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THE WOMAN BEHIND

A BETTER WAY TO

ELECTION GUIDE

RETIRE

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THE VANCOUVERITE'S

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THE VAN CITY DIET We asked a few of our favourite locals about their food obsessions du jour. Dig in on pg. 60

the

FOOD ISSUE

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VOLUME 48

OCT

NUMBER 8

F E AT U R E S

Cover: Carlo Ricci, Food Styling: Juno Kim; this page: Carlo Ricci

THE FOOD ISSUE

THE SECRET IS TO EAT IT WHILE IT’S HOT AND GOOEY IN THE MIDDLE” –Gloria Macarenko, CBC host

59 Order Up!

72 Back Angus

82 Pour Circulation

What do an actor, a tech mogul, and a comedy troupe have in common? They all have to eat! And they’ve shared with us—in their own words—where they love to go to sate the craving

His restaurants are widely acclaimed and his empire is growing. But rather than bask in success, chef Angus An just keeps on working By Fiona Morrow

Gone is the era of the career bartender who spends decades at a single establishment. Nowadays it’s the staff—not just the patrons— who are into bar-hopping By Neal McLennan

O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

11


OCT

***

“I’M GUESSING IT’S BAKED CAULIFLOWER COVERED IN SOME KIND OF METHAMPHETAMINE”

—pg. 78

THE

THE

42 TASTE MAKER

104 PERSONAL SHOPPER From

18 FROM THE EDITOR Our senior

Drybar’s launch in Canada to the benefits of bee venom, our roundup of new, notable, and stylish finds

editor reflects on the various ways covering the city’s food scene can feed the soul

BRIEF DISH 22 VANCOUVER LIFE Vancouver’s

hippie past is resurrected by East Van woodworkers; the tortured memories of a VPD detective investigating the Pickton murders 24 BLOCK WATCH

PG.22

The city’s boomers have the capital to retire in style. Lucky for them, luxe options abound 26 ON THE RECORD As

executive director of VIFF, Jacqueline Dupuis is our local custodian of a precious art form

What does a critically reviled movie director know about serving fine German cuisine? Bauhaus aims to answer that question 44 BRIEFLY NOTED

Kitsilano’s newest must-visit dining destination hits the ground running

GOODS PLUS

106 MODEL CITIZEN The

dapper man charged with heading up the city’s new Nordstrom flagship shares his style favourites

114 SNAP CHATTER Hot-to-

trot at the polo field, West Van toasts, and the reopening of an iconic restaurant

46 THE DECANTER

Mountain environ- 108 FIELD TRIP Whether your ideal ments make a considerable labour getaway involves taking in unspoiled of grape-growing, nature or spoiling but the wines that yourself amidst result are worth five-star urban the extra effort luxury, Oahu ticks all the boxes

28 URBAN FIX

Far removed from Ottawa and largely averse to Conservative viewpoints, Vancouver battles for fair representation in this month’s federal election PG.42 34 THE ESSENTIAL 7

112 SWEAT EQUIT Y Once the

exclusive pursuit of law-flouting thrill-seekers, parkour has gone mainstream. A local enthusiast offers his own allages playground

Life-affirming theatre, convention-defying art, soul-stirring rock, and more—your best entertainment choices this month

Va n m a g .co m See hundreds of winners from past Restaurant Awards, with chef videos and more PG.108

12

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

Bauhaus: Luis Valdizon; Waikiki Diamond Head: Hawaii Tourism Authority/Tor Johnson; Chris Wanless: Pooya Nabei

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SENIOR EDITOR

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Clinton Hussey, Evaan Kheraj, Joe McKendry (contributor illustrations), Andrew Querner, Carlo Ricci, John Sinal, Martin Tessler, Milos Tosic, Luis Valdizon EDITORIAL INTERN

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VANCOUVER MAGAZINE is published 10 times a year by Yellow Pages Homes Ltd.. Copyright 2015. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without publisher’s written permission. Not responsible for unsolicited editorial material. Privacy Policy: On occasion, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened organizations whose product or service might interest you. If you prefer that we not share your name and address (postal and/or email), you can easily remove your name from our mailing lists by reaching us at any of the listed contact points. You can review our complete Privacy Policy at Vanmag.com. Subscriptions in Canada: one year $39.99. Subscriptions in the United States: one year $59.99. Rates include GST. Back issues $10, including postage and handling. All figures in Canadian funds. For address change, send old and new address to our circulation department. Indexed in the Canadian Magazine Index by Micromedia Ltd. and also in the Canadian Periodical Index. International standard serial no. ISSN 0380-9552. Canadian publications mail product sales agreement #40064924. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Circulation Dept., Suite 560, 2608 Granville St., Vancouver, B.C., V6H 3V3. Printed in Canada by Transcontinental Printing G.P. (LGM Graphics), 737 Moray St., Winnipeg, MB, R3J 3S9. All reproduction requests must be made to: COPIBEC (paper reproductions) 800-717-2022, or CEDROM-SNi (electronic reproductions) 800-563-5665. Distributed by Coast to Coast Ltd.


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Can eating certain foods make my skin look better? - Lana, Vancouver

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Rhiannon Morris

A balanced and nutritious diet is critical for overall physical and skin health. Patients often inquire about nutricosmetic supplements and the latest superfood trends, hoping for that miracle that will solve their skincare woes, but what you should focus on is ensuring you receive sufficient quantities of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients from your diet for your skin to function normally. We suggest patients “eat a rainbow” of fresh fruits and vegetables. Brightly coloured fruits and vegetables (green, red, yellow, orange, and purple) are rich in antioxidants and nutrients. Avoid bland colours like beige and white— these foods have a high glycemic index and are high in carbohydrates. Instead, strive to have this rainbow of colours at every meal, every day.

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Reducing the amount of sugar in your diet will also help promote healthy skin, not just a healthy waistline. One negative impact sugar has on the body is called glycation, which damages the collagen and elastin necessary for healthy, supple skin. This accelerates aging and wrinkles, and reduces the overall healthy appearance of skin.

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A Flawless Design by Palladio

At the crossroads of classic winemaking and California innovation lies Sonoma’s legendary La Crema. Long known for producing some of the finest Sonoma wines, La Crema’s Chardonnay and Pinot Noir set the bar for California’s

operated winery has focused exclusively on cool-climate coastal appellations, where grapes ripen slowly and develop complex flavours each possessing of a unique personality, consistent flavours and silky mouthfeel.

Like us on Facebook to receive recipe and pairing information. / L AC R E M AW I N E RY

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beloved coastal appellations. For more than 30 years, this family-owned and


THIS

MONTH

WE KNOW WHAT’S GOOD A NATIONWIDE JUDGING PANEL OF CHEFS, JOURNALISTS, AND INDUSTRY EXPERTS PLACED A DOZEN VANCOUVER DINING ROOMS IN THE INAUGU-

FROM THE EDITOR

The Big Picture

RAL ‘CANADA’S 100 BEST RESTAURANTS’ LIST, INCLUDING HAWKSWORTH AT NUMBER TWO. SEE THE FULL LIST AT CANADAS100BEST.COM

I could never be a great chef or bartender—I struggle to execute an acceptable plate of spaghetti or anything but the most rudimentary cocktail—but I’m a tireless cheerleader for those who are

The Hunger Games 

MICHAEL WHITE michael.white@vanmag.com

18

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

3

FOOD BY THE NUMBERS

7 The number of years elapsed since Vikram Vij and Meeru Dhalwala acquired the Cambie Street space that will house the new Vij’s restaurant 10 The number of dishes our staff sampled from the 13-item menu at Fat Mao, Angus An’s new noodle place 12 The number of pounds senior editor Michael White has gained since taking charge of this magazine’s Dish section in June 2014

Carlo Ricci

my favourite aspect of being responsible for this magazine’s food and drink coverage—other than the fact that it grants me the privilege of attributing my gluttony to professional obligation—is that I often have the opportunity to meet and learn about the people whose livelihoods are earned from sating local appetites. Almost invariably, these are fascinating characters: unconventional, ambitious, and risk-taking. I’ve considered chef Angus An to be among our city’s greatest culinary wizards since the first time I ate at his Kitsilano restaurant, Maenam, in 2009. Although I knew the then-new Thai eatery had been opened quickly to take the place of An’s debut endeavour, Gastropod—a costly fine-dining temple that became out of step with the public’s desires after the previous year’s economic crash—I couldn’t have known how that early failure would inform his career over the next half decade. In the midst of him doubling the number of restaurants in his portfolio, writer Fiona Morrow spent a day in August following An between his various properties, and came away with an endearing profile (“Back Angus,” pg. 72) of a talent whose outward success harbours astonishing humility and uncertainty. The inherent turbulence of the food-service trade—if not of modern working life in general—is also reflected in “Pour Circulation” (pg. 82), a look at the increasingly unsettled lifestyle of bartenders in the 21st century. Meanwhile, “Order Up!” (pg. 60) shifts perspective to the customer’s side of things, a selection of notable Vancouverites sharing with us where they love to go in the city when hunger calls. It’s this last story with which I identify most. I could never be a great chef or bartender—I struggle to execute an acceptable plate of spaghetti or anything but the most rudimentary cocktail—but I’m a tireless cheerleader for those who are. So I’m thrilled that our annual Food Issue has returned for its fourth year to celebrate the marvellous relationship between kitchen and customer: one of the most basic and common transactions in everyday life, yet, in more ways than one, the most sustaining. VM


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VA NC O U V E R L IF E

BL OCK WAT CH

ON THE RECORD

URBAN FIX

THE ESSENTIALS

“Vancouver has an added problem. It’s thousands of miles away. It’s far from the minds of senior policy staff ”

THE

PG. 32

The month in politics, real estate, business & culture

Van City Buzzed



whether it’s narrowly avoiding collisions with seaplanes, halting firefighting in Oliver, or perversely spying on topless sunbathers, drones have transcended social nuisance to become a genuine safety concern. But a freak overlap of governing bodies has created a loophole for drones to fly through. So what should you do if you feel threatened from above?

Call 911? Not unless someone has crashed their drone into your property. “More often than not, drone users are not breaking the law,” explains Randy Fincham of VPD. “It doesn’t become police business unless there is criminal negligence or voyeurism.”

What about 311? Though the City of Vancouver has prohibited “model aircrafts” on City property without a permit, they currently have no jurisdiction over Vancouver airspace. Officials say they are looking at how to regulate drone use, but in the meantime “citizens should contact Transport Canada.”

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Canada regional office.”

O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

21


THE BACK-TO-THE-LAND ETHOS OF THE

THE

HIPPIE ERA WAS EXEMPLIFIED BY THE

BRIEF

MUD FLATS HOUSES OF THE EARLY ’70S,

VA N C O U V E R L I F E

Carving Out a Legacy

The idealistic spirit of a ragtag collective of hippie carpenters is reborn for another generation of Vancouverites

22

CLEMENS FAMILY’S COLLECTION

Tr e n d i n g S t o r i e s

HISTORY

L

AS SEEN IN THESE PHOTOS FROM THE

low-hanging clouds envelop the Maplewood mud flats, a tidal plain that skirts Burrard Inlet east of the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge. Sam Clemens steps gingerly around the washed-up logs, trying to get a better view of the western sandpipers that normally reside here. The mud flats are a conservation area now, home to dozens of birds, but Clemens has been here before—decades ago, when he was a toddler and the flats were a hippie haven to about 25

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

artisans, their partners, and their children, living in self-built shacks and shelters. His rubber boots squelch in the mud as he edges closer to the water’s edge. “I was conceived here,” he says as he spies several pilings in the distance, the only remnants of Vancouver’s infamous squatter community. “This is where my life began. It’s part of my story.” By 1971, Clemens’s parents, Dan and Wendy, were well entrenched in mud flats society. Wendy carved out a living making leather goods. Dan, along with his buddies—a group of self-taught carpenters called DeLuxe Renovators— scoured West Side demolition sites for gingerbread trim, balustrades, and stained glass (heritage pieces nobody wanted at the time) and turned their booty into kiosks, restaurant facades, and movie sets. (Robert Altman’s McCabe & Mrs. Miller made use of the collective’s wares; see sidebar.) At night, Dan retired to his wife and child in their

mud flats home. But not for long. The District of North Vancouver deemed the squats unsanitary and an eyesore, and ordered them to be removed. “There was a big protest,” says Clemens. “As a baby, I was in front of the bulldozers. But, of course, it got torn down.” In December of that year, the authorities set the Clemens house ablaze and the family relocated. Clemens grew up with a hammer in his hands, helping his dad build houses on the Sunshine Coast. He eventually became a contractor—a steady 9-to-5 that paid good money—but he felt unsettled and unfulfilled. Too young to remember those Maplewood days in detail, he grew up restless and inquisitive, steeped in the mud flats mythology thanks to family stories and photographs. “It’s in my DNA,” he says of the hippie ethic that drives him. In 2014, Clemens left the construction business and, together with his younger brother, Lenny, established his


own enterprise, Hobo Woodworks, sourcing used lumber from demolition sites like his father did 45 years ago. “My dad is still my inspiration,” he says. “I’ve always looked up to him as someone who could spin something out of nothing and make things happen.” His father returns the compliment. “That little business he does, it’s really familiar to me,” says Dan Clemens, from his current home in Mexico. “It just ties together what we were thinking and how we were feeling in those days.” In essence, a DeLuxe redux. Today, Sam and Lenny work out of an East Vancouver shop they opened last year, where the duo turn reclaimed wood into kitchen islands or coffee tables. Commissions also figure prominently. “It’s probably more lucrative to open up a cabinet shop and just bang out boxes, but that’s not what we’re trying to do here,” says Sam. “What we’re trying to do is get back to a natural, organic way of living.” Clemens says it’s wrong to assume he’s simply following in his father’s footsteps. It’s broader than that. He says he represents a West Coast attitude, a reverence for nature and the environment. “People don’t want mass-produced crap. People want to be connected to where their stuff comes from,” he says, citing his practice of making handmade goods out of recycled indigenous species. “This landscape, this part of the world, completely informs what we do.” It’s this consciousness, Sam believes, that will keep both the DeLuxe legacy and the Maplewood mud flats story alive. “I’m very aware of the history of this part of the world and where I come from,” he says. “Hobo is a continuum of a story that’s still being written.” —John Thomson

CRIME

A REAL COP-OUT THE MUD FLATS MEET TINSEL TOWN Legendary director Robert Altman’s McCabe & Mrs. Miller stars Warren Beatty and Julie Christie (the latter garnered an Oscar nomination) as business partners who run a brothel at the turn of the 20th century. Set in the fictional town of Presbyterian Church, Washington, the 1971 movie was shot in West Vancouver and Squamish. Construction of the sets provided work for the Vancouverbased DeLuxe Renovators crew for roughly a year.

In her new book, former VPD detective Lori Shenher lays bare the various battles she waged (not least with her conscience) during and after the investigation of the Pickton murders £ Throughout my policing career, I felt like an imposter—as a queer person, as

investigation was another matter. Am I obligated to share the details

a female, as left of centre, as a writer,

of the horrific nightmares that woke

as someone who questioned the police

me every morning at 4:00 in those first

culture and the system. I was differ-

months after the Pickton farm search,

ent, and never before had I felt that

plus several sleepless years before

as intensely as when the Pickton case

and after? That I’d sit in front of my

broke. Far stronger than my sense

computer obsessively pounding out

of being a cop and a detective was

the details of the investigation until I

my need to be a truth teller—a need

went to work at 6:00 every morning?

that simmered just below the surface

That overwhelming anxiety is a power-

throughout Project Amelia [the VPD’s

ful motor driving you forward, unlike

alternate name for its Vancouver Miss-

depression, which presses down on

ing Women Review Team], but that

your head and pulls at your heels like

could not be expressed for so many

a ball and chain? Anxiety made me

reasons, most relating to job security

productive, but its effects don’t last

and the culture I toiled within.

forever, as I would discover. I wrote like

Now that need was replaced by a

a person possessed because I felt my

loud, screaming voice inside my head

life depended on it.

that told me I had to tell this story, my

They wonder how I could quit the

story, their story. It was not a desire; it

investigation and then write and con-

was a compulsion, and I briefl y tried

sult for Da Vinci’s Inquest. How has this

to fight it, knowing there was nothing

commission of inquiry become about

I wanted more than to just forget this

me? Why are the brightest lights of

whole damn thing. But as a writer, I saw

scrutiny glaring into my eyes when so

no choice. As a human being, I bore a

many others are much more deserving

responsibility. As a police officer, I felt a

of audit? Because I had dared to put

duty. Sitting here in the Missing Women

myself out there. Why should I have to

Commission of Inquiry hearing room, I

publicly point out that my trauma has

think of the media accounts I’ve read of

never been about the actual events on

my pending testimony, of those report-

that farm, tragic and deplorable as they

ers wondering how I could possibly cite

were, but is rooted in the lack of sup-

burnout and breakdown and, at the

port for our investigation from the VPD

same time, have the energy and ability

and the RCMP? Why do I feel the need

to write a book. Some of the lawyers in

to explain myself and be known?

the inquiry pursue this line of questioning, asking me how I could possibly write a book if I was so shattered by my work on this file. I struggle to articulate that writing the manuscript both tortured and soothed me. Writing was never an effort for me, but reliving the

Excerpt from That Lonely Section of Hell: The Botched Investigation of a Serial Killer Who Almost Got Away by Lori Shenher, published by Greystone Books. Available now.

O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

23


THE

BRIEF

B L O C K WAT C H

Real Estate

STREET LEVEL

Boom Town

The city’s stratospheric housing prices are a bust for some while a boon for others by kerry gold



aging boomers have got to be the biggest beneficiaries of Vancouver’s ongoing property bonanza. This past July, the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver reported an 11 percent increase in property prices over last, and the number of sales had increased by a whopping 30 percent. Who’s better poised to cash out than the boomers who bought into the market

30-plus years ago? Their vast wealth has shaped the retirement market in a variety of ways. Some are taking their millions and upsizing with bigger houses in far cheaper locales, such as the Sunshine Coast and Vancouver Island. The more urban boomers are downsizing in style, with the purchase of a high-end downtown condo or a contemporary townhome in West

Vancouver. They’re also starting to look to North Vancouver, where there’s slightly more luxurybang for their buck. And for retirees who are really looking ahead, there’s the aging-in-place concept, which has driven retirement projects around the Lower Mainland to offer a spectrum of luxury services from

in-house movie theatres, yoga classes, educational seminars, and gourmet organic diets to later-stage nursing care. It’s not for the budgetoriented senior, mind you. Monthly rentals can easily run $4,000 to $10,000 and beyond, and that doesn’t include the add-on costs like field trips.

“It’s a complete paradigm shift compared to what seniors’ housing was,” says Edgemont Senior Living’s Alison Keller.

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VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15



Demand for seniors’ housing is going to spike. Seniors want luxury more than ever before, and developers are filling the void



NURSE THIS HOME

LEGACY SENIOR LIVING

EDGEMONT SENIOR LIVING

SPECIALTY Located on West 41st Avenue across from Oakridge Centre, this newish facility features a chauffeurdriven Bentley and an on-call nurse. The contemporary complex includes landscaped terraces, extra elevators, club rooms, and state-of-the-art security. UNITS 91 TENURE Monthly rental Legacyseniorliving.com

SPECIALTY This North Vancouver property targets the mid-market senior with selfcontained apartments, bistro, theatre, fi tness centre, communal garden, three meals a day, and round-the-clock care. Live independently or with assistance. UNITS 128 TENURE Monthly rental Edgemontseniorliving.com

Gutter Credit Legacy: Erich Saide; Edgemont: Ray Letkeman Architects Inc.

B U I L D I N G WAT C H


$163 billion: the amount in clear title equity that baby boomers are currently sitting on HOT BUYS

FAR AND AWAY When it’s time to cash out, where will you go? Here are a few options ARLES, FRANCE

COUNT Y WEXFORD, IRELAND

$1.2 million 4-bedroom equestrian castle For the price of a bungalow on the East Side, you can get a castle in France—with horses. Who wouldn’t want to spend their golden years where Van Gogh was most inspired? Nimes Airport is a half-hour drive away and the French Riviera a short distance, too. Frenchestateagents.com

$202,845 3-bedroom cottage It’s a cottage, surrounded by charming Irish countryside, outside tiny Ballycullane. There’s a church, a pub, and beaches close by. For that price in Vancouver, you’d end up living in a 500-square-foot studio near Surrey Central Station. Myhome.ie

* Livin’ the FIGURE ONE

SAN JOSÉ DEL CABO, BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MEXICO

$909,484 3-bedroom beachfront condo Cash out of your West Side house, buy this beachfront condo in Mexico, and pocket some serious change. It’s got ensuite baths, a walk-in marble shower, and a customfurniture package. And no kidnappings! Blog.mexi-go.ca

Dream

Which of the following comes closest to describing your ideal vision of where you’ll live in your retirement?

Moving to a different province or country

Staying in the house where I currently live

11%

23% Moving to a different house in my municipality

19%



Gutter Credit Tapestry: Concert Properties; Westerleigh PARC: Stu Ross Photography

*

Results are based on online interviews that Insights West conducted for Vancouver magazine with a representative sample of 603 residents of Metro Vancouver between April 22 and 24. The margin of error is 4.5%.

TAPESTRY

WESTERLEIGH PARC

SPECIALTY Concert Properties’ Tapestry communities are for seniors who don’t feel like seniors. Their Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, at UBC, includes spa treatments, a fi tness program, and gourmet cuisine. Think boutique hotel for the affluent. UNITS 200 TENURE Monthly rental and strata ownership Discovertapestry.com

SPECIALTY Aimed at wealthy West Vancouverites, this complex at 22nd Street and Marine Drive includes chauffeured transportation, dining hall with maître d’, use of a grand piano, housekeeping, spa, massage room, beauty parlour, and temperature-controlled wine storage. UNITS 129 TENURE Monthly rental Parcliving.ca

 O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

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THE

BRIEF

ON THE RECORD

£P E T T I F O N G

Newsmakers

Screen Test

Having steered Calgary’s film fest through post-recession struggles, Jacqueline Dupuis came onboard as executive director of the Vancouver International Film Festival in 2011. As the pastime of moviegoing changes everywhere, her job is to give great filmmaking— local and international—the biggest audiences possible PETTI FONG By the time you had turned around the financial and staffing hardships of the Calgary International Film Festival, Vancouver came calling. Why take on a new challenge? JACQUELINE DUPUIS I was exhausted from working in turnaround situations when the board of directors and [then-director of VIFF] Alan Franey approached me. They told me they admired my skill set, and we talked about expanding their business model and getting the resources needed to grow and expand in a challenging business.

works. The cinematic experience has been around a long time and I’m confident it will remain for a long time to come. PF What do the films at this year’s VIFF tell you about where the industry is heading? JD Independent filmmaking continues to thrive. Story is king and quality has become more important than ever in the race to rise above the mountain of content that exists. The ability to create across different platforms—web to TV to big screen—is helping filmmakers build skills, audience, and reputation. It’s an interesting and evolving ecosystem that, in the end, has resulted in an increase in quality content. PF How do you think VIFF reflects our city? JD The programming is as diverse as ever, speaking to the vast interests in issues and cultures around the world, many of which affect or are cared about by

THE CINEMATIC EXPERIENCE HAS BEEN AROUND FOR A LONG TIME AND I’M CONFIDENT IT WILL REMAIN FOR A LONG TIME TO COME

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VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

Vancouverites. People here are inspired and informed, and films have the power to transform, to change hearts and minds. This is a powerful combination for the greater good. VM

The 34th annual Vancouver International Film Festival runs Sept. 24-Oct. 9. Viff.org

Pooya Nabei

PF Is the word “fi lm” still relevant when we’re consuming so much of what we watch digitally? JD All the festivals are wondering the same thing: Whether you’re developing for television or online content, is the word “film” still being used? And it is. Artists still use the term broadly—“film” or “cinema”—and talk about things being cinematic. The verbiage still


it’s beautiful inside

B A K E R . M C G U I R E . M I T C H E L L G O L D . L E E . B OL I E R . D E L L A R O B B I A . S A NG I A C O M O . S A B A . G A M M A

1855 Fir Street at West 3rd Armoury District Vancouver 604.736.8822 Monday - Saturday 10-5:30 pm broughaminteriors.com


THE

BRIEF

URBAN FIX

Civic Af fairs

KEY BATTLEGROUND 1: VANCOUVER GRANVILLE A new riding with Conservatives in the wealthy middle, while Liberals and NDP share the ends. In 2011, it would have gone Conservative, but the Liberal (Jody WilsonRaybould) and NDP (Mira Oreck) candidates are strong

£F R A N C E S B U L A

for the middle class.” She’ll be voting Liberal in her new riding, Vancouver Granville. What she means, of course, is that she wants something different for city-dwellers like her. Yemchuk is one of the many people in urban Vancouver who feel as though they are being ruled by aliens—people from another planet who are indifferent to what city people care about. Not gun registries, or terrorism, or income splitting, or tax credits for soccer equipment. On their agenda? The surreal price of housing, the increasing congestion with no transit solutions in sight, and the crushing load of child-care costs. And, among Vancouver city-dwellers in particular, Yemchuk and her ilk by and large support way-out-in-front drug policies, and they care a lot about climate change. In the past couple of elections, Conservatives have appeared to be mostly indifferent to those city slickers and what they might care about. They’ve put little effort into being seriously competitive in the ridings in central Canadian cities and particularly in the centralcity ridings in our West Coast outlier. Deploying their resources strategically, Conservatives have concentrated their efforts on their How we lost our voice in Ottawa and why it’s so difficult—but vital—to traditional rural vote and the get it back in this federal election increasingly vital and attainable suburban vote. Cities from Vanthe air in the converted store be, he declares. It should be about couver to Toronto to Halifax end space on East Hastings is moist, drawing people in, about equality. up without a place at the table. tropical. It’s another hot sumNot “focused on its own benefits In between elections, Consermer day in Vancouver and about but the benefits of all Canadians.” vatives have rewarded the minor200 people have jammed in to Marlene Yemchuk, a retired ity who voted for them with new listen to—or, more accurately, to civil servant, can’t wait. She’s fed policies aligned with their values experience and capture on their up with the Conservatives. She and a disproportionate share of the phones—Liberal Party leader Jus- thinks their policies on drugs are money for bridges, roads, musetin Trudeau, buoyant and off-putwrong. She favours marijuana ums, arts centres, and transit. It’s tingly good-looking, as he pumps legalization. She wants to see her accepted in the Lower Mainland as them up. They are the people who federal government do more for the an odd given—not even worth getunderstand what politics should environment. “And I want fairness ting outraged about—that reliably

Vancouver Versus Everybody

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VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

Jamie Yeung

T


FALL’S

NEW

MOOD EXCLUSIVELY OURS 1670 S H O P T H E B AY. C O M


VS.

THE

BRIEF CONSERVATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE DOLLARS VANCOUVER

(pop. 640,000, with one Conservative MP and mostly devout Liberal/NDP ridings) received the following from the $150-million Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund, 2012-2014:

$225,000 for the roof of the Bloedel Conservatory $225,000 for the rehabilitation of the Jericho Pier $651,000 for improvements to buildings and services run by ethnic associations the Conservatives are courting nationally

Turn the page to see what Conservativetargeted Surrey/White Rock got...

30

CONSTANCE BARNES

URBAN FIX

Civic Af fairs

HEDY FRY

Conservative Surrey will likely get federal money for its light-rail project from the Conservatives long before NDP- and Liberal-dominated Vancouver (whose ruling city government is a mix of the two) will ever see a dime for a Broadway subway. That’s even though the subway would carry 250,000 people the day it opens, possibly at a profit, while Surrey’s light rail likely will need to build ridership for a decade before it can break even on operating costs. Recent analyses of federal infrastructure grants showed that Tory ridings got far more than their fair share of the lolly. That was, in part, because the Tories have distributed more money from the small-communities program than from the programs targeted for large cities. But then again, that’s the point. The money went out to the little places first. The cities can wait to see what they’ll get after the election. Donald Savoie, a Université de Moncton professor whose upcoming book, What Is Government Good At?, looks at the dynamics of this lopsided approach, says the skewed distribution of government money has always been a fact of politics. But it’s become even more noticeable, because MPs see it as one of their core functions. “It’s because infrastructure is something that MPs understand and they see their role as being able to bring home the bacon to their riding. Programs that are visible are very vulnerable to partisan politics.” All governments do it, although Savoie says “the Harper government may be more sensitive to its core” and therefore more inclined to weight the rewards unevenly. Vancouver city councillor Raymond Louie, who is also president of the national Federation of

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

KEY BATTLEGROUND 2: VANCOUVER CENTRE Liberal MP Hedy Fry has won this dense urban riding since 1993, but not always with a majority. In 2011, the Conservatives and NDP had 15,000 votes apiece to her 18,000. If upstart NDP candidate Constance Barnes can tap into any late orange tide surge, the Liberal incumbency could fall

Canadian Municipalities, says one of the key requests the federation is making in the election is that whatever party is elected use a system for distributing money that is less of a lottery: “We’ve long recognized at the FCM that the superior model is allocation—it gives the surety to do proper planning.” As long as rural communities aren’t cut out of the deal, Louie wants money distributed on the basis of population, not according to a process where one federal department or another decides which rail line or bridge or highway has more “merit.” So far there are no promises from the Conservatives to do anything of the sort in future. But still, there is a whisper that the political strategy might shift in this election—that everyone, including Conservatives, might be paying more attention to cities, bastions of unreconstructed liberalism though they are. “I think all the parties will have to pay atten-

suburban are starting to look and sound more urban with every passing year, complete with the kinds of concerns that used to be just the territory of inner cities: transit, immigration, poverty, crime, high housing costs, and drug addiction. Those once-homogeneous dormitory satellites to the city are also seeing changes that are the result of federal policies and changing settlement patterns. Immigrants and refugees are now as likely to settle in suburbs as cities. Single people, once rare in the suburbs, are also part of the new mix. So are the homeless and the poor. “Increasingly, the problems of Vaughan are the problems of Toronto,” says York University political scientist Dennis Pilon, who knows B.C. well from years of teaching at the University of Victoria. And the problems of Surrey are not as dramatically different as they used to be from East Van. “Politically, there is

THERE IS A WHISPER THAT THE POLITICAL STRATEGY MIGHT SHIFT IN THIS ELECTION, THAT EVERYONE MIGHT BE PAYING MORE ATTENTION TO CITIES tion to the urban ridings this election,” says David Coletto, the CEO of Abacus Data, an Ontario-based polling firm that tracks urban attitudes and voting preferences. There are 30 new ridings in this election. Almost all of them are in urban areas where population is intensifying. Beyond that, neighbourhoods that used to be called

going to be more pressure on the Conservatives from exurbs and suburbs for the same kinds of support that central cities have had. I would expect them to pick a few marquee areas at the urban level and put some money in. Pouring money into transit—it crosses class boundaries.” And so, everyone in this


BRIEF

URBAN FIX

Civic Af fairs

HARJIT SINGH SAJJAN

election is playing more noticeably to urban voters. NDP leader Thomas Mulcair has promised cities another penny from the federal gas tax—something that could add new millions to cities’ transit and infrastructure budgets. The NDP has also promised a new minister for urban affairs, and $2 billion for co-op housing, a program beloved of cities in the 1970s and ’80s. Justin Trudeau is promising closer co-operation with cities, and he’s riding on the Liberal Party’s reputation as the party that poured money into city projects in the 1960s and ’70s, as post-war Canada was shifting from a rural nation to an urban one. (Of course, in the 1990s, then-Liberal finance minister Paul Martin killed the federal government’s housing program, a move widely seen as having contributed to the rise in homelessness and housing affordability problems in cities ever since.) Even Stephen Harper’s Conservative government took to making money announcements in the weeks before the election campaign started that were geared to cities. In June, a promise of $2.6 billion for the SmartTrack transit line in Toronto. In July, a promise of $1 billion for Ottawa transit. And then $1.53 billion for Calgary’s light-rail expansion.

VS.

VS.

AMANDEEP NIJJAR

In the new riding of Vancouver Granville—a strip of a riding that goes from the very dense quasidowntown neighbourhood of Fairview in the north through posh Shaughnessy and suburban-feeling Oakridge to working-class Marpole in the south—the candidates are hearing, and reflecting back, the big-city concerns that are preoccupying residents here. Both Liberal candidate Jody Wilson-Raybould (nominated and door-knocking since July 2014) and NDP candidate Mira Oreck (acclaimed for the nomination at a celebratory meeting at VanDusen Garden this past July) say they hear about one issue more than anything else: the cost of housing and the lack of political action at the federal level to do anything about it. In separate interviews, they echo oddly similar phrases about what people are telling them. “Eighty to 85 per cent that we speak to want a change,” says Wilson-Raybould. “Their voices are not being heard.” Oreck, who worked on campaigns in the past for Mayor Gregor Robertson, Vision Vancouver, and the B.C. NDP, says, “You see a lack of voice on urban issues across the country. So much of what was built up in our city was done with the federal government—co-op housing, infrastructure, transit, the all this money is only due Coast Guard.” Now people feel like to arrive long after the electhey’ve been cut adrift, to make tion, so not even cash in hand like their way as best they can. (In a the child-care benefit cheques. telling sign of how anxious each And, just the day before Harper party is to speak to city voters asked for Parliament to be disand capture this riding, the NDP solved so campaigning could start, and Liberal candidates each set his people even dropped some up interviews promptly for this funding into Vancouver—half a article. A representative for Erinn million each for upgrading the cen- Broshko, the riding’s Conservatral library and the seawall. tive candidate, promised to do the The new focus on urban is same, but never did call back.) playing out at the local level, too. But Vancouverites shouldn’t



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VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

KEY BATTLEGROUND 3: VANCOUVER SOUTH This was once a Liberal riding, but Conservative Wai Young wrested it away in 2011. It’s seen as a strong possibility for the Liberals to win back, especially after some public missteps by Young, like comparing Bill C-51 to the work of Jesus Christ

CONSERVATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE DOLLARS SURREY WHITE ROCK

(pop. 522,000, with one Conservative MP but more ridings considered attainable)

$250,215 for change rooms at the Surrey YMCA $42,800 for improvements to the Ocean Park Library $50,000 for improvements to the Cloverdale Library $202,385 for upgrades to water systems at four Surrey aquatic facilities $150,000 to help replace boilers and a cooling tower in Surrey facilities $110,738 to upgrade the Surrey Sport & Leisure Complex $40,300 to upgrade Bayview Park $250,000 for the Bridgeview Community Centre $112,000 for White Rock pier upgrades $150,000 for Guildford Community Centre and Library upgrades

get their hopes up too much about a tilting balance toward urban concerns. Political watchers say there are some peculiarities about Vancouver that the Conservatives have no interest in catering to, no matter how much they want urban votes. And even a Liberal or NDP government would need to tread cautiously. Vancouver’s out-ofwhack housing market, its citizens’ high interest in environmental issues, its liberal attitudes to drug policy—those are issues that are either so unique to this city, so distant from Ottawa, or just so antithetical to Conservative values that there will be no ground-shifting. “Vancouver has an added problem,” warns Savoie. “It’s thousands of miles away. It’s far from the minds of senior policy staff.” So Vancouver’s unique housing problems just aren’t pressing enough for people back east. The housing policy that Conservative voters like is low interest rates and other government breaks that help with buying. So Harper’s promises, once he started campaigning openly in August, were suburban-geared: more tax credits for home renovations and the ability to take out even more RRSP money for down payments; the latter is something financial experts say only helps push up demand and, therefore, prices in hot markets like Vancouver. (He did throw Vancouverites one bone, though, saying his new government would start collecting data on foreign ownership.) As for the environment? “That’s an issue most voters don’t make a priority. It’s far more prominent in B.C.,” he says. So that box won’t get ticked. And liberalized drug policy— the thing that Marlene Yemchuk cares about most? Forget it. “The Tories are never going to go near

Harjit Singh Sajjan: Adam Scotti

THE

WAI YOUNG


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IN SUPPORT OF drugs,� says David Coletto. Not supervised injection sites. Not legalized marijuana. None of it. Another long-time federal Liberal campaigner in Vancouver said before the campaign started that the Conservatives might even highlight their opposition to Vancouver’s drug policies in the election, because it can function as a morality play where they have the starring role for the many people elsewhere who are not as freethinking as Vancouverites. And behold, within two weeks of the campaign start, Harper was promising more money for crackdowns on drug labs and support for a hotline parents could call about youth drug use. He also made a point of reaffirming his opposition to supervised-injection sites when he travelled to (suburban) Richmond. Even if the Liberals or NDP win Vancouver Granville, even if Liberal or NDP candidates win all of the new 30 ridings, that isn’t necessarily going to translate to one of those more urban-centric parties forming government. Because there are still all the suburban ridings that are going to be the real battleground, the place where the federal election is decided. Whether Marlene Yemchuk and the voters of Vancouver Granville get what they want depends far less on what happens with Vancouver Granville than what happens in the ridings of many of the candidates that Trudeau had on stage with him on that steamy Thursday afternoon in July: people from Surrey and Delta and North Vancouver. It’s the suburban Liberal, NDP, and even Conservative candidates—more conscious than ever of urban problems—who are Vancouver’s best hope for a new voice for cities. VM

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BRIEF

THE ESSENTIALS

S t u f f You Should Do

T H E AT R E

A Light in the Darkness

Playwright Morris Panych discusses his latest work, a theatrical interpretation of Spirit of the West album The Waiting Room, itself inspired by group frontman John Mann’s struggle with cancer THE WAITING ROOM, OCT. 1 TO 31, GRANVILLE ISLAND STAGE

How did this project come about? John told me he had written an album of music about his journey with colorectal cancer. He asked if I was interested in doing a book [stage script] around the music, and I didn’t hesitate to say yes, without even hearing the album. John and I go a long way back as collaborators—aside from working together on different theatre projects, we used to get together to show each other our new work. What was your initial reaction to the music? While I’m pretty familiar with John’s music, it always surprises me: the depth of his ideas, the shape of his melodies, the sincerity, tenderness. John is a poet, first of all, which is what makes him such a good theatre collaborator. His songs have stories, drama, character… I knew, as I listened, that the songs could inspire a book.

34

How did that evolve as you worked on the play? I wanted to hear John’s story first-hand, so he came to visit me and stayed for a couple of days. We went through the main points of his cancer journey. He told many stories that aren’t in the songs. He gave me a very clear picture not only of the detail of his journey, but the emotional toll that it took on him—a toll that could only be exorcised by writing the album. Suddenly, the album made a great deal of sense, and it was this emotional impact that I knew I had to capitalize on. What was the biggest challenge of translating John’s album into a stage work in its own right? The biggest challenge, in many respects, is the strength of John’s songwriting. The songs are so completely selfcontained that it’s difficult to surround them with action

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

and dialogue. Luckily, I have done other shows that gave me some clues how I might approach the album.

S P E C TA C L E

BEND ME, SHAPE ME From Down Under, an unusual notion of what a circus can be GRAVITY & OTHER MYTHS: A SIMPLE SPACE OCT. 13-24, YORK THEATRE

How closely did you collaborate with John? In some respects I’m not a great collaborator. And John really writes his own stuff. So to put those two things together requires that we stay focused on what we both do best. The songs were already written when I started. I asked John to write one song, but I didn’t end up using it. What do you hope people will feel after the performance? I hope they feel inspired to go out and really live their lives. Life is so precious and short, one should value as much of it as they can, knowing that all struggles are living struggles and central to our existence as human beings. Artsclub.com

£ Logic-defying, stripped back, and intense, Gravity & Other Myths is Australia’s answer to the modern-day circus. Forget smoke and mirrors, elaborate costumes, and carefully choreographed distractions. Here, there are only bodies in motion—swinging and stalling in the air, and twisting in mind-boggling contortions. Thecultch.com

A Simple Space: Chris Hertzfeld

THE


OPERA

ROCK MUSIC

END TIMES Vancouver Opera bows out of year-round programming in style

Loverboy

Destroyer linchpin Dan Bejar gets a little amorous on his new album DESTROYER OCT. 17, COMMODORE BALLROOM

Fabiola Carranza; Tim Fuller; Ryan Gander. Courtesy the artist



dan bejar’s grumpy rock-star facade has just been blown apart. We’re talking about his latest album as Destroyer, Poison Season, ahead of taking it on tour, and the singer-songwriter is being chased out of the house by a gaggle of little kids yelling, “Uncle Danny! Uncle Danny!” He calls back “from a bunker,” where he’s hiding from them. This is far from expected, but Vancouver’s own Bejar is nothing if not contrary: Poison Season is as different from 2011’s sweet, poppy Kaputt as that album was a volte-face from everything that came before. Is it fair to describe this new offering as romantic? “I think I was shooting for that more than in the past,” he concedes. “There’s definitely a nod to the American romanticism of Duke Ellington and the classic American songbook.” The resulting soundscape is lush and cinematic—and potentially a challenge to pull off onstage. “It’s starting to freak me out a bit,” he says, laughing. He’s also not immune to the extra pressure a hometown gig can bring. “It’s easier when you roll into Iowa City and you know you have nothing else to think about except the music. Vancouver brings tons of distractions. I always sweat the bigger shows.” Ticketmaster.ca

RIGOLETTO, QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE. FEB. 12

£ Vancouver Opera’s final full season

Earlier this year, VO announced that

begins with a favourite: Verdi’s tale of

along with the retirement of its artistic

court jester Rigoletto, eaten up with bit-

director, James Wright, at the end of

terness and fury when his boss, the Duke,

the 2015/16 season, the company would

seduces Gilda, his daughter. International

retire its year-round programming, opt-

baritone superstar Gordon Hawkins (last

ing for a two-week festival from 2017

seen locally in Tosca) and his awe-inspir-

onward. The Canadian premiere of

ing bel canto take on the title role. He’s

New York wunderkind Nico Muhly’s

joined by the rising star that is Vancou-

Dark Sisters aside, this final hurrah is an

ver-born soprano Simone Osborne, and

indisputably populist one, with the return

directed by Vancouver Opera regular

of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly and a

Nancy Hermiston (also director of UBC

production of the evergreen Evita.

Opera Ensemble).

Vancouveropera.ca

VISUAL ART

Magnus Opus Ryan Gander 2013

LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP An artist thrives on benevolent provocation

RYAN GANDER: MAKE EVERY SHOW LIKE IT’S YOUR LAST

TO NOV. 1, CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY

£ At British conceptual artist Ryan

Gander may be playful and culturally

Gander’s new show, a pair of animatronic

eclectic, but he’s also deeply controver-

eyes stare down from the wall, eyebrows

sial. He refuses to explain his works and

wiggling. “Spectators go in to art galleries

says that much of what he tells inter-

and make judgmental decisions,” Gander

viewers are lies made up on the spot. To

told the BBC. “So I thought it would be

respond to his art, he recommends we get

nice that the institution is given the ability

back in touch with our kid selves—feel-

to critique as well.” Elsewhere, a bronze

ing first, before thinking—to experience

Degas-inspired ballerina is allowed to

looking without fear. “You can choose to

relax, perching on a ledge, also looking

engage or not,” he says.

down on the gallery’s visitors.

Contemporaryartgallery.ca

O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

35


THE

CO-STARRING THE CITY THE LIKES OF HYCROFT

BRIEF

MANOR AND ROEDDE HOUSE MUSEUM SERVED AS SETS FOR EADWEARD. OTHER SCENES WERE SHOT

THE ESSENTIALS

IN ABBOTSFORD, PORT MOODY, AND SQUAMISH

S t u f f You Should Do

FILM

You Oughta Be in Pictures

A new Vancouver-made movie celebrates the man who basically invented them ROOTS & WORLD MUSIC

EADWEARD, FROM OCT. 16, VANCIT Y THEATRE

A POCKETFUL OF RY One of modern music’s most omnivorous guitarists visits the city twice: once in body, once in spirit ??Lŏīŏb$&TŏīŏP0

OCT. 8, VOGUE THEATRE

BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB OCT. 1, CHAN SHUN CONCERT HALL

£ Legendary guitar poly-

members of Cuba’s Buena

math Ry Cooder shares the

Vista Social Club to interna-

Vogue stage with a combo

tional attention. This, their

made in country and blue-

farewell Adiós tour, features

grass heaven. He’s teamed

a 13-strong lineup perform-

up with Grand Ole Opry

ing the collective’s sizzling

members (and husband

big-band fusion of mambo,

and wife) Ricky Skaggs and

Afro-Cuban, cha-cha-chá,

Sharon White, along with

and more. Sadly, many of

White’s 84-year-old pianist

the original members have

dad, Buck, and Cooder’s son,

passed away, including the

Joachim, on drums for good

remarkable Ibrahim Ferrer,

measure. Together, they’ll

leaving the wonderful octo-

spend the night plundering

genarian songstress Omara

American roots and gospel

Portuondo to hold the torch.

music that many a chicken

“Though he is not here,” she

shack and church has heard

told The Guardian, “the love

over the years.

and affection of this great

Cooder may not be play-

friendship is still alive. It still

ing with them, but he was

lasts.” Voguetheatre.com,

instrumental in bringing the

Chancentre.com

36

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

actors kyle rideout and josh epstein were touring as part of Bodies in Motion, Electric Company Theatre’s acclaimed play based on the life and work of Eadweard Muybridge, when they realized there was no movie dedicated to the so-called “godfather of cinema.” Already working on a different screenplay together, the pair quickly put that aside and optioned Kevin Kerr’s play. The result, Eadweard, was directed by Rideout and cowritten by Epstein, and shot locally. Within two days of the trailer being posted on YouTube, it broke 200,000 views. Born in 1830, Muybridge is famous for having devised ways of photographing bodies—human and animal—in motion, lining up a row of cameras to capture image after image as the subject passed before them. Viewed through his invention, the zoopraxiscope, the appearance of continuous motion was achieved. His cameras and archives, held at the University of Philadelphia, were opened up for the filmmakers. A cast that includes several local thespians is led by Michael Eklund in the title role, who, apart from being able to turn a phrase, proved reliably hirsute. “That was the biggest worry for me,” Rideout admits. “We needed an actor who could grow and maintain Muybridge’s huge beard. I couldn’t even imagine trying to fake it.” Viff.org/theatre

BVSC: Alejandro Gonzalez




SPONSORED REPORT

Cosy and luxurious space for couples, or small groups

BACCHUS RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 845 Hornby Street (at the Wedgewood Hotel)

Managing Director of the Relais & Châteaux Wedgewood Hotel and Spa, Elpie Marinakis-Jackson & Bacchus Food and Beverage Manager, Edward Sweetman

Bacchus Restaurant and Lounge Embrace retro cool at Bacchus

T

ransport yourself into indulgent luxury at Bacchus Restaurant and Lounge, where the lush leather chairs, velvet sofas and relaxedyet-refined atmosphere would fit naturally in an episode of Mad Men. But despite the high standards the restaurant sets for itself (and often surpasses) there’s no pomp and circumstance here, only an elegant and rich experience that won’t be found anywhere else in Vancouver. Located in the beautiful Wedgewood Hotel and Spa, Bacchus is an award-winning contemporary modern French restaurant (awarded “Silver, Best French Upscale 2015” by Vancouver magazine) that is indulgent in the best way possible, with menu items like Roasted Rack of Lamb and Haida Gwaii Halibut that will have the pleasure centres of your brain firing on all cylinders. The breathtaking cocktail bar, big bold and inviting, is the cherry on top of one of the city’s most distinguished rooms. At the helm of the kitchen is a talented team of chefs with European culinary experience at some of the finest restaurants and five-star hotels around the world. Bacchus uses fresh seasonal ingredients to create delicious dishes that are only matched by the impeccable and thoughtful service that makes dining out an experience to be celebrated. Food and Beverage Manager Edward Sweetman ensures that the wine list is stacked with exciting new vintages and old favourites alike. As the only Relais & Châteaux hotel in Vancouver, the Wedgewood has enjoyed run-away success for its excellence in customer service by a team of professionals that make guests feel welcomed and comfortable. Managing Director Elpie Marinakis-Jackson, who for the past 20 years has lived and breathed the Wedgewood Hotel and Spa, looks to continue the service and the standards that her family and the hotel are known for. Created by the Vancouver magazine advertising department in partnership with Bacchus Restaurant and Lounge at the Wedgewood Hotel

604.608.5319 wedgewoodhotel.com

MENU HIGHLIGHTS

BEST OF THE CELLAR

APPETIZERS Hawaiian Ahi Tuna Tartar Yuzu, nori aïoli, cucumber, sesame cracker

CHAMPAGNE Veuve Clicquot ‘Grande Dame’ Brut, 1998 Louis Roederer ‘Cristal’ Brut, 2000/2002 Krug Vintage Brut, 1996

Marinated Mozzafina Heirloom tomatoes, arugula, cold pressed olive oil, garlic crostini MAIN COURSE Pan Seared Fillet of Haida Gwaii Halibut Caramelized cauliflower, nugget potato, asparagus, salted grapes, verjus sauce Center Cut “AAA” Alberta Beef Tenderloin Pomme dauphinoise, spinach, roasted heirloom carrots, red wine jus LUNCH & LOUNGE Bacchus Cobb Salad Grilled chicken breast, hearts of romaine, crisp iceberg, cherry tomato, bacon, crumbled blue cheese, ripe avocado, egg, lemon dressing Pizza Funghi Shiitake, button and oyster mushrooms, caramelized onion and goat cheese PLATES TO SHARE B.C. Cheese and Charcuterie house-made pickles and preserves Bacchus Kennebec Frites Mustard, truffle and parmesan aioli

WHITE Felton Road Chardonnay, Otago, N.Z., 2009 Foxtrot Vineyards Chardonnay, Naramata Bench, B.C., 2011 Vincent Girardin ‘Les Navraux’ Meursault, Côte d’Or, 2010 Domaine Michelot Meursault Charmes 1er Cru, Côte d’Or, 2009 Aldo Conterno ‘Bussiador’ Langhe, Italy, 2009 RED Foxtrot Vineyards ‘Reserve’ Naramata Bench, B.C., 2011 Kosta Browne ‘Gap’s Crowne’ Sonoma County, California, 2011 Signorello Estate Napa County, California, 2010 Château Haut-Bergey PessacLéognan, Bordeaux, 1998 Château Canon Saint Emilion Grand Cru Classé, 2005 Louis Jadot ‘Clos de Chênes’ Volnay 1er Cru C. de Nuits, 2006 Gaja ‘Conteisa’ Langhe Nebbiolo, Piedmont, 2008

Pan Seared Fillet of Haida Gwaii Halibut: Caramelized cauliflower, nugget potato, asparagus, salted grapes, and verjus sauce


PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRUCE LAW

SPONSORED REPORT


BBQ DUCK CLUBHOUSE peking duck, roasted chicken, prosciutto di modena, pecan fruit bread.


TA S T E M A K ER

THE DECANTER

THE FOOD ISSUE

“I suppose it could be perceived as being a little mercenary, but it’s really not about that. For me, I think I just needed to keep challenging myself”

THE

PG. 82

Hot restaurants, food trends, wines & chefs

Patience is a Virtue



one year ago, vikram vij graced the cover of our third annual Food Issue. The accompanying profile detailed a period of great forward momentum in the life of the beloved restaurateur and his wife, Meeru Dhalwala, whose recipes helped make Vij’s perhaps the most acclaimed Indian restaurant in North America. Among many other activities, they were continuing to renovate a Cambie Street space (acquired in 2008) that would house a new, larger, more deluxe Vij’s. It was projected to open this past January. Fast-forward to August, when Vij declared to us that—fingers crossed—it would finally open in late September. “It’s going to be called Vij’s Lantern,” he says of the building, its name a reference to the dining room’s lit-from-within glow. (The restaurant itself will remain, simply, Vij’s.) Meanwhile, Dhalwala assures those who worry that the Cambie spot might stray too far from the longtime Vij’s signature charms: “It’s the same family. It’s just as if the family is having a new baby.”

VISIT

Andrew Q Querner

VANMAG.COM/EAT

Vij’s paneer and cashew “truffles” and fennel-seed curry on zucchini, potatoes, and yellow squash

TO READ THE FULL TRANSCRIPTS OF OUR INTERVIEWS WITH DHALWALA AND VIJ

O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

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TA S T E M A K E R

Recently Reviewed

PULL QUOTEQUAM SAPIDENIS SAM FUGIAM ERES ESEQUIST, NON NULPA SIM RE PREPERIS RERERUM REIUR ALIS ET, VOLUPTAE. NEMPOREICIUM

The Neu Thing

annual Golden Raspberry Awards gave him the prize for Worst Career Achievement in 2009), and almost as well known for responding to Infamous filmmaker Uwe Boll believes upscale German dining is what Vancouver his critics with expletive-laden screeds. Prior to its opening, execuneeds. Will the masses agree? tive chef Stefan Hartmann told the by timothy taylor || photos by luis valdizon Globe and Mail that Boll’s aim was for Bauhaus to be “the No. 1 restaurant in Vancouver.” bauhaus opened amid considIt’s not—not yet, anyway. But erable fanfare in May, and the you should try it because of HartGerman-themed restaurant has mann, a Michelin-starred Berlin received plenty of attention since import whom we’re lucky to have in then—as much for the words and town for however long this enteractions of its proprietor, German prise lasts. (More on that later.) -born filmmaker Uwe Boll, as My party of three sat near the for the food it serves. Boll is best open kitchen to watch it in action, known for being deemed the which is quite unlike the madworld’s worst living director (a scientists’ lair at Farmer’s Apprendistinction made official when the tice or the pleasantly chaotic

B

42

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

flame-geysering one sees through the pass at AnnaLena. Here, there is very little crashing and banging, and not much flame either. Sauces are built by the tablespoon. Immersion blenders quietly whir. Bags of protein are tonged silently from a sous-vide bath. You may hear the faint sound of Hartmann expediting orders. Other than that, there’s a kind of poised calm I don’t normally associate with busy kitchens. That said, the place does smell great: light burnt-caramel scents, toast, fennel, something being seared. The bathrooms may boast art by Spanish graffiti duo Olliemoonsta (featuring the highly improbable assertion “Bauhaus in da hood”), but the rest of the place


EXECUTIVE CHEF STEFAN HARTMANN EARNED A COVETED MICHELIN STAR FOR HIS BERLIN RESTAURANT, HARTMANNS. UNMANAGEABLE DEBT LED TO ITS CLOSURE LAST YEAR, ALLOWING BOLL TO BRING HIM TO VANCOUVER

Clockwise from opposite page: halibut with market beans and tomatoes; black cod with mussels and root vegetables; executive chef Stefan Hartmann; the dining room during dinner service; a dessert of chocolate, cherries, berries, and meringue; beef two ways

THE

WHAT YOU GET AT BAUHAUS IS PRECISION, TECHNIQUE, AND GREAT ATTENTION TO DETAIL is a subtle undertaking. And that will either delight or disappoint you as the plates start to arrive. Don’t expect bold. Don’t stand by for mind-blowing innovation or umami explosions. What you get at Bauhaus is precision, technique, and great attention to detail. This was apparent from the moment our amuse-bouche arrived: three little quenelles filled, respectively, with avocado, eggplant, and roasted-cabbage purée, plus a snip of rye cracker topped with a very thin slice of radish. All were understated but delicious (and all the better for being accompanied by a bottle of Aecht Schlenkerla

TICKET BAUHAUS 1 W. Cordova St., 604-974-1147 HOURS Lunch 11:30am2:30pm (weekdays only). Dinner 5:30-10:30pm (until midnight Fri.-Sat.). Closed Tuesdays PRICES A Michelin-starred chef’s cooking doesn’t come cheap here: the menu’s least-expensive main at the time of this writing was $33. A tasting menu is $110 NOTES If you want to sample the kitchen’s talents without breaking the bank, try the “imbisse” (bar food) menu, which is priced under $20 per dish. The German beer selection is very good

O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

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Divine Sturgeon The Kobe Beef of Fish

THE

DISH

TA S T E M A K E R

Recently Reviewed

Schnitzel with potato and cucumber salads

Aged to perfection. Delicate taste. Meaty Texture.

Local. Sustainable. Certified Organic. from the crafters of

northerndivine.com Enjoy at Blue Water Cafe in Yaletown

OLD WORLD ELEGANCE... NEW WORLD EDGE!

Signature 2012

Look for our wines at your favourite wine shop or restaurant. Buy from our OnLine store: closdusoleil.ca Visit our tasting room: 2568 Upper Bench Rd, Keremeos, BC Open 7 days a week (250) 499-2831 @Closdusoleil 44

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

Rauchbier smoked beer). This was a theme that carried on through the appetizers. Guinea fowl was served two ways: the breast sous-vide and the leg fried. Apple purée, salty-sweet walnuts, and a cute little cube of celeriac cake were perfectly balanced accompaniments. My favourite of the starters was black cod in a brightly acidic broth, alive with dill and saline flavours. Ask for a spoon to enjoy it fully, and join me in being surprised that the wine foam actually added something and wasn’t just a fanciful flourish. Mains were similar in their technical perfection and elegant flavour profiles. Veal top round was cooked sous-vide and served along with a seared piece from the cheeks. The top round was muted in flavour until I swirled it through the braising reduction, but its accompanying brioche dumpling with bitter greens offered the right harmonizing notes. Halibut was, again, precisely cooked—the flesh moist, the skin brought to a perfect crisp in a hot pan. If there was an anomalous dish on our table, it was the highly touted schnitzel. The only really obvious German dish, it comes cut huge over ample

portions of potato and cucumber salads. My kid devoured it and was reluctant to share. That said, I question whether schnitzel anywhere should cost $35. Which brings me to a couple of closing points. Bauhaus could stand to be much more German. On our visit, the experience was more Michelin than Munich. And maybe if it were more German, and more distinct in Vancouver as a result—where our German cuisine options have dwindled almost to zero with the sad demise of Cafe Katzenjammer—it would justify the cost of visiting. As it stands, the prices just feel like someone is trying to make a point. (Great veal dish, but $73 when enjoyed with a glass of wine?) Knock yourself out over lunch with a client or a date you want to impress. But I doubt Bauhaus will become anyone’s HQ any time soon, and I worry for its longevity as a result. On a Wednesday night less than two months after opening, I counted maybe two dozen customers in a room built for more than a hundred. And that has to make you wonder how long Bauhaus and exciting newcomer Stefan Hartmann will actually survive in da hood. VM


THAI RESTAU RANT ( on Burrard)

B R I E F LY N O T E D

Mission 2042 W. Fourth Ave., 604-739-2042 £ Blessed be the stealth arrival of Mission, quietly entrenched in an unassuming Fourth Avenue grotto. Diners are welcomed upon arrival with genuine warmth. If the cozy whitebrick room under arched cathedral ceilings is full, staff might suggest you

Immerse yourself in the great tradition of classic and authentic Thai dining.

try nearby Fable—owners Curtis Luk (chef) and Chase MacLeod (sommelier/GM) both worked there. Begin with a well-crafted cocktail

Catering, Take-out and Delivery orders available. Fully Licensed. Semi-Private & Private Room Booking Options.

as an introduction to the restaurant’s farm-to-table/root-to-stem/nose-totail orthodoxies, which shine through every bite and sip without ever getting

102-888 Burrard Street | 604.683.7999 | salathai.ca Friday-Saturday 11:30am-10:30pm, Sunday-Thursday 11:30am-10:00pm

preachy. You could choose à la carte, but guests are encouraged to try the tasting menus (available in four or six courses, both with vegetarian versions]. We concur. At $45 and $65, these exquisite cannonades—replete with house-made bread, amusebouche, and palate-cleansing sorbet— are the best haute deals in town. Even on the meat menu, vegetables—foraged mushrooms, textured potatoes, sweet turnips and their tips—make heroic advances. VM

“At Temper, our philosophy is to ensure our customers will encounter an experience that will leave your taste buds wanting more.”

Brittany Gill

In the picturesque seaside village of Dundarave, West Vancouver, our gourmet chocolate and pastry shop offers only the finest in culinary delights including sandwiches, soups, BC wines and craft beers.

604.281.1152 2409 MARINE DRIVE WEST VANCOUVER Open 7 days a week 8am-5pm temperpastry.com O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

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THE DECANTER

£D J K E A R N E Y

Wines Discovered

High Achievers

ZUCCARDI SERIE A TORRONTÉS 2014



The mile-high tilted plateau of Cafayate, Argentina, is home to the world’s loftiest vineyards. Torrontés vines ripen slowly at 1,800 metres above sea level, developing intense gardenia perfume and stone-fruit flavours on a rich, waxy palate with sizzling acidity

MORE SK YSCRAPERS

($18.49)

($86.99)

Wines produced from mountain-grown grapes are the result of a special magic that occurs between soil and sky mountains impose unique conditions for winegrowing, and like the term “cool-climate,” “altitude” is a new buzzword in the world of wine. Mountain vineyards tend to be rugged and exposed, often with thin, nutrient-deficient soils that cause vines to struggle. But in wine, a little hardship can be a very good thing. Stress forces vines to send their roots deeper, producing fewer bunches of grapes with smaller berries that deliver greater concentration of flavour. Altitude also brings amplified sunlight intensity for more ripening energy, and thicker skins with more colour and tannins. The result is a more mature fruit with greater complexity. Slopes, too, provide an advantage to grape growing that the ancients noticed millenniums ago: both air and water flow down slopes, keeping roots well drained (which is essential) while downdraft breezes cool the vines. In hot regions like Argentina, nighttime baths of fresh air keep acids bright and put the brakes on premature ripening. Growers in Argentina, Australia, and Sicily are increasingly seeking the cooling effects of highaltitude vineyards to sharpen acids and intensify fruit. Here are four lovely examples of their efforts, all imbued with the special magic of the mountains. VM

46

ETNA ROSSO PIETRADOLCE VIGNA BARBAGALLI 2011

MCWILLIAM’S APPELLATION SERIES TUMBARUMBA CHARDONNAY 2013

($19.99) In mineral-rich soils born of Mount Etna’s persistent explosions, near-centenarian nerello mascalese vines cling to 900-metre-high terraces. This is mesmerizing wine with a smoky, floral fragrance, wild strawberry flavour, and a long finish

Cool sunshine bathes chardonnay vines grown at 500 to 800 metres, at the western edge of Australia’s Snowy Mountains. Aromas of lemon oil, vanilla, and brown butter introduce a rich yet tense palate of citrus curd and spicy oak

CATENA HIGH MOUNTAIN VINES MALBEC 2012 ($21.79) £ Cannonau is the Sardinian name for the Spanish grape garnacha (grenache in French), and this mellow but gutsy red delivers a mouthful of plummy fruit, a punch of spice, and a dusty finish. Make sure you inhale its captivating fragrance before you sip

BEST

CELLAR

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

£ Erudite, cool-cat wine guy Neil Ingram ran lauded wine programs at Lumière and Boneta, and he now treads the burnished boards at Cinara (350 W. Pender St., 604-428-9694), where his brilliant list is seeded with mountain-grown gems to match chef/owner Lucais Syme’s immaculate flavours.


BRUNCH Saturday & Sunday, 11:00 am – 2:30 pm DINNER Monday to Thursday, and Sunday, 5:00 pm – 9:30 pm Friday and Saturday, from 5:00 pm – 10:00 pm 2229 Folkestone Way West Vancouver T: 604.926.3212 F: 604.926.8539 info@salmonhouse.com salmonhouse.com

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An amazing and innovative new community is emerging on the North Shore...the “Spirit Trail Floating Village”...spacious custombuilt Ocean Homes and Yacht Homes...experience the convenience of central city living with the enjoyment of a waterfront lifestyle... Built to order from $686,000 (including tax)

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SPONSORED REPORT

WEST COAST Urban Living

The Lower Mainland’s real estate chatter isn’t going away anytime soon. And with these gorgeous new developments popping up around town chances are you won’t be, either. VANCOUVER

A big city skyline, a small town vibe, and these new projects on the way—it’s no wonder our seaside metropolis is adored around the world.

35 PARK WEST

4963, 5033 & 5077 Cambie Street, Vancouver Units: 183 condominium residences Project completion: Late 2017 Distance to city centre: s By car 14 min s By transit 19 min s By bike 20 min INFO Washington Properties has epitomized sophisticated Westside living at 35 Park West, their latest development in the heart of the coveted Queen Elizabeth Park enclave. The cascading solid concrete design by IBI Group features 9- and 10-foot ceilings (with floor-to-ceiling windows no less), large private decks and rooftop terraces, and design-rich details by Cristina Oberti Interior Design that infuse the one-, two- and three-bedroom floor plans with modern elegance. Bright kitchens are adorned with premium stainless steel Miele appliances, sleek modern cabinetry, solid quartz countertops and a stunning marble backsplash, while gorgeous Kohler fixtures and porcelain tile fill the spacious, spa-like bathrooms. Open landscaped courtyards built within each of the three buildings provide homes with maximum light, extensive outdoor space and a quiet park-side setting, adding a final touch of comfort to the sophisticated new development. BUYER BREAKDOWN 35 Park West captures the allure of the unique Westside lifestyle. Empty nesters looking to downsize into a spacious, high-quality residence, and young buyers looking for a stylish newer, bigger, more luxurious home, will find themselves drawn to this striking Cambie community. AMENITIES Just across the street from the beautiful Queen Elizabeth Park and high-end retailers at Oakridge Centre, 35 Park West also includes central air conditioning, a fitness centre and a social space complete with a media centre, billiards room and full kitchen.

1555 WEST EIGHTH

1555 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver Units: 20 executive residences Project completion: August 2017 Distance to city centre: 6 min s By car s By transit 10 min s By bike 16 min INFO For over two decades Kenstone Properties has been committed to building progressive living spaces that stand the test of time. Their latest project, 1555 West Eighth, is perfect proof. The South Granville development features architecture and interiors by internationally acclaimed OMB that reflect the contemporary-meets-classic aesthetic of one of Vancouver’s most coveted neighbourhoods. The timeless, minimalist design is striking with exterior metal cladding and exceptional interior finishes. These bright three-bedroom homes range from 1,644 to 1,882 square feet and include several city, mountain and ocean views. BUYER BREAKDOWN Home to many of Vancouver’s best boutiques, galleries and eateries—all within walking distance of Granville Island, downtown Vancouver, the Seawall and an array of parks and beaches—1555 West Eighth is ideal for young executive families, downsizers, and professional couples of all ages. FEATURES A unique floorplan and clever exterior landscaping maximize nature, light and privacy for all 20 homes in this one-of-a-kind building.

Created by the Vancouver advertising department in partnership with 35 Park West and 1555 West Eighth


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SPONSORED REPORT KITS POINT

7800 Oak Street, ,Vancouver Units: 41 townhome residences Project completion: 2017 Distance to city centre: s By car 15 min s By transit 32 min s By bike 36 min INFO Located on Oak Street at Park Drive is Alabaster Homes’ landmark project. Acclaimed Robert Ciccozzi Architecture combines striking black-andwhite exteriors with textured brick and wrought-iron stylistic details for a classy take on modernity. BUYER BREAKDOWN Within walking distance of top-ranked schools, parks and the Oakridge Marpole Community Centre, Oak & Park is perfect for young families and active downsizers. AMENITIES Each home includes a basement flex room with direct access to underground parking.

1880 McNicoll Avenue, Vancouver Units: 3-bedroom home + den/loft Project completion: Complete Distance to city centre: 8 min s By car s By transit 18 min s By bike 15 min

ONE BURRARD PLACE

Architects and a 235,000-square-foot office complex designed by Bing Thom Architects, all thoughtfully finished by OMB. The development—featuring the third-tallest tower in the city at a remarkable 60 stories—will take over an entire city block, drastically impacting the Vancouver skyline and revitalizing the Burrard slope area. The 800+ units will provide stunning views of the city centre, surrounding landscapes and unprecedented amenity access. BUYER BREAKDOWN A wide range of residence styles, from micro-lofts to large penthouses, make One Burrard Place suited to first-time buyers, upgrading homeowners, local downsizers and everyone in between. AMENITIES One Burrard Place offers never-before-seen five-star amenities including 24/7 butler concierge service, a private shopping salon, on-demand chefs serving a private dining room and outdoor long-table space, temperature-controlled wine storage with on-site sommelier services, a fitness centre, weight room and stretching lounge, a swimming pool, massage treatment rooms, a child-friendly play area and more.

OSLER RESIDENCES

INFO This stunning open-concept home is designed to entertain thanks to the large kitchen’s solid marble island and top-ofthe-line appliances and the great room’s collapsing glass doors, which open over a large patio and garden. The master suite—one of three full bedrooms— includes a walk-in closet and spa-like ensuite, perfect for at-home pampering. BUYER BREAKDOWN Kits Point combines a neighbourhood emphasis with city and ocean access for an active Vancouver family of any make-up. AMENITIES Beyond the unbeatable beach access, this home includes a three-car underground garage, well-equipped rec room and gorgeous rooftop deck.

OAK & PARK

8500 Osler Street, Vancouver Project completion: 2016 Distance to city centre: 17 min s By car s By transit 32 min s By bike 39 min 1281 Hornby Street, Vancouver Units: 800+ residences Project completion: TBD Distance to city centre: s By car 5 min s By transit 9 min s By bike 6 min INFO Vancouver mogul Jim Pattison has partnered with Reliance Properties Ltd. to develop a spectacular new three-building project in the downtown core and take living large to a whole new level. One Burrard Place will feature two residential towers designed by IBI

INFO Designed by esteemed Formwerks Architectural, Osler Residences is an exclusive collection of traditionally designed townhomes inspired by the grand mansions of nearby Shaughnessy. BUYER BREAKDOWN Osler is well-suited for families looking to relocate near topranked school, as well as local downsizers. AMENITIES The three- and four-bedroom townhomes will feature spacious entertainment rooms, direct access to parking, modern interiors and premium finishes.

Created by the Vancouver advertising department in partnership with Kits Point, Oak & Park, One Burrard Place and Osler Residences


SPONSORED REPORT THE JERVIS

THE NORTH SHORE

If the address of your dreams sits halfway between city centre and mountain escape, the North Shore is for you. These stunning properties are just the icing on the lush, emerald cake.

GROSVENOR AMBLESIDE

AMENITIES All suites feature future-ready technology by Millson and each building will have its own dedicated 24-hour concierge team, private residents’ lounge, fully equipped fitness centre, yoga space, private enclosed garages and stunning terraces. Performances by the Kay Meek Centre for the Performing Arts will take place under Grosvenor Ambleside’s impressive covered galleria.

THE ARGYLE

Corner of Davie & Jervis, Vancouver Units: 58 homes Project completion: Spring 2018 Distance to city centre: 7 min s By car s By transit 14 min s By bike 7 min INFO The Jervis sees Intracorp and Inform, two time-tested Vancouver companies, merge their extraordinary development expertise and aesthetic sensibilities for the first time. The result is an intimate collection of design-led homes that reflect contemporary luxury and embody the ultimate Vancouver lifestyle. Intracorp’s forward-thinking build fits right in along the gorgeous tree-lined streets, while a single step inside one of the two-bed, two-bath homes proves the visionary influence of Inform’s renowned Niels and Nancy Bendtsen. Located in the heart of the textured West End, the striking development’s prime location capitalizes on city centre convenience without sacrificing the comforting welcome of a true neighbourhood vibe. NSDA Architects and Richard Henry Architect have partnered with Trepp Design Inc. to create the modern new community made for living. Founded on Inform’s designfirst philosophy, The Jervis sets out to prove that “design impacts everybody every day.” BUYER BREAKDOWN The Jervis combines the convenience of downtown living with the colourful history of the West End, just around the corner from a selection of Vancouver’s finest beaches, making it the perfect place for passionate Vancouverites seeking an upscale design-driven home and full-time access to the big city’s many amenities.

PH 9 – 2142 Argyle Ave Dundarave, West Vancouver Units: 1 penthouse Project completion: Complete Distance to city centre: 25 min s By car s By transit 35 min s By bike 34 min 1340 Marine Drive, West Vancouver Units: 98 suites total (57 in Phase I, 41 in Phase II) Phase 1 completion: 2017 Phase 2 completion: 2019 Distance to city centre: s By car 14 min s By transit 21 min s By bike 29 min INFO Designed for the ultimate West Coast lifestyle, with Italian cabinetry by Snaidero custom-configured for each residence and seamlessly integrated indoor-outdoor spaces, Grosvenor Ambleside establishes a new standard of attention to detail and quality befitting the prestigious West Vancouver waterfront. The two building, six- and seven-story terraced mixed-use development include street level retail which will create an engaging streetscape of shops, cafes, art and music. The James KM Cheng Architects project, featuring interiors by Mitchell Freedland Design, public art by Douglas Coupland and residential lobby art by Gordon Smith, is already over 60% sold. BUYER BREAKDOWN Existing West Van residents looking to downsize from singlefamily homes have shown overwhelming interest.

INFO Floor-to-ceiling windows herald 360-degree views from this lavish 3,400-square-foot property—all within walking distance of West Van’s amenities—making it the finest waterfront penthouse on the market. BUYER BREAKDOWN This home exudes oceanside luxury. With space for a family, privacy for a couple and proximity to the seawall, mountains and city, the rest is up to you. AMENITIES A large media room, state-ofthe-art kitchen and wine cellar, open-plan living and dining area, extensive outdoor decks, fully electronic light and window covering system, air conditioning, two fireplaces and a four-car garage… Are we dreaming?

Whether you’re searching for the perfect first home, a hip downtown pad or a luxurious waterfront view, Vancouver’s real estate scene is prime for the taking.

Created by the Vancouver advertising department in partnership with The Jervis, Grosvenor Ambleside and The Argyle


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THE ARGYLE PH 9 - 2142 Argyle Avenue Dundarave, West Vancouver Penthouse $9,650,000

HARVEY KARDOS c: 604.328.3499 t: 604.925.2911 e: harvey@harveykardos.com For more pictures and details visit harveykardos.com

JOHN KARDOS c: 604.613.4841 t: 604.913.4014 e: john@johnkardos.ca For more pictures and details visit johnkardos.ca

Royal LePage Sussex 2397 Marine Drive West Vancouver


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SPONSORED REPORT

THE

SUMMER SOCIAL

On July 8th, your favourite city magazine celebrated the sweetest season at our annual summer social. Hosted by Cactus Club Cafe Coal Harbour and the one and only Chef Rob Feenie, the night was a reminder why Vancouver is unrivaled when the sun shines and the North Shore mountains soar.

Vancouver’s Edwin Rizarri, senior sales manager Western Canada (left), Eve Abrams, account manager.

Vancouver’s Judy Johnson, account manager (left) with Western Living’s Corinne Gillespie, account manager, Gabriella Sepulveda, sales coordinator, Dale McCarthy, business development manager and Carly Tsering, account manager.

Vancouver’s Jenny Reed, assistant art director (left), Tom Gierasimczuk, publisher and Naomi MacDougall, associate art director.


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FOOD ISSUE

Please enjoy

Photo: Carlo Ricci; Styling: Juno Kim

Going out for a meal—whether a quick, cheap bite or a multicourse tasting menu—is virtually our city’s official sport. Here, we celebrate the award-winning talents who create our gastronomic memories and the dining public that eats it all up

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ORDER UP! “Where do you like to eat?” It’s a question we ask— and are asked to answer—countless times throughout our lives. Several factors inform favourite dining destinations: service, convenience, nostalgia, and (of course) taste. But more often than not, a combination of each of these elements influences where we end up going time and again. We asked some colourful Vancouverites to tell us where their appetite leads them when the choice is theirs to make. photos by ca rlo ricci


Gloria Macarenko HOST, CBC RADIO AND TELEVISION

margherita pizza from Nicli Antica Pizzeria 62 E. Cordova St., 604-669-6985 “There’s something about the simplicity of the flavours in the margherita pizza here that just keeps me coming back. I’ve tried Neapolitan-style pizzas around town, but I’ve yet to sample anything that compares. The secret is to eat it while it’s hot and gooey in the middle. And for me, a little splash of rosemary-infused olive oil delivers pizza perfection every time.”

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Ryan Holmes FOUNDER/CEO, HOOTSUITE

“schranke-style” currywurst from Bestie, 105 E. Pender St., 604-620-1175 “Who doesn’t automatically love a restaurant with a neon blue sausage out front? I love Bestie’s delicious, simple comfort foods. Lately I’ve been trying out their rotating feature dishes, and the veggie Schranke currywurst today was awesome. I try to opt for vegetarian or local choices when I can.”

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Osric Chau ACTOR, SUPERNATURAL, 2012, AND MORE

golden temple soup with noodles from Chau Veggie Express, 5052 Victoria Dr., 604-568-9508 “I’ve been through some vegetarian phases, but not currently. I just like that this is a good old mom-and-pop shop. These noodles are amazing. They’re definitely worth the trip.”


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The Sunday Service COMEDIANS

pretty much everything from Duffin’s Donuts, 1391 E. 41st Ave., 604-325-5544

Aaron Read (second from left): “There’s nothing else like Duffin’s in Vancouver. It’s a very inclusive restaurant—it’s like the last frontier of honest food for everyday people. Get the machaca torta sub and a piece of spicy fried chicken and wash them down with a watermelon smoothie. It’s open 24 hours, so we tend to go after late-night shows. But I go, like, four times a week sometimes.”


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Dan Mangan

“Nuba is a block away from my studio—if I’m in recording mode, I probably eat lunch there two or three times a week. Everything is pretty

SINGER-SONGWRITER

great, but I always come back to Najib’s Special. I’m guessing it’s baked

najib’s special from Nuba Café, 146 E. Third Ave., 604-568-6727

become a bit of a local chain, Nuba manages to make each location a

cauliflower covered in some kind of methamphetamine. For what’s little unique, which is refreshing.”


Jackie Kai Ellis OWNER, BEAUCOUP BAKERY & CAFÉ

mint, pea, and mascarpone agnolotti from Bistro Wagon Rouge, 1869 Powell St., 604-251-4070 “There’s this velvety springpea cream just bursting out of this pasta, and I thought, ‘This is frickin’ amazing!’ My job is to eat a lot of food—I know something’s really special when a week later, two weeks later, a month later, I’m still thinking about it. That one dish, I was thinking about it a month later.”


SPONSORED REPORT

Local Learning Guide Did this fall’s back-to-school rush get you thinking about your family’s education? It’s never too early, or too late, to explore the benefits of private school CROFTON HOUSE SCHOOL

MULGRAVE SCHOOL

Q What are the benefits of an all-girls school? A

can interested parents and students get Q aHow feel for life at Mulgrave School prior to applying? A

.

All-girls’ schools offer the only educational environment that unapologetically makes the education, advancement and achievement of girls its first priority. The environment allows girls to push beyond boundaries and take risks, to feel their own empowerment and competence, and to create deep connections within the school and the community. Girls develop the confidence to discover their unique potential and follow their ambitions without any sense of limitation.

What additional opportunities are available to Q Crofton students that set your school apart? A .

Crofton House encourages students to discover and pursue their personal excellence and service learning is an integral part of this pursuit. Opportunities begin in the Early Childhood Education Centre, where families and staff participate in our annual Kids-forKids Holiday Market, and progress to the Senior School, where the girls can participate in more than 20 social responsibility initiatives that benefit the local and global communities, allowing them to experience citizenship through leadership, engagement, and agency. Crofton House also offers specific programs within the curriculum designed to enrich the students’ educational experience. All grade 6 and 7 students partake in the Discovery Project, where they gain applied, hands-on experience and learn how they can change their community for the better. In the Senior School, grade 10 students can choose to take the Challenge 10 course, designed for young women seeking to challenge themselves and learn through experiential pursuits in B.C.’s wild spaces. The education and environment at Crofton House enables girls to explore their world with confidence and create their own extraordinary possibilities.

Crofton House School

.

We encourage our prospective parents to visit the school while it’s in session. Observing Mulgrave students in their classes as they work both independently and collaboratively helps our visitors determine if the school is a good fit for their family. We have open houses scheduled throughout the year, private tours that can be arranged any time, and we welcome applicants to attend our Friday assemblies and special student performances. Additionally, our new website captures the essence of who we are as a school and as a tight-knit community. We see it as an extension of our facility: a modern and innovative space used to facilitate learning.

Who is your IB programme best suited for, Q and what other streams exist? A .

Many IB schools are selective in terms of which students can enrol in the Grade 11 and 12 IB Diploma Programme. Mulgrave is different in that every one of our students works to earn the challenging distinction. That is why our 97% diploma pass rate is so impressive. We truly believe in the potential of each child. Any student who aspires to a university education and who is committed to being the best they can be would benefit from an education at Mulgrave School. The outstanding level of care and support that students receive allows them to thrive in our academically rigorous program. We simply ask our students to be open-minded, engaged learners.

Mulgrave School

Created by the Vancouver advertising department in partnership with Crofton House School and Mulgrave School


A+ PRIORITIES

Each school weighs in on which aspects of a private school education are most valuable...

Ä‘ The power of smaller classrooms and commitment to personalized learning

Open Houses

Ä‘ Support and guidance for post-secondary planning Ä‘ Attention to the whole student: academics, athletics, ďŹ ne arts, health and wellness, and leadership development

Oct. 31, 10:00am - Jr. & Sr. Kindergarten Nov. 07, 10:00am - Grade 6 & Grade 8

We educate girls for life

croftonhouse.ca/welcome

 Ĺ?SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE

Ä‘ A culture of excellence and shared values that work together to support students as they strive to achieve their dreams

Ä‘Ĺ?0+!.Ĺ?Ä‚Ĺ? Ä‘Ĺ?+2!)!.Ĺ?ĆĹ? Ä‘Ĺ?!!)!.Ĺ?Ä…Ĺ? ÄŠÄ?ăĀ)Ĺ?ÄĄĹ?Ä Ä‚Ä?ĀĀ,)

Ä‘ An outstanding faculty that dedicates themselves fully to student success by providing opportunities for quality learning, extracurricular activities and effective communication Ä‘ A resource-rich environment that encourages students to explore a variety of interests and develop passions

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BACK ANGUS

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Angus An is widely considered to be one of Vancouver’s best—and, of late, most ambitious—chefs. But his budding empire was born of an early failure that keeps him resolutely modest. “For me, it’s about ego,” he says. “I try not to have one” there’s a lot of banging coming from the kitchen. A single expletive rings through the air. “I’m breaking things already,” a voice calls out, only half laughing. Chef Angus An jumps up to lend help to the source of distress. It’s a sweltering day in August, and we’re sitting in Fat Mao, his long-delayed Chinatown restaurant, the week before it opens. The menu is short: five noodle dishes, eight sides. Initially, 120 portions of noodles will be made daily, and when the kitchen runs out they’ll shut for the day. “I know it doesn’t look like we’re ready,” An shrugs as by fiona morrow || photogr aphs by a ndrew querner

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Prior to the August opening of Fat Mao, chef/owner Angus An explored Chinatown for ingredients and perfected dishes —including braised duck noodles (left) and braised tripe salad (below)—in the restaurant’s kitchen

we survey a floor covered in workman’s tools, half-built tables leaning against the walls, and the chaos underway in the restaurant’s tiny open kitchen. He turns his attention back to the plumber currently trying to squeeze a regulation-required storage unit into a skinny space by the sink. “This will work,” the man asserts emphatically as he and An raise the unit up from the floor a few inches by fixing casters to the legs. It squeaks into place by a hair. There are smiles all round. This, An proffers apologetically, is what life is like for him right now. We’re spending the day together, and rather than watching him manage and prep for dinner service at his Kitsilano flagship restaurant, Maenam, we’ll be flitting between Chinatown and New Westminster, only arriving at West Fourth Avenue later, when service is underway. Before then, there will be endless texts and phone calls, punctuated by several meetings to discuss new projects. And food. Lots of food. Now 35, An is undoubtedly one of Vancouver’s best chefs. At Maenam, he creates perfectly executed and authentic Thai cuisine in modern surroundings. It’s chic, but casual; top-quality, but at approachable prices. The accolades have flowed freely, from taking the Best Thai trophy at the Vancouver Magazine

Maenam was the phoenix that saved An from the ashes of Gastropod, his first restaurant, which went down in flames in 2009 Restaurant Awards every year since 2010, to storming in at number 26 in this year’s inaugural edition of the Canada’s 100 Best Restaurants list (just behind Cioppino’s, at 18, and inches ahead of Vij’s, in the 29th spot), ranked according to the votes of dozens of chefs and industry insiders. An is happy for his work to be recognized, but careful not to set too much store in plaudits. He prefers to keep a lower profile. “When people talk to me about Maenam, they’re obviously polite and say good things about me,” he says. “But it’s also because Maenam has been consistent and we’re not competing with many restaurants in town.” This misplaced modesty speaks volumes: Maenam was the phoenix that saved An from the ashes of Gastropod, his first restaurant (in the same location), which went down in flames in 2009. He may not have been the only restaurateur hammered by the economic downturn, but you can hardly blame him for taking it personally.

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Gastropod was An’s dream. It was the restaurant that would bring together everything he had been working toward. He’d studied fine art at UBC, then headed to New York to train at the French Culinary Institute, working under Jacques Pépin and apprenticing at Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s JoJo. He started his culinary career proper under Normand Laprise at Montreal’s legendary Toqué, before heading to Michelinstarred rooms in the U.K.: Heston Blumenthal’s the Fat Duck; Raymond Blanc’s Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons; and then David Thompson’s Nahm, the first Thai restaurant in the world to receive a Michelin star. As a classically French-trained chef with more than a passing interest in modern gastronomy, An’s decision to work at Nahm, though serendipitous, was not an obvious choice. “I always wanted to cook European food,” he says. “So I treated my experience working with David as something that was going to eventually benefit my Western cooking. Learning about how to balance intense flavours and seasoning, I believed, would help me when I opened Gastropod.” (Nahm changed his life in more ways than one: It’s where he met Kate Auewattanakorn, who would become his wife and business partner. When they moved back to B.C. in 2006, they were struck by how few Thai restaurants there were in Vancouver and pledged to make casual Thai their second project.)

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It’s easy to forget how radical Gastropod was when it opened at the tail end of 2006. An was drawing on what was then an innovative molecular toolbox, presenting food that took Vancouver to a culinary cutting edge. His signature oyster—served with sauternes jelly and horseradish snow—was such a perfect bite that, almost a decade later, the memory of it has the power to make your mouth water. “All I was interested in was cooking the food I wanted to cook,” he recalls. “I wanted it to be the best restaurant around, and I think we made great food.” Gastropod won this magazine’s Best New Fine Dining Award in 2007, but just two years later An was forced to close its doors. After six or seven months of losing as much as $25,000 monthly, there was no other way out. Fortunately, he and Auewattanakorn had the concept for Maenam all ready to go, and they were able to open a brisk three weeks later. But despite the city welcoming this reinvention with open arms, behind the front-of-house smiles, things remained uncertain. “There were some dark days,” he confides. “Even the first couple of years at Maenam—I was doing it, but I was thinking, ‘I don’t know if this is the right path for me.’ There were times when I thought we could just stop doing this and we could move somewhere. I could get a job where I’m paid a lot better. I thought about moving to Thailand with Kate. Our son, Aidan, was born in 2007, so that added to the stress.


93 POINTS 2012 HYPOTHESIS ~ Rick van Sickle

4790 Wild Rose Street, Oliver BC 250.498.0789 info@culmina.ca culmina.ca


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“We lost a lot of money with Gastropod,” he adds matter-offactly. “Even though Maenam is profitable, we’re still making that loss up.”

Freebird distills that model even further. “It’s basically a chicken shack,” An explains. “I’m really fascinated by Asian street markets where a stall will sell one thing—one thing they do really well.” there’s a sigh, followed by a low groan. His first thought was fried chicken, but a lack of ventilation “I can’t believe it. You stop paying attention for a second… scotched that idea. Instead, he bought a rotisserie oven with Last time, I came out and they’d painted everything the wrong which Freebird will serve roasted, marinated chicken prepared colour.” in the traditional Thai gai yang style. Also on offer will be khao We’re in New Westminster’s River Market, and An is staring man gai, the Thai version of poached Hainanese chicken. in dismay at the height of the sneeze guard that’s been installed “I hope you’re hungry,” he says, as Cheung brings a succesacross the front of a kiosk at Freebird, soon to be his fourth res- sion of dishes to our riverside table. There’s a zingy compressedtaurant. (At the time of this writing, its opening date could not watermelon-and-tomato salad; perfectly crisp fried chicken be projected.) “It’s as tall as me,” the five-foot-10 chef remarks wings served with lip-smacking nahm jim dipping sauce; a about the mandatory shield that protects the kitchen’s foodrevelatory bowl of laksa (it’s clear why people go wild for this stuffs from public exhalations. “What were they thinking?” Malaysian noodle soup whenever Cheung puts it on Longtail’s An has had a presence at this waterfront development for menu); and a plate of the poached chicken and rice that will be a while. He opened Longtail Kitchen—a second, more casual served at Freebird. Thai eatery—two-and-a-half years ago. The food is simpler The dipping sauce is under fierce discussion. Today we have than at Maenam, but no less fragrant and bright. New West’s the spicy Thai version, not the traditional Hainanese gingergeography, he tells me, makes it the perfect place to build a based accompaniment. “Kate wanted this sauce,” he says. presence in the suburbs: Maple Ridge (where he grew up), “Being Chinese, I wanted the other.” Richmond, and Surrey are all fairly near. Headed up by chef He pauses for a smile. “We’ll see who wins.” Justin Cheung, Longtail also fits An’s recent business-developWorking so closely with his wife is, he admits, a challenge. ment model: small space, tight menu, good value, low risk. At Gastropod, Auewattanakorn managed front-of-house and

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“The hardest decisions involve not only yourself but people who depend on you to feed their families, pay their rent. It’s difficult”

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An was king of the kitchen; at Maenam, she rules the roost. “She’s really the only qualified person in there to judge what I need to do— and she does judge, and she does change things. “I pick my battles, and I think we have learned to deal with things. I’m not going to say it’s easy and we do a great job of it, but I think we do a good enough job to still have a good marriage and raise a family.” For efficiency’s sake, the couple splits tasks, both domestic and professional: An is responsible for the daily school run; Auewattanakorn takes charge of the weekly order of imported Thai ingredients. She sticks to Maenam, while he stick-handles their growing empire. “Kate has many strengths,” he says, “but multitasking isn’t one of them.” Again, he smiles. “Maybe that’s why I’m out opening all these restaurants.” He jokes, but family is key for An. His parents have always been involved: Dad provided handyman services and grew herbs in the early days; Mom looks after Aidan, and Fat Mao’s scallion pancakes will be made by her (“Only a hundred portions a week, so she doesn’t work too hard,” An says). He’s working as hard as he is so that he can secure his family’s future—one he envisages will include retirement in Thailand. maenam is almost full by 5:30 p.m. on a Tuesday. I perch at the bar and An heads to the kitchen. He comes back and waves a stick of Thai lemongrass under my nose. “So much more fragrant than the Mexican stuff.”

The food is, as always, spectacular: refined, beautifully presented, yet uncompromisingly Thai. There’s the appetite-stimulating betel leaves wrapped around grilled prawns in galangal dressing; a seared albacore tuna curry; ridiculously moreish ribs; and a delectable fermented-sausage salad with clusters of crispy rice. (“I wanted to make the rice grains separate, but Kate won.”) Just when I think I will burst, Auewattanakorn insists we need vegetables, and appears with a perfect plate of greens studded with pork belly. This year, An pruned Maenam’s à la carte choices, putting more emphasis on the chef ’s menu. He’s also offering whole crab and fish dishes, available with advance notice. These are signs, I suggest, that he has his confidence back. He agrees. For the first time in several years, he says, he is comfortable with who he is and what he needs to do. “For me, it’s about ego,” he states. “I try not to have one. The failure of Gastropod was such a confidence-shatterer that I don’t have an ego anymore. I used to dream so big. I really wanted to change the world with my cooking.” His plans, though relatively modest in scale, remain big in concept. Among them is a goodquality food court, currently in the early stages of development. (All further details are, as yet, closely guarded.) Using his own experience to help younger chefs is also high among An’s priorities. Cioppino’s owner/chef Pino Posteraro has been a huge help and mentor to An, and he wants to pay that


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forward. He’s playing around with a restaurant co-op idea that would provide practical as well as financial assistance. “Being able to help someone better themselves is part of bettering yourself,” he states. “Surrounding yourself with good people is also part of that. It’s about professional pride.” Learning to be a businessman has been, he says, his toughest life lesson. “The hardest decisions involve not only yourself but people who depend on you to feed their families, to pay their rent. It’s difficult. Believe me, it’s so much easier to just stand in a kitchen and cook.” Eight years ago, says An, he was showing up to work with no idea where his life was going. He may still be some way from financial security, but at least his vision has become clearer. “Now I understand what I need to do to be successful—and it’s not to have a TV show, it’s not to write 20 cookbooks. The ultimate goal—the reason we’re doing Fat Mao and Freebird and Longtail—is they’re brands we can reproduce easily. I set up a place, I spend a bit of time there, and it’s fine. It can run with minimal oversight from me. And I can concentrate on Maenam.” He references celebrated New York restaurateur Danny Meyer (of Gramercy Tavern and the fastgrowing Shake Shack chain) while talking about opening restaurants that fit every sector of a pyramid that begins with fine dining at the top, then Maenam, followed by more casual places, and finishing with fast food at the bottom. “Apart from fine dining,” he’s quick to clarify. “I don’t need to chase that glory anymore.” VM

2013, 2014 AND 2015 VANCOUVER MAGAZINE RESTAURANT AWARD WINNER


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Jay Jones 19 Cactus Club Cafe (Richmond), Big River Brewing Company, Araxi, West, Nu, Salt, Donnelly Group (twice), Loden Hotel, Pourhouse, Shangri-La hotel, Rogers Arena (Aquilini Investment Group) MANTRA: “Where is going to challenge me next?” YEARS BARTENDING: STOPS:

Lauren Mote 15-plus Lumière, Goldfish Pacific Kitchen, Chow, Hawksworth Catering, the Refinery, Uva Wine & Cocktail Bar M A N T R A : “I love to be out there, performing” YEARS BARTENDING: STOPS:

David Wolowidnyk YEARS BARTENDING: 20-plus STOPS: Lucy Mae Brown (general manager), West, CinCin MANTRA: “Hey, it’s great to see you again”

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POUR CIRCULATION by neal mclenna n || illustr ation by rob dobi

Vancouver’s pool of top bartending talent is emblematic of an industry-wide trend. A profession that used to be about setting down roots now sees its best and brightest wandering like insatiable nomads

david wolowidnyk’s workday starts around 9:30 a.m., when he enters his bar, records his arrival time, and sits down to write out a detailed list of what he intends to accomplish that day. The routine varies slightly from day to day, but it can generally be encapsulated by imagining Wolowidnyk gazing at his spiritual domain and wondering, “How do we make today better than yesterday?” Around 3 p.m., he’ll take 15 minutes for a quick staff meal, then change into his uniform—black pants and a crisply laundered dress shirt—and by 4:30 the doors are open and he’s ready for service. For the next five hours (or more, if it’s busy), he’ll work without a break. If it’s a slow night, he may duck out after the last reservation has ordered its first round of drinks, which might get him home by 9:30. If it’s busy, more like midnight. And then he wakes up the next day and repeats. He’s exercised this rigour for the past decadeplus for one company: the city’s Toptable Group, owner of West (where he spent 10 years) and CinCin (to which he transferred last year), among others. In years past, tenures like Wolowidnyk’s were the norm for elite bartenders. The legendary Harry Craddock spent almost two decades at London’s Savoy.

Jon Smolensky 14 Steamworks, Brix, Hawksworth, Sovereign Canada MANTRA: “I know I’ll be back behind the bar in the future” YEARS BARTENDING: STOPS:

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FOOD (+ drinks) ISSUE

“THESE DAYS, EVERYONE REQUIRES A ‘BAR PROGRAM’ TO STAY IN THE STATUS QUO”

Colin Peter Field, the head barman at the Ritz in Paris, has been there since 1994. But in Vancouver, it’s tough to think of a barkeep other than Wolowidnyk who’s a fixture anymore. Among the top dogs, he is the exception. The norm looks more like Jay Jones. With his succession of highprofile positions and ever-present moustache, he may be the most recognizable bartender in town. His skills at preparing a drink and making every customer feel special have garnered him accolades from around the globe. But in the 19 years since he picked up his first shaker (at Cactus Club in Richmond), he’s held down jobs in no fewer than 11 bars—12 if you count two separate stints for the Donnelly Group (and many more if you include various guesting spots). Recounting all the tenures, he chuckles. “I suppose it could be perceived as being a little mercenary, but it’s really not about that. For me, I think I just needed to keep challenging myself.” At his first Donnelly gig, he wanted to see if he could bring high-end cocktail culture to a high-volume operation. (He could.) At the Loden, he wanted to acquire some high-end hotel experience. At the Shangri-La, he had the time to concentrate on local and international bartending competitions. If anything, he’s proud he’s made so many different stops. “I’ve worked in over a dozen venues, including casual restaurants, brew pubs, lounges, nightclubs, wine bars, saloons, hotels, fine dining, and sports arenas—all very intentionally—to not only satisfy my personal interests in experience and challenge, but equally importantly to reach a broader

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demographic with better drinking and better hospitality.” Lauren Mote may have fewer entries on her resumé than Jones, but only because she hasn’t been at it for quite as long. Since 2007, she’s made stops at Lumière, Goldfish Pacific Kitchen, Chow, Hawksworth Catering, the Refinery, and, most recently, Uva Wine & Cocktail Bar. And while she agrees with Jones that challenge is a major motivator, when it comes to moving around, she thinks there might be something else at play. “These days, everyone requires a ‘bar program’ to stay in the status quo, and people throw money to poach and pull people from other bars.” She’s right, of course—you can open a casual Italian spot in Vancouver, but you’d better have someone who not only knows how to make a Bicicletta properly but knows the cocktail’s history as well. Or you’ll get scoffed at. And Mote knows the lure of a sweet gig first-hand: She was happily running her very successful bitters company, Bittered Sling, when Uva came a-calling and made her the proverbial offer she couldn’t refuse. As a result, she essentially has two full-time jobs right now. Until recently, Jon Smolensky was in the same boat. By night he would tend bar at Hawksworth, but his days became increasingly taken up by his growing import company, Sovereign Canada, a company he started five years ago when he and his pals couldn’t source the ingredients they needed for their cocktails. If anything, he was made from the Wolowidnyk mould: He had been at Hawksworth since the day it opened, and but for the success of Sovereign, one gets the impression


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FOOD (+ drinks) ISSUE he’d love to still be there. He sees the transitory nature of today’s barkeeps through a much more business-driven lens: “With everyone opening new restaurants, new bars, and new concepts, bartenders are lured away by opportunity, money, or oftentimes sweat equity. As a result, there are an increasing number of hired guns out there.� Nostalgia can be a dangerous thing, however. The institutional bartenders who remain dedicated to a single roost are admirable and occasionally brilliant, but there’s no better place to get a terrible cocktail than a hotel whose bar staff haven’t turned over since Joe Clark was prime minister. The upside of the current condition is we live in a city where you have to go out of your way to get a bad drink. And it’s clear that it’s never been a better—or at least a more lucrative—time to be a bartender. Your services are in demand, you can negotiate advantageous terms (ownership stakes are not uncommon), and if you’re lucky you can join the ranks of Josh Pape (Wildebeest, Bufala, Supermarine), Tannis Ling (Bao Bei Chinese Brasserie, the upcoming Kissa Tanto), and Nick Devine (the Cascade restaurant group), who stepped out from behind the bar to become successful restaurateurs. For his part, Wolowidnyk seems unmoved by the lure of greener pastures. “I’ve never seen the point in moving on if I enjoy where I’m at.� We say goodbye and he goes back to his inventory. It’s now 1:30 p.m., which means the staff meal is around the corner, then service, then home. He’ll see his regulars, apprentice his younger co-workers, and not send a drink out that he’s not proud of. And then he’ll wake up and do it all over again. VM


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MEET CELEBRITY GUESTS CHERYL TORRENUEVA, SAMANTHA PYNN, JILLIAN HARRIS & TODD TALBOT.

SHOW GUIDE

THURSDAY, OCT 22

4PM–9PM

FRIDAY, OCT 23

NOON–9PM

SATURDAY, OCT 24

10 AM–9PM

SUNDAY, OCT 25

10 AM–6PM

FOLLOW US H O ME A N D GA R D E N E VENT S @ VAN H OM E S H OW S VA N HOM E S H OW S H O ME A N D GA R D E N BLO G.CO M

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OPENING NIGHT SOIRÉE! THURSDAY, OCT. 22ND: 4PM–9PM

PRESENTED BY

The Vancouver Home + Design Show will proudly reopen its doors at the Vancouver Convention Centre with an evening of perks, pours and musical performance. Sample BC VQA wines at stations throughout the show and make your way to the Main Stage presented by the Vancouver Sun for a special presentation by the fabulous duo from Parker Barrow – all while keeping company with the inner circle of Vancouver’s design scene.

CELEBRITY GUESTS

JILLIAN HARRIS & TODD TALBOT

SAMANTHA PYNN

CHERYL TORRENUEVA

@JillianHarris

@SamanthaPynn

@Cher_Torrenueva

Hosts of W Network’s Love it or List it Vancouver @ToddTalbot

A self-proclaimed “polished redneck,” Jillian Harris is an expert at mixing equal parts whimsical and classical to achieve her coveted style. As co-host of W Network’s Love It or List It Vancouver and proprietor of Jillian Harris Design, Jillian’s motto about doing it all never rests. The other half of Love It or List It Vancouver, talented thespian and longtime investor, advisor and real estate consultant, Todd Talbot is a man of many talents. With a reputation as a savvy real estate mind, Todd has years of experience buying, selling and renovating properties, and a fierce commitment to bringing the possibility of home ownership to Vancouverites.

Host of HGTV’s Open House Overhaul Samantha Pynn is a designer, stylist and the host of Open House Overhaul on HGTV Canada. She is also the contributing home editor for Chatelaine, a home columnist for National Post and regular guest expert on Citytv’s Cityline. Sam is most excited about her recent partnership with Simons which opens at Park Royal mid-October. There she will launch a home collection of bedding, bath and tabletop linens that captures everything she loves as a designer: touch-me textures, gorgeous colours and mix-and-match pieces that deliver maximum style with minimum effort.

Host of Game of Homes Vancouver Cheryl Torrenueva has become a hot commodity in the TV and design worlds! As a resident judge on W Network’s Game of Homes and a top designer on Food Network USA’s Restaurant Impossible, Cheryl has quickly made her mark in the design scene across North America. She’s known for her innovative designs on Restaurant Makeover, Restaurant Takeover and as the feisty design manager on Colin & Justin’s Home Heist. Cheryl just launched her own YouTube Channel “Simply Cher Cher” with Kin Community.

For more information on our celebrity guests, visit www.vancouverhomeshows.com

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS + PARTNERS

OFFICIAL PAINT SPONSOR

For more information on our sponsors and partners, visit www.vancouverhomeshows.com


CONTEMPORARY INNOVATION | TIMELESS DESIGN (604) 795-3522 | oldworldkitchens.com


Show Opens

7 PM

Janette Ewen & Jef Hancock* Around the World with Parker Barrow

9 PM

Show Closes

NOON

Show Opens

1 PM

2 PM

FRIDAY

3 PM

1 0 AM 11 AM

NOON

Western Canada’s Next Home Stylist Winner* Dean Mitchell* How to Plan for Your Home Renovation Janette Ewen & Jef Hancock* Around the World with Parker Barrow

4 PM

Sarah Gallop* How to Stay Married When Renovating or Building a New Home

5 PM

Christine Friend* Entertaining Spaces

6 PM

Janette Ewen Think Like a Designer

7 PM

Jillian Harris & Todd Talbot* For Love or Money

9 PM

Show Closes

PRESENTED BY

Show Opens

10 AM

Show Opens

Susie Wall* How to Have the Bling Without the Sting

11 AM

Susie Wall* How to Have the Bling Without the Sting

NOON

Cheryl Torrenueva* DIY or DELEGATE? A Renovation Reality Check

1 PM

Janette Ewen Think Like a Designer

2 PM

Jillian Harris & Todd Talbot* For Love or Money

3 PM

Samantha Pynn* Maximum Style With Minimum Effort

4 PM

Christine Friend* Entertaining Spaces

5 PM

Cheryl Torrenueva* DIY or DELEGATE? A Renovation Reality Check

6 PM

Leigh-Ann Allaire Perrault* The Art of Upcycling: How to Discover, Transform and Repurpose Old Things

7 PM

Jamie Banfield* Style and Design with Power Smart in Mind!

9 PM

Show Closes

12

SUNDAY

4 PM

SATURDAY

THURSDAY

THE MAIN STAGE SCHEDULE

Leigh-Ann Allaire Perrault* The Art of Upcycling: How to Discover, Transform and Repurpose Old Things

1 PM

Jamie Banfield* Style and Design with Power Smart in Mind!

2 PM

Cheryl Torrenueva* DIY or DELEGATE? A Renovation Reality Check

3 PM

Dean Mitchell* How to Plan for Your Home Renovation

4 PM

Sarah Gallop* How to Stay Married When Renovating or Building a New Home

6 PM

Show Closes

* Presented by Love it or List it Vancouver * Presented by Parker Barrow * Presented by Canadian Renovations * Presented by Sarah Gallop Design * Presented by Friendly Decorator * Presented by Game of Homes Vancouver * Presented by Simons * Presented by Rust-Oleum * Presented by BC Hydro Power Smart * Presented by breez *Presented by Urban Barn

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WHERE LIFE, DESIGN & RENOVATION COME TOGETHER SAMSUNG JUNIOR CHEF CHALLENGE

FLOFORM LOUNGE

On Saturday, October 24th, two school-age home cooks will couple up with a top Vancouver chef in a battle for culinary supremacy, hosted by Jonathan Chovancek. Armed with Samsung’s premium home appliances including the new Flex Duo Electric Range with Dual Door, fresh ingredients and plenty of ambition, the duelling duos will race against time as they take turns behind the burner to create the perfect entrée and dessert – all at the same time. Expert judges will select the winners, with the last Junior Chef standing scoring $5,000 worth of Samsung home appliances for their family’s kitchen. Now that’s a tasty trophy.

Study up on fall’s must-have home styles in the latest issue of Western Living magazine, well-deserved bevvy in-hand. Styled by Parker Barrow and located steps away from the Main Stage, you can lay back without losing out on any of the action – talk about the best of both worlds.

presented by

WESTERN CANADA’S NEXT HOME STYLIST This summer, three of Western Canada’s top tastemakers went head-to-head in the ultimate competition to discover Western Canada’s Next Home Stylist, with the winner claiming the title of official Marketplace Events spokesperson in Western Canada. Stop by the show to see them in action on the Main Stage on Friday, October 23 and see their style in person at the Look Book area, complete with the hottest furniture decor trends from Urban Barn. presented by

AND MAKE SURE YOU DON’T MISS: Ottoman Empire, Ask A Designer, M(art)ket & Portobello West.

presented by designed by

furnished by

ULTIMATE UPCYCLE CHALLENGE: TAKE A SEAT Do-gooders, take note! We’ve recruited 15 of Vancouver’s top media personalities, designers and tastemakers to turn drab into fab for a cause. Armed with a black box of RustOleum products and a small design budget, each participant will upcycle a pre-loved piece from ReStore into a swoonworthy seat that’s fit for a second chance at love. Bid on your favourite seat at our silent auction (100% of proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity Greater Vancouver) and rest easy knowing you’ve made a difference by going green and giving back. It’s design, with a conscience. presented by in support of

BC HYDRO POWER SMART DREAM HOUSE An energy efficient home can also be a stylish one! Designer Jamie Banfield of Jamie Banfield Designs will create the ultimate dream house combining contemporary design and energy conservation. Learn easy ways to lower your energy bills while creating an eye pleasing living space. It’s official, energy efficiency can fit into any space. presented by

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Why sit out in the rain this fall?

Call now for your backyard design consultation!

Come see us at Booth #510 at the Vancouver Home + Design Show! 1 844 655 8666 | 604 857 1702

Frameless retractable glass walls | Sunrooms, solariums & patio covers


THURSDAY

COOKING STAGE SCHEDULE 4 PM

Opening Night

10 AM

Show Opens

9 PM

Show Closes

NOON

Samsung Junior Chef Challenge

10 AM 11:30 AM

presented by samsung

FRIDAY

Chef James Olberg* COAST: The Art of Butchering

2 PM

2 PM

Chef Sheldon Maloff*

4 PM

Jennifer Trecartin* My Edible Advice: Healthy Juicing & Smoothies

Kitchen Caileigh: The Paleo Diet

3:30 PM

Provence Marinaside: Asian Crudo

6 PM

Sean Fay & Chef Brandon Dac* Boy With A Knife: Knife Skills Workshop

9 PM

Show Closes

Kelly Beswitherick*

omega flax presents

Kurtis Kolt* Sommelier: Wine Pairing Workshop

5 PM

Chef Taryn Wa* Savoury Chef: Dim Sum-thing

7 PM

Emma Davison* Golden Ears Cheesecrafters: The Art of Cheese

9 PM

Chef Juno Kim* Juno Kim Catering: Food Styling Workshop

3 PM

Chef Elie Nehme* Nosh: The Art of Dessert & Pastries

6 PM

Show Closes

Show Closes

*Stage schedules subject to change

Don’t face another freezing winter. Here’s to cozy, insulated homes. Warm up from the outside in by getting thousands back on energy-efficient renovations. Save power and money this Offtober at powersmart.ca.

Chef Keev Mah* Sai Woo: Delish Dumplings

1 PM SUNDAY

12:30 PM

Show Opens SATURDAY

NOON

Show Opens

PRESENTATION CATEGORY * Asian * Hot Topics * Artisanal * Culinary Skills


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Visit us at the Vancouver Home + Design Show Booth #513


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EXHIBITOR LISTING 18 Karat 21st Century Roofers Ltd A 1 Window Mfg Ltd A1 Orthotics Abracadabra Distribution Inc Action Interior Cabinet Refinishing & Renovating Active Doors & Mouldings Ltd ADT Security Cda Aerus/Electrolux Canada Ajia Custom Prefab Homes Alair Homes All Weather Waterproofing Inc ALP’s Mechanical Inc ANGEL ACCESSIBILITY INC. Arbutus Furniture & Closets Ltd. Arctic Spas Langley Art Smart Design Artcraft Display Graphics Artisan Residential Services Ltd As Seen on TV Marketing Ltd Avante Garde aVision Photography B.C. Air Duct & Furnace Cleaning Baeumler Approved Basil Restoration Ltd. Bath Fitter Batten Industries BC Eco Paving BC Hydro BC Timberframe Beachcomber Hot Tubs Group Bella Decors Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism (BWC Tourism) Benjamin Moore & Co. Better Business Bureau BKH Jerky Blanco Canada BRMI Essentials Inc Brougham Interiors Canada Furnace Ltd. Canada Home Elevator Canadian Home Improvement Centre Ltd. Canadian Renovations Inc Centra Windows Inc Checkers Premium Fudge Classic Cutlery Clay Construction Inc. Clever Quarters Coast Spas Lifestyles Colonial Countertops Costco Wholesale Country Furniture Creative Home Furnishings Credit Unions of BC Creekside Tile Company Cubicasa Cutco Cutlery Demilec Detzler Chiropractic Dexter Delores Interiors

Digital Connect dba DC Simple Direct Buy DLC Canadian Mortagage Experts DMC Contracting Ltd Door Pro Ltd Draft On Site Services Dream Home Fencing Ltd DRIcore Products Duradek Canada Ltd Eagle Eye Sales Inc Econowise Sunrooms & Patio Covers Ltd ELECTROLUX SMALL APPLIANCES, BEAM CENTRAL VACUUM & En Masse Marketing Eneready Products Ltd. Espressodolce.ca (Ultimate Cup of Coffee ltd) Euroline Windows Inc Expand Furniture Filterqueen Canada / Healthtek Inc Fitterfirst (Fitter Int’l Inc.) FLOFORM FortisBC Four Seasons Sunrooms Fresh Designs Inc Friendly Decorator (Ask A Designer) Future Living Development Ltd Garaventa Lift BC Giraud Glass World Gleam Guard International Wood Refinishings Gotcha Covered GR Distributors, Inc. Granite Transformations GreenLED (Smart Lighting Solutions) Grippo Stair Tread Inc Ground Down Floors Inc Have a Rice Day (Sonray) HD Ray International Inc. Hiddenbed Canada Direct Home Idol Building Supplies HomePro Hire Homey.Home Independent Respiratory Services Innovation Fencing Inspirational Glass and Metal Art Instant Bedrooms Manufacturing Inc. Interlock Industries International New York Times In-Touch Chiropractic Intrawest Resort & Club Group Investors Group Financial Services Iron Age Manufacturing LTD. Jackson Photographic Java Brew Collections Jovak Landscape & Design Ltd K2 Roofing Ltd. K2 Stone (Vancouver) Inc. Kate King Jewellery Kemp Construction Management Ltd. Kenorah Design/Build Ltd

Kilian Chiropractic kimmikat kreative Kitchen Idea Centre Kitchen Makeovers Leisure Baths Ltd. Level One Construction Lindal Vancouver Linwood Homes Lucia Spaces Lumas Manulife Bank Maple Leaf Self Storage Inc Massaging Insoles by Pacesetter Incse McLeary’s Canadian Made Quality Furniture & Mattresses Midland Appliances by Design Milgard Windows & Doors Mint Interiors My House Design/Build Team Ltd Natural Light Patio Covers Networx Windows, Doors, Exteriors Niki Design & Glass Studio Inc. Njoi Trujillo Beach Residences Honduras Northtec Painting Norwex Novell Design Build Nuteak NorthWest O & A Synergy Investments Ltd Ocean Sales Old World Kitchens & Custom Cabinets Ltd Omega Crunch Flax Products Optimera/Nerium Skin Care Organic Innovations OSIM Canada Outback Survival Gear Canada Outside the Box Distributors Ltd Papa Plumbing & Heating Ltd Pelti Window Films Penfolds Roofing Inc. Peridot Pixel Print Ltd (Lights & Parts) Portobello West Market Premier Audio Video Integration Price’s Alarms Pumped Inc R.C.B Royal City Bedding Re/Max Kelowna - Eric Steinbach Real Longlife Enviro Roofing Corp Redfern Enterprises Reed Hein & Associates LLC Regency Fireplace Products Relaxation Island/Luna Lights Renocon Design Centre Inc. Rhineland Cutlery (Sherick Holdings Ltd) RJR Construction Management Royal Bamboo Safe Pacific Financial Inc. Samsung

Saniflo Sapeli Imports Inc Save More Plumbing & Lighting Schultz Wildlife Bronze Scott Security Systems Ltd. Sears Duct & Carpet Cleaning Serge Dube SGDI - Sarah Gallop Design Inc Shakun Contemporary Art Share My Photographs Shaw Cable Shelf Genie Siema Kitchen & Bath Signature Stoneworks Sir Williams Tile Sleep Country Canada Smart Garage SoliCanada Sonos Steeped Tea STOR-X Sun Bear Building Supplies Sunlife Financial Surface Floors inc Talius Tamlin Homes Telus The Candy Aisle The NutriTower The Real Estate Corner The Red Canvas Art Gallery Titanium Exclusive Cookware Inc. TQ Construction Ltd Travis Industries - House of Fire Trinity Post and Panel Inc True Level Concrete Ltd Ultimate Creations Valor Gas Fireplaces/Miles Industries Vancouver General Contractors Vandenberg Landscape Design Versa Platinum Renovations Villa Beau Interiors Vinyltek Windows Vitamix Corporation Viva Building Supply Wall Design Studios Wallflowers and Beyond Wedobathrooms Inc Well Balanced Designs & Renovations West Coast Windows Ltd. Western Orthotics Ltd. Western Turf Farms Westwood Fine Cabinetry Inc White Smile BC Wholesale Blind Factory Ltd. Wide Plank Hardwood Inc Yaletown Interiors Yorkton Group

Visit our website for a more detailed exhibitor list – www.vancouverhomeshow.com


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CANADA’S MOST SIGNIFICANT WATERFRONT COMMUNITY

2 RIVER GREEN HAS ARRIVED

I N F I N I T Y P O O L  |  W H I R L P O O L  |  S A U N A  |  S T E A M R O O M  |  C L U B R O O M  |  P R I VAT E T H E AT R E  |  M U S I C R O O M  |  2 4 H R C O N C I E R G E  |  P R I VAT E S H U T T L E

C A L L N OW F O R YO U R E XC LU S I V E P R E V I E W A P P O I N T M E N T

For more information please visit www.rivergreen.com or call us at 604.233.2633

Aspac Developments Ltd., best known for the development of Coal Harbour in downtown Vancouver, is proud to present the second phase of their latest exclusive waterfront residences. Awarded the 2014 Urban Development Institute Award of Excellence for the Best Master Planned Community, River Green is Richmond’s most valued and sought after luxury residences. For a limited time take advantage of an exclusive preview opportunity.

Illustration reflects the artist’s interpretation of the project and may be noticeably different than what is depicted. This advertisement is not an offering for sale. Such an offering can only be made with a disclosure statement. E. & O. E.


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“At first blush, you’ll be tempted to think the throngs of tourists and the beach bars’ thumping bass beats are woefully short on redeeming features” PG. 108

The best shops, fashion, beauty, design, travel & fitness

Think Pink



it’s true—the beauty and fashion industries sometimes have a habit of skewing shallow and vacuous. So when the price of your handbag exceeds the GDP of a small Balkan country or you’re hankering for a diamondencrusted lipstick case, it’s time to rethink your style m.o. There are others in the trade who are mindful of the same thing, and October—which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month—is the perfect place to start. The Estée Lauder group of companies—which includes powerhouse names from La Mer, Aveda, and Bobbi Brown to Bumble and bumble, Tom Ford Beauty, and Donna Karan Cosmetics— has banded together to raise money for the cause. Proceeds from the sale of each BCA Campaign Pink Ribbon product go to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. That’s a sheer finish we can get behind.

Clockwise from top: Clinique Cheek Pop, Lab Series Skincare for Men pocket square, and Evelyn Lauder and Elizabeth Hurley Dream Pink Collection available in October at The Bay. Thebay.com

O C T O B E R 2 O 15 | VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E

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THE

GOODS

P E R S O N A L S H O P P E R

Best Buys

Fall Over

Blooms, blacks, and other pretty things this month by a ma nda ross Cult fave Drybar lands in Canada with its styling line-up—like this non-drying Texas Tea Volumizing hairspray ($32.50)—aimed at bringing the famed blowout bar’s looks to the home front. Exclusively at Sephora, 1045 Robson St., 604-681-9704; Sephora.ca

Victoria-based Benir Beauty harnesses the antiinflammatory properties of the highest-grade bee venom for its Benir BV-9 Platinum Bee Venom anti-aging cream ($249), a potent moisturizer aimed at cell regeneration and collagen formation. Kiss and Makeup, 1791 Manitoba St., 778-379-7928; Kissandmakeupstore.com Thanks to stronger and lighter ceramic technology, Rado’s Hyperchrome limited-edition chocolatebrown watch—with rose gold accents and diamonds ($7,800)—promises to look new no matter how many times you bang it. Lugaro, 961 Park Royal South, West Vancouver, 604-9252043; Lugaro.com

In celebration of WilliamsSonoma founder Chuck Williams’s 100th birthday this month, Le Creuset serves up the limited-edition 4.5-quart Le Creuset dutch oven ($475) in Sonoma Green-enamelled cast iron with the visionary’s signature etched on the lid. 2903 Granville St., 778-3302581; Williams-sonoma.com

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VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

This fall, comedy doyenne Melissa McCarthy launches her first-ever plus-sized fashion collection, which includes this reversible kimono ($169) featuring a fresh floral print on one side and classic black on the other. Penningtons, #730, 333 Brooksbank Ave., North Vancouver, 604-924-5517; Penningtons.com

From Canadian footwear company Pajar, the new Andre boot ($345) from the men’s Heritage Collection is a classic yet sturdy two-tone boot in brown leather and stretch cotton; Pajar.com


***

COMEDIAN ELLEN DEGENERES’S “GAPKIDS X ED” COLLABORATION AIMS TO EMPOWER GIRLS WITH PIECES LIKE THIS GRAPHIC TEE

($24.95, Gapcanada.ca)

Blurring the line between art and eyewear, these new BabyBaby sunglasses ($514) are the result of a collaborative series of designs between Retrosuperfuture and the Andy Warhol Foundation. Online exclusively at Vusunglass.com HIPS AHOY Express draws inspiration from fashionable seafarers and ’70s hipsters with their black mid-rise sailor fl are pant ($79.90) showcasing snappy gold-domed buttons. 701 West Georgia St., 604-669-5716; Express.com

The 10th-anniversary Roksanda capsule collection hit The Room as a North American exclusive this September, featuring 10 iconic dresses in new fabrics and hues, like this Celeste dress ($2,765). The Room at Hudson’s Bay, 674 Granville St., 604-681-6211; Thebay.com

With retro shades and blooms of colour, Ted Baker’s Simeto and Salso iPhone 6 covers ($39.95) add a 1950s romantic veneer to technology. Indigo, 2505 Granville St., 604731-7822; Chapters.indigo.ca

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Personal St yle

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WANLASS HAS HIS EYE ON THESE TOD’S DERBY WINGTIPS IN DARK BLUE SUEDE

(Nordstrom.ca, $555)

CHRIS WANLASS STORE MANAGER, NORDSTROM



working for nordstrom for 23 years, it’s fair to say American-born Chris Wanlass has had some time to hone his personal style. His tenure with the fashion retail giant has taken him to Atlanta, San Francisco, New York City, Seattle, and now Vancouver, where he’ll head up the brand’s new flagship as general manager. To easily transition from work to post-work events, “I try to buy timeless pieces and layer in a trend item now and then,” he says. “I’ve really been having fun with my shoes—I love a good wingtip for my dress shoes.” What’s the most beautiful piece of clothing in your closet? A Neil Barrett satin-sleeve jacket. What’s your favourite piece of clothing? I’m currently in love with a Rick Owens leather jacket. I can dress it up and wear it to work or wear it out and go casual. Favourite shave cream and razor? I bounce around with shave cream—it’s hard when you work in a store with so many choices. I like Art of Shaving, Kiehl’s, and Jack Black. My razor is a good old Mach3. Which gadget or article of clothing must every fashionable man own this season? White sneakers. My favourite pair is by Common Projects. Favourite brand and style of jeans? Levi’s Made & Crafted. What’s the difference between Canadians and are more put-together, with a more international/European fl air, yet are still comfortable. VM

Catch the full interview with Chris Wanlass at Vanmag.com

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Pooya nabei

Americans style-wise? I think Vancouverites


2015 Saturday, October 17th, 2015 | Gala ticket: $300 |

6:30 pm |

Performance Works, Granville Island

Bursary ticket: $500 |

Patrons Circle: $5,000

Culinary Capers Catering featuring Chef John Bishop PREVIEW THE COLLECTION September 21st to October 2nd, 2015 Pendulum Gallery, 885 West Georgia Street Or online at artsumbrella.com/splash

To learn more and purchase tickets visit artsumbrella.com/splash or call 604.681.5268

Join us for Splash— a fine art auction of exceptional curated works, from stunning to sublime, where accessible children’s art education is at the heart of it all. All funds raised at Splash help ensure that over 21,000 kids access high-quality arts programming each year.


THE

GOODS

F I E L D T R I P

Nex t Destinations

Fantasy Island

City slickers and outdoor enthusiasts unite: Oahu is a tale of two very different pursuits by a ma nda ross



STAY Location is everything in Honolulu, which, unlike other Hawaiian cities, is actually a major centre with attendant headaches like rush hour and commutes. The starting point is Waikiki Beach—maybe the most iconic beach in the world, but where, at first blush, you’ll be tempted to think the throngs of tourists and the bars’ thumping bass beats are woefully short on redeeming features. But there’s great history to be had on one of Hawaii’s most perfect stretches of sand. Frequented by Hawaiian royalty in the 1800s, the beach now feels exclusive only if you’re game to rise before dawn: come 9 a.m., tourists cover the sand in an

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FIELD NOTES DISTANCE Vancouver and Honolulu are 4,357 kilometres (fi ve hours, 38 minutes) apart FLIGHTS Fly direct with WestJet or Air Canada. During the last week of October, Air Canada flights start operating daily CUSTOMS Accept and wear a lei—it’s impolite to refuse or remove it in front of the person who gave it to you

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

intricate patchwork of beach towels. Stake yours right outside your hotel, The Royal Hawaiian ( from US$395, Royalhawaiian.com), otherwise known as the Pink Palace of the Pacific. This circa-1927 grande dame is a Moorish classic originally built for the steamertravel crowd, but its flamingo-pink exterior is still perfectly suited to its environs today. It’s like a classic Hawaiian shirt—gaudy yet oddly normal in situ. The flip side to The Royal Hawaiian’s heritage and history is best captured by The Modern Honolulu ( from US$365, Themodernhonolulu.com), a very upscale boutique hotel without the Waikiki tempo. Rimming the quieter

Ala Wai Boat Harbor, these digs espouse a more subdued cosmopolitan chic, with sleek interiors frequented by the jet set and other well-groomed urbanites lounging on outdoor daybeds. The most recent addition to the Morimoto restaurant empire has landed here, where a Zen garden vibe rules— perhaps the most fitting of all the famed chef ’s American outposts, since almost one in four Honolulu residents is of Japanese descent (compared to just 6.8 percent Native Hawaiian). Prices are steep, so navigate the menu accordingly. If the buzz of Waikiki holds no allure but you still want a city experience, there’s only one choice: the Kahala Hotel & Resort

Hawaii Tourism Authority/Tor Johnson; cheesecake: David Murphey

like any self-respecting vancouverite, I love Hawaii. It may not have the street cred of an off-the-grid South American backpacking trip, but it’s got all the hallmarks of the quintessential Christmas or spring break—dynamite food, fun, and adventure—minus the intestinal parasites. Each island brings its own personality to the table: Maui, familiar and friendly, almost guarantees you’ll run into your neighbour in the hotel hot tub; lush Kauai is there when you’re hankering for something more rugged and outdoorsy; Lanai offers elegant seclusion; and the Big Island prefers to straddle both soft and hard adventure, with its craggy moonscape enjoyed equally well from a hostel or the Four Seasons. But Oahu? Isn’t Hawaii’s most populous island the Vegas of Polynesia, the set of Hollywood blockbusters and bus package tours? Well, yes, but it’s also ground zero for island sophisticates and some of its most wild nature. Here’s how to navigate both sides of the coin.


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MAKE TIME FOR A TOUR OF DORIS DUKE’S FORMER PRIVATE MANSION, SHANGRI LA, WHERE THE HEIRESS’S PENCHANT FOR ISLAMIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE IS ON FULL DISPLAY.

(Shangrilahawaii.org)

ON THE WATERFRONT

Long before surfing, or heenalu, became a sport, fishermen used to ride the waves to reach shore with their catch HIGH NOTE

The engineers behind Michael Jackson’s final concert tour designed the sound system—as well as the lighting system, composed of 40,000 light bulbs—of The Modern Honolulu’s Addiction nightclub SO SWEET

Hawaiians eat dessert first—like the deconstructed Kula Strawberry Cheesecake at MW Restaurant

Room: Turtle Bay Resort; The Royal Hawaiian, a Luxury Collection Resort

UP HERE

(Kahalaresort.com), only minutes from downtown but a world away. The resort sits oceanside in the capital’s tony residential neighbourhood of Kahala, but you’ll need to trade your stilettos for flip-flops to start the downshift. The most expensive hotel in the world when it was built, the circa1964 mid-century resort has since hosted every sitting president as well as serving as the bar in Magnum, P.I. It’s still deluxe without any stuffiness. If you want to feel like a (very well-heeled) local, there’s no quicker shortcut.

EAT Another benefit of visiting Honolulu? There’s no shortage of

Located on the North Shore on five miles of unspoiled beach, Turtle Bay’s guest rooms give spectacular ocean views PINK PALACE

world-class restaurants. At MW Restaurant (Mwrestaurant.com), only a 15-minute walk from The Modern, local pastry chef and James Beard Award semi-finalist Michelle Karr-Ueoka turns dessert to socially sanctioned crack with the Hawaiian Crown Chocolate Banana Cream Pie, otherwise known as graham crackers, chocolate pudding, kinako banana ice cream, and salted butterscotch shortbread. Meanwhile, New

York transplant chef Lee Anne Wong—who counts The French Laundry, Charlie Trotter’s, and Nobu as resumé fodder—opened up brunch spot Koko Head Cafe (Kokoheadcafe.com) in the low-key neighbourhood of Kaimuki. No reservations, very frequent lineups, and menu standouts like kimchi bacon cheddar scones and Elvis’s Revenge (peanut butter, banana tempura, billionaire’s bacon, local honey, toasted coconut, and a

A diamond in the rough: flanked by the ocean and a lush courtyard, The Royal Hawaiian sits pretty

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GOODS

F I E L D T R I P

Nex t Destinations

GIDDY-UP

sweet bun) mean it’s time to check your dietary resolve at the door. Up the street, chef Ed Kenney (who runs the locals’ hangout Town) opened Mud Hen Water (Mudhenwater.com) in June. In here, Valley—otherwise known as the set of a representation of the chef ’s life Jurassic Park through food looms—restroom wallpaper is a pastiche of tasting FIRED UP menus from his travels around the The Modern Honoworld. Meanwhile, the menu skews lulu’s best cocktail local: the luau (served with grilled hour perch he’e, or octopus) is a traditional Hawaiian dish in which luau leaves are cooked in coconut milk until they’re incredibly soft. (Kenney’s secret: he buys coconuts on Craigslist, since getting fresh coconut milk is paramount.) In Waikiki, restaurants run absurdly expensive or are of the chain variety—or both—but a block off the beach sits Bills Sydney (Billshawaii.com), where Australian chef Bill Granger’s relaxed, light-filled sanctuary serves See nature from the back of a trailriding horse at Kualoa Ranch in the Ka´a´waa

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Asian fusion with local inflections, like the sticky chili pork and peanut salad. A drive west is in order, where The Pig & the Lady (Thepigandthelady.com)—modern Vietnamese fare at communal tables—signals the rebirth of one of the U.S.’s oldest Chinatowns. And this past spring, local chef Mark Noguchi opened Mission Social Hall & Café (Thepiligroup.com) at the Hawaiian Mission Houses museum, channelling dishes he grew up with, like hand-pounded taro and Shinsato Farm pork.

ROAD TRIP Notwithstanding Honolulu’s big size, the island of Oahu is relatively small, so after a few days in the city, drive north where the island vibe reigns supreme. Here, Honolulu could be light years away as you pull up to Turtle Bay Resort (US$310, Turtlebayresort.com), fresh off its $45-million facelift.

Perched on the northernmost tip of the island, the hotel rocks a low-slung, sprawling design with front-row seats to its most fabled shores. The north may have the most powerful waves in the world, but stationed at the hotel, surf proturned-instructor Rocky Canon (and his surfing dog) will help you find the most tranquil bays, so you’ll be hanging ten (or shakily standing up) in no time. Eating options up north are majorly lowkey: Ted’s Bakery is justly famous for its pies, but its under-$10 plate lunches are the real steal here. Outside of Turtle Bay is a cluster of shrimp trucks, each trying to tempt you with crevette magic— Romy’s for garlic lovers, Giovanni’s for butter fiends, Macky’s for a Vietnamese take. But the contrast between city and country, upscale and down-home, and the allaround chill ethos has never been more perfect than here and now. VM

Kualoa Ranch; firepit: Hopper Stone

THE


Collect stories, not selfies. You won’t remember the time you spent staring at your screen, but you’ll never forget your time with us in Hawaii. 866·774·2924 | astonhotels.com

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Visit us online at SplashesOnline.com or follow us on Facebook!


THE

GOODS

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S W E AT E Q U I T Y

“I CAN’T GIVE AWAY ANY SECRETS, BUT THERE ARE SOME INTERESTING PARKOUR SPACES ALONG THE SEAWALL!”

Workout Plans

(Rene Scavington, Origins Parkour)

Leap Year

How to turn the city into your personal playground



to run, leap, and climb over obstacles and voids, you’ve got to have an impressive fitness level and precise muscle control—and a dash of the daredevil gene. But parkour (the Frenchdesigned practice of conquering urban elements with the body) is also about the mind, says 29-yearold Rene Scavington. When he was an aspiring teen filmmaker, Scavington followed parkour-loving friends with his camera, clambering up buildings trying to capture it all. “I was able to keep up, and soon I got tired of being the guy holding the camera.” A decade later, he decided to open his own gym dedicated exclusively to the sport. Origins Parkour on Main Street now sees over 1,000 athletes a month (kids and adults), though Scavington knows that the city streets are where parkour really lives.—Stacey McLachlan

WHERE TO GO

Origins Parkour offers beginner classes to improve your moves and increase your fi tness. Hone your craft during open gym nights (including a ladies discount on open-gym Wednesdays, $7.50). Originsparkour.com

BRING FRIENDS The new PNEadjacent Plateau Sports Park is a citysanctioned, all-ages

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playground designed for putting your vertical jump and precision landings to the test. Vancouver. ca/parks-recreationculture.aspx

BRING A DEFIBRILLATOR The landscape of the city is the ideal playing field for the sport—and the best way to get your heart pumping is to access the inaccessible. Just try not to get yourself arrested, okay?

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

THE BURN

300

CALORIES/HR* * Depending on the intensity of the workout

Andrew Querner

BRING GRANDMA


DINNER AND A MOVIE MA K E Y OUR E V E N I N G C O M P L E T E , V I SI T O N E O F T H E SE G R E A T R E ST A URANTS

YA LE TOW N M INA M I | 604 6 85 80 80 | MI N AMI R E ST AU R AN T . C O M T HE NE W OXF O R D | 6 0 4 6 0 9 0 9 0 1 | D O N N E L L Y G R O U P. C A

DOWNTOW N C HA M B A R | 60 4 87 9 7 1 1 9 | C H AMBAR . C O M C INC IN | 604 6 88 7 3 3 8 | C I N C I N . N E T T HE B LA C K B IRD | 6 0 4 89 9 4 4 5 6 | D O N N E L L Y G R O U P. C A LIB RA RY S Q U A R E | 6 0 4 6 3 3 9 6 4 4 | D O N N E L L Y G R O U P. C A B OU LE VA RD K I T C H E N & O Y S T E R BAR | 6 0 4 6 4 2 2 9 0 0 | B OU LE VA R D VAN C O U V E R . C O M FORA G E | 604 6 6 1 1 4 0 0 | F O R AG E VAN C O U V E R . C O M G YOZA B A R | 6 0 4 3 3 6 5 5 6 3 | G Y O Z ABAR . C A

GA STOWN NU B A | 604 68 8 1 6 5 5 | N U BA. C A ( VAR I O U S L O C AT I O N S)

SEPT. 24 - OCT 9, 2015

S P E C IA L T HA N KS T O VAN C O U V E R MAG AZ I N E F O R S U P P OR T ING VI F F D I N N E R AN D A MO V I E

VIFF.ORG


BACK

PAGE

S N A P C H AT T E R

£M A L C O L M P A R R Y

A b o u t To w n

“Why do you think I look slimmer? If you open a restaurant, you lose weight” — Umberto Menghi to guests at a private reception for the launch of a successor to his 37-year-old restaurant Il Giardino

Michelle Bouffard and Michaela Morris

Maija and Eeric Savics

COMMUNIT Y

Riley Jehnichen and Jazzmin McCurdy

BEST OF THE WEST August 5 Odlum Brown presented and Grosvenor Canada, Michelle Bouffard and Michaela Morris’s House Wine firm sponsored the fifth-annual eat-anddrink-athon on Ambleside Pier as part of the Harmony Arts Festival that has been a West Van summertime fi xture since 1990.

REOPENING

GIARDINO RECEPTION August 9 Two years after his iconic Giardino Restaurant closed for demolition, restaurateur Umberto Menghi unveiled a new location a halfblock north on Hornby, inviting guests to see what decades of his expertise and Peter Brown’s, Frank Giustra’s and Sam Feldman’s new money could accomplish.

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KimberleySt. Pierre

Frank Palmer Dylan Warner and Mauricio Vasquez

FUNDR AISING

Richard Jaffray and Robin Peterson

VA N C O U V E R M A G A Z I N E | O C T O B E R 2 O 15

Marian and Umberto Menghi

Nadia Iadisernia, gelding Dorado and Jay Garnett

PACIFIC POLO CUP August 16 Southlands Riding Club president Brooke Saunders and VP-event chair Kimberley St. Pierre had Craig Stowe and Nadia Iadisernia add the pizzazz of September’s Luxury and Supercar Weekend with great results.


A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, NATURALLY.

IT’S IN OUR DNA For over three decades, Toptable Goup has defined elegant yet approachable dining and this year, we celebrate several milestones including the 25th anniversary of CinCin Ristorante and the opening of Bar Oso and The Cellar, by Araxi in Whistler. The finest regional ingredients – crafted by extraordinary culinary talent and delivered with an unparalleled level of hospitality – is what sets Toptable Group apart. But it is you, our guest, who continues to inspire us in our ongoing pursuit of excellence.

toptable.ca


604.922.1380 | Info@GrosvenorAmbleside.com | GrosvenorAmbleside.com

WITH OVER 65% OF OUR HOMES SOLD, WE INVITE YOU TO C O N T A C T U S T O D A Y T O B O O K A P R I V A T E A P P O I N T M E N T.

EXCEED ALL EXPECTATIONS. V A N C O U V E R ' S F I N E S T H O M E S T H O U G H T F U L L Y D E S I G N E D FOR REFINED LIVING. SITUATED ON WEST VANCOUVER'S COASTLINE JUST 10 MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN. UNPARALLELED ATTENTION TO DETAIL AND VIEWS OF THE PACIFIC OCEAN. NOTHING ELSE COMPARES.

Opportunities Such As This Are Rare.

The developer reserves the right to make changes to the information contained herein without notice. Rendering is representational only and may not be accurate. E.&O.E.

Profile for NextHome

Vancouver Magazine October 2015  

Engaging articles, reviews and stories all about Vancouver Vancouver Magazine informs, guides and entertains people who engage with the city...

Vancouver Magazine October 2015  

Engaging articles, reviews and stories all about Vancouver Vancouver Magazine informs, guides and entertains people who engage with the city...

Profile for wall2wall