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The Gig Is Up: How the Freelance Economy Is Changing Work 50* Years!

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FE ATURES

35

Good Libations Your ultimate guide to drinking in Vancouver, featuring the best happy hours, hottest bars, beloved locals—and hangover cures.

46

The Gig Is Up Freelancing may be the future of work, but life in the gig economy means many workers are without a safety net. What happens when they fall?

35

City 15

20

27

Taste

Play

15 At Issue Emily Carr is leaving Granville Island.

27 The Dish Burdock and Co. masters fried chicken.

18 City Informer Investigating Trump Tower economics.

28 Reviews Jamjar arrives in South Granville.

56 Hot Take Essential pieces for fun in the sun.

20 Modern Family Stepping into the wrestling ring.

30 Taste Test What’s the best latenight pizza in town?

58 Throwback Vintage covers from the VanMag archives.

22 Future of the City Does decriminalizing drugs actually work?

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53 The Destination How to take advantage of our national parks.

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ED NOTE

A Toast to the Local Raising a glass to the emergence of the good old-fashioned neighbourhood bar.

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resounding answer seemed to be…not that much, at least not anymore. A change in policy that allowed for our booming craft beer scene, for one, has seen the creation of casual joints I once lamented the lack of. Recently, on one of the first patio nights of the season, my friends and I gathered at our local on Davie—a place where, not long ago, the wait staff had to remind us it was a food-primary spot as we sat down. But on this evening, as the patio got more crowded, we made room for strangers at our table, including one couple who had popped in to grab a quick night-before-the- Sun Run drink (some people hydrate in unusual ways). I know that because—prepare for a Vancouver shocker—we talked to them. Did that happen because it’s easier now for people to just drop in for a beer or two? Maybe, maybe not—but I do know it was a pretty good night. This new era of warmer welcomes and looser beer taps means you now have more locals to choose from, and our “Good Times Guide” (page 35) is here to help, with great places to drink around the city—including a calendar to get you out every night of the week. I hope it’s a starting point for you in getting to know your ’hood, and maybe even your neighbours, a little bit better.

Coming Up Next Issue We’re Turning 50! VanMag is celebrating its golden anniversary in style, with a very special edition featuring now-andthen photo essays, the stories behind the stories and first impressions of Vancouver icons from our archives. Heritage? What Heritage? As the demand for density heats up (and new condo developments go up), how do we preserve our community character?

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PORTRAIT: EVA AN KHERA J; ST YLING BY LUISA RINO, MAKEUP BY MEL ANIE NEUFELD; DRESS COURTESY NORDSTROM; WATCH COURTESY TIFFANY AND CO. PHOTOGRAPHED AT THE AVIARY, THEAVIARY.CA . EAST VAN: MARK FAVIELL .

i moved to vancouver back in 2001, and it took a little acclimatizing, particularly on the after-work drinks front. A place could look like a bar and act like a bar, but if it held the lower-tiered “food-primary” restaurant license, you had to follow a prescribed set of rules—mainly about ordering food to go with that beer. It was a skill newcomers quickly learned: how to fudge it a little. “How about I just leave the menu here, for later?” one server at the now-shuttered WaaZuBee asked me. (I was also quickly schooled when I tried to order a half pint like a foolish Easterner. Sleeve, please.) The challenge for restaurant owners in acquiring a liquor-primary license back then meant a challenge for us patrons in finding a true local to call our own. Much as I never like to extol Toronto’s virtues over Vancouver’s—who would give up mountains and ocean and beaches for the Big Smoke?— its (comparative) lack of nanny-state laws meant that bars with gruff service and cheap beer (with or without a side of fries) were easy to find. And while I’m always a fan of a wellcrafted cocktail and a great meal, it seems that perhaps Vancouver’s reputation of being a little insular wasn’t helped by our less-than-social social policies. An easy place to pop in for a drink after work, and strike up a conversation with those you didn’t arrive with—those are the spaces where community can be found. But it’s gotten better. In fact, our senior editor, Jessica Barrett, was originally following a story on what was broken with our liquor board for this issue, and the


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VA N M AG .C O M/C I T Y

nightlife

creative studios retail space

arts education

AT ISSUE

Hot Property

GARNET

Emily Carr University’s impending exit from Granville Island will open up a huge chunk of the area’s building stock— and everyone wants in. by

Tessa Vikander

In a cIty where it seems like every inch of land is spoken for and bidding wars are routine, the 200,000 square feet of soon-to-be-available, rent-controlled, condo-free space on Granville Island is a very rare gem. Emily Carr University of Art and Design (ECUAD) is still months away from its big move from Granville Island to its new campus in the False Creek Flats, but already schools, arts groups and entrepreneurs are jostling to snag space in what will become its former home. The winners of this real-estate jackpot will shape the island for decades to come. Granville Island began its transformation from industrial wasteland to cultural hub in the 1970s. Back then, the federally owned land, managed by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), received a mandate for urban experimentation, which directed that j

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City

125,000 square feet be set aside for studio space for artists, glass-blowers, woodworkers, potters and the like. As of 2012, however, that sector held only a third of the promised cultural residents, while retail shops held more than twice the 35,000 square feet they were initially allotted. Jessica Schauteet, director of Kroma Artist’s Acrylics and president of the Granville Island Business and Community Association, sees opportunity in ECUAD’s exit for the island’s mandate to finally be fulfilled. “We have this opportunity to deinstitutionalize these incredibly interesting buildings,” she says, suggesting that young people without a lot of money—like her mentors, who founded Kroma on Granville Island in the 1970s—should be prioritized for mixed-use space. “I’m a believer that ideas need time and space, really, more than money.” Red Gate Arts Society is one organization salivating over the island’s tightly controlled rent and freedom from municipal zoning restrictions. A non-profit group providing art studios and venue space to visual artists, musicians and performers, Red Gate is eyeing ECUAD’s waterfront north building. Director Ana Rose Carrico says her organization is “bursting at the seams” and unable to secure a new long-term lease at its current East Hastings Street location, where it’s been paying about $7,500 a month for 7,000 square feet. “We’ve been looking for a forever home for a while,” she says. The CMHC will not specify how much it will charge non-profit organizations for former ECUAD space, but under current lease practices similar groups pay a tiny fraction—10 to 20 percent—of market rates in other spaces managed by the CMHC. As one of the few areas in the city destined to stay distinctly non-residential, says Carrico, Granville Island

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LOCAL C U LT U R E

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has the potential to become “a vibrant cultural epicentre at night,” and Red Gate, popular for its late-night dance parties, could be a perfect fit. “We definitely deal in the nighttime economy and I think Granville Island could really benefit from that.”

We have this opportunity to deinstitutionalize these incredibly interesting buildings.” —j e s sic a sch au t e e t, di r ec tor , k rom a a rt ist ’s acry l ic s

A much larger, more well-heeled institution is also aiming for island digs. Langara College wants to move its arts programs from its South Vancouver campus to the south ECUAD building on Johnston Street. According to vice president Ajay Patel, the move would give Langara’s creative industry programs “a visible hub,” in return for a guaranteed injection of 2,500 students’ worth of foot traffic to the island. If granted the space, Langara’s web development, journalism, photography, and Aboriginal carving programs, and others, would move in. So far, the CMHC is mum on its plans, but Lisa Ono, manager of public affairs for Granville Island, hinted at what the future may hold. The south building will likely remain earmarked for arts education, with the provincial government, the long-term leaseholder on the building, to recommend who should occupy it next. The north building could become an innovation hub for artists and artisans, with space for day and evening use as well as cafés and pubs. The new tenants won’t be determined until at least 2018, when the call for proposals is due to go out, but Red Gate’s Carrico says one thing is for sure: there won’t be any shortage of applicants. “I wouldn’t be surprised if almost every arts group in the city would be interested.”

RE AD

Please Proceed to the Nearest Exit A former contributor to this magazine, Vancouver native Jessica Raya (now based in San Francisco) follows up her first novel, The Buenos Aires Broken Hearts Club, with this tragicomic tale about a teenage girl in 1970s California navigating adolescence, paternal abandonment and accidental arson. Available June 6

SEE

Bittergirl: The Musical In 1999, three Toronto actresses conceived of a play whose plot would comically mirror their own romantic travails. An instant hit, it was parlayed into a book, and now a musical version of the original play based around 1960s girlgroup classics (“Be My Baby,” “Where Did Our Love Go?” et cetera). Arts Club presents this local run. Granville Island Stage, June 15 to July 29 HE AR

Kandace Springs Signed to the legendary Blue Note Records, this Nashville singer/ songwriter/pianist’s debut album, Soul Eyes, tips its hat to the label’s almost 80-year history as home to countless giants of jazz but also incorporates R&B, pop and a whisper of folk. Springs brings her burnished-beyond-its-years alto to the city for the first time, as part of the Vancouver International Jazz Festival. Pyatt Hall, June 25 —Michael White


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City

INFORMER

Does Donald Trump Make Money if I Spend Mine in the Trump Tower? by

Stacey McLachlan Byron Eggenschwiler

illustration by

It’s hard to know what to make of the new and very tall Trump International Hotel and Tower on West Georgia Street. (69 floors? Real mature, you guys.) On the one hand, it’s not technically owned by the Trumpster, but on the other hand, he must have something to do with it, right? If you don’t like to frequent businesses that benefit a cartoon supervillain—or, I suppose, if you do—it’s nice to know exactly what the relationship is between POTUS and his branded entities. Here’s the scoop: Holborn Group holds the keys to the Arthur Erickson–designed building and licensed the trusted Trump name for a new luxury hotel and condo development after a deal with the Ritz-Carlton fell through. So while the building does have to follow strict brand style and service standards, it’s

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Trump’s company has a vested interest in the property’s success. not a real estate asset for the Trump Organization. But Trump’s company still has a vested interest in the property’s success, which is why his progeny were here for the opening while Dad was off trying to Make America Great Again™. Not only does Trump Org. manage operations for the hotel, restaurants and spa (the exception being the nightclub, which is independently operated),

it also receives a profit if certain sales targets are hit, a source from Holborn said, and it takes a percentage of each condo sale, too. Those numbers add up fast. At Mott 32, the hotel’s upscale Chinese restaurant, you can order a braised whole dried fish maw for $880, and I think we all know what the profit margins on fish maw are in this economy. So if you’re the kind of person who loves spending

an afternoon surrounded by chandeliers but hates being grabbed by your genitals, you have some soulsearching to do. Formerly non-partisan activities, like popping by the Spa by Ivanka Trump for facial serum applied via conch shell, are now a direct line to the First Family’s next Mar-a-Lago getaway. Got a question for City Informer? stacey.mclachlan@vanmag.com


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Find the next show at eccw.com

1 “Wrestlers were my heroes growing up and I always looked up to the ones that weren’t sleazeballs, you know what I mean? I want to be a role model for kids. That’s what fuels me and keeps me going.”—Randy “Your Weirdo Hero” Myers

1

2

2 “Originally I had two dreams: one was to be a professional wrestler and one was to help my reserve. There are thousands of people stuck on reserves, and they don’t have any opportunities. I was fortunate enough to get out and accomplish things. Now I have a duty to help others.”—Andy “The Dreadful” Bird

6 “Wrestling has become something Vancouver can be proud of. We’ve built up our own wrestlers, told our own stories and not relied on anything else to build our fan base. We’ve gone from a hundred people in Surrey to a thousand people at the Commodore. Find me a local band that sells out the Commodore every six months and does it faster every time.”—Scotty Mac time.”—

3 “Some people ask, ‘Is it fake?’ Well, you know, come to a show and find out. Is a movie fake? Is theatre fake? Everything’s fake. We’re probably in a multidimensional reality right now in someone’s fake computer.”—El El Phantasmo

7 “I’d been wrestling with my brother in the house and breaking everything around: breaking couches, beds, all that stuff. My mom was pissed. She did not like wrestling at all. She loves it now.”—Air Adonis

4 “Injury is always a risk when we go in there. I was doing [a move called a] swanton dive off of the top rope and the girl moved. I broke my collarbone. It was the most painful injury I’ve ever, ever had.”—Christina Von Eerie 5 “When you’re a villain, you can’t fail. If you trip getting into the ring and fall flat on your face, the crowd’s going to love it, because they already want to dislike you. You just gave them more ammo.”—Karl “The Catch” Cunningham

4

6

5


3

City

M O D E R N FA M I LY

Ready to Rumble

7

Elite Canadian Championship Wrestling is booming, with seven straight sold-out shows at the Commodore Ballroom under its big, shiny belt. Meet the largerthan-life men and women who spend their nights engaged in the city’s most raucous—and most misunderstood—performance art. Max Mitchell Carlo Ricci

as told to photo by

Group portrait taken at the Commodore Ballroom, January 14, 2017


City

FUTURE OF THE CIT Y

Crisis Averted

B.C.’s mounting overdose death toll has public health officials floating a radical solution: legalize drugs to curb the problem. But what would that look like? Dr. João Goulão has an idea. Portugal’s national drug coordinator helped solve a similar crisis 16 years ago when his own country decriminalized personal drug use. Today, addiction rates are way down, and the system has widespread support—but it isn’t perfect. Is this Vancouver’s future? by

Petti Fong

IllUstRatIoN by

Q: A:

Rob Dobi

What can Vancouver learn from Portugal’s decision to decriminalize drug use?

Like Vancouver, we had a very significant overdose problem, but our history in Portugal is unique. We had a dictatorship for 40 years and during that time we had no problems with drugs. Then came the colonial wars and drug use was tolerated, even incentivized, in the colonies. There was a high prevalence of drug use and addiction among the soldiers who returned from those wars in 1974. After the dictatorship, there was this freedom. Criminal organizations introduced heroin, cocaine, and suddenly everything changed. A population that was completely naive about drugs quickly shifted, and it’s important to remember that drug use affected everyone, not just one socioeconomic class. The history is different between Portugal and Vancouver, but this is the point: it became almost impossible to find a family in Portugal that wasn’t affected by addiction, and that changed the attitude. This is a health issue, not a criminal issue. That’s what has to happen in Vancouver. Q: After nearly 20 years, are there many critics of decriminalization in Portugal?

A: In the beginning, there was talk that babies will be drinking drugs from their baby bottles, that we would get kicked out of the UN. Nowadays there is a political consensus: no one, not even the right-wing parties, will try to dismantle it. I’ve worked with nine ministers of health and no one has talked about replacing me.

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EX CEPTIONA L IND OOR & OUTD OOR FUR NIS H INGS


Q: In the move to decriminalize, one plan was to open supervised injection sites like we have in Vancouver. But they’ve never opened in Portugal. Why is that? A: We have legislation that allows us to build injection rooms, but it depends on the common will of municipalities and the central government. When we passed the bill in 2001 we were in need of them, but it was not possible to find a consensus among the government—for eight years we couldn’t find the political consensus we needed. When we finally got political conditions to go forward on that, injection use was dropping so fast that people told me it was no longer needed. The population seeking treatment went from 10 percent injection drug users to three percent in 2015.

This is a health issue, not a criminal issue. Q: How important is it to have treatment available for them right away? A: It’s as important as having a threshold that everyone understands. Programs are there right away if the person needs help. Q: Portugal is dealing now with former addicts coming back and needing treatment. Why is that happening?

A: Portugal is going through a financial crisis. Many social service departments have had budget cuts of 30 percent. [Our department] had some cuts, about 10 Q: People arrested have to appercent, but fortunately the governpear in front of a dissuasion ment was sensitive that we will pay later panel rather than before a judge. if we just let people get cut off. What was How do these panels work? sacrificed was employment policies and A: Citizens who are found in possesprograms. As we learned, it is crucial sion of a substance are taken to a police to work right from the beginning of the station. The substance is weighed and treatment process with labour and soif the threshold is calculable for use cial reintegration of drug users. Our infor 10 days or less, it’s allowed and not dicators are that this recent outbreak of considered trafficking. If you’re under what’s called “ancient users” are people that amount, the police send you to a in their 50s and 60s. They’re not workdissuasion committee, which includes ing. It’s a recent phenomenon and dia lawyer, a social worker and a psycholo- rectly connected to Portugal’s economic gist. They assess your condition to see crisis. One of our big challenges is going if you are a problematic user in need to be how to stay with this population of treatment. You are invited to try a and help them get old with dignity. treatment facility and you’re free to ac- Q: One of the anti-drug ads in cept or not. If you’re not a problematic Portugal from the 1970s had the drug user, the commission assesses: are slogan “Drugs, Madness, Death.” there problems in your family life, your Portugal’s decriminalization policy social life, your psychological status? is now founded on values of humanDo you have any other risk factors? ism, pragmatism and participation. The dissuasion committee provides What are the three words that should one moment where people are forced define Vancouver and Portugal’s to stop and reflect on their drug use. drug policies in the next 20 years? Q: How important is that moment?

A: Most of the people, when they have that time to think, assume they have problems with drugs and they could benefit from a treatment process. Most of them, 80 percent of them, accept treatment. I believe this prevents lots of people from becoming more problematic users. Cirque du Soleil and Sun Logo are trademarks owned by Cirque du Soleil and used under license. PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. RUSSIAN STANDARD® VODKA. PRODUCT OF RUSSIA. 100% GRAIN. 40% ALC/VOL. ©2017 IMPORTED BY ROUST CANADA.

A: Education is one word. We need to create the way for people to be informed. That would build capacity, and then in the end, we have to let them have the tools to make informed decisions. The last word would be opportunities. That’s my pick: Education. Capacity. Opportunity. Far better than drugs, madness, death.


JUNE 15, 2017 6 PM

Celebrate Our Oceans and Canada’s 150th Anniversary Join us for a spectacular evening at Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre’s Night at the Aquarium in honour of our oceans and Canada’s momentous milestone. The festivities begin with the Taittinger Champagne Reception and canapés amidst the stunning backdrop of aquatic creatures followed by a collaborative Ocean Wise® four-course dinner prepared by Vancouver’s top chefs, paired with premier wines and spirits. All proceeds directly support our ocean conservation, education and research initiatives.

Restaurant Partners Araxi Restaurant + Oyster Bar blue water café + raw bar Boulevard Kitchen & Oyster Bar Fanny Bay Oysters Fish Counter The Pointe Restaurant Wickaninnish Inn Vancouver Aquarium YEW seafood + bar

Tickets and Event Details at NightAtTheAquarium.org Presented by


LOCAL TASTES WAY BETTER

at Bar One we proudly make all our cocktails with local ingredients supporting local suppliers. 1088 Burrard Street, Vancouver BC, V6Z 2R9 | 604-331-1000 | www.sheratonvancouver.com


U N B I A S E D R E V I E WS / PIZ Z A PA R A D I S E / W H E R E TO D R I N K N OW

VA N M AG .C O M/ TA S T E

Taste THE DISH

FIT FOR A COLONEL

PHOTOGRAPH BY CLINTON HUSSE Y. FOOD ST YLING BY L AWREN MONETA .

GOOD CHEFS CAN NAIL A DISH, but the great ones, they can shine in any genre. Exhibit A is Andrea Carlson, who, as owner of Harvest Community Foods and chef/owner at Burdock and Co., has become a de facto poster child for all things local, sustainable, organic and vegetableforward. But deep down she’s also a fried chicken savant. This $16 dish has been on the Burdock menu in various guises for the past few years, but its current iteration—organic chicken thighs marinated in buttermilk before being perfectly fried and topped with a dusting of dill pickle powder—is the stuff of dreams. To cut through the richness, there are pickles of charred cipollini onions on the side and the whole operation rests on a pillowy streak of mashed potatoes. Imagine Colonel Sanders doing a stage at Chez Panisse and you’ll get the idea. 2702 Main St., burdockandco.com

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Taste

REVIEWS

A STICKY SITUATION AT JAMJAR

The darling of Commerical Drive brings its modern take on Lebanese fare to South Granville with mixed results. by

Neal McLennan Andrew Querner

photographs by

Chicken Shish Tawouk

Our spirits were buoyed by the final dish, chicken shish tawouk.”

Hummus

Makanik Platter to go

28

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Kafta Skillet

South Granville is not Gastown when it comes to dining options. You have a few stalwarts, like West, and the holy trinity of chains (Joey, Earls and Cactus Club all within a block of each other) and not a whole lot else, especially since Vikram Vij took his lineup generator of a restaurant to Cambie. So when the Commercial Drive mainstay Jamjar announced they were stepping into the old Rangoli spot (with Rangoli moving next door to the old Vij’s), expectations were high, maybe unreasonably so. Owner Fadi Eid and his team have done little to the space other than paint and add some painfully uncomfortable steel school chairs (a friend admitted to sitting on his coat throughout his meal), but all in all it feels more homey than Rangoli ever did, and I expect it that’s due to having possibly the friendliest, happiest staff in town. “Come on in!” they beam. “Oh, good order,” they coo, and just when you’re ready to make this your new neighbourhood spot, a few cracks appear. Perhaps everyone


THE DEETS

Jamjar

1488 W 11th Ave. 604-733-2211 jam-jar.ca Best Dishes: Chicken Swish Tawouk ($12), Original Hummus ($9)

AMUSE-BOUCHE

Turf Living 2041 W 4th Ave. 604-428-9970 ourturf.com

is so friendly because there’s zero pressure to move food out of the small kitchen: on my first visit I waited for my food for 35 minutes, even though the room was only half full. Inexplicably, the first dish to arrive was a side of cubed potatoes roasted in garlic and heartcrushingly cold. A few minutes later the mains arrived—hot—but for the most part underwhelming. A kafta skillet—basically some hulking Lebanese beef meatballs—was woefully underseasoned save for the tomato-paprika sauce they were served in, which was so salty as to border on the inedible—and I’m one of those freaks who travels with those little tins of Maldon, so salt is an old friend. The mujadra, a spiced lentil stew, arrived without the advertised crispy onions and likewise suffered from terminal blandness. The staff kept popping by to ask how the bites were, and they were so upbeat I couldn’t bear to tell them of my sadness. Thankfully, our spirits were buoyed by the final dish, chicken shish tawouk, perfectly grilled chunks of Rossdown Farms chicken breast that were a spot-on mixture of charred and moist, and served with a whipped garlic sauce that also

helped revive the tired spuds. It, coupled with the approachable pricing—all the above with a glass of Strange Fellows was only $55—left us hopeful that repeat visits might fare better. And they did. The staff’s demeanour remained unseasonably upbeat and other Lebanese classics, like a very creamy, if mild, take on hummus, the very crispy falafel platter or the touted makali, a deep-fried cauliflower tossed in pomegranate molasses, were solid. But on both occasions the fatoush, a mixture of cucumber, radish and romaine, was so dripping with dressing that it resembled a takeout Greek salad from a mom-and-pop pizza joint. There was a time—preOttolenghi-mania—when this was what Lebanese food was in Western Canada: hearty, healthy and unpretentious. And if that’s what you’re looking for, then Jamjar delivers. But if you’re coming to South Granville to see if there’s any of Vij’s leftover magic in his old stomping grounds, then, sadly, next door is the only place you’ll find it.

Work out, hang out, take out: Turf Living on West 4th is a destination for meet-ups as well as workouts, with a menu that focuses on plant-based recipes and the offer to add “happy protein,” i.e., humanely sourced meat—Uncle Tuffy’s Bison Balls, anyone? After a will-testing fitness class, settle in with the kimchi ’n’ mash (a heavenly heap of mashed root vegetables and squash topped with kimchi, adzuki beans, sautéed greens and tahini dressing). If you’d rather fake the part of gym rat, enjoy locally roasted Moja coffee and baked goods or, better yet, something from the soon-to-arrive beer and wine list.—Maia Odegaard

Pidgin

350 Carrall St. 604-620-9400 pidginvancouver.com Chef Wesley Young continues to evolve Pidgin’s menu forward into a smart marriage of Asian flavours and modern techniques. Gochujang-jolted bolognese warmly dresses Korean rice cakes—pure comfort in any language. Chinese barbecuescented roasted quail is served bone-in to maximize succulence, with sprouted lentils to sop up the glorious juices. A delicate salad of squash, cauliflower and greens shows a deft touch. With its gently scuffed glamour, Pidgin has settled remarkably well into the DTES neighbourhood.—Lee Man

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Taste

T H E TA S T E T E S T

MIDNIGHT SNACK

Uncle Fatih’s

Vancouver is full of artisan pizza spots, but after midnight, the real heroes are the ones serving cheap, cheese-covered slices. Which of these six wedges will satisfy your late-night cravings—and which of them will you forget by morning? We asked an expert panel of judges to find out. by

Kaitlyn Gendemann

photo aND styLINg by

Ariana Gillrie

HONOUR ABLE MENTION

Hot Pie The volume of toppings (“It’s a two-hand pizza, for sure,” said Iranzad) and smoky flavour of Hot Pie’s bacon and mushroom pizza impressed our judges, who were all surprised to learn the slice came from this humble late-night spot in the centre of Gastown. 4 Powell St., hotpiepizza.ca

Uncle Fatih’s

Goldies

Described by our judges as a “standard” late-night slice, Uncle Fatih’s Hawaiian pizza “needs some sort of dipping sauce.” But they did like the generous portion of ham and the sweeter-than-average tomato sauce, which “maybe wouldn’t work with other toppings” but pairs nicely with pineapple. Multiple locations, unclefatih.com

Goldies’ meatball pizza earned a nod of respect— the mozzarella extends right to the edge—but the extra-thin crust left one judge hungry for more: “I probably wouldn’t be satisfied with just one slice.” Multiple locations, goldiespizza.com

Fire Pizza “Those peppers are way too overwhelming,” said one taste tester. Further described as “lacklustre in flavour” and “dry,” the spicy mushroom pizza from this Commercial Drive shop was our judges’ least favourite. 1918 Commercial Dr., firepizza.ca

Megabite The cream-based sauce made this pizza seem cheesier than it was (“It’s a clever cheat”), but the judges still enjoyed the Philly cheesesteak-style toppings—red and green bell peppers, mushrooms, caramelized onions, tender steak—and the sesame seed crust. Multiple locations, megabitepizza.com

Follow @vanmag_com and look for the #VMTasteTest hashtag for your chance to be a judge.

Fire Pizza


BEST IN SHOW

Pizza Garden

The judges loved the chewy-andcharred crust of this slice: “Anything from a wood-fired oven has got my vote,” said Stewart. Our other taste testers agreed, praising the quality of the toppings (the onions are delicate in flavour but provide a nice crunch) and the creamy béchamel-style sauce. “You’re not going to get better quality than this after midnight,” said Voon. Multiple locations, pizzagarden.ca

Megabite

Goldies

Hot Pie

Meet the Judges

James Iranzad is coowner of Wildebeest, Lucky Taco and Bufala. In the spirit of late-night eats, he brought a bottle of bubbly to share with his fellow taste testers.

Kaitlyn Stewart is a selfproclaimed pizza junkie, no doubt a result of pulling the late shift at Royal Dinette— named Best Pacific Northwest at our 2017 Restaurant Awards—where she works as bar manager.

Jeff Voon is our Twitter contest winner. This librarian and business development research specialist knows his way around Vancouver’s pizza scene: he correctly guessed two of the day’s samplings (a VM Taste Test first!).


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THE BIGGEST FOOD EVENT OF THE SUMMER!

C A N A D A D AY L O N G W E E K E N D | T H E O L Y M P I C V I L L A G E THURSDAY JUNE 29

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: FRESH IDEAS ABOUT FOOD A food-centric TED Talks-style speaker series.

FRIDAY JUNE 30

GATHER | COLLABORATIVE LONG TABLE DINNER Long table dinner with top local + international chefs

SATURDAY JULY 01

CANADA DAY COOKOUT | BANDS + BBQ A massive outoor celebration of food, music, and summer.

SUNDAY JULY 02

THE STREET FOOD SHOWDOWN A gathering of 60+ food carts, restaurants, breweries + more.

MONDAY JULY 03

THE BIG BRUNCH The largest outdoor brunch event in the history of the city.

FOR TICKETS + INFO VISIT: WWW.YVRFOODFEST.COM


WHERE TO DRINK

COCK TAILS: CLINTON HUSSE Y; WHERE TO DRINK NOW: ARIANA GILLRIE; L ATE-NIGHT EATS: LUCY ’S EASTSIDE DINER; LOCAL HEROES: STORM CROW TAVERN

Good Libations Don’t feel like going out? Make Max Borrowman’s Mexican Wrestler and more at home. vanmag.com/drinks

Looking for a good time?

We’ve got the ultimate guide to drinking your way through this fine city. Bottoms up!

Late-Night Eats

40 Local Heroes

HEADLINES WE CAME UP WITH WHILE DRINKING

Cruising for a Boozing / You Snooze, You Booze / Honey, I Drunk the Kids / Drunky See, Drunky Do / Sip Sip Hooray / Brew the Right Thing / Turner and Hooch / Spirited Away / Potent Potables / In the Drink / Booze Control / Tap That

Where to Drink Now

36

42 Plus… Hangover Cures Editors’ Picks Best Happy Hours

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Drinking

TO -DO LIST

Where to Drink

NOW 36

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There are a million places to wet that whistle, catch up over a pint or dance the night away—but only seven nights a week to do it. So allow us to help narrow the field with recommendations for Manic Mondays, TGIF and beyond. by

Stacey McLachlan Ariana Gillrie

photographs by


Belt out some George Michael (RIP) and canoodle with a cutie who might just be able to snag you a reso at Savio.

Upstairs at Campagnolo

M

The Boxcar

Monday

Tu Tuesday

KEEP IT LOW-KE Y.

SLIP INTO A SPEAKEASY.

There’s no better place to raise a toast to the start of the week than the Boxcar (923 Main St., thecobalt .ca/the-boxcar). The narrow wood-panelled room features 24 rotating craft beer taps alongside cocktails, but more importantly, the laid-back staff is totally cool if you bring in a pizza from Pizzeria Farina next door. (The carbonara pie pairs beautifully with a Berliner Weisse—just sayin’.)

A secret bar is a good bar. Head through the unmarked green door and up the staircase to Upstairs at Campagnolo (1020 Main St., campagnolorestaurant .ca), where the mustachioed bartenders pour stiff drinks that play on the classics—the French 125 pairs cognac with cava—and the music is turned low to accommodate actual conversation.

SING YOUR HEART OUT.

The Boxcar’s other neighbour is big-sister venue the Cobalt (917 Main St., thecobalt.ca), which offers up some rowdier Monday-night fun in a delightfully dive-y 100-plus-year-old space. Mondays mean nocover karaoke on the low-slung stage, and the event is an industry fave for chefs and servers from the city’s hottest restaurants. So grab a $4 PBR, belt out some George Michael (RIP) and canoodle with a cutie who might just be able to snag you a reso at Savio.

GO ON A GENDER BENDER .

Peach Cobblah bills herself as “the Baddest Bitch of East Van,” but it’s 1181 (1181 Davie St., 1181.ca) in the West End that’s been home to her weird and wild weekly storytelling-meets-drag show Shame Spiral for three years and counting. Buff bartenders serve up cocktails through the lip-sync roulette and into the wee hours.

Editor’s Pick I’ve tried to recreate the

Shameful Tiki Room (4362

Main St., shamefultikiroom .com) experience at home, but there’s something about sipping a frothy coconut bev out of a tiki glass (I always order the Pain Killer— it’s like drinking a vacation), surrounded by bamboo and Polynesian kitsch, that can’t quite be replicated in the living room.— Stacey McLachlan, executive editor

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Drinking

TO -DO LIST

Th Thursday GROOVE THROUGH HAPPY HOUR .

W

Skip the patio Thursdays, and find your spot inside the Keefer Bar (135 Keefer St., thekeeferbar.com). DJs are spinning soul all night, and between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m., it’s happy hour: two-for-one food (Peking duck sliders!) and any of the weekly cocktail specials ($5 rosemary gimlets!).

Revel Room

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL PIANO MAN.

At Revel Room (238 Abbott St., revelroom.ca), live boogie piano accompanies “Sour Hour” most afternoons (variations on the traditional sour cocktail, like the Lime Sorbet or the gin-based Last Word, are just $6 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.), but stick around Thursday nights for an extended bout of key-tickling as duelling pianists duke it out.

The Diamond Clough Club

Wednesday

ROCK OUT WITH KOI FISH.

Think of the Imperial (319 Main St., imperialvancouver.com) as the spiritual successor to Richards on Richards: a music venue big enough to attract solid acts (Jon and Roy, Thurston Moore) but small enough to maintain an intimate vibe. The current design takes cues from the building’s history as a Chinese-language theatre, featuring koi aquarium and chinoiserie; terracotta warriors stand guard at the two well-stocked bars.

38

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Fr Friday TAKE DATE NIGHT UP A NOTCH.

The Diamond’s (6 Powell St., di6mond.com) brick-lined lounge offers a birds-eye view of Gastown to go along with its oh-so-Vancouver combo of craft cocktails and sushi. So come sunset, station yourself and your date by the oversized windows—if you can manage to juggle your Yoshikazu (made with shiitake-infused cognac) and spicy tuna roll long enough to hold hands.

Back and Forth

SCHOOL YOUR FRIENDS AT THE PING-PONG TABLE .

Paddle the night away with pals at Back and Forth (303 Columbia St., backandforthbar.com), the Chinatown ping-pong bar that cheekily channels a rec-room vibe with menu items like Pizza Pockets and instant noodles. Pair these juvenile snacks with $5 sleeves of beer (from local faves like Twin Sails and Parkside) and wine-on-tap offerings between rounds.

ARIANA GILLRIE

GIVE DONNELLY A CHANCE .

Some may write off the impossible-to-pronounce Clough Club (212 Abbott St., donnellygroup.ca /clough-club) for its Donnelly Group pedigree, but the Craig Stanghetta–designed room is unlike the rest of its pub brethren. Enter the moody, artfully shabby tavern and sip any of the inventive (and highly boozy) cocktails on the menu—though on Wednesdays, it may be best to stick with the weekly agave special: select top-shelf tequilas and mezcals are just $5 or $10.


R E A L LY HAPPY HOURS

Sa

WEST END

Timber The vibe Canadiana cool The deal Half-price snacks (like $2 house-made potato chips); $4 cans of B.C. Genuine lager When to get it 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Lounge at Fairmont Pacific Rim

Saturday

CHINATOWN

LIVE THE LUXE LIFE .

INSTIGATE A DANCE- OFF.

At the sleek Lobby Lounge at Fairmont Pacific Rim (1038 Canada Pl., lobbyloungerawbar.com), the moneyed West Van regulars dress to impress , but it’s the venue that steals the spotlight with soaring ceilings and a white-marble-everything design. Snag a Japanese-inspired cocktail (like the sesame-bourbon Sesame Street) and a spot by the fire to soak in the nightly musical act and prime people watching.

Though a select portion of the population may pine for the venue’s previous iteration as a porno theatre, the rest of us are busy dancing at Fox Cabaret (2321 Main St., foxcabaret .com). Fun theme nights—a Daft Punk–inspired party, Motown dances, Y2K jams—helmed by stalwart DJs like Trevor Risk and Common People keep the unpretentious space bumping every night of the week.

Su

33 Acres

Juniper The vibe West Coast chic The deal Negronis on tap for $7; house-made pickles for $3 When to get it 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

MOUNT PLE ASANT

The Cascade Room The vibe First-gen gastropub The deal $8 banger and a beer (plus: sauerkraut!) When to get it 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. DOWNTOWN

TIMBER: NELSON MOUELLIC; CASCADE ROOM: JANIS NICOL AY

Boulevard Kitchen and Oyster Bar The vibe Downtown glam The deal Two-bucks-a-shuck oysters; $5 beers When to get it 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Sunday UP YOUR WINE-SNOB GAME .

Irreverent brown-bag tasting challenges led by David Stansfield and Lisa Cook— the core curriculum at their consistently sold-out Sunday School wine seminars at Vancouver Urban Winery (55 Dunlevy Ave., vancouverurbanwinery.com)—take the term “Sunday Fun Day” to heart.

BRUNCH HARD, PL AY HARD.

Though the neighbourhood is full of top-notch tasting rooms, 33 Acres (15 W 8th Ave., 33acresbrewing.com) has the edge on Sunday morning. The beer waffles with a scoop of Earnest ice cream (plus avocado toast made with Nelson the Seagull bread) almost distract from the real appeal of brunch at a brewery: swapping coffee for a flight of ales.

View our timeline of the city’s ever-evolving (often

infuriating) drinking rules and regs at vanmag.com/drinks

Editor’s Pick Head to Stateside Craft (1601 Commercial Dr., statesidecraft.com) on Thursday nights for the best general-knowledge trivia in town. They’ll have you and your team shouting out answers—especially since free pitchers of beer are at stake. It’s unfussy and balanced trivia that asks everything from “Who sang that?” to “What’s the densest non-metal on the periodic table of elements?”—Natalie Gagnon, associate art director

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Drink Like a Brewer We ask beermakers, what are you drinking?

Adam Chatburn, Real Cask THE BEER Altbier, Doan’s Craft Brewing Company “It’s a tricky style to do, but Evan and Mike have been working on the recipe for years— great people, great beer.”

Mike Doan, Doan’s Craft Brewing Company THE BEER Amarillo Sour, Powell Street Craft Brewery “Everyone is making sour brews these days, but this one is my favourite: it’s tart but so well balanced, and I love the stone fruit and citrus notes you get from the Amarillo.”

David Bowkett, Powell Street Craft Brewery THE BEER Talisman, Strange Fellows Brewing “A flavourful, hoppy, light and refreshing pale ale. The best part is that it’s low-alcohol, so I can have a few without feeling the effects the next morning.”

Iain Hill, Strange Fellows Brewing THE BEER Happyness, Superflux Beer Company “Fruity and tropical dryhopped East Coast IPA with a silky mouth feel.”

LateNight Eats Marijuana isn’t the only thing that gives people the munchies—alcohol can share some of the blame for ill-advised midnight mow-downs. The problem isn’t so much the time of consumption, but the quality and volume of the food consumed. Here, we’ve compiled a wide range of choices, some of which will seem good the night of, others of which will seem good the day after. Choose wisely. by

Graham Templeton

Emergency Rations Snack Land (open until 2:30 a.m.) proclaims itself “King of Snacks,” and with a selection of weird chocolate (Idaho Spud!) and soda (IrnBru!) from around the world, it’s hard to argue. 3011 Main St.

40

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House of Dosas OPEN 24/7 SIGNATURE DISH

Chicken vindaloo dosa, $11 WHY? All the way out near Kingsway and Knight Street, this out-of-the-way favourite serves the sort of enormous, screw-tomorrow food tubes your margarita-addled mind craves most. These huge lentil wraps are filled with curries, combining the strong flavours the intoxicated love with the sort of easy consumption that keeps their dignity largely intact.

A crepe-like dosa (made from lentil batter) is the ideal after-hours feast.

The Naam, Kitsilano

Did’s Pizza, Downtown

OPEN 24/7 SIGNATURE DISH Naam Dragon Bowl, $10.75 WHY? This is where you should tell your sober

OPEN Until 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays SIGNATURE DISH Pesto pizza, $3 to $3.50 per slice WHY? Open late on Fridays and Saturdays

friend to make sure you end up. The plates are generous and full of bold flavours for your dumb drunk mouth, but this all-vegetarian option won’t add too much to the 1,500 calories of beer you downed just before arriving. Their rice- and quinoa-based dragon bowls focus on warm Asian aromas like peanut and spicy curry sauce, with tofu and “meaty” veggies to soak up the flavours.

Lucy’s Eastside Diner, Mount Pleasant OPEN 24/7 SIGNATURE DISH All Day Every Day burger and milkshake combo, $13 WHY? Lucy’s

may have been designed with the drinking crowd in mind. Think about it: the diner is open all night, cares naught about style and believes firmly in the uninhibited mixing of their billion flavours of milkshake. We would tell you to get mint-peanut butter, because that’s the best, but half the fun is in trying to concoct a bad combo and failing every time.

(you weren’t drinking on a school night, were you?), Did’s is a Vancouver institution. Drunk Vancouverites have been satisfying their poorly articulated hungers here since the ’80s, and the signature pesto pizza has been served since day one—it’s practically part of Vancouver’s history.

That One McDonald’s at International Village, Downtown OPEN 24/7 SIGNATURE DISH “Gimmmme every

big mmmack and fries! Wate. No. Just one meal inssssead. That’s SMART! Right? Right, what, whassyername…manager? Isn’t that right, MANAGER?!”, $7.79 WHY? Let’s be honest. This is where you’ll end up, no matter what we say. By including it, at least we get to seem influential. Get the Big Mac because, what, are you trying to impress someone?


Drinking

Confessions of a Bartender

SECOND HOMES

What cocktail trend are you tired of? “I’m not into cocktails smoked to order. I love the smoky flavours in Scotch and mezcal, but I find smoking guns to be messy and inconsistent.”—Amber Bruce, bar manager, the Keefer Bar

Local Heroes

We asked Vancouverites, what’s your go-to neighbourhood bar?

Elwood’s

“It’s pretty small and a bit of a dive, but the drinks are cheap, the atmosphere is chill and the clientele isn’t as young as at some of the other nearby bars. Plus, they have random things on their menu that you wouldn’t expect to find at such a hole in the wall, like frog’s legs and duck wings.” —Kristin McBurney, 30, science communications manager SOUTH GRANVILLE

The Marquis

“The Marquis is my favourite bar in the city. The staff are friendly and attentive,

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CORNWALL AVE.

WEST END

Bayside Lounge

“The Bayside is a hidden gem with some of the best views the city has to offer. That sunken circle bar should be a protected heritage site by now. I have shared many a beer here with friends and I always bring my mom here when she visits to stare out at the sunset. It’s a blessing it’s on the second floor above the busy summer crowds. The tourists don’t even know it’s there.”—Steven Pollock, 45, furniture designer

WEST 4TH AVE.

Elwood’s 3145 W Broadway WEST BROADWAY

ARBUTUS ST.

Quin, editorial director

Mamie Taylor’s

MACDONALD ST.

Editor’s Pick I discovered the Comox Street Long Bar (1763 Comox St., coasthotels .com) one night when my friends and I heard strains of what sounded like Pink Floyd wafting down the street. It was soon followed by the Black Eyed Peas, then the Tragically Hip, then the Knack—and our game became to guess which era and artist would be next. The Comox’s interior is ridiculously dated—there’s an incredible pink neon tube light above the bar, and the logo is very Miami Vice—but pool is still $1 per game, drinks are $5 after 10 p.m. most nights and whatever band is playing is not even remotely cool. Which makes the whole place very cool indeed.—Anicka

the drinks are cheap ($3.75 highballs daily) and the cherry-wood interior will make you feel like a sexy white-collar criminal. They’re even open until 2 a.m. on weekdays. South Granville is not known for being affordable or unpretentious; thankfully, the Marquis is here to fill the void.” —Max Mitchell, 35, student financial advisor

DOWNTOWN

Steamworks Brew Pub

“I really love Steamworks near Waterfront Station. It’s great for enjoying casual after-work drinks as well as for having a night on the town. Because of its different sections, you can have a different experience every time. I love it!” —Andrea Cotter, 32, senior aquarium biologist YALETOWN

Distillery Bar and Kitchen

“Our weekend carb load tradition happens at Yaletown Distillery Bar, where you can get fettuccine alfredo and a shot of vodka for 10 bucks. The bar also makes a mighty

Meat Hook cocktail, if you’re so inclined. The room has a classic (Art Deco?) vibe and there’s always a loop of The Godfather going, so you can do your best Marlon Brando impressions while you eat.” —Andy Fang, 28, photographer

Gastown. The cocktails are fantastic, the staff is amazing and whether I’m there with friends or not, there’s always an interesting conversation to partake in with great people from all over the world.” —Dario Meli, 40, entrepreneur

GASTOWN

CHINATOWN

L’Abattoir

Mamie Taylor’s

“L’Ab is widely considered one of the best restaurants in the city, but that isn’t why I frequent it on the regular. There is a beautiful and beautifully appointed bar right up front at street level with a never-boring view of

“Gone are the days of afterhours noodle houses and BYOB. to the Green Door, but the new faces on the block are keeping up with Chinatown history. Mamie Taylor’s late-night kitchen serves up great food alongside the

ELWOOD’S: ROB KING; MAMIE TAYLOR’S: ANDREW QUERNER; ANICKA QUIN: EVAAN KHERAJ

KITS


What are you most looking forward to drinking this summer? “Long drinks are due for some love: cool, refreshing and effervescent cocktails that offer understated or absent spirit intensity (Tom Collins, Long Island Iced Tea, Dark ’n’ Stormy) are a challenge to make expressive but are so satisfyingly mellow and zesty when done right.”—Jay Jones, beverage and media manager, Vij’s Group

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What drink do you order to test a bartender’s skills? “I would have to say a classic daiquiri. Although it’s a very simple cocktail—made with only rum, lime and sugar— it’s surprisingly hard to make. But when the perfect balance is achieved, it truly sings.” —Robyn Gray, head bartender, Prohibition

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Bayside Lounge 1755 Davie St.

The Princeton Pub 1901 Powell St. 8 blocks east j

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Mamie Taylor’s 251 E Georgia St.

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Storm Crow Tavern 1305 Commercial Dr.

6 blocks east j

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Distillery Bar and Kitchen 1131 Mainland St.

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L’Abattoir 271 Carrall St.

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Steamworks Brew Pub 375 Water St.

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The Marquis 2666 Granville St.

Main Street Brewing Co. 261 E 7th Ave.

WEST BROADWAY

Brown Derby—my favourite bourbon cocktail. (Though I also recommend the Ivanhoe for a cold beer and a show.)” —Diane Fatiaki, 55, chef

Endeavour gin from Liberty Distillery that’s in the freezer and mix it with Fentimans tonic I picked up at Buy-Low.” —Kathryn Aberle, 62, retired

MOUNT PLEASANT

COMMERCIAL DRIVE

MAIN STREET BREWING: LUCAS FINL AY

Main Street Brewing

“When I’m looking for somewhere to get great beer with some nice nibbles, it’s a hop across the street for a pint of Naked Fox IPA at Main Street Brewing. A quick peek off my terrace lets me know if it’s crowded, in which case I grab a growler and enjoy the beer and view from my deck. If I’m looking for a G&T, I just get the bottle of

Storm Crow Tavern

“When I want to grab a beer with a pal, I almost always suggest the Crow. Sleeve specials are great, drink selection is decent and there’s not a million TVs blasting TSN at you. Yeah, it’s a nerd bar, but that really doesn’t matter. It’s a good bar before it’s a nerd bar.” —Kody Huard, 28, archaeologist

HASTINGS-SUNRISE

The Princeton Pub

“In the three years that we have lived in our increasingly dynamic neighbourhood, we have had absolutely zero problems with the craft brewery boom. At the Princeton, you get that great selection of the local beers with the pub that you know has been there long before the East Village banners were. There’s always a table, a great mix of people and live music that is just good enough and loud enough to keep it on the Hastings-Sunrise side of the railroad tracks, so to speak.” —Travis Woloshyn, 39, teacher/actor

Editors’ Picks As awed as I am in temples of modern mixology, what I really love are old-school bars. And in Vancouver it doesn’t get any more old-school than Bacchus (845 Hornby St., wedgewoodhotel .com/bacchus-restaurant). There are no handmade shrubs or bespoke tinctures, and the Broker’s gin martini is cold, huge, surprisingly well priced and served with a starched cocktail napkin and a bowl of bar snacks. Class—it never goes out of style.—Neal McLennan, food editor

From the minute I spied the Emerald Supper Club’s (555 Gore Ave., emeraldsupperclub .com) crimson carpet staircase and crystal chandelier, I thought, “This is my kind of place.” While the cabaret stage hosts all manner of hip events, it’s the lounge—with its dark leather seats, wood detail, stone feature wall and classic cocktails on special (I’ll take the bourbon sour, thanks)—that makes this place feel like a true bar, and a rare find in a city that likes to overcomplicate its watering holes.— Jessica Barrett, senior editor

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Drinking

O H G O D, M Y H E A D

The Morning After

What actually helps a hangover? We turn to an expert to find out. by

Graham Templeton

DR. DAMARIS ROHSENOW is an eminent researcher and the associate director of Brown University’s Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies. She’s studied the ins and outs of inebriation as part of her illustrious career—so who better to ask for advice on treating the symptoms of overindulgence? Spoiler: the only real cure is not to drink to excess in the first place. For everyone else, there’s the list below. Editors’ Picks

Greasy Breakfast Leaving aside the fact that piling delicious, fatty food into your mouth will make you feel better in almost any circumstance, research from Keele University suggests that glucose supply affects the length and severity of a hangover—so the easily unlocked energy of simple fats could be a great way to quickly heal what ails you. But ever the pragmatist, Rohsenow points out the obvious problem: what about indigestion?

Go for a Run This one is counterintuitive, since recuperation usually involves rest. But since we’re looking to feel better, rather than be better, running could work by raising adrenalin and generally exciting a person’s nervous system. It can help overcome tiredness, though the good doctor notes that it might not be quite as helpful for a pounding headache.

Hair of the Dog Surveys show that this solution has 50 percent effectiveness in the opinion of European students who tried it—but remember, people who choose to treat the downsides of drinking with more drink are likely to have a heavier drinking style in general. What feels good to their body might not feel good to a more average one. And, of course, habitual doghairing could lead to lasting liver damage, says Dr. Rohsenow. Cheers?

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Hydrate Like Crazy One of the primary components of a hangover is dehydration—and all of the problems that come with it. Lots and lots of water can obviously deal with thirst, but, interestingly, Rohsenow says it’s unclear if it would speed recovery from other symptoms, like a headache.

Prairie Oyster To make this controversial treatment, toss a raw egg, tomato juice, salt and a bunch of spicy ingredients into a cup, and drink it down. Salmonella aside, this drink contains a lot of sinus-opening aromatics, plus a little shot of protein energy in the egg yolk. Rohsenow doesn’t think it’s the sort of thing that’s likely to get a peer-reviewed study any time soon, but, in her words, “If it works for you, go for it.”

The relaxed atmosphere at Portland Craft (3835 Main St., portlandcraft .com)—high-top booths and community tables—is perfect for mid-afternoon, casual date night or pre-dinner, I-have-to-wait-fora-table drinks. And because the beer list is always changing, I have an excuse to try something new with each visit—though it’s not often I’ll choose anything other than a fruit-based sour or malty brown ale.—Kaitlyn Gendemann, staff writer

My favourite spot to wind down is the 1927 Lobby Lounge in the Hotel Georgia (801 W Georgia St., rosewoodhotels .com/hotel-georgiavancouver). It’s quiet, secluded, intimate and romantic; the selection is broad, the servers are lovely and there always seems to be someone mysteriously interesting at the next table.—Paul Roelofs, art director


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2017-04-28 2:14 PM

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by Jessica Barrett

illustration by John Holcroft

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For flexibility-loving professionals flocking to Vancouver’s creative industries, self employment, contract work and part-time jobs are part of the deal. But life in the gig economy leaves many workers without a safety net. What happens when they fall? 46

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by the standards of most human resources managers, Adrian Sinclair’s job-hunting style is like a step-by-step guide to career suicide. In interviews, the 35-year-old event planner is frank about his challenges with punctuality and his preference to work off-site, and has, on more than one occasion, actively petitioned to downgrade a permanent position to a contract gig. Take, for example, the time he interviewed for a parttime job with the Museum of Vancouver, organizing soirees and happenings to promote their rotating exhibits. “They were asking for a 21-hour-aweek position, where I’d be there three days a week. I kept saying, ‘I’ll work eight hours a week for you on-site and another eight hours a week for you off-site—or as much as you need—as a contractor.’” He didn’t get the job. But four months later the museum called him up to take advantage of his proposal, with no guarantee Sinclair would get a minimum number of hours each week. He was stoked. “I was like, great!” If you’ve been paying attention to labour market news in the last few years, you’ll be familiar with the term “precarious work.” The catch-all phrase encompasses the part-time, temporary and contract gigs that have comprised the careers of a growing number of Canadians since the 1980s, when companies began eliminating full-time jobs—and all the security, benefits and pensions that came with them—in favour of hiring contractors and consultants. The costsaving corporate measures


“These are the people who are one bicycle accident away from not being able to pay their rent.”

— —DARCY VERMEULEN

hit high gear during the Great Recession of 2008 with a “jobless recovery” in the years since giving rise to an entirely new class of worker. Often, the so-called precariat are portrayed as disenfranchised young people locked out of the traditional labour market and left to grapple with terminal uncertainty. But in Vancouver, where many workers, like Sinclair, want to work in contract-based creative industries or create their own projects altogether, a life built around balancing gigs isn’t necessarily the raw end of a bad deal; it’s part of the appeal. “The city markets itself as a creative city—it wants to be that,” says Sinclair, who these days co-runs an event planning company that helps produce large-scale events such as the Vancouver Mural Festival. He also teaches part-time at SFU’s City Studio and enjoys a flexible schedule that allows for hobbies like the drop-in freestyle rap sessions he sometimes runs. The combo earns him about $40,000 a year before tax—above the provincial median income for individuals. “Part of it is everyone is drinking the Kool-Aid, which is fine. I’m happy to put some bubbly water with that and drink it down.” That may bode well for the city’s reputation as a place where people value passion over paycheques, but it also has profound implications for the future of a city that is increasingly fuelled by freelancers. “The Lower Mainland is, I think, particularly attuned to this shift in precarity for workers because of the types of sectors here—that’s tech, that’s the maker economy, that’s arts and culture, the service sector,” says Darcy Vermeulen, a B.C. spokesperson for the Urban Workers Project, a nonpartisan, non-profit group launched in 2016 to organize and advocate for precarious workers. “And these are the good jobs, the jobs that people want.” But supporting an economy built around the boom and bust cycles of small start-ups, service workers and independent contractors is tricky business. Many of the city’s workers are without paid sick days, health and dental benefits, maternity leave or access to Employment Insurance, which, Vermeulen worries, will cost us all down the road. An awareness campaign done by the Urban Workers Project revealed precarious workers make major sacrifices to compensate for their lack of security. They put off routine health checks such as eye or dental exams that aren’t covered by MSP, or delay or forgo having children, and many do not have financial backup in the event of illness or injury. “I like to say these are the people who are one bicycle accident away from not being able to pay their rent,” he says. With nearly 60 percent of the jobs created across the country in 2015 categorized as self-employment, according to Statistics Canada, this segment of the population is poised only to grow, creating an urgent

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need to update employment legislation to reflect this reality. That’s already happening in Ontario, which is reviewing its labour laws and where the Urban Workers Project is pushing for changes that would make it easier for contractors, consultants and freelancers to unionize, as well as give them greater access to Employment Insurance, including maternity and parental leave, and other benefits. Vermeulen would like to see the same thing happen in B.C., which leads the country in per capita rates of small business, most of which are run by sole proprietors, and where more than one in five people—22 percent of the population—is self-employed, according to Small Business BC. There is already some precedent on how the province could adjust its legislation, says Vermeulen, noting that contract workers in B.C.’s film and TV sectors are able to unionize, a model that could be extended to other industries. Meanwhile, some cities are taking concrete steps to improve life for precarious workers. In October 2016, New York City council passed a bill requiring companies who use contractors to pay for work in full by a set deadline or face possible court action and hefty fines. The city’s comptroller general also introduced the New York Nest Egg, a plan that would allow small businesses and self-employed individuals to buy into municipally supported pension programs. It’s a move Vancouver city councillor Andrea Reimer says could serve as inspiration for Vancouver as it scrambles to respond to the results of several decades of workforce change and the success of the city’s own branding. While she admits that provincial laws governing municipal pension plans would make a New York-style nest egg difficult to implement here, “it should at least be a discussion that we’re having,” she says. According to Reimer, governments of all stripes have been slow to realize the way work has fundamentally changed, and it’s not just labour codes that need a major overhaul. The way we plan city infrastructure and services also needs to change. All of Vancouver’s “guts and feathers”—the pipes, zoning bylaws and transit corridors—were created to serve an economy that relied heavily on resources and industrial processing. That is all part of a bygone era. “Fast-forward to the modern economy and very little about that makes sense anymore,” she says. For instance, Reimer says it’s no longer necessary to keep a stark separation between business and residential districts or maintain industrial areas that shut down at 5 p.m. But figuring out how to adjust city planning to support what she calls the “innovation economy” is challenging because there isn’t a mechanism to track how people are configuring their working lives.


“Realistically, I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to retire and I don’t really care.” — —ALE X ANDRA SAMUEL

Reimer suspects close to half of Vancouver’s population works out of places that aren’t licensed to conduct business in—whether they make the rounds at local coffee shops with their laptops, write reports at the kitchen table or run maker studios in the “flex space” of their condos. This is relevant not because the city wants to crack down on people working independently without a business license, but because it needs that information in order to update its planning policies. “Even if you have a job, that doesn’t mean you have a physical place to undertake it in, and we do not build our housing stock with that consideration in mind,” says Reimer, adding that the city has convened an innovation economy roundtable to study how it can better support modern workers through land-use planning. But she admits the process is long overdue and tackles only some parts of a complicated issue. “We’ve only just started thinking about where your pension is going to come from, or how we’re going to protect you when you’re sick, or any of those things.” Often, many people who willingly opt for those unconventional working arrangements aren’t thinking about them at all, says Christian Saint Cyr, a former career counsellor and independent labour consultant who publishes the BC Labour Market Report. While changing sensibilities around work and technological advancement have made self-employment more enticing for people who want autonomy over their schedules and their work, many still don’t adequately plan for the long term. “That’s a huge problem with self-employment, generally,” he says. “You have lots of 50- and 60-year-old people out there who continue to work because they have a mortgage on their house . . . and they haven’t done that planning.” Alexandra Samuel may well wind up as one of them. But the 45-year-old freelance technology writer and strategist isn’t fazed by the prospect of working forever. Always one to value flexibility and meaningful work over stability, Samuel has spent much of her career working for larger organizations as both a contractor and an employee, as well as for herself. She ran social media consulting company Social Signal for five years with her husband, a political strategist and speechwriter who has also spent large chunks of time working as an independent contractor. These days, she’s freelancing full-time. Samuel agrees Vancouver invites a certain breed of entrepreneur with its focus on lifestyle, but there’s another reason many people choose to strike out on their own. With a lack of corporate ladders to climb, professionals in their mid- to late careers often find they either need to leave town for bigger centres or go it alone. “There aren’t that many jobs in Vancouver for somebody at my level,” she says.

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While they’ve contemplated moving to San Francisco or Toronto, Samuel says she and her husband, who have two school-aged children, have decided to stay put. Running their own business has come with trade-offs— for instance, Samuel has never had a maternity leave and was back at work literally the day after giving birth to her youngest child. But working from home and hiring a nanny made the situation manageable, even preferable. “Babies are a lot of work, but they’re boring,” she says. “You might as well build some websites.” Through the years, the family has had periodic access to extended benefits when either partner has taken the occasional “real job,” but they’ve had some long periods where dental checkups and eye exams have been paid out of pocket or through a privately purchased insurance plan. For Samuel, the financial cost is outweighed by the freedom she has to focus on work that she loves, as well as the flexibility to support her son, who has autism. However, she acknowledges that without long-term disability coverage, the family is incredibly vulnerable to illness or injury. “If we get sick, we’re screwed,” she says. Similarly, there’s not much in the way of retirement savings. “We have done nothing. We have no financial cushion,” says Samuel, although she adds the couple does own their home in a Kitsilano duplex, and as an only child she’ll likely receive some inheritance from family. But that doesn’t exactly add up to a retirement plan, and Samuel has adopted a Zen-like attitude toward the reality that she may be working forever; in fact, she’s hopeful her best earning years lie ahead of her. It all goes back to the major perk in being the architect of your own career, she says: when you like your work, you don’t mind the idea of doing it indefinitely. “Realistically, I don’t know that I’ll ever be able to retire and I don’t really care.” Adrian Sinclair seems equally at peace with a murky financial future. Running his business with a partner, Andrea Curtis, affords some degree of insurance against life’s ups and downs—one partner can continue to run the business in the event the other needs time off. But Sinclair has also been experimenting with ways to build up equity beyond private pension plans or real estate, which he doubts he’ll ever be able to afford. Lately, he’s been buying ethical stocks and experimenting with the market in order to learn how to extend his savings. “Besides that, if I ever get a lump sum from work, I buy precious metals.” It may sound quirky, but for Sinclair, being willing to think outside the box in order to make things work is just part of Vancouver’s civic identity. “Anyone who is willing to stay is a hustler—is able to deal with a lot of uncertainty,” he says.


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PARK PARADISE

Whatever winter may have brought us this past year, all is forgiven come summertime in B.C.’s backyard. National parks are free in 2017, so we asked local travel writers to dish on their favourite lake hikes and best-of-B.C. swimming holes. Make the most of it.

SIDESTEPPING THE TOURISTS

Yoho National Park Emerald Lake

Emerald Lake is generally overrun with summer tourist buses, but it’s worth the stop for the view of its unearthly electric turquoise water surrounded by the Rockies. We pulled in on a hot August day, ate a picnic lunch while waiting an hour for our canoe rental, and then paddled out onto the lake with our four-year-old son. At the far end we beached our canoe on the limestone duff that gives the lake its colour and stripped down for a (very) quick family dip. A classic summer vacation highlight, with pictures that will never appear on Facebook.—Tyee Bridge

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T H E D E S T I N AT I O N

SOLITUDE AMONG THE GIANTS

Mount Revelstoke National Park Giant Cedars Boardwalk Trail

Between the second and third years of my undergrad degree, I worked for Parks Canada doing surveys in Jasper National Park. Near the end of the summer, my supervisor asked if I would consider accepting an undercover assignment in Mount Revelstoke National Park, where I would ditch the beige polycotton Parks uniform for civilian garb so as best to observe tourists incognito. I accepted, and after driving west for several hours on the Trans-Canada I arrived at the site of what I was now referring to as my “sting operation”: Giant Cedars Boardwalk Trail, a wooden trail that meanders through an amazing collection of 500-year-old coniferous giants. My task was to sit there and count the number of visitors, then time every third visitor to see how long they took to read the interpretative signs. For the most part, nobody came, so I sat on the boardwalk by myself, enjoying at last enough peace and quiet to get through Infinite Jest. So in a summer where the national parks are going to be slammed, it’s tough to beat some solitary commune with the biggest trees you’ve ever seen.—Neal McLennan

TOP OF THE WORLD

Glacier National Park Asulkan Valley Trail

Most of us have driven through Glacier National Park, along the Trans-Canada Highway and over the infamous Rogers Pass. This summer, stop. Hike the Asulkan Valley Trail. Turn-of-the-century explorer Arthur O. Wheeler described it as “a gem of mountain scenery” in an “enchanted” valley. Clambering past waterfalls, steep slopes and wildlife (asulkan means “wild goat” in a local First Nations dialect), your top-of-the-world destination is the Asulkan Hut, set below the samenamed glacier and surrounded by peaks, where the front porch—with a view of Rogers Pass far below—is the perfect picnic spot. The Alpine Club of Canada maintains the panabode Asulkan Hut, which is available for overnight use ($40). alpineclubofcanada.ca—Barb Sligl

Yoho National Park Lake O’Hara

The Canadian Pacific Railway built Lake O’Hara Lodge in 1926.

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“Yoho!” The Cree expression of awe will escape your lips in the high alpine of Yoho National Park. Amid the western slopes and hanging valleys of the Rockies, the Lake O’Hara trail network starts above 2,000 metres—an engineered, multifaceted circuit that skirts some dozen lakes ringed by the jagged formations of the Wiwaxy Peaks and Cathedral Mountain. Take the Lake Oesa (oh-EE-sa, another wonder-filled word meaning “ice”) Trail past Seven Veils Falls, along quartzite cliffs and up giant stone steps carved by legendary (and quite literal) trailblazer Lawrence Grassi. It’s as if you’ve stumbled upon Middle-earth. There’s a quota system that limits visitors into Lake O’Hara’s trail network (accessible only by Parks Canada bus service), but if there are no spots left for the day, you can always stay for tea or overnight at the rather posh Lake O’Hara Lodge. lakeohara.com—B.S.

ASULK AN TRAIL: MARY SANSEVERINO; GIANT CEDARS: JEROEN VAN LUIN; L AKE O’HARA: JACK BORNO

WELCOME TO RIVENDELL


A WEST COAST SPIN ON THE WEST COAST TR AIL

Pacific Rim National Park

SUSPENSION BRIDGE: DAVE GINGRICH; BEACH: DARREN STONE; MOUNT NORMAN: PARKS CANADA/SCOT T MUNN; HAIDA TOTEMS SGANG GWA AY: BRODIE GUY

Coastline

The classic 75-kilometre-long West Coast Trail is so popular you need to book a reservation during peak season. To get literally off the beaten path—as elite athletes Jen Segger and Norm Hann did—you can load your gear onto stand-up paddleboards and tour along the rugged coastline instead. Faster than hiking, it will also give you access to remote spots like the enormous cave and sea stacks at Owen Point.—Masa Takei A BRIDGE TO TEST FRIENDSHIPS

Pacific Rim National Park

Logan Creek Suspension Bridge The West Coast Trail has many natural wonders, from passing grey whales to the sight of the Milky Way setting over the ocean on a clear night. One man-made wonder is the Logan Creek Suspension Bridge, a Pacific Rim rite of passage. It’s a 300-foot span that is not so much a bridge as a hanging 12-inch board with some fencing tacked on both sides. The descent to the bridge is down a sheer cliff on wobbly ladders, and the bridge itself—not dizzyingly high, but high enough— is also bouncy, especially if you have a pal who thinks it’s funny to jostle the span when you hit the midway point.—T.B.

A SHORT HIK E WITH A BIG PAYOFF

Gulf Islands National Park Reserve Mount Norman

Thanks to a generous relative with a cabin, I spend a good bit of time on Pender Island. I’m usually indolent and overfed on these trips, but when I want to climb out of my torpor, I head to Mount Norman. Starting from Ainslie Point Road, it’s a short (1.25-kilometre) but steep hike to the viewing platform. The trail itself, an old logging road, is not terribly inspiring, but it leads to spectacular southwest views of Bedwell Harbour and the outlying islands.—T.B.

TIDE TO TABLE

Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site

An exploration of the Haida Gwaii park areas by kayak takes about two weeks. But by switching up paddles for petrol power on a guided Moresby Explorers Zodiac, we went from T’aanuu Llnagaay at the northern end down to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of SGang Gwaay in the south over four days. On a tour more exclusive than a Michelin-starred restaurant, we shared a candlelit meal at the company owner’s childhood home—an old whaling-station-turned-hippie-homestead—in Rose Harbour (population: 2), prepared by his mother from ingredients she grows and fishes for herself. moresbyexplorers.com—M.T.

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T H E H O T TA K E

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l When Coco Chanel first took note of the Breton striped uniform worn by the French Navy circa 1858, the style would forever be crowned a fashion staple. This striped wrap jacket by the Gap updates a tried-andtrue classic with a loose shape and long length. $118, gapcanada.ca

BEACH COMBER

Summer’s at our door, which means it’s time to get your sun, surf and sand groove on.

n Harnessing the colours of the Pacific West Coast, the limited-edition, terrytowel Arrow beach blanket by the Tofino Towel Co. is more than just a pretty face. One percent of all profits go to help locals preserve the area’s pristine beach and wildlife. $100, tofinotowelco.com

i YSL’s Volupté Tint-in-Balm offers a kiss of colour for instant glow but also doubles down on lip care with a soothing, balm-like consistency. The N°7 Flirt Me Coral is note-perfect in peach—a fresh pairing with summer’s nautical navy and white. $42, sephora.ca

n Men’s bathing suits are often too baggy or better suited to the teen set, but Montreal’s Boto reimagines this summer standard as sophisticated shorts with a tapered leg instead. Each pair of trunks is crafted from a 22-piece pattern and tailored like a suit for a flattering fit—and the perfect dip. Khaki green Aruba Embroidered Anchors, $79, botoswimwear.ca

o Whether yachting or hitting the pavement, Swims’ new Webbing loafer driver is the ultimate men’s summer shoe with its semi-seamless, ultralight, breathable and water-friendly construction. $235, harryrosen.com

NOW OPEN

Nettle’s Tale 330 W Cordova St., nettlestale.com

Why we’re excited: While the other swimsuit companies were busy making us all feel embarrassed about that extra cookie, Vancouver’s own Nettle’s Tale opened its Gastown doors to all shapes and sizes (otherwise known as 99 percent of the population). Ranging in price from $59 to $164, adjustable swimsuits can be worn multiple ways for flattering fits to suit any shape.

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Amanda Ross


PROMOTION

presents

2017

hat happens when you pair the best of 24 Vancouver’s W On February 2017, restaurants with award-winning th

Best of CityFebruary brought6 wine? Onthe Friday, more than 500 guests found out together some of the top at Vancouver Magazine’s annual Big Night. restaurants With top chefsfrom from winning the magazine’s 2015 category our Restaurant Awards winners proving their accolades with dishes,dishes the city’s whohundreds created ofspecial culinarily curious were left sated paired with of the and satisfi ed, some especially given the pairing of each dish with afrom winning top category winners bottle from the Vancouver Magazine our Wine Awards and Craft International Wine Awards.

1. 3.

4.

Beer Awards.

1. Guests fill the Coast Coal Harbour Hotel’s ballroom taste and sip their 1. A fulltohouse at Coast Coalway through the winning andguests wineries. Harbourrestaurants Hotel where 2. Perfectly Wolfpairings. Blass Gold Label mingle chilled and enjoy Chardonnay is paired with slow cooked lamb 2. Palm Sugar neckMaenam’s and beetroot ravioli from& Spiced PorkBar Belly paired with Arrowleaf Tableau Bistro. Pinot Noir 3. Representatives from Cockburns serve up 3. Soleil pouringStilton theircheesecake. port Clos to pairduwith Preston’s signature PinotVikram Blanc.Vij of Vij’s 4. Chef of The Year Restaurant poses with ChefKurtis FrankKolt Pabst of 4. Wine Awards Judge Blue sampling Water Cafepairings. + Raw Bar. 5. NorbergRichardson (left), Suzanne 5. Christina Chef Andrew of Bidinost, Erin Cebula, Christy Murphy, and Kathryn CinCin grating fresh parmesan on MacDonald. his Spinach and Ricotta Ravioli. 6. Vancouver Magazine’s Editor-in-Chief 6. Central Brewing Teamfrom Emiliana Max Fawcett City enjoys some sips Coyam. pouring their crisp Red Racer IPA. 7. Miku Restaurant the fiGordon nishing of touches Leeta Liepins puts and Jim on their Salmon TV OshiShow. Sushi pressed with OurAburi City Tonight B.C. wild salmon and jalepeño. 8. Russian Standard Vodka’s 8. Jay Jones of Vij’s Restaurant serves up Rhubarb Shrubwith Cocktail created signature cocktails Russian Standard by Bartender Robyn Gray. Vodka. 9. Volvo Showcase Pianodisplays Pianist providing 9. of Vancouver their stunning for the evening. brightmusic blue S60 Polestar model. 10. Refreshing Vivreau waterBraised cleansed guests’ Cactus Club delicious pallets between sipsCaramelized and bites. Short Rib and Lasagna with Tomato 11. AOnion stunning centrepiece from Flower Factory surrounded by Les Ragout. Dames’ Wall of Wine. 11. Suzanne Bidinost of Coast 12. Eric of YP Dine CoalMcCutcheon Harbour Hotel with poursMark champagne to toast the Featherstone. restaurants before the doors open. 13. Chef David

2.

5.

6. 8.

9. 7. 10.

11. HOST SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSOR

SILVER SPONSOR

WINE POP UP SPONSOR

MUSIC SPONSOR


THROW B AC K

For Vancouver magazine’s 50th year, we’re taking a look back through the archives and sharing a few classic covers each month. Just like the city, we’ve changed a lot over the past few decades.

June 2007 The lobster claw on the cover may look like a simple shot, but photographer Eydís Einarsdóttir had to hold it in the perfect position with pins, and then put in hours of Photoshop work retouching it.

June 1990 VanMag capitalized on Molson Indy excitement by, um, running a story guessing how a variety of car brands would do in a hypothetical race around the track. Somehow, this story is six pages.

June 1975 In the aftermath of a bitter threemonth strike by the disc jockeys of Top 40 station CKLG, Vancouver magazine profiles the drama that included picketing advertisers, disowning scabs and a station manager who refused to negotiate. Those looking for a more uplifting story should turn to “My Pals the Fantails,” an ode to the joys of tropical fish ownership (even after a nasty aquarium leak onto a shag carpet). An events listing teases what to expect at an Alice Cooper show: “Dancers in spider suits crawling along a web, accompanied by a chorus line dressed in skeleton suits. And a Cyclops monster.”

June 1981 The glamorous and successful Miss Teen Vancouver (she’s a champion baton twirler!) graces the cover of an issue packed with style. Consider the fashion stories on hot topics like “cotton” and “clayand-rust-coloured silk separates.”

#vanmagturns50 For more vintage VanMag all year long, follow us on Instagram at @vanmag_com

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Monika Deol

CIBC Private Wealth Client as painted by Jen Mann

CAN A FINANCIAL PORTRAIT C A P T U R E T H E R E A L YO U ? Artists take time to understand their subjects. So does CIBC Private Wealth Management. We go deeper and look beyond the surface to create a financial portrait that uniquely reflects who you are and what you value. See what CIBC Private Wealth Management can achieve for you. Visit cibcprivatewealth.com.


Vancouver magazine, June 2017  

Engaging articles, reviews and stories all about Vancouver. Vancouver Magazine informs, guides and entertains people who engage with the cit...

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