Attachment 6.7 with actions related to this program highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 6.8. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 6.9. Personnel: The DDT program is staffed by two full-time instructors and an evening adjunct instructor. The program chair has been in this position for 2.5 years, and has worked in the industry for 28 years. A vita is included as Attachment 6.10, and professional development record as Attachment 6.11. All members of the staff are motivated; student oriented and positive contributors to the program. The personnel meet the needs of the program.


Equipment: The computer software is renewed annually and meets industry standards. Our computers are outdated and are inadequate to efficiently run the latest 3D software applications. Faculty have requested updated computer systems. We have two large scale plotters and two printers that are adequate for student training. A 3D printer has been approved for the program and is currently under bid. This printer will keep the program on the cutting edge of technology within the drafting and design field.

Program Highlights: Within the program, students are exposed to the foundations of drafting and design. These concepts are academically challenging, very diverse, and require study and practice. Being diverse in the numerous areas served by the drafting field is a priority focus within the program. All spring 13 and summer 13 graduates have secured employment with firms representing different and diverse fields of drafting and design. Faculty have partnered with a local industry and provided specialized collaborative training. The result was an internship and eventual full time employment for three students. Faculty are building a secondary feeder system through dual enrollment and summer scholarship programs for high school students. Students have also been successful in Skills USA competitions, routinely placing in the architectural and mechanical drafting categories and placing first in the state for two consecutive years in the “Technical Math” category.

Future Plans: The program will move in a new direction in the fall of 2013 under the heading of “Engineering Technology.” The program must continue to evolve in a positive direction to support industry needs, requirements, and changes. The industry continually demands high levels of achievement and creativity from its work force. As it moves into the future, the department will continue to encourage high levels of academic achievement in order to meet these needs by exposing all students to the traditional principles that are the basis of the drafting and design and engineering technology fields. Faculty will continue to train students to use the software and equipment necessary to perform tasks to industry standards.

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Flight Technology The Flight Technology program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates in a short-term certificate (1-3 semesters) or an AAS degree (76 credit hours). Program Description: The Aviation program consists of flight and ground instruction that will qualify graduates for diverse careers in the aviation industry. Students have an opportunity to acquire FAA certification for Private Pilot, Instrument Rating, and Commercial Pilot. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level positions in flight in such areas as pilots, co-pilots, flight instructors and first officers. To achieve this mission, the Flight Technology faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The beginning student will demonstrate foundational aeronautical knowledge and skill as preparation for further advancement toward the Private Pilot Certificate (to meet FAA practical test standards for Lessons 1 through 10 of approved Private Pilot Airplane Syllabus) (LO 1,2,3,5).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 100% of progressing students will demonstrate proficiency through FAA-mandated skills check-offs in basic flight maneuvers, and will have successfully soloed in the traffic pattern (assessment incorporates passage of FAAmandated skills checklists for the introduction of maximum performance takeoff and landing procedures in Stage II) (each semester). Note that no student is allowed to continue in the program without

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

48% of students met the desired proficiency criteria of soloing in the traffic pattern and demonstrated the required takeoffs and landing procedures required for Stage II of the FAA Approved Part 141 Private Pilot Airplane syllabus.

As a result of analysis, faculty determined the need for additional instructional resources to improve student learning outcome. Funding requested through Administrative Council budget hearings for flight lab: upgraded instructor stations, student computers, and FAA Computerized Testing Center.


SLO (2): The intermediate student will demonstrate proficiency that meets or exceeds the FAA requirements for the Private Pilot Certificate, including practical knowledge of aircraft aerodynamics and principles of flight, systems, performance, regulations, weather, airspace, publications, Visual Flight Rules navigation, aero medical factors, and safety (LO 1,2,5). SLO (3): The graduating student will demonstrate knowledge of protocols and skills necessary for IFR and VFR flight (LO 1,2,5).

PO (1): Flight Technology faculty will demonstrate a

clearing all FAA-mandated checklists. 90% of students will achieve a passing score (defined by FAA benchmark) on the first attempt on FAA Stage II Private Pilot Certification exam (each semester).

100% of intermediate students demonstrated successful completion of the practical knowledge as defined by FAA FAR Part 141 of the Private Pilot Airplane syllabus during their first attempt with the Chief and/or Assistant Chief Flight Instructor.

To sustain these results, faculty have aligned instruction with the industry-standard Jepperson course syllabi.

90% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 90% or higher) on an exercise that requires the student to plan IFR and VFR flights under simulated flight conditions (each semester).

100% of graduating students demonstrated through knowledge tests, flight tests, and appropriate records that met standard regarding knowledge, skill, and experience necessary to obtain commercial pilot certification.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a

100% of faculty attended multiple professional

As a result of analysis, faculty determined the need for additional instructional resources to improve student learning outcome. Funding requested through Administrative Council budget hearings for flight lab: upgraded instructor stations, student computers, and FAA Computerized Testing Center. Faculty continue to adhere to industry-standard course syllabi commercially available. As a result of professional development activities, contacts

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commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Flight Technology faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

development activities, including attendance of the Southern Aviation Expo in Birmingham and regional flyins. The program chair serves on the board of the Cullman County Airport Authority. 80% of graduates will report Graduates on most recent satisfaction with the quality and survey rated overall quality of efficacy of instruction, program “Very Good� or curriculum, assessment, better. No negative ratings teaching pedagogies, and reported on any measure. instructional resources (each spring semester).

with flight community broadened to enhance employment opportunities for students. Membership on Airport Authority enhances government/institutional partnership. To improve graduate satisfaction, faculty have proposed making more resources available online, offering more degree options, and offering more networking and social opportunities for students enrolled in the program.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Flight Advisory Committee met 9.23.13. Key items discussed were unprepared students enrolling in the program and maintenance of aircraft. Members also discussed need for more CFIs and ideas for enhancing promotion of the program through fly-ins and industry shows.

As a result of the meeting, faculty have begun plans with Airport Authority to host a flyin spring 2014. Faculty have sent proposal for additional CFIs to Dean of Applied Technologies. [Marsha, make sure you and Bert have done this.]

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years

No graduates were reported for the 2008, 2009, and 2010

To improve graduation rates, faculty have increased entry

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of program entry (data collected each spring).

cohorts.

requirements, recommended that students maintain a certain GPA, and considered developing a re-admission policy for students who make failing grades in one or more courses.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 53% and 60% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 69% and 67%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have increased entry requirements and are considering GPA thresholds. Faculty have noted that retention is largely an issue because students cannot meet rigorous program standards and demands.

90% of graduates will be 100% of 2012-2013 graduates pursuing a higher degree or were employed in field or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To sustain these rates, faculty have incorporated wider range of exposure. For example, faculty have obtained FAA and VA approval for CFI, and CFI II, and Instrument ratings for helicopter as FAA Part 141 approved training courses.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each

As a result of analysis, faculty presented request for upgraded computer lab in budget hearings conducted by

Faculty conducted a review of facilities and instructional resources in May, 2013. Among items showing as future

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spring semester).

programmatic needs were upgrading testing lab, adding multi-engine licensing options, upgrading aircraft to glass cockpit instrumentation, and purchase of flight simulator.

Administrative Council. Other items tabled until 2014.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

No employer survey conducted for 2012-13.

To improve employer satisfaction, faculty have incorporated wider range of exposure. For example, faculty have incorporated Jet Ranger training in helicopter program, offered helicopter instrument ratings, and have obtained FAA and VA approval for CFI, and CFI II, and Instrument ratings for helicopter as FAA Part 141 approved training courses.

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Analysis and Planning: Flight Technology Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 7.1, 7.2, and 7.3. A. Facilities: The Flight Technology Program consists of two classrooms, a testing center, one office, a lobby, and a receptionist area, and both men’s and women’s restrooms. 1. Classroom A, which is 22' x 23’, is equipped with tables and chairs, dry eraser board and electronic smart-boards, television, VCR, CD, DVD, and overhead projectors. Maximum seating capacity is 30 students. NEEDS: An area large enough to host safety seminars and FAA Safety Briefings 2. Classroom B is 17.5' x 23'. It contains a VCR with VCR, CD, DVD and overhead projection capabilities. This classroom also houses a computer lab for Internet access and practice FAA knowledge exams for all certificates and ratings, and simulators for both airplane and helicopter. Maximum seating capacity is 15 students. A lab photo is included as Attachment 7.4. NEEDS: Dedicated computer lab large enough for three stations and the flight simulators. 3. Offices, reception, and lobby area are adequate NEEDS: Records are required by the FAA, TSA, and PSI to be kept for 5 years. A storage area is needed for these documents. Additional space is needed to store bookstore supplies sold at our facility. NEED: A dedicated break-room with sink, microwave, vending, and refrigerator for students and staff. 4. The Lasergrade/PSI Testing room is adequate for the requirements of the FAA. A Memorandum of Understanding has been authorized between PSI and the Airman Testing Standards Branch of the FAA. NEEDS: Three Updated computers for Testing Center B. Computer Lab/Student Resources: 1. The three-station computer lab is also housed in classroom B. Two of the three student lab stations have been placed on the disposal list. NEEDS: Technical Resources New computers to replace the ones that have been targeted for disposal and for those that have inoperable capacitors. Current computers are inadequate to efficiently run the latest software.


2. On-line scheduling was implemented during summer of 2013. What faculty are using as a server is a computer that has been put together using spare parts from discarded computers. NEEDS: Two new computers. One for students to check aircraft in and out, and another to serve as a server between all of the network stations. C. Aircraft: Single-Engine Land Airplanes are used for flight training in the airplane option. These aircraft will meet the requirements of Section 141.39 of the FAR. Radio equipment consists of at least one VHF transceiver. In addition each airplane is equipped for day and night IFR/VFR flying as specified in Section 91.205 of the FAR. Hughes 269 Helicopters are used for flight training in the helicopter option. These aircraft meet the requirements of Section 141.39 of the FAR. Radio equipment consists of at least one VHF transceiver. In addition each helicopter is equipped for day and night VFR flying as specified in Section 91.205 of the FAR The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 7.5. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 7.6, and the presidential response is Attachment 7.7 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 7.8. D. Personnel: The Flight Technology Program is staffed by one full-time faculty member, 1 full-time support staff member, and six part-time instructors who are available at varying days and times. The program chair has been in this position for 32 years, and has worked in the industry for 34 years. A vita is included as Attachment 7.9, and professional development record as Attachment 7.10. NEEDS: Additional flight instructors are needed to accommodate the flight requirements of the students for both airplane and helicopter options.

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Machine Tool Technology The Machine Tool Technology program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates in a short-term certificate (2629 credit hours) long-term certificate (60 credit hours), or an AAS degree (76 credit hours). Program Description: The Machining/Computer Numerical Control program prepares students to enter the skilled manufacturing workforce as highly trained employees. Students learn to shape, form, or cut metal work pieces into blueprint-specific tools for industry using high-tech machines and modern software. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level positions in the programming and operation of highly technical computer-controlled lathes, milling machines, and other industrial equipment. To achieve this mission, the Machine Tool Technology faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate proficiency in basic blueprint reading, including multi-view drawings, interpretation of conventional lines, and standard industry notation (LO 1,2).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher on departmental rubric) on the first attempt on a MTT 121 blueprint that incorporates interpretation of conventional lines and standard industry notation when measured against departmental rubric (each semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

91% of students achieved a passing score. Although majority successful in incorporating material learned in classroom into lab environment, students tended to lack skills in visualization of two-dimensional drawings into three-dimensional shapes.

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate proficiency in the

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70%

100% of students met the established benchmark.

As a result of analysis, the faculty have implemented pretests and other reading activities in MTT 121. Additionally, to address visualization skills, partnered with PAVES staff to create visual parts from twodimensional drawings to assist students in visualization comprehension and skills. To sustain these results, faculty have implemented additional


use and application of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, including the utilization of modern conventions, symbols, datums, datum targets, and projected tolerance zones (LO 1,2).

or higher on program rubric) on the first attempt on a MTT 128 geometric dimensioning and tolerancing exercise that employs the use of modern methods, symbols, datums, datum targets, and projected tolerance zones (each spring semester).

SLO (3): The intermediate student will demonstrate broadbased knowledge of machine shop operation, focusing on shop safety, measuring tools, lathes, drilling machines, saws, milling machines, bench grinders, and layout instruments (LO 2,3,4,5).

80% of intermediate students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a MTT 147 written or oral report addressing one or more critical considerations of machine shop operation (each spring semester).

Although benchmark met, exercises and activities both in faculty noted that some and out of the classroom: students needed additional • Students are required to practice and assistance with create two certifiable GD&T (Geometric NIMS (National Dimensioning and Tolerancing) Institute for Metal principles and terminology. Working Skills) projects that incorporate GD&T principles • Implemented a CMM [identify] class for checking the GD&T requirements • Added vocabulary practice for GD&T terminology 90% of students achieved the As a result of analysis, faculty benchmark. A majority of have implemented additional students achieved high scores exercises and activities both in on research and writing. and out of the classroom: However, students achieved • A new mentoring lower scores in the oral program that assists presentation of material. students with oral communication, including mock interviews • Peer mentoring opportunities for students who need additional assistance

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SLO (4): The graduating student will demonstrate proficiency in performing standard industry measurements with diverse tools, including calipers, micrometers, and indicators (LO 1,2).

80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher on department checklist) on a MTT 148 exercise on a machining project when measured against departmental blueprint (each semester).

90% of students achieved the benchmark. Faculty noted need for additional assistance in proper measurement techniques associated with a degree of accuracy.

As a result of analysis, faculty have modified the MTT 148 curriculum to include additional exercises and activities in the laboratory setting: • Students now required to perform selfinspection process for all projects (to be evaluated by instructor) • Students placed in small groups structured to facilitate peer mentoring with students to promote selfconfidence

PO (1): Machine Tool faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty attended a minimum of two professional development activities, including training on Okuma Genos controls and lathes and training in Haas ST20 controls and lathes. Representative participated in the 2012-2013 Master Teacher program and Leadership Wallace State.

Professional development strengthened curriculum on lathe operation and applications. As a result of analysis, faculty identified specific areas of emphasis for 2013-2014: • Advanced training on CMM • Develop stronger network of industry contacts and mentors

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PO (2): Machine Tool faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

for faculty and students • Attend Solid Works (industrial software program) seminar • Attend SurfCam (industrial software) seminar 80% of graduates will report 100% of graduates on most To sustain these high results, satisfaction with the quality and recent graduate survey (2012) faculty have upgraded efficacy of instruction, rated overall program quality as machines to industrial curriculum, assessment, “Excellent.” No negative standards, encouraged students teaching pedagogies, and ratings on any of 21 measures. to display personal projects to instructional resources (each make lab sessions more spring semester). appealing, and provided mentoring on a regular basis. An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Machine Tool Advisory Committee met 9.20.13 with nine members in attendance. The main topics of discussion included recruiting and marketing of program, NIMS certification being offered, and the need for future equipment upgrades.

As a result of discussion, faculty have increased recruiting efforts in area high schools. Faculty are preparing a budget request for equipment upgrades for 2014 budget hearings.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 28%, 20%, and 29%

To improve graduation rates, faculty have partnered with PAVES (life coaching, etc.) to

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collected each spring).

respectively.

encourage and support students to completion.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 47% and 56% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 81% and 85%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have partnered with PAVES (life coaching, etc.) to encourage and support students to completion. Faculty have also strengthened advising and mentoring.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

Of the 2013 graduates whose employment status is known, 100% are employed in-field (Unknown = 1).

To sustain these rates, faculty have developed professional development targets in 20132014 to greatly expand industry contacts and participation. Faculty also now require that students participate in mock interviews.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

While faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and resources, faculty itemized a list of needed improvements and upgrades.

As a result of analysis, faculty have prepared proposal for upgrades and improvements for spring 2014 institutional budget hearings.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

No employer responses received on latest survey.

To improve employer satisfaction, faculty have developed professional development targets in 20132014 to greatly expand industry

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contacts and participation.

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Analysis and Planning: Machine Tool Technology Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 8.1, 8.2, and 8.3. Facilities: The MTT/CNC/T&D area consists of two classrooms, two computer labs, two shop/labs, two inspection labs, a tool room, two storage rooms, and four offices. Classrooms: These classrooms accommodate 18 to 22 students comfortably. The rooms have Smart Boards, Computers, Elmos, projectors, and dry eraser boards. Needs: Larger classrooms to accommodate more students. Computer Labs: One computer lab has several outdated computers. The other computer lab has updated computers that require software to enable us to meet industry standards. Both labs have furniture that needs to be replaced. Needs: new computers software updates, and computer furniture. Laboratory: The labs are in the process of updating the machines; however, the program still has several machines that need to be updated. The consumable items are in short supply and need to be increased in quantity and variety. The immediate improvement of the lab is the greatest need of the program. A lab photo is included as Attachment 8.4. Needs: Modern equipment replacing older machines. As enrollment grows, faculty become more aware of limited space available. Inspection Labs: The labs are located on both ends of the building and one lab has a terrible leak over one of our expensive inspection machine tools. Needs: Combine both labs into one lab in the center of both shops to protect machines and provide access to all students. Tool Room: The tool room contains shelving and attachment for machines. It is adequate for present needs. Storage Room: Contains lessor-used oil used to maintain machines, consumable items, and housekeeping supplies and is adequate. Offices: The offices are largely adequate. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 8.5. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 8.6, and the presidential response is Attachment 8.7 with actions related to this program highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 8.8.


Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 8.9. Personnel: The MTT/CNC/T&D program is staffed by three full-time instructors, and two evening adjunct instructors. The program chair has been in this position for 3 years, and has worked in the industry for 35 years. A vita is included as Attachment 8.10, and professional development record as Attachment 8.11. All members of the staff are motivated, student-oriented and positive contributors to the program. Needs: Due to the nature of lab environment and increased enrollment a labassistant would provide a safer environment for the students. Equipment: The equipment that is useful in carrying out academic and laboratory instruction within an MTT/CNC/T&D program is necessary to provide students with “hands on� activities while training in the program. The equipment that is necessary to properly carry out the goals of the program is separated into three categories: Conventional Machine Tools, Computer Numerical Control machine tools, and Tool and Die machine tools. Our machines simulate what would be expected in an actual manufacturing environment. Needs: Updating aged machines, transition over to more computerized machine tools, and updating presses in our Tool & Die department. As the program moves forward it will make these acquisitions a high priority.

Other Academic Resources: Due to the high level of accuracy needed by future employers, students need more project-based competencies that require more time in the lab environment. While the conceptualizations are very demanding and often very difficult to master for most students, eighty percent of the student’s learning time occurs in the labs. The use of optimal lab resources makes learning goals more attainable. Computer-based resources are helpful and offer students additional avenues to achieve critical comprehension. The use of internet videos, interactive software, and informational websites are very helpful to students who may lose focus in lecture sessions and have a wide range of learning styles. The program needs to maintain technological resources in multiple areas of the facility.

Program Highlights: Within the program, students are exposed to the foundational principles of the sciences that shape MTT/CNC/T&D theory and practice. These concepts are technically challenging and require study and much practice. Math, Trigonometry, and Blueprint comprehension is a high-priority focus within the program. A good understanding of problem-solving techniques helps to be successful within the machining industry as a technician or machinist. Also, the program offers multiple certifications that prepare the students for future higher-level certifications and aid students in obtaining entry-level employment.

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Future Plans: The department must continually evolve in a positive direction to become the best and remain the best. The industry is continually in a state of change and demands higher levels of achievement and comprehension from its work force. Moving forward, the department will continue to encourage high levels of academic achievement in order to meet workplace needs. Students will be exposed to the traditional scientific principles that are the foundation of the industry. Students will be trained in the use of all the required tools and equipment to perform tasks in a manner that meets all requisite standards. In addition, the program will move into new areas of science that are becoming a part of the industry. It is a goal to train students to be prepared for immediate entry into the industry workforce as qualified technicians by offering them a basic education that will support them in specializing in many different areas. In addition, the program intends to guide students toward further educational attainment, encouraging them to pursue careers in fields such as engineering, education, and business.

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Welding The Welding program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates in a certificate (60 credit hours). Program Description: This four-semester program offers a guide to the skills and knowledge in the safe operation of the following welding processes and equipment operation: oxy-acetylene flame cutting, plasma arc cutting, welding and brazing equipment, electric arc welding equipment for shielded metal arc, and others. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level positions in industrial welding To achieve this mission, the Welding faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: Welding Acronyms: Oxy-fuel Cutting—OFC; Plasma Arc Cutting---PAC; Carbon Arc Cutting—CAC; Shielded Metal Arc Welding—SMAW; Gas Metal Arc Welding—GMAW; Flux Core Arc Welding—FCAW; Gas Tungsten Arc Welding--GTAW

1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate proficiency in the manual oxy-fuel cutting (OFC) of carbon and structural materials (LO 1,4).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a portfolio of lab assignments in WDT 122: SMAW/OFC Cutting lab (every fourth semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

70% of students achieved the benchmark. Students performed above standard on OFC straight-line cutting (73%) and OFC set-up and shutdown of equipment (77%). However, students performed below benchmark on OFC Thick Material Cutting (45%), OFC Thin Material Cutting (55%), and OFC Beveling (64%).

As a result of analysis, the following additional learning modules of instruction have been added: • Hands-on activities in various cutting operations (for example, for the straight line activity, students given opportunities for additional practice utilizing peer monitors)


SLO (2): The graduating student will demonstrate proficiency in manual plasma arc cutting (PAC) and carbon arc cutting (CAC) operations, meeting all industrial safety standards (LO 1,4).

SLO (3): The graduating student will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the skills and practices associated with entry-level welding employment, including Shielded Metal Arc Welding (MAW), with an emphasis on low carbon steel alloys (LO 1,3,4).

Hands-on activities in various angular and radium cutting operations (for example, to increase proficiency in beveling, students give opportunities for additional practice utilizing peer monitors). 80% of graduating students will 75% of students achieved the As a result of analysis, the achieve a passing score benchmark. Students performed following modules of (defined as 70% or higher) on well on carbon arc cutting instruction have been added: the first attempt on manual (77%) and set-up and shutdown • Hands-on activities in skills accreditation checklist of carbon arc equipment (73%). various cutting prior to graduation (WDT123Students scored lower on operations designed for SMAW/PAC/CAC, every plasma arc straight cutting more student practice fourth semester). (32%) and plasma arc beveling • Hands-on activities in (55%). defective weld discontinuity removal 80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a comprehensive lab task evaluation that addresses entrylevel industrial employment expectations against accreditation checklist (WDT122-SMAW/OFC

75% of students achieved the benchmark. Students scored well on SMAW pad of beads activity (91%) and SMAW tjoint fillet welds in the overhead position (86%). However, faculty noted that students needed more instruction on the SMAW fillet welds in the horizontal position

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As a result of analysis, the following modules of instruction have been added: • Hands-on activities in SMAW were developed for student practice • Hands-on activities in instructional 3-D manual on the SMAW process (for example,


PO (1): Welding faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): Welding faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

Cutting Lab, every fourth semester).

(77%) and SMAW t-joint fillet welds in the vertical position (82%).

students were given additional practice opportunities on the Virtual Reality Welding Simulator In any two-year period, all full- 100% of full-time faculty have As a result of these activities, time faculty will attend a completed multiple faculty exposed to trends minimum of two internal or professional development shaping welding industry. external professional activities, including updated OSHA certifications enhanced development activities that OSHA certifications at the lab and classroom safety address industry trends and best University of Alabama, ATN protocols. As a result of practices (data collected each certification on basic hydraulics attending the OSHA workshop, spring semester). and troubleshooting, AMI faculty placed additional orbital pipe welding training, emphasis on workplace safety, and updated AWS welding particularly in enhancing inspector certification. Also instruction in open circuit served as Contest Chairman for voltage on how to avoid Skills USA welding electrical shock while using competition and Educational SMAW welding equipment. Chair for the Greater Huntsville chapter of the AWS. 80% of graduates will report Only one response on latest To improve graduate satisfaction with the quality and graduate survey. Response satisfaction rates, faculty have efficacy of instruction, (N=1) showed “Excellent� in increased opportunities for curriculum, assessment, all areas. Repeat in spring extensive practice in labs on teaching pedagogies, and 2014. areas identified as weaknesses. instructional resources (each spring semester). An advisory committee comprised of external

The Welding Advisory Committee met 1.15.13, with

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As a result of the 2013 advisory committee meeting, faculty


practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

four state representatives in attendance. Key items discussed included an industry overview and company needs assessment by two industry representatives and the need to continue to upgrade CNC laser cutting and orbital and automated welding technologies as opportunities arise.

have identified additional funding needs, presented in the 2013 budget hearings. Key items of equipment received high priority from the Administrative Council and have been acquired, thereby enhancing curriculum and labs. Faculty have also encouraged completion and readiness through peer tutoring to improve student support.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 5%, 20%, and 21% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have increased one-onone advising for students. Faculty have also increased use of peer monitors in lab exercises. Students have been given more practice and instruction in successfully completing the American Welding Society (AWS) certification test.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 36% and 39% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 76% and 74%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have increased one-onone advising and increased use of peer monitors in lab exercises.

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90% of graduates will be 100% of graduates are working pursuing a higher degree or in-field. employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have required that students create a welding portfolio that represents their knowledge of industry-standard welding practices. Faculty also have encouraged student participation in job fairs and industry visits.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported overall satisfaction with the facilities and instructional resources, but identified a need for upgrades of computer labs. Program has incorporated new, state-of-the-art technologies, including virtual welding capability.

As a result of analysis, faculty have prepared request for 2014 budget hearings for upgrades to computer systems used in classrooms and labs.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

92% of graduates passed the Certification exam offered by the American Welding Society on the first attempt.

To improve certification pass rates, students have been provided with mock-up certification tests to allow them to practice skills and increase confidence in test-taking.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected

No employer surveys conducted.

To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty have reinforced skills identified as important on surveys and

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each summer)

interaction with practitioners. Faculty have continued aggressive program of professional development to remain current in industry trends and practices.

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Analysis and Planning: Welding Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 9.1, 9.2, and 9.3. Facilities: The Welding Technology area consists of a medium classroom, a computer lab, a laboratory, a student locker area, and one office. Medium Classroom: The medium classroom accommodates several students with very limited seating, which does not allow for expanding classroom seating. It has an outdated smart-board and an overhead projector that is in need of repair or replacement. Needs: Updated smart-board, smart-board computer software, and operating computer. Welding/Diesel Computer Lab: The computer lab has twenty-four new computer systems, an overhead projector with an outdated operating computer for symposium. This computer lab is used for online evaluations and weld inspection demonstrations. Needs: Welding/Diesel computer lab needs to replace operating symposium computer. Laboratory: The laboratory has fifty-one welding booths utilizing multi-process welding equipment with process training capabilities of SMAW, GMAW, FCAW, and GTAW and each having individual fume extraction arms for a safe training environment. There are six manual oxy-fuel/plasma cutting stations with two fume extraction exhaust hoods providing plasma fume protection for students. The laboratory has CNC water-jet and plasma arc cutting equipment, and a robotic arc welding cell. The lab also utilizes 3-D virtual welding simulators. There is a horizontal band saw, pipe beveling equipment, and an iron-worker that is used for welding environment training. A lab photo is included as Attachment 9.4. Needs: Older inverter technology multi-process welding power sources will require replacement. Student enrollment is at capacity. To meet the demands of student enrollment, additional welding and cutting booths will need to be increased. Offices: The office has recently been remodeled and meets expectations. Needs: Updated computer systems and add an additional telephone. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 9.5. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 9.6, and the presidential response is Attachment 9.7 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 9.8.


Personnel: The Welding Technology program is staffed by a full-time instructor, two part-time lab assistants, and an evening adjunct instructor. The program chair has been in this position for 18 years, and has worked in the industry for 36 years. A vita is included as Attachment 9.9, and professional development record as Attachment 9.10. All members of the staff are motivated, student oriented, and positive contributors to the program. Needs: College will need to consider employing an additional full-time welding instructor as program continues to grow. Program Highlights: The Welding Technology Department is a “State of the Art” training facility, utilizing programmable inverter technology with process training capabilities of SMAW, GMAW, FCAW, GTAW, Plasma arc and oxy-fuel cutting equipment. The student learning environment is safe and meets industry standards by providing fume extraction systems throughout the laboratory. Student learning is enhanced through the use of virtual welding simulators to provide instant feedback for muscle memory for various welding techniques. The program meets the standards to be classified as an American Welding Society Accredited Testing Facility and a National Center for Construction Education and Research Accredited Training Facility. Graduates are tested in accordance with the American Welding Society D1.1 Structural Welding Code-Steel; each graduate is required to pass two different welding certification credentialing exams. Future Plans: The Welding Technology Program will continuously evaluate and improve curriculum, keeping pace with industry technology and advancements. The program will continue to be the premier “State the Art Welding Facility” in the Community College System. With constant and continual improvement, the department will encourage students to achieve high academic success and advanced skill levels required by present and future industry.

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Upholstery The Upholstery program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates in a certificate (60 credit hours). Program Description: The Upholstery/Interior program prepares students to enter the workforce as a specialist in all facets of restoring and recovering furniture. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level positions in the programming and operation of highly technical computer-controlled lathes, milling machines, and other industrial equipment. To achieve this mission, the Upholstery faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The beginning student will demonstrate proficiency in following patterns to make bags and pillows (LO 1,4).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of beginning students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on an exercise in which the student follows a pattern to make a bag or pillow when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

95% of students enrolled in UPH 114 met or exceeded the benchmark. Students scored well on following instructions on preparing patterns. However, student scores reflected need for additional practice on measuring and cutting.

As a result of analysis, faculty have modified the curriculum by adding incorporating additional hands-on exercises in reading and working with patterns (e.g., students are now designing simple patterns that reinforced measuring and cutting techniques). Faculty have also added more exercises on measurement (e.g., students given worksheet on measurements). As a result of analysis, faculty added exercises on commercial

SLO (2): Graduating students will demonstrate the ability to

80% of graduating students will 92% of students enrolled in achieve a passing score UPH 218 achieved a passing


select appropriate materials in accordance with the dĂŠcor, specifications, or other considerations required by an upholstery work order (LO 2).

(defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a simulated work order that requires correlation of decorative elements and principles in appropriate material selection when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

score on required commercial sewing machine operation exercise. Even though benchmark met, student scores indicated that additional practice was needed in identifying sewing machine elements and functions.

SLO (3): The graduating student will demonstrate proficiency at commercial sewing machine operation (LO 1,4).

80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 90% or higher) on the first attempt on an exercise that requires demonstrated competence with commercial sewing machine operation when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 90% or higher) on the first attempt on a simulated work order that requires the planning, development, and execution of a sewing or upholstery pattern when measured against departmental

79% of students in UPH 215 scored 90% of higher on the pattern and layout assessment. Student scores indicated that additional support and practice were needed in measurement and layout. Students need more practice on sewing machine elements and function.

SLO (4): The graduating student will demonstrate the ability to plan, develop, and execute a sewing or upholstery pattern in accordance with work order requirements and parameters (LO 1,2,4).

75% of students in UPH 216 met the benchmark. Student scores indicated that additional support and practice were needed in centering patterns for project and on making color choices appropriate for design.

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sewing machine functions and operation (e.g., students given exercise on identifying sewing machine elements and functions). Faculty arranged for peer assistance to improve overall performance. To improve all SLOs, faculty presented request to Administrative Council for additional instructional resources. As a result of analysis, faculty added measurement and layout activities (e.g., added word problems that required accurate measurements). Faculty arranged for peer assistance to improve overall performance. Faculty also added how-to videos on measurement and layout. As a result of analysis, faculty added exercises in embroidery design (e.g., students created a design scrapbook of various embroidery patterns). Faculty arranged for peer assistance to improve overall performance as well as added how-to videos. Faculty requested computer


rubric (each spring semester). SLO (5): The graduating student will demonstrate the ability to identify and utilize upholstery tools and equipment and the proper application of design technique in working with the function, beauty, and individuality of a design plan or foundation (LO 1,2,4).

PO (1): Upholstery faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): Upholstery faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program

80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 90% or higher) on the first attempt on a capstone project that requires the proper use of tools and equipment and the proper application of design technique in working with the function, beauty, and individuality of a design plan or foundation when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

77% of students enrolled in UPH 216 met or exceeded benchmark. The following areas were identified for additional practice and support: developing blueprints and choosing appropriate fabric for design project.

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including on-campus workshops on advanced Blackboard use and external activities, such as attending computer sewing training in Albertville and the American Sewing Guild meeting in Birmingham. 80% of graduates will report On most recent graduate survey satisfaction with the quality and (2011), only one response efficacy of instruction, returned. One response (N=1) curriculum, assessment, rated overall quality of program teaching pedagogies, and “Fair�.

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embroidery program through budget hearing process. As a result of analysis, faculty added activities to reinforce measurement and layout skills (e.g., students were required to create a blueprint that organized and described each step of drapery project and provide samples of fabric, thread, etc.). Faculty arranged for peer assistance to improve overall performance. Faculty also introduced how-to videos for the design of draperies. As a result of professional development, faculty were able to gain new design ideas and view contemporary designs and colors and share this information with students.

As a result of analysis, faculty have provided more intensive advising and peer mentoring and have added field trips and other off-campus co-curricular


effectiveness.

instructional resources (each spring semester).

activities.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Upholstery Advisory Committee met 12.30. Faculty provided a program overview and tour of facilities. Members of committee provided faculty with information on new fabric used in hospitals and career opportunities associated with its installation and use.

As a result of the meeting, faculty are able to expand employment opportunities and options for graduates.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 11%, 27% and 14% respectively.

To improve graduation and retention rates, faculty have added more intensive advising and peer mentoring.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 48% and 52% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 89% and 90%.

To retention rates, faculty have provided new project opportunities for students. For example, students measured and designed curtains for the WSCC Coliseum, which gave students an opportunity to participate in a large-scale project and one that allowed

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them to make a community contribution. Faculty have also offered field trips and outside learning options, such as a trip to the World of Wheels for automotive upholstery, and committed to more intensive advising and peer mentoring. 90% of graduates will be No graduates for 2012-13 year. pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have committed to increasing program awareness among prospective employers through more field trips and off-site learning opportunities.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and resources. Itemized list of desire improvements was prepared.

As a result of analysis, faculty presented proposal for updated instructional resources at spring 2013 budget hearings.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

No employer survey conducted To increase employer due to no graduates for 2012-13 satisfaction ratings, faculty year. have committed to greater efforts to stay current in discipline, strengthen

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communication and collaboration with industry representatives, and regularly inform students of employment opportunities.

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Analysis and Planning: Upholstery Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified five program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, and 10.5. Facilities: The UPH facility is located in the Vocational Building and consists of one large classroom/workspace and a small classroom/workspace. The space also contains an additional storage area, an office, and two restrooms. Classrooms/Workspace: The larger classroom/workspace will seat 30 students with space for their upholstery projects. A photo is included as Attachment 10.6. The smaller classroom will seat approximately 12 students with space for sewing projects. Each classroom contains either a dry eraser board or a blackboard. Four computers are available for student use. The larger classroom/workspace is equipped with Smartboard technology. Sewing/Upholstery Equipment: The larger classroom contains 14 sewing machines, including three computer sewing machines. The smaller classroom contains ten sewing machines. Other equipment includes a band saw used to cut foam for upholstery projects. Needs: 2 new sewing machines in each classroom Storage Room: The storage room contains upholstery and sewing supplies, cloth, zippers, welt cords, buttons, burlap, denim, dust covers and teaching aids that are regularly used. Offices: The office is adequate. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 10.7. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 10.8, and the presidential response is Attachment 10.9 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 10.10.

Personnel: The UPH program is staffed by one full-time instructor who teaches all UPH classes. The program chair has been in this position for 31 years, and has worked in the industry for 32 years. A vita is included as Attachment 10.11, and professional development record as Attachment 10.12. Experienced students serve as mentors and are positive contributors to the program. Needs: A lab assistant would provide needed student support and assistance in the program.


Equipment: The majority of sewing machines are five years old and older—only one sewing machine is new and updated with current technology. The other sewing machines need to be either replaced or updated. Needs: 2 new sewing machines and software updates for the other sewing machines are needed. Additionally the UPH program would benefit from additional computers for student study and research. Program Highlights: UPH students design and create items for the Future Foundation auction. These items are training objects for students but are used in the Foundation auction to raise money for scholarships. To provide students with diverse learning opportunities, field trips to World of Wheels and fabric companies located in Birmingham, Al are organized each year. Students are encouraged to share their accomplishments in the UPH program by posting photographs on Facebook and other social media. Additionally, students gather often to share a meal and discuss their projects and the upholstery business.

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Agriculture/Horticulture The Agriculture/Horticulture program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates with either a long (60 credit hours) or short (22 credit hours) certificate. Program Description: This curriculum is designed to prepare students for various jobs in local agriculture, business, and industry. Students learn skills in greenhouse and nursery operations, landscaping, seeding, transplanting and planting flowers, trees, and shrubs, and grafting plants (Catalog, p. 85). Mission: To prepare graduates of the agriculture production/horticulture program for positions as technicians and sales consultants with garden centers and related industries and to perform landscape installations and maintenance work on commercial, residential, and recreational properties. To achieve this mission, the Agriculture/Horticulture faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to perform basic engine repair on agricultural equipment (LO 2).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students enrolled in AGP 152 will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on the simulated repair of an item of agricultural equipment when measured against a departmental rubric (each fall and spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% of students passed the written portion of an exam on the fundamentals of engine repair. 70% were able to successfully rebuild an engine in the exercise to working order. After remediation, the pass rate increased to 90%.

To improve this outcome, faculty have increased the time spent in class and lab on emphasizing the underlying principles of mechanics and more time identifying engine parts and how they work as an integrated whole. Faculty have also included more repair videos on how different parts work individually, students gained understanding of the entire process, which enabled


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate the ability to identify ornamental plants customarily used in landscaping (LO 4)

80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score on the first attempt (defined as 75% or better) on a departmental examination on identifying ornamental plants (each fall and spring semester).

After completing the theory portion of the class associated with this outcome, 70% of students tested on visual identification of specific plants in the nursery achieved a passing score. After remediation, consisting of intensive review, 86% achieved a passing score.

SLO (3): Students will demonstrate the ability to plan and organize a residential landscape project (LO 1,2,4).

80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a residential design project incorporating basic design principles, functional diagrams, appropriate use of plant materials, planting, site

95% of students achieved a passing score. Faculty noted that this was a critical assessment measure as these principles are utilized and applied in other courses.

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faculty to better instruct students on how these repair principles apply to other engines used in Agriculture, whether 2- or 4-stroke engine. To improve this outcomes and student learning, faculty increased emphasis in classroom and labs and expanded plant selection to include more plants as well as showing plants at more stages of growth. Faculty also added more reference material and allowed students to work in groups in greater frequency for peer assistance in identifying plants in a real environment that differs at times from photos and drawings in textbooks. To improve this outcome, faculty have given students more design assignments in which they must use scaled drawings for plants to building scale, and design landscapes for residential as well as commercial settings.


SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Agriculture/Horticulture faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Agriculture/Horticulture faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

preparation, and special composition when measured against a departmental rubric (each fall and spring semester). 90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

2013-2014

100% of full-time faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including attendance of a workshop at Auburn University on small-engine repair and oncampus workshops in teaching pedagogy and the optimal use of instructional resources. Faculty also hosted professional development for area secondary agriculture teachers. 80% of graduates will report The program produced only satisfaction with the quality and one graduate in 2012-13. efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

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2013-2014

As a result of these activities, faculty were able to enhance the curriculum in the area of agricultural equipment repair. Faculty are attending a January 2014 conference on Sustainable Agriculture.

To improve graduate satisfaction rates, faculty have expanded electives that better match areas of student interest. Faculty have also increased student engagement and exposure by adding field trips to supplement classroom


instruction. An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Horticulture/Agriculture Advisory Committee met 9.23.12 with broad industry representation. Members of the committee were given tour of greenhouses, labs, and nursery areas, and overview of courses offered, materials used, and requirements for certificate and AAS degree. Members expressed need for more “farm equipment� if college was starting a Sustainable Agriculture Program.

As a result of meeting and suggestions from members, faculty have purchased Ball Red Book to keep up with new varieties of plants, requested Dr. Ponder at Auburn for reference book he authored on identification of trees, and contacted Dr. Reddy at Alabama A&M for identification of book he uses on medicinal plants and explored speaking opportunity at Wallace.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the last three cohorts (2008, 2009, and 2010) were 11%, 0, and 33% respectively. The numbers, however, are low. Only three total graduates in these cohorts.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have changed the structure of many classes to incorporate curriculum-related field trips and have expanded the offering of electives that better match areas of student interest, e.g. in Forestry, Hydroponics for Greenhouse and Nursery careers, and Floriculture.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012

To improve retention rates, faculty have changed the

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fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

were 44% and 18% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 76% and 89%.

structure of many classes to incorporate curriculum-related field trips and have expanded the offering of electives that better match areas of student interest, e.g. in Forestry, Hydroponics for Greenhouse and Nursery careers, and Floriculture.

90% of graduates will be Only one graduate in 2012-13 pursuing a higher degree or year. Status of employment is employed and 75% will be unknown. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have increased networking with area employers, particularly in promoting the program and trying to locate internships and co-op opportunities for students.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources.

Although faculty reported overall satisfaction, they have begun work on a list of updates in preparation for the institutional budget hearings in spring 2014.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected

With only one graduate, employer surveys were not conducted.

To improve employer satisfaction, faculty have broadened electives to better prepare graduates for areas of

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each summer)

specialization. Faculty have also increased networking activities to make program more responsive to employer needs and expectations.

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Analysis and Planning: Agriculture/Horticulture Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 11.1, 11.2, and 11.3. Facilities: The computer lab is not adequate. A lab photo is included as Attachment 11.4. There are only five computers available for students to use. Also the wireless internet capabilities are not adequate. Some areas of the classroom pick up the wireless signal while other areas do not. Most classes average 12-15 students so students have to share computers, which reduces project work time. There is only one classroom currently. With another Agriculture Program being planned, there will be a need for another classroom with technology, including a computer, projector and whiteboard for instructional use. Also, the current computer lab and classroom were not in the original building design, and the heating and cooling of these rooms is not good. Thermostats are located in areas where they do not carry the desired temperature to these rooms. Department tools are limited. Many hand-tools are old and in limited quantities so students have to share them. The tool room is adequate and meets departmental needs. Large implements are old and in need of constant repair. Some are left outside in the weather which impacts the condition of them. There is a need for a large storage building to store all large equipment and supplies in and to keep better control of inventories. With more programs being developed, there will be a need for more greenhouses and large equipment, or a need to replace some of the older equipment that is worn out. Offices are adequate for current needs. There is a need for different laboratories. To enhance learning of propagating, there needs to be a sterile environment for a Tissue Culture Lab. This would enable students to clone plants successfully and learn about developing new varieties and perform more research. The Horticulture Program is staffed by one full-time instructor, two full-time lab instructors/laborers, and two part-time employees. The program chair has been in this position for 1.5 years, and has worked in the industry for 34 years. A vita is included as Attachment 11.5, and professional development record as Attachment 11.6. As new programs are developed, there will be a need for another instructor. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 11.7. Program Goals and Plans: As the program is being modified to current trends, there is a need for a greenhouse for Hydroponics and Aquaculture, for two Highbay greenhouses for vegetable production to


show students how to multi-crop to expand crop production, a Lath-house to provide shade for plants that need shady environments since the program has limited shade available. And plans are to put in an orchard for classroom learning in grafting and budding, insect management, pruning and production methods. Also, plans are in place to install sod plots for the Turfgrass Management courses. There will be a need for equipment to go along with this program such as spray equipment, sod cutters, aerators and more. After talking with industry professionals, the program continues to change to provide information to students so that they can be industry ready. Live work labs are being developed to enhance their “hands on� abilities. Students are exposed to situations that constantly change due to environmental conditions and the effects they have on plants they are working with. This reinforces their understanding of agricultural practices. Also continued partnerships with local industry and networking with High School Ag instructors help recruit more students into the program.

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Automotive Manufacturing Technology/Electronics The Automotive Manufacturing Technology (AUT) and Electronics (ILT) program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates in either a certificate (27 or 58 credit hours) or an AAS degree (74 credit hours). Program Description: The AUT and ILT program provides training for students in electronic concepts, electronic/electrical test equipment, industrial automation, fluid power, communication systems and protocols, biomedical equipment, sensors, AC and DC motors and controls, machining, welding, and robotics equipment and prepares them for entry-level employment in local and regional manufacturing facilities. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level employment as technicians in manufacturing, communications, biomedical, power production, and related industries. To achieve this mission, the Automotive Manufacturing/Industrial Electronics faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness:

1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate mastery of fundamental principles regarding direct and alternating current and their properties, including safety, terminology, components, color coding, and associated electrical theory (LO 4).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students successfully completing the introductory ILT series of courses will achieve a passing score (defined as 70 or higher) on the first attempt on an examination that encompasses fundamental principles of direct and alternating current and their properties (each fall and spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

Deferred to 2013-2014

Deferred to 2013-2014


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate the ability to perform foundational arithmetical calculations, including measurement of properties of a circuit, applications of Ohm’s Law and Watt’s Law, and the use of scientific calculators and other types of test equipment (LO 2,4).

80% of students successfully completing the introductory ILT series of courses will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a problem set related to foundational arithmetical calculations (each fall and spring semester).

100% of students successfully completing ILT 106 and 107 scored 70% or higher on the first attempt on a problem set solving calculations related to basic electronic circuit properties and measuring them correctly.

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate the ability to perform troubleshooting of simple and integrated circuits (LO 2,4).

80% of students successfully completing first 12 hours of instruction will receive a passing score (defined as 90% or better) on a troubleshooting exercise delivered through a

100% of students who successfully completed ILT 106 and 107 scored 80% or higher on the computergenerated troubleshooting exercises.

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Although the benchmark was achieved, several modifications have been made to effect additional improvement. A comprehensive review process has been added to ensure that students more firmly grasp fundamentals. Secondly, the faculty have added more intermediate practice problems in specific areas, such as seriesparallel circuits in ILT 106, to ensure that students master basic concepts. Faculty have added more online resources to encompass different learning styles to allow students to perform more hands-on labs to augment classroom instruction and labs. For example, introduced students to sites such as www.wisc-online.com where students can receive supplemental instruction and guidance in electronics. Although the benchmark was achieved, several improvements have been made as a result of analysis. Students are now required to perform more hands-on labs related to


computer-generated simulation (administered each fall and spring semester).

SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Automotive Manufacturing Technology/Electronics faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

2013-2014

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including automation training with Rockwell Automation in Birmingham and NIDA Online Course Development workshop conducted by equipment suppliers.

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computer simulated troubleshooting exercises. For example, students are now required to perform the practice exercises at least three times, showing the results to the instructor, before attempting this instrument. Students enrolled in ILT 106 and 107 are placed in mentorship roles with peers to help them understand best practices in constructing and troubleshooting circuits. Mentorship is accomplished by students’ having a lab partner throughout the courses. 2013-2014

As a result of these activities, faculty have enhanced curriculum in manufacturing automation in classroom and labs. Increased networking with area practitioners.


PO (2): Automotive Manufacturing Technology/Electronics faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

On most recent graduate survey, only one response received. Overall quality of program from response (N=1) shows “Very Good”.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have endorsed departmental participation in new life coaching program under the aegis of a DOL grant. Have also expanded mentorship among peers within the department.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

Two Advisory Committee meetings were held on 3.20.12, each conducted by a fulltime faculty member. Among the items discussed were the growth of the Biomedical technician field in electronics, the importance of training in troubleshooting, and the ongoing need for “soft skills” for graduates seeking entrylevel employment.

As a result of discussion, faculty were made aware of significant industry trends and the desirability of adding VFDs and Servo motors for training purposes. Faculty also have increased emphasis on soft skills such as resume preparation, interviewing skills, and machine-to-machine adaptability. Links with potential employers were strengthened.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 fall cohorts was 27%, 36%, and 16% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have endorsed departmental participation in new life coaching program under the aegis of a DOL grant. Have also expanded mentorship among peers within the department.

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Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 44% and 54% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 69% and 75%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have endorsed departmental participation in new life coaching program under the aegis of a DOL grant. Have also expanded mentorship among peers within the department.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

95% of 2013 graduates were employed and 79% were employed in-field within ninety days of graduation.

To improve job placement rates, faculty have begun to aggressively pursue more employment options for graduates. One example has been multiple contacts with Nissan in TN.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported satisfaction with the program facilities, including labs, and instructional resources.

As a result of analysis, faculty are preparing a budget request to the Administrative Council for additional equipment in networking and industrial communications.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

66% of students passed the ISCET exams on the first attempt.

To improve pass rates, faculty have increased the number of practice tests and exercises, particularly in areas where students are weakest, as well as supplemental online content.

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80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

One response from 2013 employer survey rated overall preparation of graduate as “Fair”. Negative response noted was graduate needed more “machine knowledge”.

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To increase employer satisfaction, faculty are increasing coverage of industry needs at advisory committee meetings and increasing industry contacts with regional employers like Nissan, Topre, Mercedes, Rehau, and Ruskin.


Analysis and Planning: Automotive Manufacturing Technology/Electronics Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 12.1, 12.2, and 12.3. Facilities The AUT/ILT program currently occupies two classrooms and three labs. A lab photo is included as Attachment 12.4. The entire building was renovated and updated in 2008. The two classrooms are nearly identical and each can seat forty students comfortably. The labs are separated by function. The large lab is where the “core” labs are performed. It consists of forty benches equipped with 2012 dell computers, oscilloscopes, power supplies and multimeters for performing the associated labs in basic electronics. The “PLC/Robotics” lab has eighteen stations with computers (purchased in 2012) along with the other associated equipment for PLC training. The final lab is used for Fluid Power and it has three hydraulic trainers (with three more on order) and five sets of pneumatic trainers. Classroom space is one area faculty are very satisfied with, but note that as the program continues to grow and cover more diverse areas of Industrial Automation, more lab space will be required. Faculty believe the climate at WSCC is welcoming. They also feel that they are respected, supported, and valued. The AUT/ILT classrooms contain comfortable seating and space for students, as well as proper ventilation and lighting. Each classroom is equipped with current technology for instructional purposes (projector, computers, etc.). Faculty strongly agree that the services offered by the college, such as the library and student support services, are adequate. Audiovisual and computer equipment are available for students for class activities or assignments. Student support services are readily available to all students. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 12.5. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 12.6, and the presidential response is Attachment 12.7 with actions related to this program highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 12.8. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 12.9. Personnel The AUT/ILT program currently employs two full-time faculty members (one hired in August 2013). The program chair has been in this position for 2 years, and has worked in the industry for 32 years. A vita is included as Attachment 12.10, and professional


development record as Attachment 12.11. Faculty generally agree that the number of faculty is adequate both in the classroom and lab, but if the program continues to grow as expected, this position may need to be re-evaluated. Equipment The faculty strongly agree that the AUT/ILT program offers lab equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives. The AUT/ILT program currently offers lab equipment and exercises that are very relevant to what graduates will encounter when they enter the workforce. Faculty strongly agree that they have access to the supplies needed to teach labs appropriately. Faculty will be requesting additional training equipment through the 2013-2014 budget hearing process. This equipment would be in the area of networking and industrial communications as identified by faculty and the departmental advisory council.

Program Highlights The AUT/ILT program continues to be one of the premier programs in the state. While this is difficult to document or to prove, faculty know this by visiting other programs and from comments and actions by students, parents, and industrial representatives that visit the program. One example of the program’s regional reputation is a company that is physically located within three miles of one of the other colleges in the state, but which is choosing to send their apprentices and trainees to Wallace State.

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Automotive Service Technology The Automotive Service Technology (AUM) program is housed in the Applied Technology Division and terminates in a certificate (59 credit hours). Program Description: The AUM program provides training for students in effective diagnostic strategies and automotive repair for entry-level employment in local and regional automotive repair facilities. Mission: To train graduates to use effective diagnostic strategies and modern test equipment to monitor and evaluate system data for correct function and operation. To achieve this mission, the Automotive Service Technology faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness:

1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate an understanding of safety requirements relative to automotive service procedures and tool/equipment use (LO 1).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students completing the introductory sequence of AUM courses will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the OSHA 10-Hour General Industry Safety and Health tests developed for AUM 101, “Fundamentals of Automotive Technology� (each fall semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

Because of changes in progress by the sponsoring organization, the University of Alabama, the offering of the course has been deferred to 2013-14. This represents a change in sponsorship from Georgia Tech. Faculty made this change to provide a more rapid response for obtaining student completion cards and more timely response to program/instructional support. UA provided updated training

Deferred to 2013-14.


to faculty that will allow students to receive completion cards as credential for future employment. 75% of students scored at least 4 out of 5 on the work order activity. Benchmark was not met.

SLO (2): Students will demonstrate the ability to successfully complete a Work Order (developed by departmental faculty) on brakerelated repairs (LO 1).

80% of students enrolled in AUM 124 will achieve a passing score (defined as 4 or higher) on the completion of a Work Order on brake-related repairs when measured against departmental rubric (each fall semester).

SLO (3): Students will demonstrate the ability to complete a lab journal detailing specific repair procedures followed and verified for live work vehicles (LO 1,2).

80% of students enrolled in AUM 130 will achieve a passing score (defined as 4/5 or higher) on the completion of a lab journal activity detailing specific repair procedures followed and verified for live work vehicles when measured against departmental rubric (each fall semester).

60% of students scored a 4 or higher on the lab journal activity. The benchmark was not met.

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To improve student performance on the brake repair Work Order activity, the following steps have been taken: • Provide students with enhanced instruction on the components of the work order form. • Provide individualized instruction to student on industry purpose and use of a work order. To improve student performance on the lab journal/repair outcome, the following steps have been taken: • A new lab journal form was developed to help students organize and reflect better on the activity. • Faculty provided individual advising for students experiencing


SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the ability to complete a job sheet activity that demonstrates the ability to evaluate the condition of engine cylinders, including bore, taper and out-ofroundness (LO 1,2).

80% of students enrolled in AUM 220 will achieve a passing score (defined as 80% or higher) on the cylinder repair activity (each fall semester).

80% of students scored an 80 or above on the cylinder job sheet activity. The benchmark was met.

PO (1): Automotive Service Technology faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of faculty attended multiple professional development activities, which included the following training: Diagnosing Variable Valve Timing Problems – September 2012; Gasoline Direct Injection – November 2012; Diagnosing the Top Anti-Theft Problems – March 2013; Diagnosing the

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problems completing the activity Even though the benchmark was met, the following steps have been instituted to enhance student learning: • Implemented a new job sheet with more detailed direction on performance of the task. • Provided student mentoring for students needing additional instruction. • Investigated web-based media or computerized programs to help students with cylinder evaluation and measurement As a result of professional development activities, the faculty have more printed resources available relevant to current production technology and issues specific to the current automotive technology. The information is shared with students within lecturers and shop activities. Faculty have


Top GM Driveability Problems – June 2013; Diagnosing Top OBD II EVAP DTC’s – August 2013

PO (2): Automotive Service Technology faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

committed to more campus training in 2013-14 by the college’s AVC staff on the effective use of instructional resources and instructional pedagogy. 80% of graduates will report In the most recent graduate Although graduate satisfaction satisfaction with the quality and survey (2012), satisfaction was rates were high, the following efficacy of instruction, measured across 18 dimensions steps have been implemented to curriculum, assessment, with 94% satisfaction. Only enhance graduate satisfaction: teaching pedagogies, and one area, preparation to • Broadened the network instructional resources (each perform automatic transmission of potential employers spring semester). and transaxle repairs had • Provided graduates with negative response. information related to possible employment • More intensive evaluation of WSCC student course surveys To address the negative response on automatic transmission repair, students are being provided information related to manufacturer classes (note: in order for a student to achieve an advanced level of knowledge, additional training beyond the WSCC curriculum is required.) An advisory committee

The AUM advisory committee

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As a result of advisory


comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

met in October 2012 with seven members in attendance. Major topic of discussion was the standards relative to the requirements of NATEF certification.

committee review and input, the automotive program’s NATEF mid-certification assessment was completed for submission to NATEF. The review and assessment addressed concern with federal and state funding and monies available for tools and equipment.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, 2010 cohorts were 50%, 31%, and 31% respectively.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added much greater emphasis on program completion than in the past. Faculty have begun special emphasis on flex scheduling to adapt to students’ work schedules. New diagnostic equipment should strengthen student engagement.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 28% and 33% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 71% and 79%.

As a result of analysis, faculty have begun special emphasis on flex scheduling to adapt to students’ work schedules. New diagnostic equipment should strengthen student engagement. To increase retention rates, faculty have prepared proposal to Dean of Applied

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Technologies to offer two new short certificates, one specializing in under-car technology and one in underhood technologies. These short certificates would improve both retention and completion rates. 90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

83% (5 of 6) of graduates were employed in-field within ninety days of graduation. One is unknown.

As a result of analysis, faculty have developed better credentialing opportunities through proposed short certificates. Faculty have committed to more contacts with local employers. Having better diagnostic equipment should continue to improve workplace preparedness.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported satisfaction with current program facilities and instructional resources.

Although currently satisfied with resources, as a result of analysis, faculty noted the need to prepare comprehensive upgrade proposal for 2014 spring budget hearings.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

In most recent employer survey (2012), only one response received. Employer rated preparation for employment as “Very Good.� Repeat in

To address employer satisfaction survey results , the following measures will be implemented: • Develop and maintain

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spring 2014. •

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an employer information contact sheet Contact service area employers regarding potential employment needs related to graduates entering the field.


Analysis and Planning: Automotive Service Technology Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 13.1, 13.2, and 13.3. A lab photo is included as Attachment 13.4. The program chair has been in this position for 6 years, and has worked in the industry for 36 years. A vita is included as Attachment 13.5, and professional development record as Attachment 13.6. The program’s spring 2012 budget proposal is included as Attachment 13.7. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 13.8, and the presidential response is Attachment 13.9 with actions related to this program highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 13.10. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 13.11. Program Review: •

FACILITY: The Automotive Service Technology program has a facility that consists of a lab/shop area with twelve bays or stalls. Three of these are utilized for component/tool/equipment storage. One is utilized as a component service area (e.g. brake rotor/drum service, tire mounting and balance, suspension service, etc.). One bay is utilized as a securable tool room. The facility also has an Automotive Electrical/Electronic lab that houses hands-on trainers and computers with access to electronic service information. The facility provides a classroom with capacity for 30 students with Smart Board capabilities and five computers that allow students access to electronic information. This classroom is shared with the Collision Repair and Paint program. If it were possible to add another classroom to our facility, the two programs could utilize posters, graphics and storage of instructional material that would enhance both programs and provide a better learning environment for the students. At present the classroom storage is being utilized by janitorial service for storage.

TOOLS / EQUIPMENT: Faculty strive to keep program equipment up-to-date on industry equipment requirements and provides some of the latest technology available. Equipment needs that would enhance the program and increase student exposure and education include software and computer equipment that would allow for digital oscilloscope possibilities and replacement of some of the older digital volt/ohm meters (DVOMs). Through a partnership venture with the Morgan County School System and Brewer High School, the automotive program will be receiving new DVOMs and multiple scan tools from Snap-On Tools to


allow for student transition from secondary through post-secondary with credentialing from Snap-On Tool Corporation. •

FACULTY: At present the Automotive Service Technology program has one full-time day instructor/program chair with a part-time lab assistant. The parttime lab assistant serves in an adjunct capacity to teach night classes three nights per week. Both faculty maintain the training required by the agency that has certified the program (NATEF). Every opportunity is taken to participate in training that will enhance instruction and increase student’s knowledge and skills.

PROGRAM GOALS: Some of the goals set for the Automotive Service Technology program include obtaining an industry partnership that would allow students completing the program to obtain a credential from industry that would be an addition to the college’s award. The college is entering into one such partnership with Snap-On Tools and faculty hope to make the training and credential available starting in the Fall of 2014. Chrysler Corporation has been contacted and communications and negotiations are underway to offer students a path that will allow them to graduate from Wallace State with Chrysler coursespecific certifications offered while attending WSCC. These certifications will make graduates more valuable to Chrysler franchise dealerships and enhance student placement and potential earnings.

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Nursing The Nursing program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in a PN certificate (50 credit hours) or an ADN degree (72 credit hours). Program Description: The ADN program is designed to provide the necessary training to enable the graduate to fill an entry-level position as a staff nurse. Employment options include a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, home-health agencies, and outpatient surgery clinics. The program is approved by the Alabama Board of Nursing and accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN, formerly NLNAC). Graduates are eligible to write the RN National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). The PN program prepares graduates for entry-level employment in the care for ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled persons in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, private homes, group homes, and similar settings under the direction of physicians, dentists, and registered nurses. Most LPNs provide basic care, such as taking vital signs, administering medication, and performing treatments as directed. The program is approved by the Alabama Board of Nursing and accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN, formerly NLNAC). Graduates are eligible to write the LPN National Council Licensure Examination. Mission (ADN and LPN): To promote standards of excellence in nursing education through student-centered learning while emphasizing integrity, compassion, resourcefulness, and diversity. The Department of Nursing will produce graduates who are dedicated and exceptional healthcare providers committed to transforming the lives of patients, families, and the community. To achieve this mission, the Nursing faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to perform fundamental health assessments, encompassing patient history, physical examination, and basic

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of first-year students will achieve a passing score (defined as 9.7/13 or higher) on the first attempt on a simulated patient health assessment when

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

96% (127/132) of students satisfactorily completed checkoff #3 on the first attempt.

As a result of analysis, the following modifications have been made: SAM (simulated auscultation mannequin) has been acquired and integrated into curriculum to improve


symptom analysis (LO 1,2,4,5).

measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate knowledge of pharmacology principles and applications, including content addressing legal implications, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, calculations of drug dosages, medication administration, and drug classifications (LO 1,2,3).

80% of first-year students will achieve a passing score (defined as 90% or better) on a comprehensive examination addressing pharmacology principles, applications, and calculations within two attempts (each spring semester).

88% (117/133) of students met the math validation benchmark.

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate knowledge of nursing fundamental theory and practice related to the care of adults across multiple patient contexts, including issues

80% of first-year students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on an adult patient care simulation exercise addressing one or

88% (56/64) of the NUR 105 students satisfactorily completed a foundational nursing care simulation related to the safe, effective management of perioperative

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auscultation skills; more handson exercises have been integrated in labs; and documentation practice has been required during each body system session. As a result of analysis, faculty have revised plans for 2013-14 to include the following for each student: • PrepU for Pharmacology • ATI’s online “Pharmacology Made Easy 2.0 • ATI’s online Dosage Calculation and Safe Medication Administration 2.0 • Expansion of Dosage Calculation University to twice/week (faculty assistance to review dosage calculations) with timed quizzes As a result of analysis, faculty developed remediation plans for students who did poorer than expected or who failed to meet benchmark. Students were required to meet with faculty to


related to the respiratory, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, or integument systems (LO 1,2,4,5).

more system contexts when measured against a departmental rubric (each spring semester).

clients and common complications of vascular and orthopedic surgery. (Students who did not meet benchmark remediated content.)

SLO (4): The student will demonstrate knowledge of nursing fundamental theory and practice related to the care of children/infants across multiple patient contexts, including antepartal, intrapartal, and postpartal care, complications of pregnancy, newborn care, pediatric care, and diverse pediatric alterations (LO 1,2,3,4,5,6). SLO (5): The graduating LPN student will demonstrate mastery of fundamental dimensions of nursing practice, including health assessment, general adult, pediatric, and geriatric patient care, and

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on an infant of child patient care simulation exercise addressing one or more patient contexts when measured against a departmental rubric (each spring semester).

91% (77/84) of students satisfactorily completed required maternal/childcare simulations.

80% of graduating LPN students will achieve a benchmark score (defined as 850) on the HESI LPN Exit Exam (each spring semester).

85% (11/13) of students benchmarked at 850 level on HESI. (All PN graduates have passed NCLEX on first attempt, including those who did not benchmark but received personalized mediation plan from the HESI exam.)

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identify areas of strength and areas that needed further development. Common areas needing further development, such as infection control and safety, were discussed during the debriefing between students and faculty. Faculty have also added more simulation experiences to NUR 105. As a result of analysis, faculty have requested as part of equipping of new simulation labs, more realistic equipment for clinical practice. Another OB premature simulator, as well as birthing stretcher and isolette, has been ordered to facilitate access for multiple students for clinical practice.

As a result of analysis, faculty have decided to retain HESI assessment measure despite expense. HESI practice exam is considered one reason for high success rates on licensure exam.


pharmacology (LO 2,3,6). 82% (29/35) of spring cohort met benchmark. Previous results: Spring 12 34/55 62% Summer 12 31/33 94% Dec. 12 19/27 70%

SLO (6): The graduating ADN student will demonstrate mastery of fundamental dimensions of nursing practice, including health assessment, general adult, pediatric, and geriatric patient care, and pharmacology (LO 2,3,6).

80% of graduating ADN students will achieve a benchmark score (defined as 850) on the HESI RN Exit Exam NCLEX Practice Examination (each spring semester).

SLO (7): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 1,2,3,4,5,6).

90% of students participating in 100% (45/45 AD and 12/12 departmental mock interviews PN) met benchmark. will achieve a passing score (defined as 75% or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester)

PO (1): Nursing faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of faculty have participated in multiple professional development activities, addressing both pedagogy and subject-matter content. The program director, for example, attended the International Nursing Simulation/Learning Resource Centers Conference in Texas,

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As a result of analysis, faculty have begun incorporating HESI content into exams and offering HESI content reviews. (This was done for the cohort beginning summer 2012, which achieved 100% licensure pass rate.) To increase the efficacy of this outcome, faculty have developed specific interviewing instructions that have been recorded for student download through Tegrity. Faculty have also improved scoring rubric. Minor inter-rater reliability issues have been resolved. As a result of these activities, many changes occurred: Clinical simulation rubrics and INASC’s Standards of Best Practices for Simulation were discussed for adoption by faculty in addition to top simulation resources available for consideration and/or acquisition. Conferences


PO (2): Nursing faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

where leaders in simulation discuss strategies, equipment, and research associated to using simulations effectively. Trip included visit to new simulation center at University of Texas. Three faculty members also attended the Elsevier Faculty Development Conference in Las Vegas, which focused on comprehensive curriculum development and learning strategies. 80% of graduates will report 100% of spring 2013 graduates satisfaction with the quality and reported satisfaction with efficacy of instruction, overall educational experience. curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

strengthened a goal achieved in 11-12 to have a simulation component in every nursing course. These activities also led to some design modifications for the sim labs in the new Nursing building. New ideas for the integration of expanded pharmacology content was shared with all faculty, particularly those teaching NUR 104.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to

As a result of discussion, faculty have taken concerns about social media to state level and a new policy has been

The Nursing Advisory Committee met 8.24.12 with more than ten clinical partners represented. Key discussion

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To sustain these results, faculty have added, at graduates’ request, the piloting various electronic medical record formats for student practice prior to graduation. The need to have student practice with the latest equipment has led to the purchase of vital sign monitors, 12 lead EKG machines, ventilators, crash carts, etc. for patient simulations.


review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

items included improvement in the professionalism and skills of recent graduates and use of electronic devices in the workplace. Discussed the increasing use of electronic medical record-keeping in the workplace.

developed. Faculty have emphasized to students the hazards of taking electronic devices into clinical settings. Faculty have also begun piloting using electronic medical records tools to promote familiarity before students enter workforce.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

Graduation rates for the spring 10 and fall 10 cohorts were 43% and 54% respectively. Previous rates: Fall 08 95/181 52% Spg 09 98/194 51% Fall 09 97/186 52% (Data not available for PN) Faculty noted that rates are lower than desired because of a program philosophy to allow students progression options. Student can, for example, opt to go part-time, which reduces the on-time graduation rates for cohorts. Withdrawal survey data notes most common reasons for withdrawal include academic difficulty, change in health status, family

As a result of analysis, faculty have noted that shift in entrance requirements to ACT minimum scores will increase graduation and retention rates. Faculty have also implemented a Nursing Success Course at no cost to beginning students to mitigate barriers to success at the critical early stages of the program of study. Faculty have begun to target students who habitually re-enter for progression counseling. Finally, faculty have volunteered to participate in Inside Track Success Coaching Program under the aegis of a DOL grant whereby nursing students who voluntarily

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responsibilities, and family crises.

participate are assigned a trained success coach to help them overcome barriers to progression and success. (Preliminary results very positive.)

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 60% and 46%, respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 85% and 77%.

The above strategies are also designed to increase retention rates.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within 12 months of completion (data collected each spring)

For ADN 90% of 2013 graduates employed in field within ninety days of graduation. For PN, 100% either employed in-field or pursing higher educational attainment.

To sustain/improve these rates, faculty have continued practice job interviews and have increased the presence of UAB and UAH BSN programs to encourage enrollment in mobility programs. DNE chair has begun to give motivational talks to graduating PN students to encourage further degree attainment.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported satisfaction with the construction of a new $22M Nursing Building with state-ofthe-art sim labs and

Faculty note that they are in transition to a new state-of-the art facility in early 2014, which will include seven high-tech classrooms, two lecture halls, a

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conferencing capacity for the service area and beyond. Faculty collaborated extensively with the architects and contractors on the building’s configuration and equipment.

computer lab, three skills labs, and nine simulation rooms in a Simulation Center, and conference capability.

90% of graduates will pass the licensure exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

Official Alabama Board of Nursing NCLEX posting was 93%. For PN, 100%.

To sustain program’s high rates, faculty have invited all vendors who produce NCLEX review courses to provide them to interested students. The program has waived any facility reservation fees. (Hurst and Kaplan are offering review courses in December 2013.) For PN students, faculty have continued to utilize NCLEX success strategies with ATI comp predictor and HESI exit exams to pinpoint student weaknesses.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

100% of employers reported that program graduates were “prepared” or higher in ten different rating areas. The employer survey was also administered to the members of

As a result of analysis, faculty have noted that the opening of the extensive network of simulation labs will greatly enhance graduate preparedness and employer satisfaction.

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the advisory committee and Faculty have begun to 100% satisfaction was reported. emphasize managing care and Students were weakest on the time and delegation. areas of management of care and medication administration.

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Analysis and Planning: Nursing Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified seven program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 14.4, 14.5, 14.6, and 14.7. Facilities The Robert T. Wilson building has housed the Department of Nursing Education (DNE) for the last 30 years. The fifteen faculty offices as well as conference room and break area provide sufficient space for daily operations of administration. The two large classrooms and two tiered classrooms are equipped with up-to-date teaching equipment, including projectors, screens and computers. However, the classroom furniture is reported by students to be somewhat uncomfortable and does not easily allow for reconfiguration to accommodate a variety of student interactive learning activities. Other classrooms on campus are regularly utilized to accommodate nursing students, including the library auditorium and computer science auditorium. There is not a computer lab located in the nursing building, so time is scheduled for nursing students in another health science building for standardized testing, which is used every semester. Six smaller classrooms have been repurposed for lab practice and simulation in the last two years. A lab photo is included as Attachment 14.8. Faculty have been strategically involved in the planning of a new nursing facility since 2010 to address some of the issues related to student comfort, student interactive learning environments, and contemporary trends in nursing education, particularly in the area of simulation. Personnel The DNE employs 12 full-time faculty, including the program director. The program chair has been in this position for 4 years, and has worked in the industry for 40 years. A vita is included as Attachment 14.9, and a sample professional development record as Attachment 14.10. There is a full-time clinical coordinator who is classified as staff, along with two full-time clinical supervisors who are assigned to clinical hours each semester. Two full-time secretaries provide support for both programs. Part-time clinical associates are employed in addition to full-time faculty each semester to meet the clinical requirements of one clinical instructor for every eight students. In the fall of 2012, there were 19 clinical associates. There is an ongoing recruitment effort to seek qualified clinical associates to provide supervision in clinical facilities, which include over fifteen acute care hospitals and over 10 long-term care facilities, depending on the semester requirements. Resources The DNE has partnered with the campus Director of Advancement to secure over $200,000 in grant funding, which has been targeted for simulation equipment. The


current acquisition of equipment has included: ten patient care manikins, two pediatric high-fidelity manikins, and three adult high fidelity manikins, as well as ventilators, crash carts, and defibrillators. Faculty fully utilize the Tegrity classroom capture system to record each classroom lecture, which enables students to review class material online. Students in the upper division can elect the hybrid option, which requires campus attendance for labs, simulations, and testing, but allows students the option to master course material at their own pace. Clinical attendance is mandatory regardless of the class format selected. The Blackboard Course Management System allows faculty and staff to communicate without constraints on location or time through the Internet. There is a WS Nursing Facebook page that is primarily used for pre-nursing students and others who have an interest in our DNE. Course-specific materials are not posted to Facebook. However, Facebook posts ensure a widespread distribution and may be used for communication in urgent situations, such as weather. Faculty and Staff are looking forward with much anticipation to the new building being constructed for the DNE. It will provide comfortable learning environments for interactive student learning as well as spacious skills labs and a nine-room simulation center complete with high-fidelity manikins and requisite medical equipment. The simulation area will utilize two medication rooms, two control rooms for video capture and monitoring, and two debriefing rooms. This will enable the simulation equipment that has already been purchased to be fully utilized. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 14.11. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 14.12, and the presidential response is Attachment 14.13 with actions related to this program highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 14.14. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 14.15.

Program Hightlights The DNE has experienced a special year. In April 2013, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) recommended that the Associate Degree Nursing Program be granted continuing accreditation and the Practical Nursing Program be granted initial accreditation. The NLNAC commended the DNE for the following: the participation of the community with the DNE in initiatives such as the Let’s Pretend Hospital (LPH) Project, which has provided health education for over 1000 first-graders in Cullman County yearly since 2008 in partnership with the Cullman Regional Medical Center and Cullman School Systems, and KidCheck, which is a school-based screening project that has served over 2000 children in Blount County yearly since 2001 in partnership with the Karing for Kids

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Foundation in Blount County and Sightsavers. The college was also commended for its active Association of Student Nurses (ANS) chapter, which won the following awards in 2012 at the state convention – Top State Fundraiser, Chapter of Champions and Outstanding Legislative Project. In addition, NLNAC commended the DNE for its broad inclusion of simulation across the curriculum; budgetary and grant support that has facilitated extensive upgrades to the nursing lab technologies and equipment, teaching /learning resources, and faculty professional development. Other areas of strength noted by the NLNAC Board of Commissioners were college administrative support for the initiatives of the nursing program and the School of Nursing and Center for Science, which is presently under construction. In collaboration with the WSCC Alumni Association, the DNE offered the Nursing Alumni Connection, which is a seminar that has made available continuing education activities for community nurses yearly since 2007. The DNE has been the first pilot school for the Department of Postsecondary Education (DPE) to incorporate new nursing admission criteria utilizing the ACT test along with some other modifications in the admission point system. The DNE will participate in this study for three years to secure data on retention and completion.

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Clinical Lab Technician The Clinical Lab Technician program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (75-76 credit hours). Program Description: The Clinical Lab Technician program trains students for careers in medical laboratories associated with the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Technicians will utilize sophisticated laboratory equipment to examine and analyze body fluids and cells. The program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Graduates may sit for a National Certification Exam. Mission: To provide continuously improving, diversified, quality learning experiences for students in order to graduate Clinical Laboratory Technicians who perform competently and professionally in the field. To achieve this mission, the Clinical Lab Technician faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate competence in relevant laboratory clinical calculations (LO 1,2).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a set of math problems that simulate clinical calculations (each summer semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

74% of students met benchmark. Students who failed to meet the benchmark generally have poor skills in Algebra.

As a result of analysis, several program modifications have occurred: Online explanations of formula derivations were incorporated into Blackboard. More practice problems introduced and counted as homework assignments. Faculty scheduled weekly tutoring sessions. Class lectures were recorded with Tegrity and made available for student use on Blackboard.


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate laboratory skills at clinical proficiency, including such areas as terminology, basic microscopy, safety, and computations (LO 1,2).

80% of students will achieve 100% competency on departmental skills check-offs addressing diverse dimensions of clinical proficiency (each fall semester).

88% of students achieved 100% competency on departmental check-offs. Faculty noted that students who failed to meet this benchmark were chronically absent.

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To improve results, faculty made several modifications: The fully didactic CLT 293 class was aligned more closely with the entirely laboratory CLT 161 so that labs reflected material covered in 293. Comprehensive pre-lab outlines are posted in Blackboard prior to laboratory exercises. Faculty began updating and re-writing all laboratory procedures and protocols and began procedure manuals. Faculty have posted additional materials to enhance student recognition of normal and abnormal lab results and how results are accessed via inlab and online testing. More laboratory procedures were added to curricula such as trichrome stain for identification of parasites. Case studies on urinalysis, hematology, and bloodbank were posted on Blackboard. Faculty were approved for $62k in laboratory improvements through college’s budget hearing process.


SLO (3): The student will demonstrate proficiency in written communication in addressing the dimension of the clinical laboratory workplace, known as parasitology (LO 3).

SLO (4): The graduating student will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of theory and practice associated with the clinical laboratory setting, including urinalysis, microbiology, clinical chemistry, immunology, immunohematology, and general practice (LO 1,5).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a portfolio addressing a dimension of the clinical laboratory workplace when measured against departmental rubric (each summer semester).

96% of students met the benchmark on this parasitology portfolio exercise. However, exercise did not have desired efficacy because of student procrastination. Many projects hurriedly done, and learning from the exercise less than optimal.

To improve this measure, faculty made changes to the parasitology portfolio rubric. The parasite (or parasite egg) must now be drawn and key points established before or during lab. Necessary information must be obtained and documented before student is allowed to use microscope to search for parasite—student must obtain instructor checkoff. Now drawings and other information are kept in page protectors during labs to enhance adherence to safe practices before students take drawings and information home for study. 80% of graduating students will 100% of graduating students As a result of analysis, several achieve a passing score achieved a passing score. (Note changes have occurred. (defined as 70% or better) on that grades were scaled.) Because faculty observed that the first attempt on a Students were weakest on items students would not study comprehensive exit exam that related to Practicum courses. during clinicals without some addresses theory and practice grade incentive, faculty wrote associated with the clinical tests for each Practicum course laboratory setting, including and had students take tests on urinalysis, microbiology, campus at end of each clinical chemistry, departmental rotation. Review immunology, materials for each test have immunohematology, and been posted on Blackboard.

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general practice (each spring semester).

SLO (5): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Clinical Lab Technician faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

Faculty also purchased and made available online practices exams given by ASCP, Laboratory Medicine’s certification entity. The synchronization of CLT 263 and 161 was also implemented to improve outcome. One purpose of synchronization was to allow students opportunity to gather together all study materials in both courses to develop “best practices� in comprehensive review.

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each fall semester) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

Mock interviews have been incorporated into CLT 293 for implementation in 2013-2014.

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities. Academic year focused on adaptation of digital and computer technology to the classroom and development of pedagogical tools to measure efficacy of instruction for students.

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2013-2014

Many departmental changes occurred as a result of professional development. All CLT courses are now hybrid. Online instruction and testing have been enhanced, saving class time for coverage of material and allowing more targeted response to student questions. Case studies for several courses have been


PO (2): Clinical Lab Technician faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

developed online, increasing student participation in learning and intensifying critical thinking skills. Students are also able to provide instant feedback to faculty. Program and assessment protocols were strengthened, and faculty gained greater familiarity with the use and instructional applications of new digital technology. 80% of graduates will report On most recent graduate survey As a result of analysis, faculty satisfaction with the quality and (2013), overall rating for made several changes. To efficacy of instruction, quality of program was “Very improve response rates, survey curriculum, assessment, Good” or “Excellent”. process now includes a letter teaching pedagogies, and from CLT program director, instructional resources (each urging graduates to respond. spring semester). Graduate satisfaction will be enhanced by institutional approval of $62K in lab improvements. An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement,

CLT Advisory Committee met October 9, 2012 with 8 practitioners and faculty members in attendance. (Minutes and PPT sent to members unable to attend). Major items of discussion included DPE-directed changes

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As a result of the meeting, several changes occurred. CLT program obtained permission to utilize a phlebotomy waiver, which legally allows students to perform phlebotomy in campus lab. Advisory input facilitated specific items in


and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

in statewide CLT curriculum, upcoming (2015) accreditation review, and overview of program enrollment, retention and BOC pass rates. Members suggested specific improvements in coverage of phlebotomy and chemistry.

funding request to college’s Administrative Council (approved for $62K in lab improvements).

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 64%, 60%, and 57% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty raised admission standards effective summer semester 2013 to a minimum ACT score of 18 and GPA of 2.5.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 55% and 40% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 76% and 69%.

To improve retention rates, faculty began conducting discrete lab sessions in each class, which allows for lower student-to-faculty ratios. Classroom sessions (Tegrity), notes and study guides, case studies, and lab procedures have been made more available and accessible for students.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or

18 or 82% of 2013 graduates are employed-in-field with 2 also pursuing a higher education. 4 graduates are

To improve job placement rates, faculty have committed to continuing emphasis on clinical partnerships and strong

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employed in-field within ninety unknown. days of completion (data collected each fall)

advisory committee presence.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

0% of CLT faculty reported satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources, particularly with high temperatures in main lab (room 505).

As a result of analysis, faculty requested and were approved for $62K in lab improvements.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

92% of graduates sitting for the certification exam achieved a passing score.

To sustain these results, faculty have committed to making more instructional resources, including supplemental items, available to students online. Preparation for licensure exam will also be enhanced by lab improvements.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

No employer surveys returned in 2012-13. Employer feedback from Advisory Committee meeting facilitated budget proposal for lab improvements and changes in student learning experiences in phlebotomy and chemistry labs.

As a result of analysis, faculty have committed to moving to abbreviated telephone survey in 2013-14.

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Analysis and Planning: Clinical Lab Technician Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified five program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4, and 15.5. Facilities The CLT Program occupies two classrooms and a laboratory on the 5th floor of the Bevill Building. A lab photo is included as Attachment 15.6. The space is adequate for program needs in that they are large enough in area, and contain enough seating and light. Room temperature in these areas, however, has been so high as to be obtrusive (88o F in summer and winter). Multiple requests for resolution have not addressed the situation in any positive manner. The lab and classrooms are also utilized by the Medical Assistant Program two or three mornings and/or afternoons a week. The WSCC Phlebotomy Program uses the classrooms one evening a week. CLT Program space is used to its upmost efficiency. The faculty feel dissatisfied with computer technology. Though the classroom computers are adequate, they have suffered frequent failures, which resulted in the loss of expensive software. Two of our computers are old and for various reasons do not work. Faculty have always agreed that WSCC treats students as a primary concern. They are treated with respect and with a guarantee of success. However, the CLT Program lost three students (1 prospective and 2 already in the program) this semester (Fall, 2013) because of problems with financial aid. The prospective student stated that she would never return to Wallace. Personnel The CLT Program employs two fulltime and one part-time faculty member. The program chair has been in this position for 8 years, and has worked in the industry for 37 years. A vita is included as Attachment 15.7, and professional development record as Attachment 15.8. CLT Program faculty believe that faculty are respected and valued and that their opinions are important. Though faculty have problems and minor frustrations, they are problems inherent in any large organization, especially one that is striving for perfection. Any concerns of the faculty are dealt with as soon as possible, and follow-up procedures are in place. We know that in any situation, Wallace will wholeheartedly support its faculty, physically and financially. Equipment Much of the CLT Program laboratory equipment is over 20 years old. In the last 7 years, the CLT Program has received more than $80,000 in new instrumentation and equipment, including $62,000 received through the 2013 budget hearings for equipment renovations. This new equipment will give the entire lab a much needed overhaul, and it will become the lab of unlimited learning potential so anticipated by instructors.


The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 15.9. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 15.10, and the presidential response is Attachment 15.11 with actions related to this program highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 15.12. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 15.13. Program Highlights The WSCC CLT Program received the full 7-year accreditation from the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences in 2010. Of the 7 students who have taken the ASCP National Certification Exam so far in this grading period (July – December 2013) 100% have passed it. This is excellent and much improved feedback for the changes made to the program curricula beginning fall semester of 2012. In only 7 months, (beginning May of summer semester, 2011 through January of spring semester, 2012) the CLT program went from 0 courses on Blackboard to all program courses on Blackboard. Also in this timeframe, online testing was initiated for all Practicum courses. This is an extremely short time for the CLT Program faculty to have achieved such a task. This year’s WSCC 2013 Alumni of the Year Award winner was CLT Program graduate Chris Garrett, who under the direction of a consortium of pathologists from Baptist Medical Center, Princeton, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, assisted in the development of a molecular biology lab in Birmingham, Alabama. It should open this fall, 2013. Chris is a prime example of the success and prestige to be earned beginning with a Clinical Laboratory Technician Associate’s Degree.

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Dental Assisting The Dental Assisting program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in a certificate (50 credit hours) or an AAS degree (60 credit hours). Program Description: Upon successful completion of this program, graduates will be prepared to function as Dental Assistants in dental offices, hospitals, and clinics. The Dental Assisting program is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation and has been granted the accreditation status of approval without any reporting requirements. Graduates are qualified to take the National Certification Examination administered by the Dental Assisting National Board. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment as Dental Assistants in dental offices, hospitals, and clinics. To achieve this mission, the Dental Assisting faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to perform an oral presentation on an aspect of dental assisting theory and applications (LO 3).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “C” or better) on the first attempt on an oral presentation on an aspect of dental assisting theory and applications when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester)

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% of students achieved a “C” or better on the first attempt on oral presentations. Students did well in the actual research of topic, but had difficulty in choosing topic.

As a result of analysis, several changes were made, including the following: 1. More time defining “new dental trends;” 2. Added a learning module for on-line research in the first weeks of DNT 100. 3. Added an “Open Tutor Time” for assistance in developing research topic.

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate the ability to

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 80%

94% of students achieved a passing score of 80% or higher

Although the students performed well in the software


utilize electronic dental records (LO 1, 4).

or higher) on the first attempt on computer exercises in Eagle Soft practiced management software (each spring semester).

on their first attempt on Eagle Soft practice management software.

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate mastery of the dental case study approach to clinical practice (LO 2).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 80% or higher) on the first attempt on a case study project when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

SLO (4): The student will demonstrate the ability to expose a diagnostic series of radiographs (LO 1, 4).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 80% or higher) on lab examination addressing the ability to expose a diagnostic series of radiographs (each spring semester).

exercises, several had difficulty obtaining the software and/or getting the software to load on computers. Change made: Faculty utilized the tutorial version of Softdent that is installed already on computers in student lab to complete exercises rather than purchasing the CD and workbook from Eagle Soft. The learning experience is the same without the stress on the students of software compatibility issues that have been experienced in the past. 86% of students achieved a As a result of analysis, faculty score of 80% or higher on the realized that students needed case study assessment. Most more practice with case studies students able to rationalize since this exercise significantly results given, but weak in improved critical thinking. critical thinking when facts not Additional case studies have obviously presented. now been added to the curriculum. 100% of students achieved a To improve future results, score of 80% or higher on the repetitive errors will be radiology lab practical. Several addressed earlier in semester. common errors were observed In addition, new radiology during evaluation: repetitive equipment has been purchased errors of film placement, with funding from a angulation, and tube placement. Department of Labor grant,

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SLO (5): The student will demonstrate competence in relating to diverse populations in a simulated clinical environment (LO 3, 5).

PO (1): Dental Assisting faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Dental Assisting

100% of students will participate in a community outreach project for area school children representative of diverse populations.

100% of students achieved a score of 80% of higher on their community presentations. Preparation was good overall. Weakness observed in presentation lengths and in need to more fully consider the age and attention span of target diverse group. In any two-year period, all full- 100% of fulltime faculty time faculty will attend a attended multiple professional minimum of two internal or development activities, which external professional included sending development activities that representatives to the ADEA address industry trends and best Program Directors Conference, practices (data collected each Dental Hygiene Meth Ed spring semester). Accreditation workshop, and Clinical Educators Workshop. Faculty represented at the American Association of University Colleges and Universities Annual General Education Assessment Conference at the University of Vermont in May, 2013. 80% of graduates will report On the most recent graduate

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which will give students more opportunities to take diagnostic radiographs in the more advanced formats they will encounter in the workplace. As a result of analysis, a learning unit on diversity has been added to DNT 113. One focus of the new unit is on helping students identify and better understand diverse and disenfranchised populations they will encounter in their clinical practice. Many curricular changes occurred as a result of professional development. Quality Assurance protocols were adopted, program and course assessments were strengthened, and faculty gained greater familiarity with the use and instructional applications of new Digital and Computerized Practice technology.

To improve graduate


faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

survey (2012), 100% of respondents rated overall quality of education preparation as “Good� or better. No negative ratings reported.

satisfaction rates, faculty have given students more opportunities to take diagnostic radiographs in the more advanced formats they will encounter in the workplace.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

Advisory Committee held 5.3.13 with six practitioners in field in attendance. Attendees completed advisory surveys and were given a tour of facilities and clinic, highlighting new equipment and instructional resources.

As a result of the meeting, the faculty acted on members’ recommendation to include more use of practice management software and digital radiography. These items were purchased and implemented in fall 2013.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 95%, 87%, and 95% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have volunteered to have dental students participate in the new life-coaching program under the aegis of DOL grant.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected

Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 100% to 95%. Fall-to-fall not applicable. Program concludes in Summer.

To improve retention rates, faculty have volunteered to have dental students participate in the new life-coaching

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each spring).

program under the aegis of DOL grant.

90% of graduates will be 56% of graduates are employed pursuing a higher degree or in-field. 19% are employed outemployed and 75% will be of-field and 19% are unknown. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have created an alumni Facebook page where job openings can be posted.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

As a result of analysis, new computers for classroom, clinic, and offices obtained through Perkins funds. New Smart Boards received through technology fees. New x-ray equipment received through DOL grant, including digital sensors and digital panoramic machine. Have begun work with synchronizing management software with present IT infrastructure. Updated grading and tracking software will be requested in next round of budget hearings. In April 2013 budget hearings, requests made for updated instructional resources, including x-ray manikins,

0% of faculty reported satisfaction with program facilities and resources. Among the areas of concern were slow and outdated office and lab computers, Smart Boards not working properly, outdated xray equipment not representative of current workplace technology, grading/tracking system outdated and subject to human error, and new patient management software not compatible with WSCC network. Many instructional resources old, malfunctioning, and/or not representative of current equipment found in workplace (e.g., dental hand-

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pieces and ultrasound machines).

dental hand-pieces, ultrasonic machines, and new dental chairs. Future plans include additional dental chairs, model trimmers, and ultrasonic cleaning equipment.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

100% of 2012 graduates who attempted the certification exam passed on the first attempt.

As a result of analysis, faculty have committed to continuing to stress importance of certification, particularly in the event that the student is considering working in another state where certification is a requirement for practice. (Faculty have noted that because certification is not required in Alabama and the cost of the exam is high, most students elect not to take it.)

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

100% of employers on the most recent survey reported overall quality of graduate preparation as “Excellent.�

As a result of poor response rates, a faculty member has been assigned to bring employer surveys to rotation site visitation.

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Analysis and Planning: Dental Assisting Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified five program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 16.1, 16.2, 16.3, 16.4, and 16.5. Facilities The Dental Assisting program facilities include one classroom, a dental materials lab, and a clinic containing two dental operatories. A lab photo is included as Attachment 16.6. The program also utilizes the dental hygiene clinic when available, which contains 18 dental operatories, one digital panoramic machine, and five intraoral x-ray machines. Faculty are satisfied with the current facilities. Faculty agree that the facilities are reflective of the workplace and enable students to fulfill program goals and meet accreditation standards. Personnel The Dental Assisting program employs five fulltime faculty members. The program chair has been in this position for 9 years, and has worked in the industry for 36 years. A vita is included as Attachment 16.7, and sample professional development records as Attachments 16.8 and 16.9. All fulltime faculty also teach in the Dental Hygiene Program. The faculty includes two dentists and three dental assistants. All of the dental assistants are also Registered Dental Hygienists. Equipment The faculty agree that the Dental Assisting program offers clinic equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives. The Dental Assisting program currently offers all available technology available in the dental field. Faculty are capable of offering students instruction in conventional radiography and digital radiography. Additionally, all operatories contain computers to expose students to electronic patient management. Faculty are satisfied with all equipment utilized in the clinic. Although the clinic is using state-of-the-art technology, other essential equipment is outdated and in need of replacement. Equipment such as new dental chairs, x-ray lab and clinic manikins, and dental handpieces were requested in the spring 2013 budget hearings but were not assigned priority funding. These items are in need of frequent costly maintenance and repair. Faculty feel strongly that these items should be replaced in order to provide adequate patient care. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 16.10. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 16.11, and the presidential response is Attachment 16.12 with actions related to this program


highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 16.13. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 16.14. Program Highlights The dental assisting students have the opportunity to provide community and interdisciplinary presentations in the spring semester. This has been very successful and has resulted in many requests for our students to participate in community projects. They have delivered oral health presentations to many groups, including Diabetes awareness groups, nursing homes, schools, and hospitals. The Dental Assisting program is approved to send students to at least 20 off-campus clinical sites. These sites provide additional opportunities for students to meet clinical requirements and expose them to diverse patients and patients with special needs. During the spring semester, dental assisting students are assigned to a variety of dental practices to expose them to specialty dental practices. These sites include orthodontics, oral surgery, endodontics, periodontics and general dentistry. During the summer semester, three days per week students are assigned to one office of their choice and many students receive job offers as a result of their experience in their summer rotation.

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Dental Hygiene The Dental Hygiene program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (76 credit hours). Program Description: The Dental Hygiene program is designed to provide students with the educational opportunity to acquire skills, knowledge, and professional attributes necessary for successful employment as competent entry-level state licensed and nationally certified dental hygienists. Mission: To train graduates to become practicing dental hygienists, serving as educators and practitioners in the maintenance of oral health and the prevention of dental disease. To achieve this mission, the Dental Hygiene faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to communicate professionally with diverse populations in a simulated clinical environment (LO 4,5,6).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate mastery of the

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 85% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Satisfactory” or better) on two presentations to two distinct diverse populations when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). (The rubric evaluates preparation, presentation, and relevance of material for target population.)

3. Assessment Results

100% of students successfully completed the two assignments with a score of 85% or higher, but significant (more than 50%) numbers failed to adequately evaluate the learning of target populations. Students relied too heavily on quickly worded questions, such as “What did you learn today?” and “By show of hands, how many know how to brush now?” 100% of students will achieve a 100% of students achieved a passing score (defined as 80% grade of 80% of higher on the

4. Analysis and Use of Results As a result of analysis, faculty have added a requirement in the Community Dental Health course that students design an inter-professional presentation to expand diversity experience. This presentation is to other healthcare professionals about oral health and its relationship to systemic health.

As a result of analysis, faculty developed a collaborative


dental case study approach to clinical practice LO 1,2,4,5).

or higher) on a case study exercise requiring correct evaluation of symptoms and determination of treatment when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

case study presentations. Students demonstrated skill in the research component of assignment, but were weak in the area of dental hygiene diagnosis and treatment planning.

assignment in DHY 124 (to precede the individual case studies) that required that students work in groups to develop dental hygiene diagnosis and treatment plans for a specific patient and present findings to entire class. SLO (3): The student will 100% of students will achieve a 100% of students scored 75% As a result of analysis and demonstrate competence in passing score (defined as 75% or higher on the mock state discussion, the faculty have meeting professional standards or higher) on the mock state dental board examination. placed heavier emphasis on in the performance of patient dental board examination (each Faculty noted that students had detecting and charting calculus care (LO 2). spring semester). difficulty detecting and deposits (contributing to lower correctly charting calculus licensure passage rates). In deposits on facial and lingual addition, faculty modified the surfaces. exam to correct some minor incongruities with the licensure exam. Faculty also developed an instructional PPT to provide clarification of state board instructions and expectations. SLO (4): The student will 100% of students will achieve a 100% of students achieved a As a result of analysis, several demonstrate the ability to passing score (defined as “C” score of “C” or higher. changes were made, including satisfactorily conduct and or better) on a research project Students improved on choosing the following: 1. More time report on current research that required research into topics that were more defining “new dental trends;” 2. findings in dentistry (LO 2,3,5). current dental research and the professional and challenging, Added a learning module for ability to satisfactorily report but depth could be improved on on-line research in DHY 214. analysis when measured against some topics. 3. Added an “Open Tutor departmental rubric (each Time” for assistance in spring semester). developing research topic.

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PO (1): Dental Hygiene faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): Dental Hygiene faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, which included sending representatives to the ADEA Program Directors Conference, Dental Hygiene Meth Ed Accreditation workshop, and Clinical Educators Workshop. Faculty represented at the American Association of University Colleges and Universities Annual General Education Assessment Conference at the University of Vermont in May, 2013. 80% of graduates will report On the most recent graduate satisfaction with the quality and survey (2012), 83% rated the efficacy of instruction, overall quality of educational curriculum, assessment, preparation as “Good� or teaching pedagogies, and better. Only negative rating on instructional resources (each managing time efficiently in spring semester). the clinical setting.

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Many curricular changes occurred as a result of professional development. Quality Assurance protocols were adopted, program and course assessments were strengthened, and faculty gained greater familiarity with the use and instructional applications of new Digital and Computerized Practice technology.

Faculty have made the following changes to improve graduate satisfaction and student efficiency: Students are now required to complete a Class I patient in one hour in their final semester; students are required to complete two patients in one clinic session before they graduate; and students are required to adhere to the time limits for each classification of patient as listed in the clinic manual. Use of new software is expected to


increase time efficiency. An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

Advisory Committee held 5.3.13 with six practitioners in field in attendance. Attendees completed advisory surveys and were given a tour of facilities and clinic, highlighting new equipment and instructional resources.

As a result of advisory recommendations, the following changes were implemented: 1. Purchase of practice management software and digital radiography 2. More emphasis placed on enhancing patient communication skills in DHY 110 3. More emphasis placed on enhancing health promotion role of the hygienist in DHY 110.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 93%, 83% and 73% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have volunteered to have dental students participate in the new life-coaching program under the aegis of DOL grant.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2011 to 2012 and 2012 to 2013 were 93% and 83%, respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 93% and 97%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have developed an action plan for identification and remediation of students who are struggling academically.

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90% of graduates will be 64% of graduates are pursuing a higher degree or employed-in-field. (29% are employed and 75% will be unknown). pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have created an alumni Facebook page where job openings can be posted.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

As a result of analysis, new computers for classroom, clinic, and offices obtained through Perkins funds. New Smart Boards received through technology fees. New x-ray equipment received through DOL grant, including digital sensors and digital panoramic machine. Have begun work with synchronizing management software with present IT infrastructure. Updated grading and tracking software will be requested in next round of budget hearings. In April 2013 budget hearings, requests made for updated instructional resources, including x-ray manikins, dental hand-pieces, ultrasonic machines, and new dental chairs. Future plans include

0% of faculty reported satisfaction with program facilities and resources. Among the areas of concern were slow and outdated office and lab computers, Smart Boards not working properly, outdated xray equipment not representative of current workplace technology, grading/tracking system outdated and subject to human error, and new patient management software not compatible with WSCC network. Many instructional resources old, malfunctioning, and/or not representative of current equipment found in workplace (e.g., dental handpieces and ultrasound machines).

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additional dental chairs, model trimmers, and ultrasonic cleaning equipment. 90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

75% of graduates passed the certification exam on the first attempt. Most of the errors were due to patient selection.

To improve certification pass rates, faculty have implemented the following changes: 1. A calculus detection exercise has been developed to assist students in identification of “Board Qualifying Calculus.” 2. Calculus detection competency has been revised to more closely resemble board requirements; students must identify 7 surfaces of “Board Qualifying Calculus.”

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

On most recent employer survey (2012), 100% rated overall quality of graduate preparation as “Excellent.” Response rate was low, but no negative ratings reported.

As a result of poor response rates, a faculty member has been assigned to bring employer surveys to rotation site visitation.

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Analysis and Planning: Dental Hygiene Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 17.1, 17.2, 17.3, and 17.4. Facilities The Dental Hygiene Program facilities include one classroom, a dental materials lab, and a clinic containing 18 dental operatories, one digital panoramic machine and five intraoral x-ray machines. A lab photo is included as Attachment 17.5. Faculty are satisfied with the current facilities. The students treat approximately 2000 patients per year in the clinic. Faculty agree that the facilities are reflective of the workplace and enable students to fulfill program goals and meet accreditation standards. Personnel The Dental Hygiene program employs five fulltime faculty members and three part-time clinical instructors. The program chair has been in this position for 9 years, and has worked in the industry for 36 years. A vita is included as Attachment 17.6, and sample professional development records as Attachments 17.7 and 17.8. All fulltime faculty also teach in the Dental Assisting Program. The faculty includes two dentists and six dental hygienists. Five of the dental hygienists are also Certified Dental Assistants. Equipment The faculty strongly agree that the Dental Hygiene program offers clinical equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives. The Dental Hygiene program currently offers all available technology available in the dental field. Faculty are capable of offering students instruction in conventional radiography and digital radiography. Additionally, all operatories contain computers to expose students to electronic patient management. Faculty are satisfied with all equipment utilized in the clinic. Although the clinic is using state-of-the-art technology, other essential equipment is outdated and in need of replacement. Equipment, such as new dental chairs, ultrasonic scaling machines, x-ray lab, clinic manikins, and dental handpieces were requested in the 2013-2014 budget hearings but did not receive priority funding. These items are in need of frequent costly maintenance and repair. Faculty feel strongly that these items should be replaced in order to provide adequate patient care. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 17.9. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 17.10, and the presidential response is Attachment 17.11 with actions related to this program


highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 17.12. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 17.13.

Program Highlights The dental hygiene students have the opportunity to provide community and interdisciplinary presentations in the fall of the second year. This has been very successful and has resulted in many requests for students to participate in community projects. They have delivered oral health presentations to many groups, including Diabetes awareness groups, nursing homes, schools, and hospitals. The Dental Hygiene program is approved to send students to three off-campus clinical sites. These sites provide additional opportunities for students to meet clinical requirements and expose them to diverse patients and patients with special needs. The Dental clinic patients include special needs organizations such as Cullman Center for the Developmentally Disabled, Lifeway, and Head Start.

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Diagnostic Imaging The Diagnostic Imaging program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (76 credit hours). Program Description: The Diagnostic Imaging program is designed to provide academic and clinical training for students in the diagnostic imaging profession. Employment opportunities for qualified professionals in this field include hospitals, diagnostic imaging centers, urgent care centers, and specialty clinics. The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. Graduates are eligible to take the national registry examination administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment as licensed professionals in the field of Diagnostic Imaging. To achieve this mission, the Diagnostic Imaging faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate effective communication skills to patients in a clinical environment (LO 3,5).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 3 points or higher on a 4-point scale) on the Clinical Evaluation of Students form (each spring semester).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate the ability to adjust positioning for diverse patient conditions (LO 1,3,4).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 75% or higher) on the first attempt on a simulation exercise requiring proper positioning for a specified patient condition

3. Assessment Results 100% of students achieved a passing score. Results revealed that students were demonstrating effective communication skills with patients in the clinical setting.

4. Analysis and Use of Results

Even though benchmark achieved, faculty re-evaluated the clinical evaluation form and modified it to better delineate and assess student/patient and student/clinical staff communication. 77% of students achieved a As a result of analysis, an passing score on the first additional instructional module attempt. Spine and skull were has been added in RAD 122 two areas identified as and RAD 212 focused weaknesses, particularly trauma primarily on trauma spine and positioning. skull positioning. To strengthen


when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). SLO (3): The student will demonstrate knowledge of theory and practice related to patient radiation protection (LO 1,2).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 75% or higher) on the first attempt on a patient simulation that demonstrates the proper use and level of care for patient radiation protection when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

SLO (4): The student will demonstrate proper use of x-ray equipment, encompassing a foundational knowledge of physics and the fundamentals of imaging equipment (LO 1,4).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 3.0/4 or higher) on a patient simulation addressing the correct use of x-ray equipment under actual clinical conditions when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best

PO (1): Diagnostic Imaging faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

68% of students achieved a passing score of 75% or better on a lab simulation that demonstrates the proper use of radiation protection. Assessment revealed that students possessed basic knowledge in regard to practicing patient care, but demonstrated apprehension in their clinical approach to the exercise. 100% of students achieved a passing score on a lab simulation addressing the correct use of x-ray equipment

100% of fulltime faculty recorded multiple professional development activities. Most activities were focused on teaching pedagogy and included workshops on e-

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quality of overall assessment, faculty also revised the evaluative rubric by adjusting award percentages. As a result of analysis, faculty added more scenario exercises to reduce student apprehension in RAD 113, RAD 112, and RAD 122.

As a result of analysis, faculty decided to adjust the rubric to increase the degree of difficulty and thereby increase this exercise’s utility and efficacy.

As a result of these professional development activities, faculty became involved in developing two hybrid courses for the program. The hybrid development incorporated 3-D


PO (2): Diagnostic Imaging faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

practices (data collected each spring semester).

portfolios, e-learning, and the use of 3-D learning objects to enhance instruction.

80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

On the most recent graduate survey (2012), 100% of graduates rated overall satisfaction with educational experience as “Very Good� or higher.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The RTA Advisory Committee met 10.25.12 with 15 people in attendance. Faculty shared the new WSCC Strategic Plan. Major items of discussion were clinical placement issues, the adoption and implementation of a statewide standardized curriculum, and the acquisition of new instructional resources through the college’s budget hearing process.

As a result of discussion, faculty have made area practitioners aware of reduced clinical placement opportunities due to the presence of for-profit competitors in the region. Links with potential employers was strengthened.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 74%, 68%, and 70% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have volunteered to have diagnostic imaging students participate in the new life-coaching program under

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objects, wikis, and blogs to enhance instruction. Faculty committed to more disciplinespecific professional development in 2013-2014. To improve graduate satisfaction rates, faculty have increased time in RAD 122 for using C-arm in surgery.


the aegis of DOL grant. Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 64% and 68% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 83% and 76%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have begun offering advising workshops throughout the year. (Faculty have noted that some first-semester students withdraw because once they begin attending clinic, they decide this is not the field they want to pursue.)

90% of graduates will be 92% of 2013 graduates were pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety employed and 75% will be days of graduation. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve/sustain these job placement rates, faculty have begun to require that students complete a career planning inventory in order to reflect on their motivation for seeking employment and establishing a career. Interview skills and resume writing are also addressed in RAD 227.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

As a result of analysis, faculty noted the need for an updated computer lab and a portable Carm. The updated lab computers (shared with Radiology) were requested in the institutional budget hearings for the 2013-2014

100% of faculty reported overall satisfaction with the facilities and instructional resources in review conducted in June, 2013. Faculty noted that students have access to a simulated Picture Archival and Communication System

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(PACS) similar to that of the clinical workplace.

fiscal year. Funding for the Carm (estimated cost: $80K) will be requested in the next round of budget hearings.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

100% of students passed the national certification exam on the first attempt.

To sustain certification pass rates, faculty have acquired newer lab equipment and virtual clinical software. Faculty have also begun to increase promotion of student participation in annual state society convention where they can engage in quiz bowls, registry reviews, etc.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

On most recent employer survey (2012), 100% of employers rated overall satisfaction with graduates as “Very Good� or better.

To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty have increased student confidence with using C-arm in surgery. Faculty have also increased lab time in RAD 122.

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Analysis and Planning: Diagnostic Imaging Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 18.1, 18.2, 18.3, and 18.4. Facilities The DI program currently occupies two classrooms, which are also used for lab. A lab photo is included as Attachment 18.5. Faculty are working with Respiratory Therapy to convert the sun room in Bevill Hall into a patient simulation lab that would be shared by both programs. This lab would simulate an ICU room complete with beds, ventilators, and a typical ICU wall unit. Classroom/lab space is one area where faculty are least satisfied. It would benefit students and faculty to have a classroom and a separate lab(s). This would allow the classroom to remain usable for not only our program but to share with others who may need classroom space. It would also allow for the lab to remain “set up� and ready to use. Faculty feel the climate at WSCC is welcoming. They also feel that they are respected, supported, and valued. The DI classrooms contain adequate seating, ventilation, and lighting. Each classroom is equipped with current technology for instructional purposes (projector, computers, etc.). Faculty strongly agree that the services offered by the college, such as the library and student support services, are adequate. Audiovisual and computer equipment are available for students for class activities or assignments. Student support services are readily available to all students. The program is currently approved for 30 clinical sites. Faculty strongly agree that our clinical facilities offer an adequate number and variety of procedures for the students to meet clinical objectives. Personnel The DI program currently employs two full-time faculty members, the program director and clinical coordinator. The program chair has been in this position for 3 years, and has worked in the industry for 20 years. A vita is included as Attachment 18.6, and professional development record as Attachment 18.7. Faculty generally agree that the number of faculty is adequate both in the classroom and lab. Faculty are least satisfied with the amount of time (contact hours) awarded for clinical education classes. Equipment


The faculty strongly agree that the DI program offers lab equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives. The DI program currently offers students access to technology commensurate with what they fill find in most medical facilities. Faculty are capable of offering students instruction in conventional radiography, computed radiography, digital radiography and mobile radiography. Students also have access to a simulated Picture Archival and Communication System (PACS) similar to the one they will encounter during their clinical rotations. Faculty strongly agree that they have access to the supplies (needles, gowns, etc.) needed to teach labs appropriately. Faculty have requested computers through the 2013-2014 budget hearing process. Computers would improve student assessment in a variety of ways, e.g., exams could be enhanced with the addition of digital images. Faculty are in agreement that a portable C-arm would enhance surgical objectives. The program has a portable C-arm that was donated from a clinical site. Students are able to maneuver the C-arm but are unable to project images on the monitor. A refurbished Carm could cost approximately $80,000.00. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 18.8. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 18.9, and the presidential response is Attachment 18.10 with actions related to this program highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 18.11. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 18.12.

Program Highlights The DI program offered a Breast Cancer awareness tent last year that was a huge success. This is an event that will be offered again. It is held in October (Breast CA awareness month) and coincides with the RAD 212 Image Analysis and Pathology class. The DI honor society, Lambda Nu, is currently working to establish a summer scholarship students already enrolled in the DI program. The program is also working with the WSCC Alumni Association to offer student members a scholarship or assistance with national exam expenses. This is still in the beginning stages.

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Diagnostic Medical Sonography The Diagnostic Medical Sonography program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (75-76 credit hours). Program Description: This program is designed to provide academic and clinical training in the field of general (OB/GYN and Abdominal/Superficial Structures) diagnostic sonography. Sonography (ultrasound) is a dynamic high-demand field of practice. Sonographers can choose to work in clinics, hospitals, private practice physician offices, public health facilities, laboratories, and other medical settings. The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography and the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. Graduates are eligible to take the national certifications examinations upon program completion. Mission: To prepare graduates of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program for entry-level employment in a variety of clinical settings. To achieve this mission, the Diagnostic Medical Sonography faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): Students will identify organ systems of the human abdomen as seen by sonographic image (LO 2).

SLO (2): Students will

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on an exercise identifying organ systems of the abdomen as seen by sonographic image when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% of students met the performance benchmark. Good overall results, but faculty noted difficulty with identifying components of biliary system.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added learning activities to strengthen identification of biliary system. Learning activities were added to the DMS 204 Sonographic Anatomy course.

84% achieved benchmark.

As a result of analysis, faculty


determine fetal presentation in diverse sonographic conditions (LO 2,4).

passing score (defined as 70% Students were weakest on the or better) on the first attempt on transverse fetal lie. an exercise requiring the accurate labeling of departmental worksheets and sonographic images (each spring semester).

SLO (3): The graduating student will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the theory and practice associated with abdominal pathology and obstetrical sonography (LO 2). PO (1): Diagnostic Medical Sonography faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or better) on the first attempt on a comprehensive pre-certification examination (each spring semester). In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of graduating students met benchmark on mock examination for both abdominal and OB/GYN sonography. Students were weakest on Doppler applications. 100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including the annual meeting of the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography in Seattle. Activities included on-campus workshops on assessment, elearning, and teaching pedagogy.

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have added new learning activities to DMS 220 to strengthen transverse fetal lie. Human abdominal phantoms and fetal dolls were used as visuals to calculate lie, and students completed a worksheet. As a result of analysis, faculty have added in DMS 217 Doppler worksheets to strengthen this competency.

As a result of these professional development activities, faculty implemented the following program changes: 1. Reflected greater compliance with FERPA guidelines in providing information for graduate employment 2. Adjusted review for SPI registry to include new interactive modules. Examples of these modules are being finalized and will be introduced into DMS 216.


PO (2): Diagnostic Medical Sonography faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

In most recent graduate survey (2012), satisfaction was measured across 16 dimensions of performance. In 14/16 areas, satisfaction was 100%. 100% of overall program ratings were “Good� or better. Two areas of weakness reported were in preparation to perform a broad range of exams in cardiac and vascular specialties.

An advisory committee

The DMS Advisory Committee

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To strengthen disciplinespecific professional development, funding requested in the institutional budget hearings for Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers Annual Conference in Las Vegas in October, 2013, including a preconference tutorial for educators. As a result of analysis, faculty noted that to strengthen the cardiac and vascular specialties would require major program modification since the program is currently approved by the state only for general sonography. Additional approvals would be required to offer Vascular Technology and Echocardiography as separate program branches. (Additional program accreditations would also be required.) Faculty will, however, continue to emphasize importance of cardiac and vascular specialties in curriculum. As a result of discussion,


comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

met 11.7.13. Major topics of discussion included the newly adopted statewide standardized curriculum, graduates’ employment skills, and the acquisition of new sonography machine.

faculty have increased training in “soft skills,� such as interview preparation, to instruction. Faculty have also begun to investigate a new software package for keeping clinical attendance and achievement records.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 83%, 88%, and 68% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have imbedded remediation activities on most DMS courses.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 50% and 47% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 51% and 56%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have imbedded remediation activities on most DMS courses to encourage program progression.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data

Of the 2013 graduates whose employment status is known, 100% are employed, and 84% are employed in-field (Unknown = 2).

To improve job placement rates, graduates are notified by DMS staff of any positions that become available. (Faculty note that many jobs are available if students are willing to

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collected each fall)

relocate.)

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources. Faculty expressed desire for selected equipment upgrades.

As a result of analysis, faculty requested $60K in funding in 2013 institutional budget hearings for ultrasound machine.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

94% of 2012 graduates passed the OB-GYN credentialing exam on the first attempt. 87% passed the ABD exam on the first attempt.

To improve certification pass rates, new format for registry questions has been included in DMS 216 SPI course and DMS 217 SPI lab class.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

No areas of weakness were noted in the most recent (2012) employer surveys across 16 dimensions of assessment.

To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty have committed to continuing to monitor field for market changes and trends.

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Analysis and Planning: Diagnostic Medical Sonography Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 19.1, 19.2, and 19.3. Facilities The DMS program currently occupies one classroom and two small scanning lab rooms in the Tom Bevill Building. A lab photo is included as Attachment 19.4. During the fall term, faculty often utilize a Physical Therapy Assistant program’s lab when it is available. This lab allows the students to readily practice patient care skills, infection control, and transferring patients from bed to wheelchair and vice versa. Faculty feel the climate at WSCC is welcoming. They also feel that they are respected, supported, and valued. The DMS classroom contains adequate seating, ventilation, and lighting. The classroom is equipped with current technology for instructional purposes (projector, computers, sympodium, etc.). Faculty strongly agree that the services offered by the college, such as the library and student support services, are adequate. Audiovisual and computer equipment are available for students for class activities or assignments. Student support services are readily available to all students. The DMS program currently has numerous clinical sites in northern Alabama and lower Tennessee. Faculty strongly agree that our clinical facilities offer an adequate number and variety of procedures for the students to meet clinical objectives. Personnel The DMS program currently employs two full-time faculty members, the program director and clinical coordinator. The program chair has been in this position for 25 years, and has worked in the industry for 37 years. A vita is included as Attachment 19.5, and professional development record as Attachment 19.6. One part-time lab instructor is employed for the fall term. Faculty generally agree that the number of faculty is adequate both in the classroom and lab. Faculty are least satisfied with the amount of time (contact hours) awarded for clinical education classes. Equipment The faculty generally agree that the DMS program currently offers lab equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives. The DMS program offers students access to the very basic ultrasound technology that they will see in most medical facilities. There are currently two GE Logiq 5 ultrasound machines (purchased in


2004) available to students. Faculty are capable of offering students instruction in abdominal sonography, small parts sonography, and obstetrics and gynecologic sonography. Students also have access to an ultrasound simulator in which they can practice scanning abdominal, obstetrics, gynecological, and endovaginal sonography. The DMS program has been approved for a 3D/4D ultrasound machine and this purchase is currently in the bid process. This piece of equipment is expected to be acquired sometime within the first few months of 2014. Faculty agree that they have access to the supplies (gloves, towels, etc.) needed to teach labs appropriately. Faculty currently utilize the shared TBH laptops for the majority of all student testing within the program. The national ARDMS exams are computerized and contain numerous digital images so having laptops available for each student tremendously aids in preparing them for the registries. Faculty are in agreement that the current laptops tend to be very “slow” and several are nonoperational. Faculty are in strong agreement that the laptops need to be updated or replaced so they will function adequately for students. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 19.7. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 19.8, and the presidential response is Attachment 19.9 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 19.10.

Program Highlights The WSCC DMS Class of 2012-13 attained 100% passing rate for the ARDMS Sonographic Principles and Instrumentation (SPI) Registry. The WSCC Sonography Club raises funds throughout the year and generally awards 1-2 summer scholarships to students already enrolled in the DMS program. The WSCC Sonography Club raises funds for the March of Dimes as sonography is generally the first test used to diagnose a fetal abnormality during a pregnancy. The DMS program faculty currently contribute to the WSCC Future Foundation which aids in awarding student scholarships.

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Emergency Medical Services The Emergency Medical Services program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in a short certificate (10 credit hours), Advanced EMT Short Certificate (10 credit hours), a Paramedic Certificate (55 credit hours), or an AAS degree (75 credit hours). Program Description: The Emergency Medical Services program is designed to prepared students for employment as entry level prehospital providers. EMS personnel respond to a wide range of emergency incidents as a point of transition from site to, when necessary, a comprehensive medical facility. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions. Students are eligible to make application to the National Registry of EMT’s examination for Alabama licensure after completing each of the three levels and meeting current licensure requirements. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment in the Emergency Medical Services field. To achieve this mission, the Emergency Medical Services faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to effectively utilize cardiac electrical therapy (LO 1,2).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a simulation exercise requiring competency in managing a cardiac emergency, including system access, use of automated external defibrillation, and patient stabilization when measured

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Faculty noted that students knew what to do but were getting confused because several key factors of the simulation were not visible to them.

As a result of analysis, faculty have acquired different instructional resources related to cardiac electrical therapy to broaden learner experience and improve this outcome. The new Human Patient Simulator removes some of the “make believe” character of many simulations and allows students to actually perform the


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate general competence in the administration of pre-hospital emergency care across a broad spectrum of healthcare applications, including the emergency application of oxygen, use of airway adjuncts, medication administration techniques, use of equipment for mechanical breathing, and suctioning techniques (LO 1,2). SLO (3): The advanced student will demonstrate advanced competence in the administration of emergency interventions, including intravenous access and fluid therapy, medication administration, blind insertion airway devices, as well as advanced assessment and management of various medical illnesses and traumatic injuries (LO 1,2).

against departmental rubric (each semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a comprehensive examination addressing the administration of pre-hospital emergency care across a broad spectrum of healthcare applications (each semester).

80% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Students struggled most with medication administration.

80% of advanced students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a capstone exercise that simulates a realtime emergency event requiring advanced intervention, addressing intravenous access and fluid therapy, medication administration, blind insertion airway devices, or other use of advanced assessment and management of a medical illness or injury (each spring semester).

70% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Faculty noted student difficulty with understanding the parallel with a real-time emergency and had difficulty with verbalized problems they could not “see.”

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electrical therapy instead of simply verbalizing protocols. As a result of analysis, faculty have increased theory and lab time to emphasize medication administration techniques. The MUSE software allows students to see how different medications work in the human body to help them better understand why a particular medication is administered.

As a result of analysis, faculty have purchased a state-of-the art human patient simulator (HPS) that will enable the EMS faculty to better simulate emergency situations and increase the simulations’ “authenticity.” The HPS will enable more hands-on learning and better retention of emergency knowledge and skills.


SLO (4): The graduating student will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of emergency interventions across a broad spectrum of emergency situations, including cardiac stabilization, injury, hazardous materials awareness, vehicle extrication, high angle rescue, and infection control (LO 1,2).

80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or better) on the first attempt on the national pre-test addressing comprehensive competency of emergency interventions across a broad spectrum of emergency situations (each spring semester).

75% of graduating students passed the National Registry Exam pre-test for licensure on the first attempt. The pre-test demonstrated that faculty needed to address pathophysiology more often and in greater detail.

SLO (5): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

The exit interviews will be implemented in 2013-2014. However, each graduating paramedic had an exit interview with the Medical Director. 100% of EMS faculty attended multiple professional development events, including attending the State Emergency Medical Control Committee regional meeting in Clanton and FEMA-sponsored workshops in Anniston on such topics as “Emergency Medical Operations for Mass Casualty

PO (1): Emergency Medical Services faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

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To improve student performance on the exam, faculty have purchased a stateof-the art human patient simulator (HPS) that will enable the EMS faculty to better simulate emergency situations. The HPS will enable more hands-on learning and better retention of emergency knowledge and skills. The MUSE software allows for pathophysiology changes to occur as they would in the actual human body. To improve the efficacy of this measure, faculty have developed an interview rubric to be implemented in 2013-14.

As a result of these activities, faculty experienced personal and professional growth and led to new ways of teaching EMS operations at all three levels.


PO (2): Emergency Medical Services faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

incidents.� 70% of graduates reported satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources.

As a result of analysis, a new program director was hired effective 3/13. To improve graduate satisfaction, an extensive list of upgrades were identified and presented as part of the institutional budget hearing process.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The EMS Advisory Committee did not meet in 2012-13. The membership roster has been reconstituted under the leadership of the new program director.

The Advisory Committee as reconstituted has been scheduled for 2013-14.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 27%, 94%, and 48% respectively. Faculty noted that many EMS students were either not turning in a graduation application or were deciding that they did not want the college-issued certificate,

To improve graduation rates, the EMS faculty have implemented pre-requisites for program entry to increase programmatic student success. Students, for example, must be eligible for ENG 101 and MTH 100 and complete BIO 201 before entering the paramedic

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waiting instead to obtain the state EMS license.

program. Faculty have begun aggressively promoting the certificates as meaningful credentials.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 20% and 7% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 47% and 71%

To improve retention rates, faculty have strengthened students engagement through comprehensive upgrade of facilities and equipment.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

87% of 2013 graduates are working-in-field or pursuing higher education. 13% are unknown.

To improve job placement rates, faculty have continued to strategically place students in clinical sites that offer an employment opportunity.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty reported the continuing need for updated instructional resources. Faculty noted that simulation equipment and software identified and acquired through budget hearing process in spring 2013 rectified most egregious needs.

As a result of analysis, faculty have identified additional items needed to modernize all major items of equipment. Itemized list will be presented at budget hearings spring 2014.

90% of graduates will pass the

The licensure pass rates were

To improve licensure rates,

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certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

76% for 2012 graduates.

faculty have substantially upgraded facilities and instructional resources, including the acquisition of the HMS.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

Employer surveys have reported near 100% satisfaction in the EMS graduates.

To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty have upgraded instructional resources for students while in the program and have reconstituted the Advisory Committee.

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Analysis and Planning: Emergency Medical Services Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 20.1, 20.2, 20.3, 20.4. Facilities The EMS program currently occupies two classrooms and a lab. A lab photo is included as Attachment 20.5. The program, on occasion, uses other areas of the campus to conduct lab exercises (i.e. Polysomnography sleep lab, nursing simulation center, etc.). EMS labs are also conducted in vehicles and other outdoor arenas to simulate traumatic events such as falls and motor vehicle collisions. Faculty are currently working with the Nursing Department for a possible move into the new state-of-the-art simulation center. This move would allow more hands-on simulation to be taught to EMS students and to better prepare EMS and nursing students alike to work together as they will in the field. Current situation allows for a minimum number of students to be allowed entry into the program each semester. One classroom holds a maximum of 22 students while the other classroom allows for a maximum of 12 students. The lab also has minimal space and classes have to be broken down into small groups when lab days occur. Each classroom is equipped with modern technology for lecturing (computer, smartboard, projector, and audio system). The large classroom has adequate lighting, ventilation, and temperature controls. The small classroom has adequate lighting but is very hot from about 10am on for the rest of the day. Box fans have to be brought into the classroom to circulate air and attempt to cool the classroom to make it comfortable. The fans are loud and distracting to the students and faculty. EMS currently has adequate clinical sites for the current student load. The program will require additional sites if student enrollment trends upwards. At this time, some clinical objectives are being met in the EMS lab on campus. Personnel The EMS program currently employs two full-time faculty members, the program director and clinical coordinator. The program also employs three adjunct faculty members to assist with labs and a clinical preceptor. Faculty agree that staff are stretched very thin and could benefit from another full-time faculty member. Faculty are currently teaching three levels of EMS with only two instructors. The program chair has been in this position for 1 year, and has worked in the industry for 20 years. A vita is included as Attachment 20.6, and sample professional development record as Attachment 20.7.


Equipment The lab equipment is getting better with recent purchases but still needs upgrading and improving. The faculty believe the current equipment enhances student learning and retention. They also agree the purchase of an ambulance would better enhance student learning by allowing for better simulated case studies and scenarios. This purchase would also allow for better interaction with the new simulated hospital and nursing students. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 20.8. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 20.9, and the presidential response is Attachment 20.10 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 20.11.

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Medical Assistant The Medical Assistant program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (71 credit hours). Program Description: The Medical Assistant provides students with the skills and training to become multi-skilled health professionals specifically educated to work in ambulatory settings performing diverse administrative and clinical duties. The practice of medical assisting requires mastery of a complex body of knowledge and specialized skills requiring both formal education and practical experience. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. Graduates will be able to sit for the national certification exam administered by the American Association of Medical Assistants Certification Board or the Registered Medical Assistant Examination administered by the American Medical Technologists Association. Mission: To prepare graduates of the Medical Assistant program for entry-level employment as healthcare professionals in diverse ambulatory settings. To achieve this mission, the Medical Assistant faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to communicate with patients in simulated clinical conditions (LO 4).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a simulated phlebotomy procedure when measured against a departmental rubric (each fall semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% of students passed the phlebotomy procedure practical demonstration on the first attempt, completing all critical steps accurately. Students had difficulty with keeping their hands still at times, and with the correct order of draw.

As a result of analysis, faculty have committed to increasing the expected results of students on the examination to 85%. Faculty have also increased the number of times the student can practice in the laboratory prior to performing the skills checkoff. In the classroom, faculty have placed more instructional emphasis on the correct order of the draw.


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate clinical competence in an extramural workplace environment, incorporating medical administrative practices, knowledge of medical law and ethics, and standard clinical protocols (LO 2).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate proficiency in calculating hematology blood counts in a simulated laboratory setting (LO 2,5).

SLO (4): Students will

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 100% on a comprehensive skills check-off) regarding standard medical administrative practices, knowledge of medical law and ethics, and standard clinical protocols in the physician/outpatient setting (each spring semester).

100% of students successfully completed clinical preceptorship check-offs. Students were successful in communication skills, administering medication upon direct orders of the physician and in assisting with both general physical and specialty examinations. Laboratory skills utilized included collecting and processing specimens, running tests and reporting results, as well as documenting quality control. 80% of students will achieve a 96% of students achieved the passing score (defined as benchmark. Students “Meets Expectations� or better) experienced some difficulty on the first attempt on a interpreting the hematocrit calculation of hematology reader while performing blood count exercise in a hematocrits. They were very simulated laboratory setting confident in filling the when measured against hematocrit tube and placing in departmental rubric (each the centrifuge. (Faculty noted spring semester). that students were unable to perform a complete blood count because the new cell counter awarded in 2012 budget hearings had not yet been delivered.) 90% of students participating in 100% of students participating

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To improve this outcome, faculty have placed more instructional emphasis on learning drug brand and generic names and uses in the pharmacology class. Faculty have led role plays in the class laboratory setting that simulate real-life experiences prior to placement in clinical rotation.

To improve this outcome, faculty have students practice multiple times with reading hematocrit prior to check-offs. Faculty have also expedited delivery of new cell counter. Delivery and training scheduled for October 2013.

Faculty have committed to


demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester)

in mock interviews achieved a passing score. Students learned to answer interview questions with appropriate responses regarding their skills and abilities in administrative and clinical areas. Through this process, students learned their interview strengths and weaknesses.

PO (1): Medical Assistant faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, addressing discipline-specific content as well as teaching pedagogy and the effective use of instructional resources. Faculty and students, for example, attended the Alabama Society of Medical Assistants annual meeting.

PO (2): Medical Assistant faculty will demonstrate a

80% of graduates will report 100% of graduating students satisfaction with the quality and rated faculty as “Effective in

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continuing this measure and regularly reviewing questions for realism and relevance. To further improve this outcome, faculty have increased emphasis on professional language in classrooms and labs. Beginning in fall 2013, scrubs are required in both the classroom and lab and students are required to meet personal appearance standards: e.g., hair pulled back, appropriate jewelry and nails to inhibit bacterial growth. As a result of activities, faculty enhanced both pedagogical and content skills as well as improved program networking with other practitioners. Program chair is scheduled to speak at the American Association of Medical Assistants meeting on collaborative learning fall 2013 and at the ABHES conference in 2014 on “Increasing Credentialing Examination Success.� To improve graduate satisfaction, faculty have


commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Instruction� on spring 2013 exit increased focus on survey. collaborative learning in both administrative and clinical areas. For example, students phone in prescriptions to the Pharmacy Tech program director for realistic practice, work with PTA students to learn more about crutches, canes, and other therapies to improve patient mobility, and work with Architecture students in collaboratively designing doctors’ offices.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The MAT Advisory Committee met 9.14.12. Major items discussed included preparing students for professional environment in terms of soft skills and implementation of EMRs. Faculty shared collaborative project with Drafting in student design of medical office.

As a result of the input of committee members, faculty have begun to regularly solicit supplies and out-of-date items from clinical sites. Faculty have also increased use of EMR and placed more emphasis on MOSS and other management software.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 65%, 63%, and 69% respectively.

To improve graduation and retention rates, MA students are participating in PAVES (US DOL grant) success coaching

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program. To improve retention rates, faculty have implemented remediation plans for any student who fails practical attempts. Students meet with the instructor and are given plans that require that they practice the skill failed and read supplementary material and classwork assignments associated with that skill.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 61% and 62% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 61% and 62%

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within 120 days of completion (data collected each fall)

88% of 2013 graduates are working-in-field or pursuing higher education degree.

To improve job placement rates, faculty post job announcements and serve as references at students’ request. Faculty also collaborate with the advising center and student support services.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources. Faculty noted that the program has been able to stay current with technology in the classroom laboratory and have medical record software similar to that

As a result of analysis, faculty have committed to prepare budget proposal for 2014 budget hearings for any identified upgrades to instructional resources to remain responsive to technology used in physicians’ offices.

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used in outpatient facilities. A state-of-the-art Cell-Dyn Emerald model was acquired and is used for hematology analysis. Graduates taking a national 73% of graduates passed the credentialing examination certification exam on the first within six months of graduation attempt (16/22) will achieve a passing score that meets or exceeds the national average (data collected when annual results are received).

To improve credential examination pass rates, faculty have added a requirement for students to sit for a national credentialing exam as part of program completion. This will prevent long lapses from graduation to certification exam. Faculty continue to offer MA review course.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each fall).

To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty have increased emphasis on identifying drug brand and generic names and indications for use. New lab activities include an interactive game for learning drug names.

On most recent employer survey (2013), most all employers reported that program graduates were “prepared� or higher in eleven different rating areas. Only (N=1) negative score was in the area of Psychomotor Domain.

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Analysis and Planning: Medical Assistant Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 21.1, 21.2, 21.3, and 21.4. Facilities The Medical Assistant (MA) program currently occupies one classroom and laboratory and shares additional classrooms on campus. Classroom/lab space is appropriate with the lab having six physician tables with workstations for students to practice role-play and activities, as well as a storage area and double sink with foot control pedals for supplies and asepsis. A lab photo is included as Attachment 21.5. Through the budget process, faculty have been able to keep up with technology in the classroom laboratory and have electronic medical record software similar to that used in outpatient facilities. There are over 20 microscopes in the laboratory shared with the clinical technology students and digital imaging equipment in the Diagnostic Imaging lab where students are trained as limited radiographers. Faculty feel the climate at WSCC is welcoming. They also feel that they are respected, supported, and valued by the administration. The MA classrooms contain adequate seating, ventilation, and lighting. Each classroom is equipped with current technology for instruction purposes (projector, computers, etc.). One area of concern is the access to the second floor computer lab in the Health Science Building. The elevator has to be continually repaired. (However it has worked better this semester.) Faculty strongly agree that the services offered by the college, especially the student support services and library, are more than adequate. Audiovisual and computer equipment is available for students for class activities or assignments. Student support services are readily available to all students, and there are tutoring labs on campus for students who need those services. The program is currently approved for 18 acute and 50 non-acute facilities. Students rotate at outpatient clinics and physicians’ offices. Faculty strongly agree that the clinical facilities offer an adequate number and variety of procedures for the students to meet clinical objectives, with family practice and outpatient clinic settings providing the most well-rounded clinical preceptor experiences. Personnel The MA program currently employs two full-time faculty members, the program director and clinical coordinator. The program chair has been in this position for 19 years, and


has worked in the industry for 18 years. A vita is included as Attachment 21.6, and professional development record as Attachment 21.7. Both full-time faculty members are Certified Medical Assistants through the American Association of Medical Assistants. Faculty generally agree that the number of faculty is adequate both in the classroom and laboratory. Part-time faculty assignments are based on the number of students and laboratory sections. Faculty are least satisfied with the amount of time (contact hours) awarded for clinical education classes because the amount of time required to supervise and communicate with supervisors at clinical sites, as well as student communication, exceeds the current allotted time according to the current formula for calculating faculty contact hours. Travel time alone to one clinical site can exceed the current allotted credit. Equipment The faculty strongly agree that the MA program offers lab equipment necessary to enhance student learning in both the administrative and clinical areas. Medical Assisting students share lab equipment with the Diagnostic Imaging and Clinical Laboratory Technology programs. Equipment is updated as needed through the budget process and installation of the newest equipment took place in October. A state-of-the-art Cell-Dyn Emerald was purchased and will be utilized for hematology analysis by both the MA and Clinical Laboratory programs. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 21.8.

Program Highlights The medical assistant program recently received Continuing Accreditation from CAAHEP for ten years, the maximum number of years awarded, with only one minor citation. The program has maintained this status for 17 years. The medical assistant program assisted with Breast Cancer Awareness Month and the state Medical Assisting meeting. Students were actively involved in the planning and preparing phases, sold advertisements, and brought door prizes in addition to networking with other medical assistants throughout the state of Alabama. Three students attended the annual American Association of Medical Assistants Conference and educational meetings and volunteered as proctors for meeting sessions. The Medical Assistant Club participates in community service and activities on campus. The program was highlighted in the CMA Today magazine for its Collaborative Learning Project involving the Medical Assisting and Architecture students designing doctors’ offices. The program director was a national speaker at the AAMA conference in Atlanta, Georgia, in September 2013 and presented “Collaborative Learning Across Campus� highlighting the ways the program students collaborate with other programs on campus to enhance skills.

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Child Development The Child Development program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in a short-certificate (28 credit hours) or an AAS degree (61 credit hours). Program Description: The Child Development program is designed to prepare students for employment in preschool programs. Graduates may be employed as teacher assistants in public kindergartens, as teachers or directors in private and preschool programs, and as the teacher or an assistant teacher in Head Start. Mission: To prepare students for entry-level positions in preschools and related educational settings. To achieve this mission, the Child Development faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate competency in developing a Nutrition Menu Plan meeting USDA standards (LO 2). SLO (2): The student will demonstrate competency in developing a Parent Handbook in compliance with Minimum Daycare Guidelines (LO 2,3).

SLO (3): The student will

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “C” or better) in developing a menu plan when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “C” or higher) in developing a Parent Handbook when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% of students achieved a passing score of 75% or better. Although benchmark met, students had difficulty identifying which food group each component came from. 95% of students achieved a passing score of “C” or better. Students gathered information well, but were lacking in organizational skills.

80% of students will achieve a

90% of students achieved a

As a result of analysis, learning activities, such as creating an activity to categorize common foods into food groups, have been created to address identification deficiencies. As a result of analysis, worksheets have been created to strengthen the development of organizational skills. Examples of facility handbooks were presented in class for student review. As a result of analysis, new


demonstrate the ability to develop age-appropriate activities (LO 2,4).

passing score (defined as 80% or higher) in developing lesson plans when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

passing score of 80% or better. Students had particular difficulty in developing objectives for the lesson plans.

SLO (4): The student will demonstrate the ability to develop a floor plan for interest areas or centers to enhance social and language development (LO 2).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) in developing Floor Plans when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

95% of students achieved a passing score of “Meets Expectations” or better. Students had particular difficulty, however, adhering strictly to NAEYC guidelines as related to defining space for young children.

PO (1): Child Development faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of full-time faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including meetings in Montgomery regarding Head Start curriculum, DPE program updates, and Workforce Partnership in Early Childhood. On-campus activities included

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activities have been developed to strengthen these skills. Additional handouts and websites were used to define age-appropriate activities and provide more examples of each. The additional activities comprise sorting, classifying, and grouping objects to enhance student recognition of age-appropriate skills. As a result of analysis, new learning activities have been added to address this skill. Each student is provided with room dimensions with instructions on planning/designing classroom layout, and pictures of examples of common and desirable layouts for classrooms have been provided. As a result of these professional development activities, faculty have enhanced range and depth of teaching pedagogy. Faculty have also strengthened portions of curriculum that reflect current Head Start program revisions. Curriculum changes consist of retaining student


PO (2): Child Development faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

six workshops on teaching pedagogy, addressing such topics as the development of eportfolios, assessment, and “flipped� learning. 80% of graduates will report No graduate surveys satisfaction with the quality and conducted. efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

An advisory committee comprised of external

2013-2014

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clinical lab experiences, which benefits all student learning and engagement.

To improve graduate satisfaction rates, faculty have committed to increasing the provision of time allocated to student advisory sessions whenever needed throughout every semester, increasing faculty availability through systematically and regularly checking emails and phone messages and providing prompt response and feedback by beginning a log of student contacts in order to compare the increase or decrease yearover-year. Faculty are increasing the convenience for students to access instruction, curriculum, assessment, and instructional resources by beginning to offer hybrid/online formats for classes through Blackboard. 2013-2014


practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester). 50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 25%, 30%, and 25% respectively.

As a result of analysis, faculty have explored offering night and/or online courses.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 44%and 39% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 77% and 74%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have committed to increasing the provision of time allocated to student advisory sessions whenever needed throughout every semester, increasing faculty availability through systematically and regularly checking emails and phone messages and providing prompt response and feedback, and increasing the convenience for students to access instruction, curriculum,

Faculty conducted specific research on attrition from fall 2012 to spring 2013.

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assessment, and instructional resources by beginning to offer hybrid/online formats for classes through Blackboard.

90% of graduates will be 80% of graduates were pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety employed and 75% will be days. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have committed to continue to increase presence and rapport with local childcare, Head Starts, Pre-K, Primary, and Elementary schools and facilities to maintain continued dialog regarding placement opportunities for graduating students. Faculty have begun a log of contacts with regional agencies and educational practitioners. Faculty have supplemented the curriculum by adding a mock interview activity to better prepare graduates to compete for jobs.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

As a result of analysis, faculty have begun discussions with Dean of Health Sciences for more expansive classroom and lab space as well as additional instructional staff. Decisions

Faculty conducted a comprehensive review of program facilities and instructional resources in September 2013. Faculty were satisfied overall with resources

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80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

but noted need for more classroom and lab space. Faculty also noted need for additional instructional personnel and reconsideration of number of contact hours awarded for clinical education classes.

are on hold until vacant chair position is filled.

No employer surveys conducted.

To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty have ensured that graduating students are competent in skills and knowledge about child development and able to provide effective and knowledgeable childcare through increasing the rigor of exams and utilizing more contemporary instructional resources.

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Analysis and Planning: Child Development Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 22.1, 22.2, 22.3, and 22.4. Facilities: The Child Development Program currently occupies one classroom located in Room 200 of the Robert T. Wilson Nursing Education Building, which is also currently used for lab purposes. A photo is included as Attachment 22.5. The one-window classroom houses resources such as children’s books, VHS and cassette tapes, a cassette player, a 19� television, various carts and shelving, and arts and crafts materials, which are sometimes utilized during lab activities. Many books and audio-visual materials and other supplies are outdated and in need of replacement to better meet the technological needs of students. There are several large dated rectangular tables, tall bookcases, and an adequate number of mismatched but functional chairs. The classroom also includes a mounted LCD projector, screen, mounted audio speakers, laptop, DVD player, VHS player, and Sympodium used as a presentation tool that allows the user to control a computer, write directly over presentations, and save revised work. The technology resources are adequate for utilizing the Internet for Blackboard demonstrations, showing video clips and webpages, presenting PowerPoint presentations, and related teaching methods. Faculty agree that the services offered by the college, such as library and student support services, are adequate. Audiovisual and computer lab access are available for students for class activities and assignments. The child development program utilizes a number of clinical sites that include Head Start centers, Pre-K sites, elementary and primary schools, and licensed church day care centers. These enable students to meet clinical objectives and complete required lab hours. Personnel: The Child Development Program currently employs one new fulltime faculty member who serves as the program director and instructor. The program chair has been in this position for less than one year, and has worked in the industry for 20 years. A vita is included as Attachment 22.6, and professional development record as Attachment 22.7. The fulltime faculty member’s office was recently relocated and is now located in the Tom Bevill Health Education Building in Office 105 on the first floor. Plans are underway to move the Child Development classroom from the Robert T. Wilson Nursing Education Building to the Tom Bevill Health Education Building if space permits in the


near future. This is due to the expansion and relocation of the health services nursing department to a new campus facility. Equipment: The Child Development Program has adequate lab materials and supplies, but most classroom materials and supplies such as books, VHS tapes, and cassette tapes are outdated and in need of replacement. In light of the current decrease in enrollment in classes over the last year and a greater need for students to access class materials and instruction online, the child development program is considering offering an increased number of hybrid classes and transitioning to a predominant online format in the near future. The Child Development Program will need increased access to online materials and resources to use with online classes through Blackboard such as NBC Learn and other online resources for audio-visual materials. New access to resources on the Internet is being considered and investigated by the new fulltime instructor and program director. Program Highlights: Preschool teachers play a vital role in the development of children. The Child Development Program is of utmost importance to better equip teachers to help children learn and engage in many critical experiences that will shape their lives and later success in school and work. In reviewing and comparing the number of students enrolled in Child Development Classes over the past several years and to meet the technological needs and requests of our students, the Child Development Program is excited to begin the transition to a hybrid and online format for classes. This will offer better, more convenient access to many students enrolled in Child Development who work full time and cannot physically appear on campus due to job restraints and family obligations. Within the past year, seven students enrolled in the Child Development Program have received financial assistance (tuition and selected fees) from the Leadership in Child Care Scholarship Program. This scholarship from the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education Department of Human Resources is awarded to qualified student professionals who are currently working with young children in child care centers/programs and family and group homes to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in Early Childhood Education at Athens State University. More scholarships are awarded each year beginning in the fall and spring semesters.

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Occupational Therapy Assistant The Occupational Therapy Assistant program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (75 credit hours). Program Description: Under the direction of an Occupational Therapist, the Occupational Therapy Assistant aids in evaluating patients and in developing a plan of selected tasks to restore, influence, or enhance performance of individuals whose abilities to cope with daily-living activities are impaired or threatened by developmental deficits, the aging process, physical injury or illness, learning disabilities, or psychological or social disabilities. Graduates are employed in general hospitals, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, home healthcare agencies, private practices, and other specialized healthcare settings. The program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education. Graduates may sit for the licensure exam administered by National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. Mission: To prepare graduates of the Occupational Therapy Assistant program for entry-level employment in the Occupational Therapy field. To achieve this mission, the Occupational Therapy Assistant faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate knowledge of the fundamentals of Occupational Therapy, including roles of practitioners, ethical considerations, and terminology (LO 2).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 90% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a case study assignment addressing the OTA practice framework, which outlines the fundamentals of OTA practice, as measured against departmental rubric (each

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% of students achieved a passing score on first attempt. Weaknesses noted by faculty in students’ ability to apply concepts of performance pattern domains.

As a result of analysis, faculty have allocated additional time throughout the curriculum to the fundamentals of practice, particularly in the OTA 200 course revision. A review of these concepts has been provided in a case study undertaken Summer Semester 2013.


SLO (2): The student will demonstrate knowledge of practical anatomy and kinesiology, with specific focus on function and movement of the upper body (LO 1).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate understanding of OTA referral and assessment techniques, including the COTA’s role in referral, data collection, evaluation, and interpretation as well as familiarity with standardized tests and screening procedures commonly used in laboratories (LO 2,5). SLO (4): The student will demonstrate competency in the planning, developing, and

spring semester). 90% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a comprehensive examination covering practical anatomy and kinesiology, with specific focus on function and movement of the upper body (each spring semester).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on the practical lab exam sequence administered in OTA 220 (by each spring semester).

100% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt on the comprehensive examination covering these components. However, weaknesses were noted in the application of principles to specific practice areas as well as in translating specific knowledge of muscle functions and locations into fieldwork contexts.

More than 80% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Some students showed difficulty in interpreting the data collected during the evaluation.

80% of students will achieve a 100% of students achieved a passing score (defined as 70% passing score on the first or better) on the first attempt on attempt. Students scored

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As a result of analysis, OTA faculty have identified opportunities to reinforce practical anatomy and kinesiology coursework throughout the curriculum in various courses (i.e., OTA 213, 221, 222, and 232) in order to apply practical and theoretical knowledge to practice. Faculty have also added additional lab experiences in order to better provide opportunities to learn the material in a way that facilitates application to fieldwork practice. As a result of analysis, faculty have added more monitoring of student analysis as related to “real world” contexts. This is a consideration in the recent curriculum redesign that takes effect Fall Semester 2013.

As a result of analysis, faculty have committed to close monitoring of this skill since it


implementing of treatment plans, utilizing appropriate purposeful activities (LO 2,3).

SLO (5): Graduating students will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the practice associated with Occupational Therapy Assistants, including the three major domains required for OTA certification by the NBCOT, which are: gathering information and formulating conclusions regarding the client’s needs and priorities to develop a client-centered intervention plan across the lifespan; select and implement evidence-based interventions to support participation in areas of occupation (ADL, education, work, leisure, and social) throughout the continuum of care; and uphold professional standards and responsibilities to promote quality in practice (LO 2,3,6).

a case study assignment that addresses the planning, development, and implementation of treatment plans, utilizing appropriate purposeful activities (each spring semester). 80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on a comprehensive practice precertification examination that encompasses the three domains of patient care specified by the NBCOT as requirements for OTA certification (end of summer semester).

particularly high on their ability to develop treatment plans that were effective as well as utilizing appropriate purposeful activities.

is critical for successful therapists. The curriculum redesign provides more opportunities for students to develop and apply this skill set.

This measure was deferred by faculty to the 13-14 AY. However, on the actual licensure exam, 83% of students passed on the first attempt.

As a result of analysis, faculty have revised the curriculum in OTA 260 to create more opportunities for students to strengthen their end-ofprogram preparation for the licensure exam.

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SLO (6): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Occupational Therapy Assistant faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): Occupational Therapy Assistant faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester beginning 13-14 AY) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

2013-2014

2013-2014

100% of fulltime faculty completed multiple professional development activities, with a strong emphasis on discipline-specific events. Activities included workshops on “Dysphagia for OTS,” “Neuroscience of the Multi-Sensory Environment,” “Preventing Falls,” and “Top Ten Clinical Indicators for Effective Screens.”

80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of graduates reported overall satisfaction with program quality and efficacy. Areas of strength were in general preparation for field of practice, knowledge of profession, and in applying principles to treatment activities and the development

As a result of these activities, faculty have been exposed to rapidly changing areas of OTA practice, particularly valuable in revising the curriculum in OTA 213/214, 215/216, and 222/223 in such areas as fall prevention, dysphagia, screening, and multi-sensory environments. Faculty also benefited from pedagogical training in such areas as teaching methodologies, outcomes measurement, and the effective use of technology. As a result of analysis, faculty have enhanced instruction in modality use as a very specialized area of practice. Modalities are covered during labs that provide hands-on experience for students.

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of care plans. Some respondents recommended more reinforcement in use of modalities. An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The OTA Advisory Committee met in February 2013. A major focus was the curriculum redesign taking place in Fall 2013.

As a result of the advisory committee meeting, community practitioners became aware of curriculum redesign taking effect Fall Semester 2013. The newly revised curriculum will strengthen students’ practice skills before entering the workforce.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 83%, 86%, and 91% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have implemented “life coaching” under the aegis of a federal grant. Faculty have also implemented “enhancement labs,” available for students who need or want additional assistance with a particular topic.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected

Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 100% and 100%. Program concludes in Summer semester.

To improve retention rates, faculty have implemented “life coaching” under the aegis of a federal grant. Faculty have also

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each spring).

implemented “enhancement labs,” available for students who need or want additional assistance with a particular topic.

90% of graduates will be 83% of 2012-13 graduates are pursuing a higher degree or employed. 80% are employedemployed and 75% will be in-field. 17% are unknown. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have made job placement a regular agenda item at advisory committee meetings. Faculty have also implemented a summer “Lunch and Learn” where industry representatives meet students and make presentations on such topics as professional conduct, interview techniques, and their particular companies.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

As a result of analysis, faculty are preparing proposals on resource needs for spring 2014 budget hearings, focusing on equipment, facilities, and instructional resources that will position the program for expansion and growth.

OTA faculty completed in June 2013 a comprehensive review of program facilities and instructional resources. Classrooms are equipped with computers and projectors, A/V systems, and therapy modality equipment. Faculty noted the need for additional classroom space and more advanced resources, such as 3D models for anatomy, to accommodate

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future program growth. 90% of graduates will pass the licensure exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

100% of graduates passed the licensure exam on the first attempt.

To sustain these results, faculty continuously make adjustments to strengthen content around the structure and coverage of the licensure exam. Quizzes and exams are all computerized and questions are formatted to be consistent with the licensure exam. OTA 260 particularly is updated to reflect exam changes and the particular needs of each graduating class. In addition, faculty provide mock certification exams for students to complete on the last day of the program, a valuable form of feedback before sitting for the exam.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

On most recent employer survey (2012), 100% of respondents scored overall satisfaction with student knowledge as “Satisfied” or “Very Satisfied”.

To improve employer satisfaction, employer feedback through advisory committee meetings and “Lunch and Learn” opportunities is strongly promoted. Courses such as OTA 223 and 224 have been designed to incorporate professionalism, clinical reasoning, and management

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skills.

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Analysis and Planning: Occupational Therapy Assistant Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified five program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 23.1, 23.2, 23.3, 23.4, and 23.5. Program Review: The Wallace State Community College OTA program has a wide array of physical, technological, and human resources available for the benefit of its students. The program is housed in the Bevill Allied Health Building, where OTA has two dedicated classrooms/lab space, offices for faculty and support staff, and storage rooms. Students are able to complete hands-on lab experiences in a lab space that contains a real working kitchen and laundry area that simulates a true home environment. A lab photo is included as Attachment 23.6. They have access to commonly used therapy materials and media to prepare them for work in clinics, hospitals, school systems, or other areas of practice with success. Classrooms are equipped with technology needed for learning, including, but not limited to, computers and projectors, A/V systems, and therapy modality equipment. Additionally, the department has purchased approximately 28 laptop computers capable of wireless internet access for students in completing assignments and testing while on campus. Other resources available to students include a student success center, tutoring, an oncampus library, advisement, as well as faculty members who are in leadership positions in state-level educational and occupational therapy organizations, professional engagement that enhances faculty knowledge of the professional milieu. The program employs two fulltime faculty members. The program chair has been in this position for 1 year, and has worked in the industry for 6 years. A vita is included as Attachment 23.7, and professional development record as Attachment 23.8. In terms of funding, the OTA program is in need of updated assessment items and resources, which faculty are in the process of procuring in order to keep student learning opportunities current with advances in the profession. In the future, faculty would like to have expanded classroom space to spread out labs more in order to accommodate additional students, which could be accomplished with little to no money with existing facilities on campus. With advances in the field of occupational therapy and in educational technology, faculty desire to have more items of advanced equipment, such as 3D models for anatomy. Faculty are presently endeavoring to acquire more advanced modality equipment and other additional faculty resources as the program continues to grow.


Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 23.9. In summary, the OTA program at Wallace State Community College has a strong reputation for providing solidly prepared graduates who are assets to their future employers. As education and the profession of OT continue to evolve, it is crucial that faculty remain abreast of changes in the field and in education in order to continue to preserve the program’s reputation, while making the program even better and stronger. The focus of the OTA faculty has always been and will remain that of making sure that students are well prepared for their fieldwork experiences, the national certification exam, and as general OTA practitioners who can function as an entry-level clinician in a variety of practice areas. Learning and program outcomes measure significant facets of these areas and faculty will diligently work to make sure the outcomes are met, and focus on program and process improvement to make sure that the needs of the students are being met at all times.

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Pharmacy Technology The Pharmacy Technology program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in a short certificate (27 credit hours). Program Description: The Pharmacy Technology program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in both institutional and retail pharmacies. The curriculum comprises theory, lab activities, and supervised clinical internships. The program is accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Graduates may receive certification as a Pharmacy Technician upon successful completion of the Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level positions as Pharmacy Technicians in institutional and retail settings. To achieve this mission, the Pharmacy Technology faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to properly utilize aseptic technique (LO 1,2).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will demonstrate competence (defined as 90% or higher) on the initial attempt on an aseptic technique practical demonstration when measured against departmental rubric (each fall semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

86% of students met the benchmark. Students understood fundamental principles and the practical application of aseptic technique, but experienced difficulty with the proper sequencing of steps in the process.

SLO (2): The student will

80% of students will

73% met this benchmark.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added instructional module in PHM 100 on use of sterile products. Hands-on practical training in PHM 201 has been enhanced by the addition of training videos that demonstrate proper aseptic technique, as well as by the addition of a lab session simulating proper sequence of steps required for sterile product preparation. As a result of analysis, faculty


demonstrate proficiency in drug dispensing as typically encountered in the technician’s hospital and retail workplace environments (LO 1,2,4).

demonstrate proficiency (defined as 100% mastery) on the prescription drug dispensing lab competency skills check-off (each fall semester).

Students demonstrated skill with the operation of the dispensing software. However, approximately 30% lacked the attention to detail necessary to identify prescription dispensing errors (i.e., incorrect directions and product selection).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate proficiency with pharmaceutical calculations (LO 2).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 90% or higher) on the first attempt on the departmental Calculations Proficiency Exam (each fall semester).

SLO (4): The student will demonstrate competence regarding the application and use of infection control policies and procedures (LO 2).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 90% or higher) on the first attempt on an infection control lab skills check-off (each fall semester).

PO (1): Pharmacy Technology faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that

93% of students earned a passing score. Students were generally proficient with pharmaceutical calculation principles. Students struggled some with the more advanced questions dealing with percentage-based solutions. 86% of students achieved benchmark. Results revealed that students understood the fundamental principles of infection control, but were challenged in some of the more specialized areas, such as chemotherapy and chemical waste. Faculty participated in multiple professional development activities, including the effective use of instructional resources and attendance of the

200

have revised the PHM 205 course to include supplemental assignments covering proper evaluation of prescription forms, as well as a graded discussion board discussion board forum on Blackboard highlighting the dangers of medication errors. As a result of analysis, faculty have added a study session for PHM 102 students who need more assistance or clarification regarding the calculation material prior to sitting for second attempt on proficiency exam. As a result of analysis, faculty have added an instructional module covering infection control in PHM 207. Faculty also added a lab assignment addressing the clean-up of hazardous substances to PHM 210. As a result of participation in professional development opportunities, additional instructional resources were made available to students in


PO (2): Pharmacy Technology faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

address industry trends and best Alabama Pharmacy practices (data collected each Association Annual Meeting in spring semester). Florence, AL.

PHM 102 via collaboration with the eLearning department to develop review exercises and games for drug names classification and usage.

80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

On most recent graduate survey (2012), 100% of students scored their overall rating for preparedness as ”Very Good’ or “Excellent”.

To improve graduate satisfaction rates, more emphasis has been placed on usage of Tegrity in PHM 102 and PHM 210 to improve the effectiveness of calculations lessons. Additionally, additional clinical sites were made available in Jefferson and Cullman counties to better accommodate student clinical placement.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Pharmacy Tech Advisory Committee met on 11.20.12. The focus of the meeting was on sharing results of the ASHP accreditation visit, clinical site placement, and a contingency plan for faculty leave or resignation.

As a result of the meeting, members of the committee agreed to critical roles in the faculty absence contingency plan. Faculty have added more laboratory exercises for nutritional and chemotherapy products.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 83%, 84%, and 78% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, additional focus has been placed on advisement during the program application and orientation process

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on the benefits of the Short-Term Certificate, specifically, the advantage of being able to earn the certificate within one academic year.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-spring for 2011-12 and 2012-13 were 91% and 78%. Program is two semesters only and concludes in spring.

90% of graduates will be 70% of graduates were working pursuing a higher degree or in field within ninety days. employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

80% of departmental faculty

100% of faculty are satisfied

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To improve retention rates, additional focus has been placed on advisement during the program application and orientation process regarding the pace of the program and emphasizing the need to keep up to date with course assignments and clinical schedules. To improve job placement rates, the program’s advisory committee has been expanded to include members who have a history of employing program graduates. These members provide valuable program input and serve as a networking resource to keep the program director of potential job opportunities for graduates. Additionally, the number of clinical facilities available to students has expanded, which increases the program’s service area and access to potential job opportunities.

Faculty will review


and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

with program facilities and instructional resources. Faculty noted that their resources include a laminar flow hood, which facilitates instruction in hospital pharmacy dispensing, as well as infection control and aseptic technique. The program currently has clinical agreements with 32 facilities.

instructional resources again in spring 2014 and present any critical needs to the Administrative Council through the college’s budget hearing protocols.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

88% of graduates who reported taking the PTCE passed the exam. The graduates who did not pass the exam reported that the calculations portion of the exam was most challenging.

After an analysis of the results, additional calculations lessons were included in program curriculum in PHM 102 and PHM 210. Additionally, exam study sessions and completion of mock exams were added to PHM 211 curriculum.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

100% of employers who responded to the survey reported overall satisfaction with the skill and preparation of program graduates.

Input from advisory committee members, as well as feedback from employers and clinical site supervisors, is utilized to keep program curriculum up to date with technologies and trends currently utilized in the profession.

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Analysis and Planning: Pharmacy Technology Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 24.1, 24.2, 24.3, and 24.4. Facilities The Pharmacy Technology program currently occupies one classroom, which is also utilized for lab activities. A photo is included as Attachment 24.5. Faculty are satisfied with the program’s current physical space. With the majority of the didactic component of the program delivered via Blackboard, most of the space in the classroom is utilized for lab activities and lab simulations. The classroom contains adequate space and seating for students. Additionally, the resources within the classroom (computers, projector, and other technology) are adequate and up to date. Faculty believe the facilities and services provided by the college are sufficient to meet student needs. The program currently has clinical agreements with 32 clinical facilities. Both hospital and retail facilities are utilized to provide students with a well-rounded clinical experience. Personnel The Pharmacy Technology program currently employs one full-time faculty member, who serves as program director and instructor. The program chair has been in this position for 11 years, and has worked in the industry for 20 years. A vita is included as Attachment 24.6, and professional development record as Attachment 24.7. This number is currently adequate both in didactic courses and in lab/clinical courses. Faculty believe that they are respected and supported by the administration at WSCC. Equipment The faculty feels that the Pharmacy Technology program offers lab equipment necessary to provide students with a comprehensive and well-rounded laboratory experience. Students receive instruction in retail pharmacy dispensing, utilizing the retail pharmacy simulation area. The lab contains a laminar flow hood that is utilized to provide student instruction in hospital pharmacy dispensing, as well as infection control and aseptic technique principles. Additionally, the program has access, via the Nursing department, to an automated dispensing unit similar to the technology currently utilized by many hospitals to gain experience with proper stocking and maintenance of medication supplies.


The technology (computers, SMART devices, etc.) and software (Tegrity, SoftChalk) required to deliver online coursework is also sufficient. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 24.8.

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Polysomnography The Polysomnography program is housed in the Division of Health Sciences and terminates in a short certificate (28 credit hours). Program Description: The program encompasses instruction in sleep technology. Graduates are trained to work in conjunction with doctors and other healthcare professionals in sleep diagnostics, primarily assisting physicians with providing comprehensive clinical evaluations for the diagnosis of sleep disorders. By applying non-invasive monitoring equipment, the technologist simultaneously monitors electroencephalography, electrooculography, electromyography, electrocardiography, and multiple breathing variables and blood oxygen levels during sleep. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, Committee on Accreditation for Polysomnographic Technologist Education. Students are eligible to sit for a certification examination at the end of the program. Mission: To prepare graduates for work or career enhancement in the field of sleep diagnostics. To achieve this mission, the Polysomnography faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate proficiency in aseptic technique in a simulated laboratory setting (LO 1,2).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics, safety and

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a simulated aseptic procedure when measured against departmental rubric (each fall semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or better) on the first attempt on

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% of students met As a result of analysis, faculty benchmark. Students completed increased the rigor of this simulation without difficulty. exercise by modifying the clinical lab check-off and the PSG 111 lab check-off to provide more comprehensive assessment of proficiency performing aseptic technique. 100% of students achieved a As a result of analysis, faculty passing score of 70% or better have strengthened the on the first attempt. The safety/storage aspect of oxygen


administration of oxygen as they apply to the treatment of sleep-related disorders and related disorders within the context of the relationships of various systems (LO 1,2).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate the ability to perform the 10/20 system of measurement (LO 2).

SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Polysomnography faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

an examination addressing characteristics, safety, and administration of oxygen as they apply to the treatment of sleep-related disorders and related disorders within the context of the relationships of various systems (each fall semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Acceptable� or better) on the first attempt on a simulated clinical case study that requires the effective use of polysomnographic theory and practice (each fall semester). 90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

average score was 91%. Students excelled in application and administration. The weakest item addressed the safe storage of O2.

by more hands-on lab time in PSG 111 and student demonstration followed by testing of knowledge in PSG 113 through week 2 quiz.

100% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt on the lab simulation.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added online exercises in PSG 111 that comprise 10-20 activities to strengthen this outcome and better prepare students for clinical practice.

2013-2014

2013-2014

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including attendance of the Focus National Conference for Polysomnography in Nashville as well as local activities in teaching pedagogy and the

The Focus national conference strengthened instruction generally, but particularly in the areas of future career paths for students and upcoming insurance changes in the field. As a result of professional development, faculty have

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application and use of instructional resources.

PO (2): Polysomnography faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

From the Fall 2012 graduation survey, of the nineteen dimensions measured, 100% of respondents rated each measure “acceptable” or higher. 100% of respondents gave the program an overall rating of “Very Good” or better on the quality of preparation as an entry-level Polysomnographic technologist.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Polysomnography Advisory Committee met 6.20.12. Among the items discussed were the benefits and advantages of program accreditation by CAAHEEP for students, the new hybrid format for courses, student attendance at clinicals, and new clinical evaluation forms. Two major credentialing exams and the new WSCC website for clinical preceptors were also presented.

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added ten Blackboard shells for Polysomnography courses. Faculty have committed to more discipline-specific professional development in 2013-14. As a result of analysis, faculty have added Blackboard shells to ten additional courses to facilitate student learning and practice.

As a result of the meeting, support and buy-in from area practitioners increased, due largely to the fact that the WSCC program would now be the only CAAHEP-accredited program in the state. Faculty became aware of some resistance to a totally online instructional format. Faculty have made changes to improve student attendance at clinical rotation sites by requesting the


preceptors note any absences. A new policy has been adopted with stricter consequences for unexcused absences and leaving early. 50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 68%, 92%, and 88% respectively.

As a result of analysis, more quizzes and study guides have been added to sustain these results.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-spring for 2010-11 and 2011-12 were 94% and 83%. Fall-to-fall retention rate not applicable due to program being only two semesters.

As a result of analysis, more quizzes and study guides have been added to sustain these results.

90% of graduates will be Of 11 2013 graduates, 9 or 82% pursuing a higher degree or were employed in field within employed and 75% will be ninety days of completion. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

As a result of analysis, faculty will work more closely with area employers to sustain this placement rate. Faculty have committed to closer monitoring in 13-14 AY of employer satisfaction and advisory committee feedback.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and

Faculty will review instructional resources again in spring 2014 and present any

While faculty reported overall satisfaction with facilities and instructional resources,

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instructional resources (each spring semester).

additional laboratory space is needed as a future goal. Faculty noted that unit has technology needed to offer instruction in nocturnal and positive airway polysomnograms, CPAP and BILEVEL, oxygen administration, and report generation and acquisition.

critical needs to the Administrative Council through the college’s budget hearing protocols.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

92% of 2012 graduates who attempted the credentialing exam passed on the first attempt. 83% of 2013 graduates who attempted the credentialing exam passed on the first attempt. (CAAHEP annual report).

As a result of analysis, faculty have committed to regular review of exam matrix to monitor changes and make requisite curricular modifications.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

On the most recent employer surveys (2012), 100% agreed graduates had sleep technology knowledge necessary to function in healthcare setting. 100% rated program overall as “Very Good” or higher.

To sustain these results and strengthen graduate preparation, faculty have created additional Blackboard shells and converted courses to hybrid format with new online quizzes, lectures, and study guides. Faculty have committed to increased industry interaction to measure trends

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shaping clinical practice.

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Analysis and Planning: Polysomnography Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 25.1, 25.2, and 25.3. Facilities The PSG program currently occupies one classroom and the solarium which are also used for labs. A lab photo is included as Attachment 25.4. Classroom/lab space is one area faculty is least satisfied. It would benefit students and faculty to have a larger lab area. This would allow enough space for all students to be working in the lab at the same time and it would also allow for the lab to remain “set� up and ready to use. Faculty feel the climate at WSCC is welcoming. They also feel that they are respected, supported, and valued. The PSG classroom contains adequate seating and lighting. The temperature is an area that needs some improvement. The students would benefit from a lower temperature setting in the classroom and lab while they are on campus. The classroom is equipped with current technology for instruction purposes (projector, computers, etc.). Faculty strongly agrees that the services offered by the college, such as the library and student support services are adequate. Audiovisual and computer equipment are available for students for class activities or assignments. Student support services are readily available to all students. Faculty strongly agrees that our clinical facilities offer an adequate number and variety of procedures for the students to meet clinical objectives. Personnel The PSG program currently employs one full-time faculty member; the program director also functions as the instructor and clinical coordinator. The program chair has been in this position for 4 years, and has worked in the industry for 20 years. A vita is included as Attachment 25.5, and professional development record as Attachment 25.6. An adjunct is employed part time in the fall semester to help with the clinical schedule and labs. Faculty are least satisfied with the amount of time (contact hours) awarded for clinical education classes. Equipment The faculty strongly agrees that the PSG program offers lab equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives. The PSG program currently offers


all available technology available to medical facilities. We are capable of offering students instruction in nocturnal polysomnograms, positive airway pressure polysomnograms, CPAP and BILEVEL, oxygen administration, patient preparation, study acquisition, report generation and acquisition scoring. Students also have access to the supplies (needles, gowns, etc.) needed to teach labs appropriately. Faculty is in agreement that additional computers will be required to replace some older units in the near future. Plans are being discussed on the best option to obtain the needed computers. Computers would improve student assessment in a variety of ways, i.e. exams could be enhanced with the addition of digital images. Faculty is in agreement that a portable sleep system would enhance our clinical objectives. At the current time we do not have a portable system. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 25.7. Program Highlights A PSG program graduate was recently offered and accepted a position at a sleep facility in Australia. The PSG program was accredited May 20, 2011 becoming the first and only CAAHEP accredited PSG program in the state of Alabama.

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Respiratory Therapy The Respiratory Therapy program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (76 credit hours). Program Description: The Respiratory Therapy program prepares graduates for administering, under a physician’s prescription, many types of breathing therapeutics, and utilizing specialized breathing, aerosol, and humidification equipment. These include the use of oxygen or oxygen mixtures, chest physiotherapy, mechanical ventilation, and aerosol medications. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care. Upon graduation, students are eligible to take the registry examination of the National Board of Respiratory Care. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment as Respiratory Therapy technicians. To achieve this mission, the Respiratory Therapy faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): Students completing RPT 234 will demonstrate proficiency in the use of mechanical ventilation equipment, focusing on the application of scientific principles to the clinical use of various modes of mechanical ventilation as applied to the clinical decision-making process (LO 1,2,4).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students completing RPT 234 will achieve 100% compliance on a departmental skills check-off encompassing the application of various modes of mechanical ventilation in the clinical decision-making process (end of summer semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

More than 80% of students met benchmark. Students performed set-up and imitation of the ventilator very well; faculty noted weaknesses with the various mode selections.

As a result of analysis, the faculty have committed to earlier identification of struggling students to offer more timely remediation. Mechanical ventilation concepts, especially modes of ventilation, now begin a few weeks earlier than previously, a modification that allows more time for students struggling with this concept and need more hands-on practice.


SLO (2): Students will demonstrate proficiency in the collection and analysis of arterial blood gases in a simulated clinical environment (LO 1,2,4).

SLO (3): Students will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of pharmacology for the Respiratory Therapy practice in a clinical environment, with focus on the determination of drug dosage, clinical pharmacology, and intended actions and possible side effects of pharmacological agents used in respiratory care (LO 2).

SLO (4): Graduating students will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of theory and practice associated with the clinical respiratory environment, including the areas of pharmacology, commonly encountered pathology, acid base regulation

80% of students will achieve 100% compliance on a departmental skills check-off encompassing the collection and analysis of arterial blood gasses in a simulated clinical environment (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 90% or higher) on the first attempt on the comprehensive respiratory care drug examination that addresses pharmacology in the clinical environment, with focus on dosage, clinical pharmacology, and intended actions and possible side effects of pharmacological agents used in respiratory care (end of fall semester). 80% of graduating students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or better) on the first attempt on a comprehensive examination addressing knowledge and practice associated with the clinical respiratory environment, including the

100% of students met this benchmark. All students received safe marks on the preparation, puncture, and postpuncture procedures. No weaknesses cited.

Although students performed well, faculty noted the need for better instructional resources. Faculty purchased new arterial arm with simulated pulse and blood products, making the process more realistic.

More than 80% of students met this benchmark. Some students had difficulty with the mathematical calculations portion of the exam.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added more practice activities and placed them earlier in the course in RPT 214.

More than 80% achieved a passing score on the NBRC Mock CRT Exam. Weaknesses were noted in the areas of managing mechanical ventilation based on clinical findings.

As a result of analysis, faculty moved up the scheduling of teaching concepts of mechanical ventilation in the semester prior to competency check-offs, allowing more time for simulations.

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and ABG analysis, and diagnostics (LO 2).

SLO (5): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Respiratory Therapy faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Respiratory Therapy faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the

areas of pharmacology, commonly encountered pathology, acid base regulation and ABG analysis, and diagnostics (each spring 2nd year semester). 90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring 2nd year semester)

100% received a satisfactory score. Faculty cited the need for more self-confidence as the only area targeted for improvement.

To improve student selfconfidence in interview contexts, faculty have reinforced the importance and value of RTA skill set students are leaving the program with. Faculty note from industry feedback that the program’s graduates are preferred over graduates of competitors. In any two-year period, all full- 100% of fulltime faculty have As a result of the professional time faculty will attend a attended multiple professional development activities, faculty minimum of two internal or development activities. These have enhanced the use of external professional addressed both general teaching simulations after collaboration development activities that pedagogy and optimal use of with other practitioners. The address industry trends and best instructional resources as well Director is attending the first practices (data collected each as discipline-specific trends and state-wide simulation spring semester). practices. All fulltime faculty consortium in November, 2013. attended, for example, the Faculty received training in annual conference of the areas of contemporary practice Alabama State Society of that enhanced personal and Respiratory Care. professional growth. 80% of graduates will report 80% benchmark met across As a result of analysis, faculty satisfaction with the quality and multiple measures of have reviewed course efficacy of instruction, satisfaction. However, faculty evaluations and incorporated

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achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

noted that graduates cited an area of concern to be the availability of adequate and functional lab equipment for the number of students in a typical lab setting.

into the faculty annual review process. To improve graduate satisfaction rates, faculty have acquired and utilized new pieces of up-to-date equipment in labs, including new arterial blood gas arms, new intubation heads, a current microprocessor ventilator, and a new transport ventilator.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The RTA Advisory Committee met 12.25.12 with more than nine area practitioners present. Key items discussed included the adoption of a state-wide standard curriculum, the closure of the BS feeder program at UAB, and institutional approval to purchase extensive new equipment for the program’s labs.

As a result of discussion, the members were made aware of critical issues facing program, primarily the reduction in clinical placements due to mew competitors, such as Virginia College, a for-profit in Birmingham. Members were made aware of the programs continuing accreditation without findings.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 64%, 71%, and 58% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have acquired extensive equipment upgrades and introduced an early intervention program of special faculty assistance and peer mentoring.

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Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 42% and 45% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2010-11 and 2011-12 were 92% and 98.

To improve retention rates, faculty have acquired extensive equipment upgrades and introduced an early intervention program of special faculty assistance and peer mentoring.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

Of 24 2013 graduates, 24 or 100% were employed in field within ninety days of completion. Of 29 2012 graduates, 28 or 97% were employed in-field within ninety days of graduation.

To sustain these rates, faculty have committed to strengthening input from the advisory committee and from area practitioners. The program has offered CEU courses free to preceptors and all clinical sites. Several HR representatives from area employers have been invited to visit the program in 13-14.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty reported satisfaction with facilities and resources but noted the need for improvement. The need for additional laboratory spaces was particularly noted. Faculty noted that equipment has undergone extensive upgrades in recent years.

As a result of analysis, faculty identified critical equipment upgrades and presented proposals at the spring 2012 budget hearings. As a result, program upgraded items such as intubation heads and arterial heads. To create more lab space, faculty are exploring the conversion of second-floor

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90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

83% of 2012 graduates passed the licensure exam on the first attempt.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

The most recent employer surveys (2012) indicate 100% satisfactory ratings for all areas of the CoARC employer survey.

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solarium into a simulated ICU. As a result of analysis, faculty have partnered with WallaceDothan in implementing an annual board review program, utilizing resources from each institution. To improve employer satisfaction, faculty have rereviewed student clinical analysis/evaluation forms for areas to target for improvement. Faculty have also emphasized standard workplace expectations in areas such as professionalism, HIPAA, and appropriate attire.


Analysis and Planning: Respiratory Therapy Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified five program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 26.1, 26.2, 26.3, 26.4, and 26.5. Personnel Resources The RT program currently employs two full-time faculty members and two adjunct instructors. The program chair has been in this position for 21 years, and has worked in the industry for 31 years. A vita is included as Attachment 26.6, and professional development record as Attachment 26.7. Each year the program’s medical director and advisory committee evaluates the teaching effectiveness of the faculty as required by CoARC. The outcome has indicated that the teaching effectiveness and number of faculty are currently adequate to meet the program’s instructional needs. Facilities The RT program currently occupies one very small classroom and a very congested laboratory. A lab photo is included as Attachment 26.8. Classroom space has been a constant need for the number of students accepted. Faculty note that the program sometimes has level one and two students on campus at the same time and only one dedicated classroom. Faculty are working with Diagnostic Imaging to convert the sun room into a patient simulation lab that would be shared by both programs, helping alleviate some of the congestion in labs. Laboratory space is one of the biggest areas of concern. With at least ten students in lab at one time / per one faculty member and the vast amount of equipment involved, the environment is crowded and it is sometimes difficult to facilitate an ideal learning environment. Laboratory Equipment The faculty agree that the RT lab equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives is constantly improving. The program has three state-of-the-art micro-processor ventilators like those currently in use at the majority of area clinical sites. The program has just recently replaced intubation heads and arterial arms, which were much needed for two of the program’s critical competencies. The program is in the process of converting the second floor solarium into a simulated ICU for more realistic patient care simulations. Learning Resources The Faculty strongly agree that the program is in great need of computers or sufficient computer access to facilitate learning and passage of 50% of the student’s National Registry Exam, which is administered via computer simulations. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 26.9. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 26.10, and the


presidential response is Attachment 26.11 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 26.12. Program Support Personnel The RT program shares a secretary with three other programs and clinical contracts. The faculty agree that the secretarial support is adequate and meets program needs the majority of the time. Financial Resources The RT program has been very fortunate to receive an adequate operating budget as well as monies for capital equipment purchases through the WS budget hearing process.

Clinical Resources The RT program currently has 25 active clinical sites. It has become more difficult to place students in an appropriate level clinical rotation due to a HUGE reduction in clinical spots. The RT program here competes for clinical spots with Virginia College in Birmingham (recently established), UAB and Shelton State Community College. Physician Interaction The RT program tracks each student’s bi-directional physician interaction each semester as required by CoARC. Each student is required to document at least 12 hours per semester, which has proven to be sufficient to meet the programs and CoARC goals. Service Learning The RT program is a proud chapter of the National Honor Society for Respiratory Care Education “Lambda Beta.” Through the local club, students participate in 8 to 10 hours of community-based learning each semester. The program is very active in promoting several events throughout the year, including the annual campus health fair, Drive for COPD, Great American Smoke out, and promoting the profession during national RC week.

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Health Information Technology The Health Information Technology program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (76 credit hours). Program Description: Graduates of the Health Information Technology program become skilled professionals who analyze and evaluate highly sensitive data in health records. Skills are wide-ranging, but include supervising the release of health information, maintaining and utilizing information storage and retrieval systems, compiling health statistics, and supervising electronic health information management systems. Mission: To prepare graduates in Health Information Technology for entry-level positions as trained professionals in the storage, utilization, and management of health information. To achieve this mission, the Health Information Technology faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate competency in using standard healthcare computer applications, including demonstrated skill in collecting, storing, retrieving, reporting, and displaying healthcare data (LO 1,2,4). SLO (2): The student will demonstrate collegiate oral communication skills in an oral presentation on medical

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a laboratory software exercise that requires demonstration of the effective use of HIT technology (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on an oral

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

89% of students achieved a passing score (32/36)

To improve on these results, faculty have begun search for more engaging textbook with requisite lab opportunities and exercises offered online through publisher.

94% of students achieved a passing score on the Oral Presentation in HIT 296 fall 2013 (29/31). Faculty noted

To improve this outcome, faculty have stressed importance of good oral communication skills in clinical


classification and reimbursement, legal and ethical issues, healthcare delivery systems, or another topic related to practice in the healthcare environment (LO 2,3). SLO (3): The student will demonstrate proficiency in theory and applications of medical classification and coding (LO 2).

PO (1): Health Information Technology faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): Health Information Technology faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks

presentation addressing a topic related to practice in the healthcare environment when measured against departmental rubric (each fall semester).

that the two students who did not achieve a passing score chose not to do oral presentation.

practice.

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a computerized capstone exercise that evaluates student ability to assign medical codes in a simulated workplace environment when measured against departmental rubric (each summer semester). In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester). 80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and

100% of students in HIT 296 fall 2013 achieved a passing score.

To improve this outcomes, faculty have developed new simulations with changing industry standards, such as ICD-10-CM.

100% of fulltime faculty exceeded the requirement of two professional development activities.

As a result of professional development activities, faculty enhanced pedagogical skills and content awareness.

100% Graduate satisfaction rate – respondents agreed that the overall academic experience prepared them to work as HIT professionals (Dec 2012 grads).

Sequence of classes will be changed to allow more time (change from fall mini term to summer regular term).

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regarding program effectiveness.

instructional resources (each spring semester).

Comments were received regarding more time on CPT coding.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

Advisory Committee met April 2013. 100% of Advisory Committee respondents indicated the HIT program meets the needs/expectation of the community of interest. Minutes reflect Advisory Committee review of program status, updates, curriculum, evaluation results, clinical coordinator report, and ICD-10 implementation plans. No negative trends are noted.

As a result of advisory committee meeting, partnership between faculty and area practitioners was strengthened. Faculty were able to convey implications of ICD-10 implementation plans.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2009, 2010, and 2011 cohorts were 71%, 48%, and 64% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have modified admission requirements and program progression criteria. (Admission standards have been revised again for students entering 2014.) Sequence of program classes has also been modified.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60%

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2012 to 2013 were 71%. Fallto-spring for 2012-13 were

To improve retention rates, faculty have modified the program progression

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respectively (data collected each spring).

76%.

requirements.

90% of graduates will be 85% of Fall 2012 graduates are pursuing a higher degree or working in-field. employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

To improve job placement rates, faculty have encouraged students to take the RHIT exam early due to employers requiring credentials.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources. Faculty noted some disruptions due to building renovations and upgrades, which are almost complete.

Faculty will review facilities and resources again spring 2014.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

100% of graduating students taking the licensure exam achieved a passing score on the first attempt (32/32)

To improve licensure rates, faculty have required an exam review class and mandatory passage of program proficiency exam before graduation.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

100% Employer satisfaction rate – respondents agreed graduates’ possess technical skills required for the HIT job.

To sustain high employer satisfaction rates, faculty have added simulations to ensure offerings are consistent with industry expectations.

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Analysis and Planning: Health Information Technology Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 27.1, 27.2, and 27.3. All HIT program outcomes were excellent. Overall, no negative trends were identified in graduate, employer, and advisory committee surveys. Graduates in 2013 achieved a 100% pass rate on the national (RHIT) exam. The program will continue to monitor outcomes and develop improvements as needed. Facilities Classroom/lab space is an area in which faculty are most satisfied. A lab photo is included as Attachment 27.4. The classrooms are equipped with up-to-date instructor computers with ‘smart’ technology. The classrooms contain adequate seating, ventilation, and lighting. The physical building has undergone renovations and repairs, which have resulted in some noise and disruption, but this work will be complete soon. The HIT program currently has three classrooms available. One of the three classrooms is equipped with 22 up-to-date computers for HIT student use and one for instructor use. This provides an excellent space for lab work and practicing with electronic health record simulations. Faculty are working on converting an additional area on the floor to a mock interview station. Faculty agree that the services offered by the college, such as the library and open computer labs, are adequate. The college has wonderful space for student comfort. Faculty are satisfied with the current number of clinical sites, although the search is ongoing for additional sites for student convenience. Clinical facilities offer outstanding opportunities for the students to meet clinical objectives. Personnel The HIT program currently employs three full-time faculty members: the program director, instructor, and clinical coordinator/instructor. Faculty agree that the number of HIT instructors is adequate both in the classroom and lab. Faculty are least satisfied with the amount of time (contact hours) awarded for clinical education classes. The program chair has been in this position for 21 years, and has worked in the industry for 30 years. A vita is included as Attachment 27.5, and professional development record as Attachment 27.6. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 27.7.


Equipment The faculty strongly agree that the HIT program has equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives. The HIT program currently offers students access to technology commensurate with that found in most medical facilities. Faculty strongly agree that they have access to the equipment (up-to-date computers and software) and supplies needed to teach both on campus and online courses.

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Human Services The Human Services program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (74 credit hours). Program Description: The Human Services curriculum is designed for students who wish to pursue a two-year degree and prepare for a paraprofessional career in the mental health/human services field. The program offers three AAS degree options: Mental Health Technician Associate, Alcohol and Drug Counseling Associate, and Social Work Associate. Human Services workers assist social workers, healthcare workers, and other professionals to provide services to the community. Upon completion of the program, graduates may voluntarily take the Nationally Certified Psychiatric Technician exam to become a Nationally Certified Psychiatric Technician. Mission: To provide graduates of the Human Services program training and skills necessary for entry-level paraprofessional employment in the mental health/human services field. To achieve this mission, the Human Services faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate knowledge of physical, social, mental, or emotional functioning of the developmentally disabled (LO 2,3,5).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate knowledge of the

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on an oral presentation on a dimension of developmental disabilities when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

95% of students achieved a passing score on first attempt. Weaknesses noted by faculty during presentations were “stage fright” and reading directly from notecards or PPT slides.

As a result of analysis, faculty have increased the number of opportunities for students to give oral presentations by assigning additional mini oral presentations.

90% of students achieved a passing score on the first

As a result of analysis, faculty modified the interview


fundamentals of human services as applied in the clinical practice (LO 2,3,5).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate knowledge of mental health issues and psychological challenges of older adults, including understanding of later life functional and organic brain disorders as well as the major Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders through DSM-IV published by the American Psychiatric Association (LO 2,3,5). SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

“Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on an interview exercise that requires a personal interview with a Human Services practitioner when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “C” or better) on the first attempt on each of three case studies addressing some aspect of mental health issues and psychological challenges of older adults when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

attempt. A weakness noted by faculty was that students procrastinated in completing their interview, which resulted in a “rushed” interview session with the practitioner.

timetable, requiring a schedule with appropriate deadlines for the development of components such as written interview questions.

85% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt on each of the three case studies of older adults. Students scored high on the psychological challenges of older adults, but were weaker in addressing the mental health issues of older adults.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added additional exercises from the current edition of DSM to strengthen this outcome. (The latest edition, DSM V, will be utilized effective spring semester 2014.)

90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester)

85% of students achieved a passing score on the mock interviews. Students who failed to pass were not dressed professionally and provided inadequate responses to interview questions.

To improve these results, faculty have required that students participate in a professional dress fashion show and prepare more rigorously to answer oral questions on the Human Services field. The fashion show is scheduled 2-4 weeks before the mock interviews.

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PO (1): Human Services faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Human Services faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including on-campus e-learning workshops on the effective use of instructional resources. External professional development included 30 hours in social work continuing education. 80% of graduates will report 100% of graduates reported satisfaction with the quality and overall satisfaction with efficacy of instruction, program quality and efficacy. curriculum, assessment, Areas of strength were in teaching pedagogies, and applying principles to practice, instructional resources (each therapeutic activities, APA spring semester). style in papers, treatment teams, group counseling techniques, and the DSM IV TR.

As a result of these activities, selected HUS classes were modified into a hybrid format, using new technologies and pedagogies. Hand-outs and websites from external activities were used to augment and update classroom instruction.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once

As a result of discussion, the faculty are considering the recommendation of the committee to combine HUS 212 and 216 into one 212 class. They recommended that HUS 216 be focused on relapse prevention.

The Human Services Advisory Committee met in November 2012. The major topic of discussion was the Department of Postsecondary Education’s curriculum changes. The committee also discussed the pending DSM V changes for 2013.

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To sustain high graduate satisfaction, links with Human Services community were strengthened, leading to better student advising and a higher rate of student participation in attending and presenting at community and regional events.


each fall or spring semester).

The graduation rates for 2008, 2009, and 2010 fall cohorts were 67%, 22%, and 60% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have strengthened individual advising. Faculty are also enlisting former graduates as speakers to encourage completion and entry into practice.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 49% and 37% respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12, 2012-13 were 76% and 82%.

To improve retention rates, faculty have strengthened individual advising. Students have been assigned to peer study groups to strengthen persistence to completion.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

89% of graduates are employed in-field or pursing a higher degree. Of those not employed, one is disabled and another has chosen to not work outside home.

Faculty have initiated a routine search for employment and baccalaureate scholarship opportunities and post this information through social media, email, and phone contacts.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

While faculty reported overall satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources, faculty expressed need for a lab, which would facilitate role-plays and simulations for mental health counseling, patient and worker

As a result of analysis, faculty have met with the Dean of Health Science to discuss the inclusion of a dedicated lab as part of capital plans moving forward. [Susan, do you have any evidence of this that I could include in 2012-13?]

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

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safety issues, and geriatric settings. 80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

99% of employers rated preparation for employment as adequate or better. (All but one employer reported preparation as “Very Good.�

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To improve employer satisfaction, faculty have strengthened clinical partnerships and service learning components of curriculum.


Analysis and Planning: Human Services Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 28.1, 28.2, 28.3, and 28.4. Facilities The Human Services and Gerontology program currently occupies two classrooms, which are shared with the Psychology and Sociology Department. The smaller classroom accommodates fifty students maximum and the larger classroom accommodates sixty students. A photo is included as Attachment 28.5. When the classrooms are not used by the departments mentioned previously, they are used for community education, division/employee meetings, and other health education departments. The department currently does not have a lab. A lab would be beneficial for role-plays and to simulate multiple scenarios in mental health counseling, mental health hospital settings, patient and worker safety, patient intakes and assessments, and geriatric settings. At this time, Health Education Building space is not available for a lab. HUS faculty are satisfied with the educational atmosphere. The HUS classrooms contain adequate seating, ventilation, and lighting. Each classroom is equipped with technology for instructional purposes (projector, computers, etc.). Classrooms and restrooms are cleaned nightly. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 28.6. Human Services utilizes clinical sites in all counties in the campus catchment area and more sites are added each semester. Clinical facilities offer an adequate number and variety of procedures for the students to allow them to meet clinical objectives. Student Support Services offered by the college are adequate. Academic advisors are available to assist students with advising and career options. Heads Up, a SAMSHA Prevention Program, and Cullman Mental Healthcare work to provide drug-related education and prevention services for students. The campus library provides audiovisual and computer equipment for class activities or assignments. Students have requested more open computer labs on campus and more WiFi hotspots. Numerous professional development opportunities are offered year-round for faculty and employees. The Campus Technology Department is accessible to assist faculty and students with Blackboard training and with other types of technology, including the new BANNER registration system. Faculty and students feel safe on campus. A full-time campus police force is present to assist with any safety and legal issues that may arise.


Various student organizations are active on campus, including the Human Services Club. Students and campus employees are encouraged to attend sporting events, musical events, and cultural activities.

Personnel The HUS program currently employs one full-time faculty member. The program chair has been in this position for 11 years, and has worked in the industry for 27 years. A vita is included as Attachment 28.7, and professional development record as Attachment 28.8. The faculty member serves as the program chair, the clinical coordinator, and the classroom instructor. Depending on the semester and class enrollment, adjunct faculty may also teach classes. Faculty are least satisfied with the amount of time (contact hours) awarded for clinical education classes. Program Highlights The HUS program was very active during the 2012-2013 academic year. During November, students hosted Mental Health Matters Awareness. The two-day event was held on campus to promote mental health awareness in conjunction with the FreshmenFaculty Luncheon and the Healthy Living Tent. Campus participants were screened for depression and anxiety, were given various mental health brochures, played therapeutic games, and received free refreshments and door prizes. During Spring Semester, students were very active in the community. Students attended the Alabama Child-Safety Conference in Decatur and the Caddell/Banks Alzheimer’s Conference. During April, HUS students applied for and were awarded scholarships to attend the Alabama Department of Mental Health’s Annual Recovery Conference. Students also developed a therapeutic activity to present to consumers during the conference break-out sessions. The Alabama Department of Mental Health reported that the department received excellent evaluations and that the activity was the favorite at this year’s conference. Lastly, the Alabama Department of Mental Health awarded the State RESPECT award to a clinical site supervisor and HUS adjunct faculty member. During the summer, HUS students traveled to Decatur to volunteer for Hospice of the Valley’s Camp Hope. Camp Hope is a bereavement camp for children and teens. HUS students and faculty assisted with activities. During July, students received Comfort Touch Training by Hospice of North Alabama. Our health program secretary and the program chair streamlined the new applicant process and worked with the Admissions Office to ease the application process.

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Physical Therapist Assistant The Physical Therapist Assistant program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in an AAS degree (68-69 credit hours). Program Description: In this healthcare program, students are trained to assist the physical therapist in providing services that help improve mobility, relieve pain, and prevent or limit permanent physical disabilities of patients suffering from injuries or disease. Duties of the Physical Therapist Assistant are varied but include rehabilitation of orthopedic, neurological, pediatric, and sportsrelated challenges. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association. Graduates are eligible to sit for the National Licensing Examination for the Physical Therapist Assistant administered by the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment as Physical Therapist Assistants in a wide range of healthcare settings. To achieve this mission, the Physical Therapist Assistant faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness:

1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): Students will safely and effectively demonstrate basic treatment planning and implementation strategies (LO 1).

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 75% or better) on the first attempt on the PTA 250 practical examination (each fall semester).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate practical and

85% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70%

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

79% (26/33) achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Students had difficulty transitioning from single skill activities to the comprehensive, patient management strategy necessary for practical scenarios. 81% (22/27) of students achieved a passing score on the

As a result of analysis, faculty have modified the scheduling format to allow additional open labs prior to practical exams to increase time available for practice scenarios.

Pending analysis – this is a new version of the exit exam and


theoretical knowledge of current PTA practice (LO 2).

SLO (3): The student will successfully communicate treatment methodologies using the standard SOAP format (LO 3).

SLO (4): Students will successfully utilize clinically relevant equipment typically encountered in practice (LO 4).

PO (1): Physical Therapy Assistant faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

or better) on the first attempt on the PTA 201 comprehensive exit examination / mock board (each summer semester).

first attempt. Collectively, the class demonstrated content weaknesses in the diseases/ conditions and equipment/ devices subcategories.

needs to be examined for efficacy in light of licensure exam results (available in March). The faculty believes this year’s version of the exit exam is more difficult than the licensure exam and expects a downward adjustment to the exit exam passing score may be indicated. 80% of students will achieve a 73% (24/33) of students As a result of analysis, faculty passing score (defined as 75% achieved a passing score. have begun posting the grading or better) on the PTA 202 final Notably deficits were related to rubric prior to assessment and SOAP note based on a patient basic SOAP formatting distributing SOAP forms care scenario (each fall problems rather than content instead of blank paper to semester) issues. heighten the realism of the clinical scenario. 80% of students will achieve a 89% (25/28) of students As a result of analysis, faculty passing score (defined as 80% achieved a passing score. have implemented a clinical or better) on PT skills using Additional study is necessary to equipment survey to assess clinically relevant equipment as assure that available lab relevance of program measured by the PTA 251 equipment continues to be equipment. Practical Exam rubric (each clinically relevant. spring semester). In any two-year period, all full- 100% of fulltime faculty met As a result of analysis, faculty time faculty will attend a the requirement of two strengthened the delivery of minimum of two internal or professional development online courses and augmented external professional activities. 100% of courses with online development activities that resources. Faculty also address industry trends and best received training in areas of practices (data collected each contemporary practice that

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PO (2): Physical Therapy Assistant faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

spring semester). 80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Results from the 2013 Graduate Survey were high across all measures of performance. 100% reported that program provided sufficient information and training to prepare graduates for employment. 100% reported that instructors effectively communicated knowledge and skills necessary for field. 100% would recommend program to others.

enhanced professional growth. As a result of analysis, faculty revised and streamlined the graduate survey to improve response rate. Also noted was a need for clinically relevant equipment. This need will be further clarified with the clinical site survey of current equipment to pinpoint deficit areas in anticipation of budget hearing requests.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

In 2012-2013, the program surveyed 42 local clinicians during three different campus events (CI workshop, jurisprudence CEU workshops and PTA/OTA alumni connection event) regarding resources, curriculum, & current industry trends.

As a result of analysis, the need to refine this survey emerged. While excellent feedback is received and curricular changes have been made in the areas of functional anatomy, manual therapy, CVA rehab, the survey needs to be streamlined. Also as a result of recommendations, a cap on observation hours has been implemented.

50% of entering new students will graduate within two years of program entry (data collected each spring). (Note that this is a one-year AAS

The graduation rates for the 2009, 2010, and 2011 cohorts were 84%, 78%, and 89% respectively.

As a result of analysis, the faculty added the PTA 120 course as an academic prep course for the program. The program also eliminated the

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degree program.)

off-campus cohort which consistently had a higher attrition rate.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-spring retention rates for 2011 to 2012 and 2012 to 2013 were 91% and 78% respectively. (Because this is a one-year degree program, fallto-fall rates do not apply.)

As a result of analysis, faculty has focused on improving the test-taking and study skills of prospective students through PTA 120. Increased recruitment of MSG graduates to PTA is also being pursued through offering application bonus points for MSG 104 & MSG 204 classes.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

Out of 27 graduates (2013), 67% are working in-field, 3% are working out-of-field, and 30% of students are unknown.

As a result of analysis, additional emphasis has been included in the PTA advising workshops to clarify program expectations/requirements. Out-of-field students are also located in former off-campus locations – closure of these locations should alleviate market saturation.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty reported moderate satisfaction with facilities and resources, noting the need for additional instructional spaces. Faculty also noted satisfaction

As a result of analysis, faculty developed a plan for extensive combined PTA/MSG space on TBH 7th floor, with final occupation of space anticipated

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with current equipment due to recent budget approvals/expenditures.

by summer 2014.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

97% (29/30) of students passed the certification exam on the first attempt.

As a result of analysis, faculty noted the impact of the new exit examination and the need to correlate results with actual licensure exam results. Will continue using the current exit exam but may need to adjust the passing score. Curricular changes are not indicated at this time since all subcategory scores on the licensure exam exceeded the national mean scale score.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

On most recent employer survey, respondents (N=3) gave a score for overall quality of program as “Good”, “Very Good”, or “Excellent”.

As a result of analysis, faculty will address the low response rate through personalized mailed surveys rather than online surveys. Follow-up email encouragement will also be provided.

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Analysis and Planning: Physical Therapy Assistant Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 29.1, 29.2, 29.3, and 29.4. Program Review: Facilities A lab photo of existing space is included as Attachment 29.5. As identified through numerous sources of analysis, the current classroom/lab space has become insufficient. Cooperatively the PTA & MSG faculty developed expansion plans and are currently in the process of transitioning to significantly expanded space to accommodate both programs. Existing classroom technology, which is sufficient, will be transitioned in the move, with expanded classroom seating and the addition of one additional permanent classroom. By fall semester 2014, the combined programs will transition from one current classroom to two fully equipped classrooms and from two inadequate lab spaces to four – a significant increase in available square footage. Faculty agree that the services & spaces currently offered by the college, such as the library and open computer labs, are adequate for the program’s needs. The faculty also express satisfaction with external clinical resources, actively using a variety of quality facilities and holding residual contacts with a surplus of inactive clinical sites that are available on demand. Personnel The PTA program currently employs two full-time faculty members, including the program director and clinical coordinator who both function as instructors. The program chair has been in this position for 20 years, and has worked in the industry for 22 years. A vita and professional development record is included as Attachment 29.6. Additionally, the program includes three part-time instructors. The full-time program faculty, in cooperation with the MSG full-time instructor (who is also a PTA), also have mutual shared instructional responsibilities across both programs. This cross training allows significant flexibility in instructional assignments and capitalizes on the instructional content strengths of each. The faculty agree that the number of instructors is adequate both in the classroom and lab, although they are least satisfied with the current contact hours expectations for both classroom/lab instruction and clinical education classes. Equipment The faculty strongly agree that the PTA program has equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives, although there is a need to assess the


currency of equipment with that found in the clinical environment. In some cases, such as traction or laser therapy, the PTA program currently offers students access to technology that exceeds that found in many medical facilities. However, the remaining equipment may need to be upgraded in spite of its current sufficiency. Faculty agree that they have access to up-to-date computers, software, and supplies necessary to teach both on campus and online courses. A summary of the 2012 year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 29.7.

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Therapeutic Massage The Therapeutic Massage program is housed in the Health Sciences Division and terminates in a short certificate (28-29 credit hours). Program Description: The Therapeutic Massage program trains students to optimally manipulate the soft tissues of the body focusing on wellness and stress reduction as well as the enhancement of healing in individuals suffering from neuromuscular dysfunction. The program at Wallace State is a licensed school approved by the Alabama Board of Massage Therapy. Graduates are eligible to apply to sit for the national certification exam administered by the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork. After successful completion of the exam, a graduate can be licensed as a massage therapist in Alabama and other states. Mission: To train graduates for employment as massage therapists, committed to the holistic manipulation of soft tissues to facilitate wellness, relaxation, or rehabilitation. To achieve this mission, the Therapeutic Massage Therapy faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will safely and effectively demonstrate the ability to perform a combination of Swedish and Deep Tissue massage techniques (LO 1). SLO (2): The student will successfully demonstrate critical thinking skills in the application of comprehensive therapeutic skills associated with the National Certification

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 75% of students enrolled in MSG 202 will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or better) on the practical examination (each spring semester) 75% of students enrolled in MSG 206 will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% of better) on the first attempt on the National Certification practice exam (each spring

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

100% (14/14) of students achieved the benchmark, receiving very good ratings from licensed massage therapist with whom they worked.

As a result of analysis, additional massage table purchases were made and a rotating schedule of replacement was established to improve this outcome. As a result of analysis and subsequent correlation with the licensure exam, faculty have begun actively seeking an alternative practice exam that would provide more

100% (11/11) of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Faculty noted that the individual feedback was pivotal in helping the students prepare for the licensure exam,


Exam (LO 2).

semester).

but the process lacked curricular feedback.

SLO (3): Students will successfully demonstrate the ability to develop a business plan that incorporates standard industry elements for communicating with the public and establishing a successful business (LO 3). SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the ability to successfully utilize appropriate technology in a presentation that describes current massage techniques or specialized skills (LO 4).

75% of students enrolled in MSG 200 will achieve a passing score (defined as 80% or better) on the MSG Business Plan when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

80% (12/14) of students achieved a passing score. Faculty noted that collectively the class struggled with putting the entire project together in a cohesive, articulate unit.

75% of students enrolled in MSG 101 will achieve a passing score (defined as 80% or better) on the MSG 101 Special Topic Presentation when measured against faculty rubric (each fall term).

100% (18/18) of students achieved a passing score, demonstrating the effective use of technology within their presentations.

PO (1): Therapeutic Massage faculty will demonstrate a commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Therapeutic Massage faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard

comprehensive program feedback that would guide curricular changes. As a result of analysis, exemplars have been selected that will be available for students as models.

As a result of analysis, the peer review process used has been refined to provide better student feedback. The evaluative rubric has also been strengthened to more effectively measure technology usage. In any two-year period, all full- 100% of fulltime faculty met As a result of analysis, faculty time faculty will attend a the requirement of two strengthened the delivery of minimum of two internal or professional development online courses and augmented external professional activities 100% of courses with online development activities that resources. Faculty enhanced address industry trends and best professional growth through practices (data collected each training in contemporary spring semester). practice areas. 80% of graduates will report Results from the 2013 Graduate As a result of analysis, 100% of satisfaction with the quality and Survey (7/11 respondents) were respondents also commented on efficacy of instruction, high across all measures of a lack of instructional space curriculum, assessment, performance. 100% reported leading to the faculty

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performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

satisfied/ very satisfied with preparation for the workplace. 100% reported satisfied/ very satisfied with preparation for certification exam. 100% reported satisfied/ very satisfied with quality of instructors. 100% reported satisfied/ very satisfied with quality of facilities, equipment & learning resources. 100% reported satisfied/ very satisfied overall.

developing a plan for extensive combined PTA/MSG space on TBH 7th floor, with final occupation of space anticipated by summer 2014.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The TM advisory committee did not meet in the 12-13 AY.

While the non-massage therapist/PTA members of the Advisory Committee are still available & interested, the massage therapists are no longer interested / licensed. A new committee will be solicited from former program graduates in 2014.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2009, 2010, and 2011 cohorts were 73%, 77%, and 76% respectively.

As a result of analysis, faculty will seek to increase interest in applicants who have some college experience. Bonus points will be added to PTA applicant process based on

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MSG 104/204 completion. This will potentially increase the number of MSG applicants who have completed at least one year of college level prerequisite classes, thereby strengthening the academic abilities and likelihood of success in the MSG program. Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-spring for 2011-12, 2012-13 were 82 and 70% respectively. (Because this is a two semester program, fall-tofall rates do not apply.)

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As a result of analysis, faculty identified changes in financial aid funding to be a critical factor in this area. The MSG website will be improved to include program cost information for better applicant planning. Long-term, the faculty are also pursuing moving the program from a short-term to a long-term certificate, requiring the additional courses as prerequisites for enrollment. This will change the financial aid classification for this program as well as strengthening the academic abilities of prospective students.


90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

Of 11 graduates (2013), 10 or 91% are employed-in-field or pursuing a higher degree. One is unknown.

As a result of analysis, faculty have implemented an earlier application process for licensure and certification exam completion. This has directly resulted in more graduates being licensed within 3 months of graduation, thus shortening the graduation to work transition.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty reported moderate satisfaction with facilities and resources, noting the need for additional instructional spaces. Faculty also noted satisfaction with current equipment due to recent budget approvals/expenditures.

As a result of analysis, faculty developed a plan for extensive combined PTA/MSG space on TBH 7th floor, with final occupation of space anticipated by summer 2014.

90% of graduates will pass the certification exam on the first attempt (each fall and spring semester).

100% of graduates attempting the licensure exam passed on the first attempt (10/10).

To sustain these results, faculty will continue with current practice testing process but will actively seek a practice exam process that provides collective outcome data regarding curricular deficits.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation

The 2012-13 cohort (7/11 respondents) 71% (5/7) reported self-employment.

Two employer surveys sent. No replies received to date. Email reminders sent.

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of graduates (data collected each summer). 80% of MSG 205 clients surveyed will report satisfaction with preparation, therapeutic technique, and customer service of student practitioners (data tabulated each semester).

Scheduled for phone follow-up in April. 100% (488/488) clients surveyed rated their overall student massage experience as “good” or “very good” during final semester clinicals, including both Swedish and deep tissue experiences.

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To sustain these results, faculty will replicate the current clinic set up in the new location to assure continuity of services.


Analysis and Planning: Therapeutic Massage Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 30.1, 30.2, 30.3, and 30.4. Program Review: Facilities A lab photo is included as Attachment 30.5. As identified through numerous sources of analysis, the current classroom/lab space has become insufficient. Cooperatively the PTA & MSG faculty developed expansion plans and are currently in the process of transitioning to significantly expanded space to accommodate both programs. Existing classroom technology, which is sufficient, will be transitioned in the move, with expanded classroom seating and the addition of one additional permanent classroom. By fall semester 2014, the combined programs will transition from one current classroom to two fully equipped classrooms and from two inadequate lab spaces to four – a significant increase in available square footage. Faculty agree that the services & spaces currently offered by the college, such as the library and open computer labs, are adequate for the program’s needs. While adequate, the faculty also express concern with the current in-house clinical resources. The current MSG clinical environment is restrictive in space and safely holds a maximum of 7 students at any one time. The new clinical area will allow for 11 student massage therapists to work at a time, plus function well as an expanded lab space for both MSG & PTA programs. Personnel The MSG program currently employs two full-time faculty members. The program director splits responsibilities between PTA & MSG and has functioned as MSG program chair for 6 years, and has worked in the industry for 22 years. A vita and professional development record is included as Attachment 29.7. The primary instructor for MSG classes is licensed both as a massage therapist and physical therapist assistant. Additionally, the program includes one part-time instructor as a clinic supervisor as per the requirement of Alabama law. The full-time program faculty, in cooperation with the PTA full-time instructors have mutual shared instructional responsibilities across both programs as permitted by the Alabama Board of Massage therapy with direct massage skill instruction under the auspices of a licensed massage therapist. This allows significant flexibility in instructional assignments and capitalizes on the instructional content strengths of each. The faculty agree that the number of instructors is adequate both in the classroom and lab, although they are least satisfied with the current contact hours expectations for classroom/lab instruction.


Equipment The faculty strongly agree that the MSG program has equipment necessary to enhance student learning and meet course objectives and update massage tables on a rotatonal basis to assure adequate resources for both clinic and labs. Faculty agree that they have access to up-to-date computers, software, and supplies necessary to teach both on campus and online courses. A summary of the 2012 year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 30.7.

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Business Education and Office Administration The Business Education and Office Administration program is housed in the Academic Division and terminates in a short certificate (24 credit hours) or an AAS degree (67 credit hours). Program Description: The two certificate and three degree programs prepare graduates for careers in the accounting and administrative assistant fields. Office automation and organizational restructuring have led secretaries and administrative assistants to assume responsibilities once reserved for managerial and professional staff. The program offers two certificate options, Software Applications and General Office Assistant, and three degree options: Accounting, Administrative Assistant, and Medical Administrative Assistant. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment as secretaries or administrative assistants. To achieve this mission, the Business Education and Office Administration faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate mastery of basic accounting theory and practice as used by service and merchandising enterprises (LO 1,2).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate mastery of skills related to records and information management, with

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or better) on the first attempt on an accounting problem set that addresses basic accounting theory and practice as used by service and merchandising enterprises (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a practicum that measures

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

67% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Students were weakest on basic journal entry skills (debit and credit).

As a result of analysis, faculty have extended coverage in class on basic journal entries: debits and credits.

78% of students met the benchmark. Students were weakest on understanding and utilizing filing protocols.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added more filing practice in class for each protocol. Faculty have also added


emphasis on basic filing procedures, methods, systems, supplies equipment, and modern technology used in the creation, protection, and disposition of records used in the modern office environment (LO 1,5).

mastery of skills related to records and information management as utilized in the modern office environment (each spring semester).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate awareness and understanding of current trends in office technology and practice addressing such areas as electronic mail, multimedia interaction, presentation hardware and software, and Internet use (LO 3,5).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a presentation that incorporates electronic communication, multimedia interaction, presentation hardware and software, and/or Internet use when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

SLO (4): The graduating student will demonstrate competency in the use of database software for general business applications in the modern office environment

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a project that requires the creation and manipulation of one or more

interactive games, tutorials, and supplemental activities to improve this outcome. In OAD 138, Records and Information Management, for example, incorporated a game that requires that the student file entries in alphabetical order. The game is interactive and the student receives feedback as steps are completed. 91% of students met the As a result of analysis, faculty benchmark. Students performed have increased opportunities well on MS Word and PPT, but for delving deeper into needed more hands-on multimedia interaction in such exercises, demos, and videos to areas as web development. In master the development of eOAD 218, for example, faculty portfolios. have shifted from a tutorial on web development to a project in which students develop their own site. Faculty also offer instruction in the use of the Weebly software package to better guide students to project completion. 81% of students achieved a As a result of analysis, faculty passing score on the first have incorporated tutorial attempt. Students mastered the software (Access 2010 help in general database (use of query, OAD 244) to increase forms, custom reports, opportunities for students to modifying reports, filtering learn on their own and at their

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(LO 2,5).

SLO (5): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

data files and the production of output in the form of properly formatted reports or documents when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on an e-portfolio designed as a tool for facilitating entry-level employment when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester)

reports, and formatting a datasheet). Students needed more hands-on exercises with formatting controls, object dependencies, sub-reports, and conditional values in reports. 81% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Faculty noted that project incorporates a resume and many MS Office programs, including Word, Excel, and PPT. Students did well with MS Word and PPT. An area of weakness was using Excel.

own pace. To address areas of weakness in Access, faculty have also added additional examples.

As a result of analysis, faculty have committed to additional training in the e-Portfolio software package utilized, Weebly, in order to better guide students in project completion. To improve students’ skill in using Excel, extra assignments with tutorials were added to OAD 243 and OAD 247. PO (1): Business Education and In any two-year period, all full- 100% of fulltime faculty As a result of these professional Office Administration faculty time faculty will attend a attended multiple professional development activities, faculty will demonstrate a commitment minimum of two internal or development activities, have incorporated flipped to discipline-specific external professional including on-campus learning applications into BUS professional development. development activities that workshops on e-learning, 241 and BUS 242. Curriculum address industry trends and best effective use of Tegrity in ECO 231 and ECO 232 were practices (data collected each software to record lectures, flip modified as a result of a session spring semester). learning, and other pedagogies. at the ACBSP conference by External professional John Taylor: “Lessons from the development included Financial Crisis for Teaching attendance of ACBSP Economics.” More disciplineconferences in Salt Lake City specific activities are targeted and Baltimore. for 2013-2014. PO (2): Business Education and 80% of graduates will report On most recent graduate survey To improve graduate Office Administration faculty satisfaction with the quality and (2012) respondents (N=4) satisfaction rates, faculty have

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will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

scored overall quality of program preparation as “”Good or “Very Good”. No negative scores received.

committed to expanding discipline-specific professional development. In addition, needed resource and facility upgrades have been identified and requested through institutional budget hearing process.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Business Advisory Committee met Spring Semester 2013. The faculty shared modifications of the course requirements for all three degree options, based largely on recommendations from previous meetings.

To improve the value and efficacy of these meetings, faculty have begun sharing graduate survey results with members.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 15%, 14%, and 19% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have developed a tracking report generated each semester for all new students, allowing for better monitoring of progression by advisors.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60%

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 38% and 39%

To improve retention rates, faculty have developed a tracking report generated each

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respectively (data collected each spring).

respectively. Fall-to-spring for 2011-12, 2012-13 were 67% and 73%.

semester for all new students, allowing for better monitoring of progression by advisors.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

Of the 19 2013 graduates, 68% are employed, and 53% are employed in-field or pursuing a higher degree.

As a result of analysis, faculty have developed proposals to strengthen the WSCC Coop and Job Placement Office.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

100% of faculty reported satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources. However, faculty noted the need for computer lab upgrades to maximize program growth.

As a result of analysis, faculty have developed a proposal for an upgrade of the computer lab to be presented through the institutional budget hearing process in spring 2014.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

90% of employers surveyed reported satisfaction with readiness skills and content knowledge. One employer reported need for enhanced critical thinking and communication skills.

As a result of analysis, faculty have increased the number of critical thinking and communication development activities. In Business Communication, BUS 215, for example, students write persuasive letters and letters delivering good news and bad news to clients. Students are given information that they

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must configure into letters using appropriate guidelines for each type.

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Analysis and Planning: Business Education and Office Administration Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified five program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 31.1, 31.2, 31.3, 31.4, and 31.5. Program Review: The Business Education and Office Administration program has updated all three of the options (Administrative Assistant, Medical Administrative Assistant, and Accounting). Advisory committee members were contacted for feedback on current software knowledge within their industries or businesses. The hospitals and doctor’s offices were contacted with regard to their current need for transcription personnel. The faculty found that they were currently in the process of cutting back or eliminating these positions due to the use of computers in the patient rooms by the doctors and nurses. The faculty made the decision to eliminate the transcription course from our curriculum. The program employs 2 fulltime and 1 part-time instructors. The program chair has been in this position for 1 year, and has worked in the industry for 14 years. A vita is included as Attachment 31.6, and a sample professional development record as Attachment 31.7. The Business Education and Office Administration program has current software and computers in a computer lab dedicated to this program. Lab photo are included as Attachments 31.8 and 31.9. It offers students the entire Microsoft Office curriculum so that they are proficient in all of these software programs, programs that are used heavily in today’s business environment. By offering the use of the dedicated computer lab to Business Education students, they are able to gain these needed skills, even if they lack up-to-date computer systems in their homes. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 31.10. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 31.11, and the presidential response is Attachment 31.12 with actions related to this program highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 31.13. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 31.14. All Business Education and Office Administration courses are offered totally online at least once (many are taught online frequently) during a student’s progression toward a credential. This option has allowed many students to complete their degree when they might not have been able to do otherwise.


Business Management and Supervision The Business Management and Supervision program is housed in the Academic Division and terminates in an AAS degree (67 credit hours). Program Description: The program curriculum is designed to provide a sound understanding of many intricate but practical business concepts and to expose students to the challenges facing today’s managers in business and industry. Management consistently involves four primary functions: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. Each function addresses a particular set of skills and perspective. Mission: To prepare program graduates for careers in management and supervision as practitioners of sound business practices and applications To achieve this mission, the Business Management and Supervision faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate the ability to work in a team setting to produce and present a project that reflects the application of core communication principles reflective of unique motivation styles used in planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling (LO 1,2,3,4). SLO (2): The student will demonstrate understanding of

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt of a “Management Style Analysis: assessment and present a group project in BUS 275 when measured against departmental rubric (each summer semester). 70% of students will achieve a passing score (define as “Meets

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

80% of students achieved a score of “Meets Expectations” or higher on the overall group project. 65% of students achieved a passing score on the written portion of this outcome. Most errors were related to the student’s inability to identify other peoples’ motivational style without prompts. 70% of students achieved a passing score. Faculty noted

As a result of analysis, faculty have required that students complete a one-on-one interview with at least three peers to improve this outcome.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added a performance


business as a dynamic process in a global setting, including private enterprise, forms of business ownership, marketing, factors of production, personnel, labor, finance, and taxation (LO 1,2,5,6).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate mastery of basic statistical concepts as applied to economic and business contexts (LO 2).

SLO (4): The student will demonstrate the integration of academic knowledge and practical applications in the business environment (LO 2,6).

SLO (5): Students will

Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a group project (“Business Style Analysis”) that incorporates one or more of the following dimensions of the modern business construct: private enterprise, forms of business ownership, marketing, factors of production, personnel, labor, finance, and taxation when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a statistical problem set that addresses basic statistical concepts as applied to economic and business contexts (each spring semester). 100% of students enrolled in BUS 296 will participate in a minimum of three off-campus business-related professional development luncheons, seminars, or workshops and complete a minimum of 12 hours of community service (each summer semester). 90% of students participating in

that most critical errors were related to students’ procrastination on completing the project, leading to omitted information.

checklist to the project and added deadlines for various sections of the project for students to complete prior to the complete submittal of the final assignment.

50% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt when using ungrouped data to construct frequency distribution tables, polygons and histograms, and interpret the results using MegaStats software in Excel. 100% satisfactorily completed the performance measures.

As a result of analysis, faculty have required that students complete the assigned task first without the use of a software program, then compare the results from both methods.

100% of students met the

To improve the range and

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To improve the value and efficacy of this requirement, faculty have required that all community service hours be pre-approved before participating. Faculty provide a list of approved community service sponsors.


demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 1,2,4).

departmental mock interviews conducted by Human Resource directors will achieve a passing score (defined as a minimum score of 3/5 in each category) on interviewing scoring rubric (each spring semester)

minimum score of 3/5 in each category.

PO (1): Business Management and Supervision faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including on-campus workshops on e-learning, effective use of Tegrity software to record lectures, flip learning, and other pedagogies. External professional development included attendance of the AAC&U Institute on High-Impact Practices in Portland, OR.

PO (2): Business Management and Supervision faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program

80% of graduates will report 100% of graduates reported satisfaction with the quality and “Agree� or better on the quality efficacy of instruction, and efficiency of the program. curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each

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efficacy of this outcome, faculty have expanded this requirement to encompass completing a job application upon arriving for the interview and writing a paragraph on a topic selected by the interviewer. These professional development activities enable the business department faculty to be more up-to-date with current trends and technology. Faculty incorporate social media into courses to make classes more fun and relevant for students. More disciplinespecific activities are targeted for 2013-2014. Funding was requested in institutional budget hearings for attendance of Annual Economics Teaching Conference in Austin, TX, and the AABSP national conference in Baltimore. Faculty elected to raise the benchmark to 85% across all measures of performance on graduate survey. To improve graduate satisfaction, faculty have requested upgrades of


effectiveness.

spring semester).

classrooms through budget hearing process and made the assessment of SLOs more rigorous (see above). Faculty will also strengthen links to outside businesses and other entities through the advisory committee and other avenues. The Business Department has continued to monitor the postgraduation knowledge and skills needed by graduates. The department administers surveys to graduates to obtain feedback based on the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources while attending WSCC.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once

The Business Advisory Committee met 4.24.13. Members were shown the updating of the Business Education course requirements based largely on recommendations from previous meetings of the committee.

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As a result of the meeting, the business community became more aware of the program of study and its options. The meeting strengthened links with area employers and stakeholders.


each fall or spring semester). 50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 25%, 17, and 16% respectively.

To improve graduation rates and cohesion, faculty have incorporated team building exercises in BUS 100, 276, 285, 263, and 275.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 were 40% and 46% respectively. Fall-to-spring rates for 2011-12, 2012-13 were 75% and 68%.

To improve retention and cohesion, these rates, faculty have incorporated team building exercises in BUS 100, 276, 285, 263, and 275.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

83% of graduates were pursuing a higher degree or employed-in-field within 90 days of graduation.

As a result of analysis, faculty have developed proposals to strengthen the WSCC Coop and Job Placement Office. The Director of Career Services helps with identifying the career direction/path for students. The Career Coordinator for the US DOL grant (PAVES) provides services to students such as Success Coaching (provides resources, support, and services to assist students in the acquisition of information and development of skills to

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achieve his or her academic potential). The department sends out survey’s to graduate’s to obtain information about employment, continuing education, etc. 80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

While faculty were satisfied overall with the resources and personnel, 67% of faculty reported satisfaction with program facilities, citing need for classroom upgrades.

Because requested upgrades were not funded in 12-13, faculty are repeating requests in budget hearings scheduled for spring 2014.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

100% of employers reported satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation. One employer suggested that students increase their overall knowledge of business.

To improve these rates, the faculty have increased the integration of critical thinking opportunities. Communication skills have been enhanced through the changes in such measures as the mock interview expansion.

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Analysis and Planning: Business Management and Supervision Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 32.1, 32.2, 32.3, and 32.4. Program Review: The Business Administration Department Program at WSCC has two programs: Business Education and Office Administration, and Business Management and Supervision. These programs offer multiple options: Accounting, Administrative Assistant, Medical Administrative Assistant, Software Applications Certificate, General Office Assistant Certificate, Business Management, Financial Management, Office Management, and Entrepreneurship. The program employs 3 fulltime and 3 part-time instructors. The program chair has been in this position for 1 year, and has worked in the industry for 14 years. A vita is included as Attachment 32.5, and sample professional development records as Attachments 32.6 and 32.7. As a result of discussion and analysis, the faculty incorporates team building activities into several business courses: BUS 100, BUS 276, BUS 285, BUS 263, and BUS 275, a change that encompasses all four degree options in the Business Management & Supervision AAS Degree Program, and the three degree options in Business Education AAS Degree Program. The Business Management Faculty, with the assistance of an adjunct faculty member, reevaluated the Entrepreneur Option (one of four options in the Management and Supervision Program). The adjunct faculty member offered extensive background in entrepreneur curriculum (Master’s Degree in Entrepreneurship and in-field experience in small businesses). Faculty proposed replacing five (5) of the old business courses with new Entrepreneurship courses recently approved and added to the Postsecondary Course Directory. The faculty feels that the college now has the best Entrepreneurship AAS Program in the state. As a result of discussion and analysis, the faculty have committed to partnering more with local businesses. One faculty member has taken students to meetings of local service organizations, including the Chamber of Commerce, Cullman Rotary Club, Kiwanis, 4th Friday Chamber of Commerce Luncheons, Cullman Business after Hours, and the Cullman Economic Development Office (Business and Industry) to better engage the business students in the business community. One faculty member takes a group of students every November to the Alabama Policy Institute, a meeting that focuses on national issues. The faculty is also pursuing additional internship/COOP opportunities for students.


To strengthen ties to the school community, the department works with the PAVES – Educator Exchange. The department also works with Cullman Area Workforce Solutions (Educator Exchange) so that business and industry can come together for the common good of students. Members of the Business Department attended the college’s Strategic Action Team Annual Meeting, summer 2013. A Business instructor also attended the National ACBSP meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, summer 2013. The Business Education building facility repairs will be completed by the end of the Fall 2013 semester. A classroom photo is included as Attachment 32.8. Routine repairs are sent as needed to the Director of Plant Maintenance. To address needs for updated equipment and resources, the faculty is preparing a comprehensive proposal for presentation in Spring 2014 to the college’s Administrative Council as part of normal budget protocols. The Business Department faculty strives to be up-to-date with current trends and technology, attending workshops and conferences and reading literature on new advancements within these fields. The faculty incorporates social media into courses to make classes fun and relevant for students. Alabama Virtual Library is offered to students in their respective courses. The Business Department would like to hire a structured learning assistant (SLA) tutor (business and computer). The Pelham C. Butler Business Scholarship offers a $1,500 scholarship for active business students. The department’s quality of instruction will be enhanced by new emerging technologies and software updates that are necessary for course materials to coincide with the newest trends within the field. The Advisory (Craft) Committee pointed out the need for continuously updated software knowledge, more emphasis on critical thinking skills, and better understanding of Business Math as suggestions for improvement. Based upon the Craft Committee suggestions, the following changes have been implemented: • A Managerial Accounting course (BUS 248) was added to all four Management and Supervision Options. • The course was also added to one OAD Option--Accounting. • Business Math (BUS 150) was added to the Management and Supervision— Office Management Option. • Additional critical thinking assignments have been added to all courses. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 32.9. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 32.10, and the presidential response is Attachment 32.11 with actions related to this program

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highlighted. A summary of the previous year’s discretionary funding is included as Attachment 32.12. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 32.13. The department has a part-time assistant, and a work-study student aide to assist/aide students with questions. The part-time assistant, along with other duties, will be able to spend time gathering information and making calls to students who are not active or registered, an effort that helps faculty track students from semester to semester.

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Computer Science The Computer Science program is housed in the Academic Division and terminates in an AAS degree (67 credit hours). Program Description: This AAS degree program prepares graduates for entry-level employment in diverse computer science fields through any one of five career/technical options: • Computer Programming • Software Support (Help Desk) • Networking Technology • Cyber Security/Computer Forensic Technology • Web Technology Computer programmers write, test, troubleshoot, and maintain detailed programs that computers must follow to perform procedural functions. Software support specialists and help desk technicians provide technical assistance, support, and advice to internal and external users. Network administrators design, install, and support an organization’s local-area network (LAN), wide-area network (WAN), network segment, Internet, of intranet system. Computer security specialists plan, coordinate, and implement an organization’s information security. Web designers are responsible for developing and maintaining websites for public and private organizations. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment in a variety of computer science disciplines. To achieve this mission, the Computer Science faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate collegiate analytical skills suitable for solving business problems pertaining to the design,

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 70% of graduating students in the capstone course, CIS 281, will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a capstone

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

71% of students completed project with a score of 70% or higher. (Project comprised writing a business report related to a pricing spreadsheet

As a result of analysis, faculty have incorporated in CIS 281 a short video (from Purdue’s OWL website) to strengthen grammatical principles. Faculty


modification, and implementation of information systems (LO 2,4).

project requiring completion of one of the following: system storyboarding, written business report, software/hardware component pricing spreadsheet when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). SLO (2): The student will 70% of students in the required demonstrate cognitive and logic logic course, CIS 150, will skills as a foundation for achieve a passing score further development in the (defined as 70% or better) on computer environment (LO 2). the first attempt on a final project requiring construction of an algorithm that solves a designated real-life business problem when measured against departmental rubric (each fall and spring semester).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate the ability to identify and utilize tools and equipment in the proper application of constructing or repairing and/or replacing computer components (LO 1,4).

70% of students in one of the required networking courses (CIS 199 or CIS 269) will achieve a passing score (defined as a score of “Successful� on the first attempt of a hands-on project requiring the construction of a

for various configuration options for a simulated computer system.) Students did well on content, but were weakest on grammar and punctuation.

74% of students achieved a passing score of 70% or higher on the first attempt on the final project. Most errors were related to failure to implement loops accurately in regard to indexing array elements and not accurately utilizing accumulator variables.

also have added an interactive PPT exercise to test their understanding of material.

As a result of analysis, faculty have revised curriculum to spend additional instructional time on implementing arrays with loops, including indexing of arrays and counter variables to process arrays. More review assignments have also been incorporated. Faculty have also increased emphasis on accumulator variables, how to implement them and when to use them within an algorithm by showing examples in videos and presentations. 100% of students in CIS 199 As a result of analysis, faculty achieved a passing score on the have incorporated additional first attempt building a patch exercises reinforcing standard cable. Most errors were related color coding. Faculty have also to wires not terminated required that networking correctly because of crossed students purchase a networking colors and not pushing wires up kit, which includes wire enough through the cable to strippers, connector tester, a

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computer component (e.g., patch cable) when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). SLO (4): The student will 70% of students in one of the demonstrate proficiency in the required web development design and development of web courses (CIS 207, CIS 208, or pages based on evaluation and CIS 255) will achieve a passing interpretation of a simulated score (defined as 70% or real-life business request (LO higher) on the first attempt on a 1,2). final project requiring successful rendering of a web page for a specified real-life business problem when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). SLO (5): The student will apply 70% of students in required algorithmic principles and computer programming course computer science theory in a (CIS 212, CIS 213, CIS 251, or manner that demonstrates CIS 252) will achieve a passing comprehension in the score (defined as 70% or construction of software higher) on the first attempt on a systems of varying complexity final project requiring (LO 2). successful execution of a software solution to a specified simulated real-life business problem when measured against departmental rubric (each fall and spring semester). PO (1): Computer Science In any two-year period, all fullfaculty will demonstrate a time faculty will attend a

properly make connections.

pack of ten RJ-45 connectors, and screwdrivers.

94% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt on the final project. Most errors were related to spelling/syntax and failing to test programs before submittal.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added a performance checklist for students to complete prior to submittal of assignments. Faculty have also added more examples of common errors and overlooked mistakes.

100% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt on the final project. Most errors were related to integrating functions into a larger project.

As a result of analysis, faculty have introduced functions earlier in the semester. Faculty have also incorporated video examples.

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional

As a result of these professional development activities, faculty

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commitment to disciplinespecific professional development.

PO (2): Computer Science faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

development activities, including on-campus workshops on e-learning, “flip” learning, and other pedagogies. External professional development included attendance of the AAC&U Institute on General Education Assessment in Burlington, VT.

have incorporated flipped learning applications into more hybrid courses. To better engage students, faculty have experimented with “Poll Everywhere” and other ways to utilize smart phones in the classroom setting. Faculty have also added interactive 2D and 3D objects to courses as a result of workshops with AVC staff. More discipline-specific activities are targeted for 20132014. 80% of graduates will report On most recent graduate survey As a result of discussion and satisfaction with the quality and (spring 2013), 66% rated analysis, faculty have efficacy of instruction, program overall as “Very incorporated team building curriculum, assessment, Good” or higher. Only three activities into CIS 281, which teaching pedagogies, and respondents and not statistically encompasses all five degree instructional resources (each significant. However, two options. spring semester). respondents reported disagreement that program provided entry level knowledge to perform computer upgrades and/or repairs. An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum,

The Computer Science Advisory Committee met July 30, 2013. Agenda focused on HTML5, web development with backend experience and

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As a result of the meeting, faculty have integrated C# into CIS 251 C++ course. Faculty have also begun teaching HTML5 in the CIS 207 Web


syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

DBMS knowledge, incorporating C# into C++ course. Also discussed possible internships and fact that networking courses need to focus on hardware and the need for students to purchase a networking kit.

development course. Stronger emphasis will be placed in areas such as launching a website, backend database experience, and how to obtain a domain name.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 18%, 24%, and 14% respectively.

As a result of discussion, faculty have put in place an SLA tutor for CIS courses.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for the 2010 and 2011 cohorts were 48% both years. Fall-to-spring rates for the 2010, 2011, and 2012 cohorts were 82%, 81%, and 68%.

As a result of discussion, faculty have developed new ways of tracking students as they transition from one semester to another. Faculty have also emphasized early identification of struggling students. (Faculty are seeking a dedicated lab assistant to help with interventions.)

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety

Of the ten 2013 graduates, 100% were employed or continuing education, and 6 or 60% were continuing education or employed in-field.

As a result of discussion and analysis, faculty have committed to partnering with more local businesses. One faculty member has taken

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days of completion (data collected each fall)

students to meetings of local service organizations, including the Chamber of Commerce and the Cullman Rotary Club to better engage the business community. Faculty are pursuing additional internship/COOP opportunities for students.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty were generally not satisfied with program facilities and instructional resources. Of particular concern are slow and outdated lab computers and printers, outdated networking equipment, such as routers and switches, and not having a secretary/lab assistant to oversee six computer science labs (175+ computers). As a result of inadequate staffing, the labs are often dirty and include a number of out-ofservice machines. In spring 2013, for example, lab could not run new updated computer forensic software (obtained at cost of $2800). Updates are critical for program success. Faculty were also dissatisfied

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As a result of discussion and analysis, detailed list of needed facility repairs sent to Director of PPE. To address need for updated equipment and resources, faculty are preparing a comprehensive proposal for presentation Spring 2014 to college’s Administrative Council as part of normal budget protocols.


with extreme temperatures in some labs and dirty, outdated bathrooms. Faculty noted that some toilets have been out of service for months. 80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

Only one response from most recent employer survey (2013). Overall rating was “Very Good�. Only negative comment pertained to knowledge of programming language.

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To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty have committed to upgrading computer labs and replacing outdated networking equipment to make graduates better prepared to meet workplace expectations.


Analysis and Planning: Computer Science Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified five program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 33.1, 33.2, 33.3, 33.4, and 33.5. Program Review: The Computer Science Program at WSC has five options: programming, networking, software support, cyber security/computer forensics, and web technology. From results of graduate surveys, the department receives very good or higher ratings from students who earn a credential. The computer science faculty strive to be up-to-date with current trends and technology, attending workshops and conferences and reading literature on new advancements within these fields. Faculty incorporate social media into courses to make classes fun and relevant for students. The program employs 4 full-time and 7 part-time instructors. The program chair has been in this position for 9 years, and has worked in the industry for 20 years. A vita is included as Attachment 33.6, and sample professional development records as Attachments 33.7 and 33.8. The department’s quality of instruction could be enhanced by new computers and necessary networking equipment. Among the areas of concern are slow, outdated computers in classrooms and public labs. The networking lab has outdated routers and switches, and is not equipped for hands-on projects. A lab photo is included as Attachment 33.9. In addition, faster computers are needed to run existing software in Computer Forensics. The program’s spring 2012 budget proposal is included as Attachment 33.10. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 33.11, and the presidential response is Attachment 33.12 with actions related to this program highlighted. Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 33.13.

The Advisory Committee pointed out that we are behind in offerings. The program should be teaching software that is used currently in offices and industry. Faculty are currently working on setting up a co-op program to give students more hands-on experience. The goal of 50% of entering new students graduating within three years is high for the Computer Science Program. Currently, students may declare computer science as a major without any application process. Students find that they are deficient in skills such


as math and logic to successfully complete the program. Many change majors once they get into the more difficult classes. In the past the department has had a lab assistant to help students with class questions. Currently the unit does not have a lab assistant. The SLA tutor is beneficial but is limited to five hours a week. A lab assistant, along with other duties, could spend time gathering information and making calls to students who are not registered. This would help faculty track students from semester to semester. Some of the highlights from the past year included the hiring of a structured learning assistant (SLA) tutor. The Computer Science Club now offers a $1,100 scholarship for second year computer science students. The computer science department was also involved in the National Robotics Competition, serving as the programming liaison for the competition as well as serving as score keepers on game day.

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Criminal Justice The Criminal Justice program is housed in the Academic Division and terminates in an AAS degree (62-70 credit hours). Program Description: The Criminal Justice program prepares graduates for entry-level employment in Criminal Justice, allowing students to choose from three academic options: Forensic Investigation, Law Enforcement, and Cyber Security/Computer Forensic Technology. Graduates may use their training and skills to maintain law and order, conduct investigations and surveillance, and collect varied forms of evidence and information. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment in diverse career paths in the field of Criminal Justice. To achieve this mission, the Criminal Justice faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate foundational competence in crime scene analysis, addressing photography, evidence collection and preservation, and legal protocols (LO 1,2).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate foundational knowledge of firearms

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a crime scene analytical exercise that addresses photography, evidence collection and preservation, and legal protocols when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better)

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

85% of students met the benchmark on the first attempt. Faculty noted that students had most difficulty with process of securing the evidence and the camera during the exercise.

To improve this outcome, new equipment has been purchased and implemented that will better enable the student to secure the evidence while performing this task.

95% of student achieved a passing score on the first attempt. Some students

As a result of analysis, faculty have made online practice sessions available for students


identification and analysis as applied in standard criminal investigation (LO 2,5).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate knowledge of the laws and applications of search and seizure protocols (LO 2).

on the first attempt on a simulation exercise that requires foundational knowledge of firearms identification and analysis when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on an examination addressing foundational knowledge of the laws and applications of search and seizure protocols (each spring semester).

struggled to complete this exercise in the allotted time.

85% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt, correctly identifying the “target� cases in understanding relevant law and the application of search and seizure protocols. Faculty found several areas where students were weak in case analysis. SLO (4): Students will 90% of students participating in 2013-2014 demonstrate the requisite jobdepartmental mock interviews seeking skills for entry-level will achieve a passing score employment (LO 3,4). (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester) PO (1): Criminal Justice faculty In any two-year period, all full- 100% of fulltime faculty will demonstrate a commitment time faculty will attend a attended a minimum of four to discipline-specific minimum of two internal or professional development professional development. external professional activities, addressing both development activities that general teaching pedagogy and address industry trends and best optimal use of instructional practices (data collected each resources as well as those that

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in addition to expanding this material to a two-day instructional module.

As a result of analysis, faculty have expanded the efficacy of instruction by utilizing additional case study resources, including, for example, companion case study texts.

2013-2014

As a result of these activities, faculty have made numerous changes, sharing professional development information at staff meetings that improved content as well as teaching pedagogy.


spring semester).

address the field specifically. Activities included monthly seminars relevant Supreme Court cases and case law for law enforcement personnel. Also regularly participated in online seminars in forensic investigation. PO (2): Criminal Justice faculty 80% of graduates will report On most recent graduate survey will demonstrate a commitment satisfaction with the quality and (2012), students reported to the achievement of standard efficacy of instruction, satisfaction (“Very Good” or performance benchmarks curriculum, assessment, better) across 5 of 6 technical regarding program teaching pedagogies, and skill areas. 100% rated overall effectiveness. instructional resources (each program quality as “Very spring semester). Good” or better.

To improve graduate satisfaction rates, faculty have incorporated more than $70K in new instructional resources and addition of new content resulting from professional development

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Advisory Committee did not meet in 2012-2013.

To revitalize this critical advisory group, faculty have made significant changes in composition. The newly reconstituted committee is scheduled to meet fall semester 2013.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 44%, 34%, and 32%

To improve graduation rates, faculty have instituted a new degree plan template that will

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collected each spring).

respectively.

map student progress from entry into program to completion, outlining classes for each semester needed to complete degree requirements.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for the 2010 and 2011 cohorts were 46% and 38% respectively. Fall-to-spring rates for the 2010, 2011, and 2012 cohorts were 80%, 71%, and 74%.

To improve retention, faculty have implemented regular meetings with majors to update degree plans and academic progression. To improve retention, faculty have requested $150K for upgrades. (The first $75K was approved through institutional budget hearing process.)

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

Of the 15 graduates in 2013, 13 or 87% were employed or pursuing further postsecondary education; 7 or 47% were employed in-field or pursuing further postsecondary education.

To improve job placement rates, faculty have revitalized the program’s advisory committee. New resources and upgrades will better prepare graduates for entry-level employment.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

Faculty reported overall satisfaction with facilities and instructional resources, but identified critical updates to move program forward.

As a result of analysis, faculty requested $150K for upgrades through the college’s budget hearing process. Approval has been given for first $70K.

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80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

Employer surveys were not conducted for 2012 or 2013 graduates.

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To improve employer satisfaction rates, faculty are contacting area employers for program feedback. Revitalized advisory committee will also provide critical feedback.


Analysis and Planning: Criminal Justice Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified three program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 34.1, 34.2, and 34.3. Program Review: The Criminal Justice program currently has two full-time faculty members and a work study. The program chair has been in this position for 15 years, and has worked in the industry for 18 years. A vita is included as Attachment 34.4, and professional development record as Attachment 34.5. Each year the instructors meet in a formal planning session to determine the effectiveness of the courses taught, the textbooks and other teaching materials used. The program at this time offers four options in the Criminal Justice field, an AS General Studies degree with selected topics in Criminal Justice, an AAS Degree in Law Enforcement, an AAS Degree in Forensic Investigation and an AAS Degree in partnership with Computer Science in Cyber Security/ Computer Forensics. In evaluating the current needs for instructional personnel, the number of faculty is currently adequate to meet the program’s instructional needs. The program is in the process of evaluating the current offering of educational degrees and in the future may request an additional AAS Degree in Corrections. If this were approved, additional faculty may be requested. The Criminal Justice program is currently housed in the General Studies Building and occupies one classroom, which will seat 50 students, and one lab, which will accommodate 25 students in a lab setting. The current lab setting is not as ideal as the program would like due to safety issues. A lab photo is included as Attachment 34.6. In the Spring Semester 2014 the program will be relocating to the Biology and Physics building and will have two labs and a larger classroom. This relocation will alleviate the safety issues and allow the program to expand. This move will also give faculty access to a part-time secretary. The current equipment is evaluated each year and outdated equipment is replaced or deleted as budget considerations allow. The program is currently adding new equipment achieved through the supplementary budget hearing process and will continue to add needed equipment as funds become available. The Criminal Justice program has been fortunate to receive these additional funds and as additional funds become available, the program will prioritize the needs of the students in the fields the program offers. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 34.7. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 34.8, and the presidential response is Attachment 34.9 with actions related to this program highlighted.


Paralegal The Paralegal program is housed in the Academic Division and terminates in an AAS degree (64-65 credit hours). Program Description: The Paralegal program prepares graduates for entry-level employment as legal assistants, helping lawyers with such tasks as preparing for closings, hearings, trials, and corporate meetings. Paralegals may prepare written reports, draft pleadings and motions to be filed with the court, obtain affidavits, and other miscellaneous legal tasks. They are most often employed by law firms, corporate legal departments, and various government offices. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment as legal assistants. To achieve this mission, the Paralegal faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate proficiency in basic legal research and writing, with emphasis on locating, analyzing, applying, and updating sources of law, correctly using citation and electronic research methods (LO 1,3,5). SLO (2): The student will demonstrate understanding of laws governing domestic relations, including marriage, separation, divorce, child custody, support, property

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on an exam that addresses collegiate proficiency in basic legal research (each spring semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

82% of students achieved a passing score on the first attempt.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added a handout on legal research material to improve outcome.

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations� or better) on the first attempt on a project that demonstrates student understanding of domestic law

81% of students met the As a result of analysis, faculty benchmark on preparing a have modified the assignment project, an uncontested divorce. to improve efficacy, streamlining requirements and revising the instructional handouts.


division, adoption, and/or domestic violence (LO 1,2).

SLO (3): The student will demonstrate proficiency in the preparation of legal briefs utilizing advanced knowledge of electronic research methods (LO 1,2,5).

SLO (4): Students will demonstrate the requisite jobseeking skills for entry-level employment (LO 3,4).

PO (1): Paralegal faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

as it relates to one or more aspects of domestic relations when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as “Meets Expectations” or better) on the first attempt on a project that demonstrates collegiate competency in the preparation of a legal brief when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). 90% of students participating in departmental mock interviews will achieve a passing score (defined as average of 2.0/3 or higher) on interviewing scoring matrix (each spring semester) In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester).

86% of students achieved the benchmark.

As a result of analysis, faculty added a handout to better contextualize court requirements on appellate briefs.

90% of students achieved passing scores.

As a result of analysis, faculty have expanded this assessment to include resumes which must be approved prior to mock interviews.

100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities, including on-campus workshops on e-learning, “flip” learning, e-portfolio use, and other pedagogies. External professional development included attendance of the Beasley-Allen Conference on tort law and ethics for attorneys

As a result of these professional development activities, faculty revised project assignments to reflect changes in requirements by applicable courts (e.g., changes in uncontested divorces in Alabama). Updates on tort law were incorporated into lecture materials. More discipline-specific activities are targeted for 2013-2014,

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in Montgomery.

PO (2): Paralegal faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program effectiveness.

including attendance of the Beasley-Allen Conference in Montgomery. To improve graduate satisfaction rates, faculty are pursuing the establishment of a computer lab with legal software currently used in law office.

80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each spring semester).

In most recent graduate survey (2012), of 13 measures, 85% of responses positive. Lowest response related to providing technical skills necessary to perform job at appropriate entry level (66%). 100% of respondents rated overall program quality as “Good� or higher. (Very low response rate makes generalization difficult.)

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The Advisory Committee did not meet in 2012-2013.

Reactivate Advisory Committee in 2013-14. Meeting scheduled tentatively for spring 2014.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 50%, 41%, and 44% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, faculty have proposed more flexible course substitutions.

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Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected each spring).

Fall-to-fall retention rates for the 2010 and 2011 cohorts were 41% and 36% respectively. Fall-to-spring rates for the 2010, 2011, and 2012 cohorts were 76%, 66%, and 77%.

To improve retention, faculty have proposed the establishment of a computer lab with legal software used in the workplace to strengthen engagement.

90% of graduates will be pursuing a higher degree or employed and 75% will be pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

54% of 2013 graduates are employed-in-field or pursuing a higher education. 31% of graduates are unemployed by choice due to new marriages and newborns. 15% are unknown.

To strengthen job placement rates, faculty are increasing discipline-specific professional development to strengthen network of prospective employers. The Beasley-Allen Conference is an example.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

While faculty reported overall satisfaction with the facilities and resources, they noted the need for access to a dedicated computer lab as well as a hardcover library sufficient to support the program.

As a result of analysis, faculty have proposed the establishment of a small dedicated lab, with funding to be requested through the institutional budget hearing process.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

No employer survey conducted for 2012-2013.

To strengthen employer satisfaction, faculty are ensuring that equipment and instructional resources are commensurate with those encountered in the contemporary workplace.

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Faculty are preparing a budget request for the 2014 institutional budget hearings.

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Analysis and Planning: Paralegal Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 35.1, 35.2, 35.3, and 35.4. Program Review: A classroom photo is included as Attachment 35.5. The program employs one full-time instructor, who serves as program chair. The program chair has been in this position for 22 years, and has worked in the industry for 26 years. A vita is included as Attachment 35.6, and professional development record as Attachment 35.7. Facilities: The Paralegal Department consists of one classroom and one office space, 3 file cabinets and one laptop. Needs: The Paralegal Department needs 25 desktop computers for the classroom to enable the classroom/lab functionality. The computers would be a great asset to learning and teaching in the classroom. The Westlaw Library online is a prime example of how the computers would be utilized to conduct legal research helping students prepare documents such as e-file in a simulated law office environment. This offers students “practical work� experience.

Needs: The Paralegal Department needs a classroom for students to use as a research lab. This room would need expandable book shelving to store law books along with 4-6 tables with chairs to allow students a work space to conduct traditional book research. Program Highlights: The Paralegal students are exposed to foundational principles of legal theory and practice. Using technology in the classroom allows our faculty and students to stay abreast of changes in our law and most up-to-date paralegal practices. This program offers an Associate in Applied Science in Paralegal. The Paralegal students enjoy educational field trips to our Alabama Judicial building, Alabama State Capital, and The Alabama Legislature where they are able to observe the House of Representatives, the Senate, and the overall law-making system. Students also have an opportunity to participate in a trip to the Annual Conference of the Alabama Association of Paralegals.


The Paralegal Department provides networking opportunities with Paralegal professionals working in-field through the Alabama Association of Paralegals. Students also participate in internships through partnerships with local and regional law offices. Future Plans: The Paralegal Department is constantly striving to stay abreast of the most up-to-date laws, technology and processes within the legal profession and to deliver this information to students through instruction in the classroom and off-campus activities. Faculty are working to further advance classroom instruction with computer technology and library resources to provide students with the most advanced qualifications for entering the law office work force.

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Visual Communication The Visual Communication program is housed in the Academic Division and terminates in a short-term certificate (24 credit hours) or an AAS degree (66 credit hours). Program Description: This program combines artistic skill and high-tech delivery to satisfy the needs of business and industry for employees adept in “new media” production. Graphic Designers plan, analyze, and create visual solutions to communications challenges using a variety of graphics and layout computer software. Mission: To prepare graduates for entry-level employment as graphic designers. To achieve this mission, the Visual Communications faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The beginning student (ART 221, Computer Graphics I) will demonstrate introductory level of competency in using a variety of graphic production software (MS Office, Illustrator, Vector, Photoshop, and Raster) in defining, collecting, inserting, filtering, and composing diverse computer graphic elements (LO 1,5). SLO (2): The Graphic Animation (ART 283) student

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 3.0/4 or higher) on a final course portfolio that demonstrates requisite skill in storyboarding, photographing, creating, arranging, and authoring animation products and objects when measured against departmental rubric (each semester).

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

82% of students achieved a passing score. Students excelled on technical use of software and performed best on “Alabama Wildlife Vector Portrait” project. Students had most difficulty with contextualizing work within commercial expectations and standards.

As a result of analysis, faculty have added an exercise in which students create a themed clip file of magazine ads to enhance awareness of commercial art context for graphic design projects.

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 3.0/4

82% of students achieved a passing score. Students had

As a result of analysis, three changes have been made: More


will demonstrate proficiency in using software to produce motion graphic objects and objects, incorporating photography, storyboarding, and image arrangement and file creation (LO 1,5).

or higher) on a final course portfolio that demonstrates requisite skill in storyboarding, photographing, creating, arranging, and authoring animation products and objects when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

most difficulty with process and complexity of first two introductory projects.

SLO (3): The ART 185, “Digital Raster Illustration,� student will demonstrate competency in using industrystandard raster graphic layout software to demonstrate skill in defining, collecting, inserting, filtering, and composing graphic elements (LO 1,2,5).

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 3.0/4 or higher) on a final course portfolio that reflects knowledge of visual communications theory and applications, incorporating digital photography, digital illustration, digital imaging, and multimedia production

88% of students achieved a passing score. Students performed poorest on the Raster Photo-manipulation project.

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reinforcing quizzes have been added to ensure earlier identification of areas students are weak on; Tegrity recordings of classroom demonstrations has been incorporated to allow students an opportunity to review graphic software concepts from any location; and lab hours have been expanded to allow students more access to individualized instruction and remediation on areas in which they have performed poorly. Faculty produced first video exhibit of student work, which increased exposure for program and students and provided a vehicle for constructive criticism and suggestions. As a result of analysis VCM faculty has decided to add a project component which requires student learners to analyze and grade a series of student project prints from previous terms to gain a sense of good and poor graphic photo-manipulation. As a result of analysis, faculty


when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester).

SLO (4): The ART 185, “Digital Raster Illustration” student will demonstrate proficiency in the application of digital photography or illustration, graphic process, and/or vector illustration in a simulated commercial project (LO 1,5).

PO (1): Visual Communications faculty will demonstrate a commitment to discipline-specific professional development.

PO (2): Visual Communications faculty will demonstrate a commitment to the achievement of standard performance benchmarks regarding program

80% of students will achieve a passing score (defined as 3.0/4 or higher) on a simulated commercial art design project that incorporates layout, typography, digital photography or illustration, graphic process, and/or vector illustration when measured against departmental rubric (each spring semester). In any two-year period, all fulltime faculty will attend a minimum of two internal or external professional development activities that address industry trends and best practices (data collected each spring semester). 80% of graduates will report satisfaction with the quality and efficacy of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teaching pedagogies, and instructional resources (each

97% of students achieved a passing score. Students were weakest on achieving balance among informational text and graphic image elements.

have added requirement that students more fully outline project goals and parameters at planning stage of project by submitting page of thumbnail sketches. As a result of analysis, VCM faculty have added project component in which students learn to search the Web for graphic elements(such as textural brushes or patterns) to cooperatively contribute to a resource pool that all course mates are then able to draw from for project completion.

100% of fulltime faculty completed two professional development activities, focused on academic assessment and “flipped” learning.

As a result of these professional development activities, faculty improved teaching pedagogical skills through implementation of flipped learning. More discipline-specific activities are targeted for 2013-2014.

100% of graduates surveyed reported satisfaction with program across 12 dimensions. All rated overall satisfaction as “Very Good” or better.

As a result of analysis VCM/ART faculty assessed need for more concerted application/delivery/assessment of both VCM and Art course content at program, course and

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effectiveness.

spring semester).

project levels. The agreed primary tool for this increased analysis is the VCM/ART Course Project Calendar document.

An advisory committee comprised of external practitioners will meet a minimum of once annually to review the courses, curriculum, syllabi, instructional resources, facilities, faculty professional development, job placement, and response to industry trends and needs (minimum of once each fall or spring semester).

The VCM Advisory Committee met 1.31.13. Discussion focused on ways to make the program’s graduates more responsive to the needs of business and industry.

As a result of discussion, faculty have requested the hiring of a lab assistant and are developing ways to have students more involved in community outreach through offering courses in graphic design through the Office of Continuing Education.

50% of entering new students will graduate within three years of program entry (data collected each spring).

The graduation rates for the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts were 7%, 3%, and 7% respectively.

To improve graduation rates, VCM/Art faculty have implemented new course content planning tools and calendar to assure content delivery and help monitor student progress toward completion.

Retention as measured both from fall to spring and fall to fall will exceed 80% and 60% respectively (data collected

Fall-to-spring rates for 2011 and 2012 were 80% and 77% respectively. Fall-to-fall rate for 2011 cohort was 48%.

To improve retention rates, the VCM/Art faculty have requested a Student Lab Assistant to assist with various

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each spring).

duties in Graphic Arts, Ceramics, and 2D Lab. New assistant will assist with tracking student progression.

90% of graduates will be 67% of 2013 graduates are pursuing a higher degree or employed or pursuing a higher employed and 75% will be education. 33% are unknown. pursuing a higher degree or employed in-field within ninety days of completion (data collected each fall)

As a result of analysis VCM faculty have decided to implement use of 1st, 3rd and last term VCM student survey to assess learners’ art/design awareness, career goals and educational plans beyond WSCC.

80% of departmental faculty and staff will report satisfaction with program facilities and instructional resources (each spring semester).

While faculty reported overall satisfaction with facilities and instructional resources, they noted a need for a larger ceramics room and software needed to promote program growth and industry responsiveness.

As a result of analysis, faculty have requested consideration for larger ceramics lab. Faculty are preparing budget proposal for 13-14 budget hearings for a vinyl cutting machine and other resources.

80% of employers will report satisfaction with readiness skills and content preparation of graduates (data collected each summer)

No employer surveys conducted for 2012-2013.

To improve employer satisfaction rates, VCM faculty have begun administering a Local Business and Industry Survey to assess need for graphic design workers and commercial art services.

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Analysis and Planning: Visual Communications Student Learning Outcomes: Faculty identified four program-level Student Learning Outcomes for 2012-13. Sample assessment instruments are included as Attachments 36.1, 36.2, 36.3, and 36.4. Facilities Faculty are least satisfied with size of ceramics room FPA222- as being poorly designed by architects with absolutely no room for growth/ exploration of other 3D materials. Faculty strongly agree that the services offered by the college, such as the library and student support services, are adequate. Audiovisual and computer equipment are readily available for students for class activities or assignments. A lab photo is included as Attachment 36.5. Student support services are readily available to all students. Personnel The VCM program currently employs one full-time faculty member who functions as the program director and computer-based graphic design instructor. The program chair has been in this position for 7 years, and has worked in the industry for 20 years. A vita is included as Attachment 36.6, and professional development record as Attachment 36.7. One full-time Art department faculty member instructs the following VCM degree program required courses: • ART113, Drawing • ART121, Two-Dimensional Composition • ART143, Sculpture I • ART 2D elective • ART100, Art Appreciation. Equipment The VCM faculty agree that the VCM Graphic Arts lab offers adequate equipment to facilitate student learning and meet program objectives. The VCM faculty plan to request vinyl cutting machine at spring 2014 budgeting hearings to give students training with this common graphic tool and its processes. The VCM faculty are also researching the purchase of a consumer-level 3D printing machine to complement production of 3D objects in VCM250, Technical Illustration, and to explore potential business models for 3D graphic/commercial artists. The VCM Program currently offers one full-tuition scholarship for a first-year degree seeking student and one half-tuition scholarship for a first-year student seeking a career in the visual arts. The program’s spring 2013 budget proposal is included as Attachment 36.8. The recommendation of the Administrative Council is included as Attachment 36.9, and the presidential response is Attachment 36.10 with actions related to this program highlighted.


Advisory Committee Minutes are included as Attachment 36.11. Advisory Committee The VCM Advisory Committee consisting of Adrian Scott, Ramon Daniel, Donny Wilson and Mark Neal met Oct 31, 2013 and based on program assessment results and needs made the following program recommendations: •

• •

The VCM Advisory Committee finds a need for more concerted application/delivery/assessment of both VCM and Art course content at program, course and project levels so that they accurately reflect the requisite creative challenges of the program and the harsh reality of the local and regional commercial art job market. The majority of VCM degree seeking students still struggle particularly with the studio art coursework. The agreed primary tools for aiding with these issues will be: o Revised VCM/ART Course Project Calendar document o Revised PROJECT REVIEW & LEARNING OUTCOME SCORING RUBRIC The VCM Advisory Committee assessed need for various program related Surveys including: o VCM Program Introductory survey of 1st term VCM degree seeking students to assess familiarity with foundation-level Visual Art and Graphic Design principles o Local Business and Industry Survey to assess skillsets and needs for graphic design workers and/or commercial art services. The Advisory Committee suggested a VCM Program Outreach Initiative to design and have degree seeking program students teach Introductory Graphic Software workshops either through WSCC Continuing Ed courses or Chamber of Commerce. These courses could be targeted through direct marketing to connect student skillsets with local industry and business that could benefit from creative enhancement/customization of their products or services. The VCM program’s faculty and Graphics lab currently service numerous campus requests for graphic layout and printing. The Advisory committee suggests a request for $700.00 additional budget request to offset growing cost of ink and large format paper. VCM Advisory committee recommends the addition of a Student Lab Assistant for the VCM Graphic Arts Lab. The primary roles of this SLA would be: o To help monitor lab during open lab hours o To help students with class questions o To manage and coordinate student/community art exhibition advertisement, artwork submission, artwork catalog, artwork setup and exhibition and breakdown o To manage WSCC online graphic art portfolio showcase of student and community artwork.

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General Education Core To assess the General Education Core, the college utilizes a competency-based model. Six competencies have been selected by the college’s Assessment Committee and endorsed by the institution’s leadership: • • • • • •

Scientific Reasoning/Collegiate Lab Skills Written Communication Oral Communication Computer Literacy Critical Thinking/Reasoning/Mathematical Skill Valuing of Diversity

Although the General Education Core is, by definition, central to all academic programs, the management of each of the six competencies is the responsibility of a particular academic division: • • • • • •

Scientific Reasoning/Collegiate Lab Skills: Biology Department Written Communication: English Department Oral Communication: Speech Department Computer Literacy: Computer Science Department Critical Thinking/Reasoning/Mathematical Skill: Math Department Valuing of Diversity: Social Sciences Department

The General Education faculty and staff have identified the following outcomes as measures of program effectiveness: 1. Student Learning and Program Outcomes SLO (1): The student will demonstrate understanding of a microscope and other laboratory equipment and

2. Assessment Criteria and Schedule 80% of BIO 103 students will achieve a passing score (defined as 70% or higher) on the first attempt on a laboratory

3. Assessment Results

4. Analysis and Use of Results

Faculty assessed this competency through three separate instruments: 79% of students achieved a passing

To improve this outcome, faculty have modified the check-off procedure in microscope use from a group


methodologies as portals of exam following completion of inquiry for scientific analysis or a module of instruction on the further study (LO 1). proper use of the microscope and other laboratory equipment and methodologies (each fall and spring semester).

SLO (2): The student will demonstrate collegiate mathematical and reasoning skills as a foundation for further study and lifelong learning (LO 2).

score on the scientific method proficiency exam; 83% on lab safety proficiency; and 92% on the microscope practical. Students were weakest in the fundamentals of microscope use and appreciation of the critical importance of lab safety 70% of mathematics students in The Math faculty met in the designated course, MTH October to finalize the scope 100, will achieve a score of at and method of assessment. Two least 70% on the first attempt semesters of data were on designated applied problems collected. 58% achieved a on the departmental final passing score in the fall, 50% in examination reflecting core the spring. Minutes reflect levels of collegiate faculty discussion of factors mathematical skills (each fall influencing outcomes, and spring semester). including poor attendance.

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activity to an individual, a process that requires that each student meet with a faculty members for a skill check-off. Faculty have begun work with the AVC staff on the production of a lab safety video. As a result of discussion, curricular and co-curricular changes have been adopted: More emphasis on applications in lectures; additional application problems in weekly/chapter testing; labeling of additional problems as “application section� on exams so wording would not confuse students on final exams; consultation with developmental math faculty on the inclusion of more applications pre-MTH 100; development of applied problem homework set by chapter by faculty subcommittee. 100% of fulltime reported multiple professional development activities to impact this measure, including


SLO (3): The student will demonstrate proficiency in written communication, including understanding of thematic unity and development in formal academic writing (LO 3).

demonstrations of MyLabs software (Pearson), “flipped” learning, and other pedagogies. A representative attended the Chair Academy in Phoenix AZ. 80% of ENG 101 students will Approximately 400 essays were As a result of discussion, four achieve a passing score collected and analyzed against changes were made: Better (defined as “C” or better scored departmental rubric fall and dissemination of assessment against departmental rubric) on spring semester. 92% and 83% and results to faculty, the first attempt on a fiveachieved the benchmark particularly adjuncts; the paragraph essay (or 500-word respectively. Minutes reflect addition of online tutorials in paper) that incorporates an discussion of student strengths areas of weakness to understanding of thematic unity and weaknesses. Faculty noted Blackboard shells; new PPTs and development in formal that most errors were in three developed by faculty to written discourse (each fall and areas: capitalization and strengthen instruction in areas spring semester). punctuation, sentence structure, of weakness; and SLA tutors and spelling and word choice. informed of departmental findings and efforts for remediation. 100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities to strengthen learning outcome, including presentations on “flipped” learning, e-portfolio use, and combating plagiarism. Regional and national activities included attendance of AAC&U conferences on high-impact practices in Portland OR, Atlanta, and Madison WI.

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SLO (4): The student will demonstrate proficiency in the application and use of oral communication theories and practice (LO 3).

80% of SPH 106/SPH107 students completing an oral presentation of four minutes incorporating widely accepted standards of oral presentation, development, and delivery will achieve a passing score on the first attempt (defined as “C” or better scored against departmental rubric) (each fall and spring semester).

Evaluative rubrics from more than 300 persuasive speeches were collected and analyzed fall and spring semesters, focusing on five traditional areas of difficulty: gaining attention, establishing credibility, avoiding oral fillers, providing an action point, and meeting the time requirement. The benchmark was exceeded in all areas except establishing credibility (69%) and avoiding fillers (63%). Faculty noted that according to Human Links, a global recruiting company, 4 of top 7 reasons people are hired are related to communication skills, and poor communication skills are frequently cited as a leading reason for termination.

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As a result of discussion, the assignment was modified to require that students actually write out the first paragraph on speech outline to enable them to better establish credibility with audiences. Faculty have emphasized the importance of practicing speeches more to reduce the use of oral fillers. Faculty are pursuing strengthening this competency by increasing the speech requirement from one course to two. 100% of fulltime faculty attended multiple professional development activities to improve outcome, including presentations on “flipped” learning and e-learning. Representative attended workshop on assessing online student learning using the Quality Matters framework. More discipline-specific activities are planned for the 2013-14 academic year, including workshops on “Dealing with Difficult People” and “How to Communicate with Tact and Skill.”


SLO (5): The student will demonstrate collegiate computer literacy in the application and use of word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software (LO 4).

70% of CIS 146 students will achieve a passing score (defined as “C” or higher scored against departmental rubric) on the first attempt on the departmental capstone project that incorporates the application and use of word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software (each fall and spring semester).

83% of students met the overall benchmark for fall and spring semesters. 71% met the Access objective and 77% the Excel.

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To improve this outcome, faculty have made several program modifications. Faculty have begun providing a synopsis of each software program before beginning instruction. This helps students “begin with the end in mind.” Faculty have also begun regular team meetings to enhance information sharing and all fulltime and part-time faculty are required to use the same Blackboard shell for the course to increase consistency and congruency. Faculty have developed a new PPT on how Access databases relate to students, and have increased emphasis to students on how these specific computer skills can enhance their skills and success in other areas. The department has added an SLA tutor to improve student learning. 100% of fulltime faculty engaged in multiple professional development activities, including pedagogical workshops on “flipped” learning, using 3-D


SLO (6): The student will show awareness and comprehension of the diversity of human experience, responding to interpersonal, historical, cultural, and global events (LO 5).

80% of students surveyed will report that the courses taken at WSCC have broadened their understanding and appreciation of social diversity (each spring semester).

objects to enhance instruction, and outcomes assessment. Representative of department attended national AAC&U Conference at the University of Vermont on General Education Core assessment. More discipline-specific activities are planned for the 2013-14 academic year. The campus-wide diversity As a result of discussion, survey has been administered several curricular and cofall and spring semesters. curricular changes were made. Student perceptions were To strengthen and broaden measured across ten evaluation of student learning, dimensions of diversity. On diversity has been added as one most recent survey (spring of three critical components of 2013), of students expressing the new model of Learning opinion, agreement ranged Communities beginning Fall from 93% to 98% on all Semester, 2013, with diversity statements except one: assignments evaluated against a “A broad range of WSCC rubric derived from the campus activities has enhanced AAC&U Value Rubric on my learning experience outside diversity. From a co-curricular the classroom� (76%). Faculty perspective, faculty voted to minutes reflect detailed designate diversity as theme of discussion of valuing diversity the 2013-2014 Campus Read as a core competency. initiative, featuring the memoir While the World Watched by McKinstry, a survivor of the Birmingham church bombing.

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The college adopted a FiveYear Diversity Plan in spring 2013. Minutes reflect faculty contributions to this competency by multiple curricular and co-curricular activities, including field trips to the Margaret Jean Jones Center (a center for mentally disabled children and adults), student field trips to the Civil Rights Museum in Birmingham, reflective journaling on the college’s 2012-13 Common Read, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and diversity-related discussion boards in Blackboard. The results of the survey have been shared with faculty throughout the college, including at an Assessment Day Conference in May, 2013. This outcome was enhanced through professional development activities accomplished in 2012-2013, including attendance of the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) Annual Meeting in

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Atlanta addressing “innovations, efficiencies, and disruptions,” the AAC&U Conference on Institutional Roadmaps for Student Success in Miami, specific diversity workshops and presentations, including a symposium in Montgomery and a campuswide presentation from a historical and public relations representative of the Civil Rights Institute in Birmingham. Representatives of the Division petitioned the college’s Administrative Council for additional funding to support the newly adopted Five-Year Diversity Plan.

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General Education Core List of Supporting Documentation: Attachment 37.1: Biology Laboratory Skills Rubric Attachment 37.2: Scientific Method Competency Rubric Attachment 37.3: Reasoning/Mathematics Competency Rubric Attachment 37.4: Written Communication Rubric Attachment 37.5: Oral Communication Rubric Attachment 37.6: Collegiate Computer Skills Rubric Attachment 37.7: Value of Diversity Survey Attachment 37.8: Sample of Diversity SLO Rubric I Attachment 37.9: Sample of Diversity SLO Rubric II Attachment 37.10: Professional Development Summary for Biology faculty Attachment 37.11: Professional Development Summary for Mathematics faculty Attachment 37.12: Professional Development Summary for English faculty Attachment 37.13: Professional Development Summary for Speech faculty Attachment 37.14: Professional Development Summary for Computer Science Attachment 37.15: Professional Development Summary for Social Science faculty Attachment 37.16: Sample Biology faculty minutes Attachment 37.17: Sample Mathematics faculty minutes Attachment 37.18: Sample English faculty minutes Attachment 37.19: Sample Speech faculty minutes Attachment 37.20: Sample Social Science faculty minutes Attachment 37.21: Assessment Committee minutes, approval of Gen Ed Competencies Attachment 37.22: Membership List for Assessment Committee, 2012-13 Attachment 37.23: Membership List for Assessment Committee, 2013-14


Academic Program Outcomes Assessment 2012-2015