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Cobourg District Collegiate Institute West “A Tradition of Excellence Since 1901”

Course Calendar for Grades 9 through 12 135 King Street West, Cobourg, ON, K9A 2M7 - 905-372-2191 www.cdciwest.com


OUR SCHOOL CRESTS DAREM LUCEM “TO GIVE LIGHT”

The oldest of the present buildings was constructed in 1901, although the history of the school extends over 130 years! The 1901 Wing was designated a Heritage Building by the Council of Cobourg in 1985 in recognition of its unique position in the history of this community. Over the years, the school has used a number of school crests, each associated with a diferent phase of its growth. In the early years of Cobourg Collegiate, there was a close ailition between our school and Victoria College (later to become a part of the University of Toronto). Professors of the college often taught students of the Collegiate Institute. In the centre of the pin (left) is the familiar logo of the school - the torch and the initials, “C.C.I.”. The perimeter bears the latin motto of Victoria College, “Abeunt Studias In Mores”, which when translated reads, “Education Develops Character”. The second crest was used prior to 1963 as the emblem for the Cobourg Collegiate Institute. It is simple in design picturing a hand-held lantern and accompanied by the school’s motto, “Dare Lucem”. With the construction of a second school in Cobourg in 1960, C.D.C.I. West decided to create a new crest which was introduced in 1973. It was designed by G. Shaw and S. Sprague, both teachers of the school. The lame of the torch represents the long association of the school with academic excellence while the supporting standards - the Vikings - represent the school mascot.


TABLE OF CONTENTS - 2012-2013 School Proile .............................................................................................................................................................................................. Pg 1 Career & Program Pathways .................................................................................................................................................................. Pg 6 Specialist High Skills Major Program ................................................................................................................................................ Pg 7 Laptop Computer Program for Learning Strategies ................................................................................................................... Pg 9 Enrichment Program................................................................................................................................................................................ Pg 9 Diploma Requirements .........................................................................................................................................................................Pg 10 Grade 9 & 10 Program Requirements ..............................................................................................................................................Pg 11 Types of Courses In Grades 9 & 10 ....................................................................................................................................................Pg 12 Explanation of Course Codes..............................................................................................................................................................Pg 12 Explanation of Streams ........................................................................................................................................................................Pg 13 Course Oferings .....................................................................................................................................................................................Pg 15 Course Descriptions Arts....................................................................................................................................................................................................Pg 17 Business Studies ..........................................................................................................................................................................Pg 21 Canadian & World Studies ........................................................................................................................................................Pg 22 Cooperative Education..............................................................................................................................................................Pg 25 English .............................................................................................................................................................................................Pg 27 French ..............................................................................................................................................................................................Pg 29 Guidance & Career Education .................................................................................................................................................Pg 29 Health & Physical Education....................................................................................................................................................Pg 30 Mathematics .................................................................................................................................................................................Pg 33 Native Studies ...............................................................................................................................................................................Pg 35 Science ............................................................................................................................................................................................Pg 36 Social Sciences .............................................................................................................................................................................Pg 39 Technological Education ..........................................................................................................................................................Pg 41 Requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Certiicate .................................................................................................Pg 43 Requirements for the Certiicate of Accomplishment ..............................................................................................................Pg 43 Substitution for Compulsory Courses .............................................................................................................................................Pg 43 The Annual Education Plan .................................................................................................................................................................Pg 43 Community Involvement .....................................................................................................................................................................Pg 44 The Provincial Secondary School Literacy Test ............................................................................................................................Pg 44 Prior Learning Assessment & Recognition.....................................................................................................................................Pg 45 Alternative Ways of Earning Credits .................................................................................................................................................Pg 46 The Ontario Student Transcript .........................................................................................................................................................Pg 47 Procedures for Course Changes ........................................................................................................................................................Pg 47 School Code of Behaviour & Student Responsibilities..............................................................................................................Pg 48 Special Education....................................................................................................................................................................................Pg 48 West Learning Commons (Library) ...................................................................................................................................................Pg 49 Guidance & Career Education and School Support Services..................................................................................................Pg 50 Student Success.......................................................................................................................................................................................Pg 51


WELCOME TO COBOURG DISTRICT COLLEGIATE WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST INSTITUTE WEST “A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE IN COBOURG SINCE 1901” •

Positive learning environment and excellent programs in all disciplines

Experiential opportunities engage students in their education

Exceptional student leadership opportunities

Outstanding school spirit that enhances a sense of belonging

Interactive and updated web site keeps students connected

Specialist High Skills Major programs available in Arts and Culture, The Environment, Information and Communication Technology, and Health and Wellness

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Advanced computer technology programs keep students on the “cutting edge” of communication

Abundant and varied co-curricular opportunities

A tradition of outstanding athletic teams

Extensive opportunities for involvement in drama, music and visual arts

Exceptional commitment to service in our community

Program Pathways prepare students for all postsecondary destinations


THE FACILITIES •

Heritage building irst constructed in 1901 with additions in 1939 and 1963

Guidance and Career Education Centre

Art Gallery

Thirty-two classrooms

State-of-the-art dramatic arts facility

Three communications technology labs

Three computer resource labs

Music room, electronic music studio and recording arts studio

Library Information Centre with a multi-media lab and literacy centre

Double gym, single gym and lakeside track and playing ield

Over 250 networked computers provide an outstanding student-to-computer ratio

Weight training facility

Smart boards to allow for creative and interactive learning

Approximately two million dollars in facility upgrades over the past two years

Wireless Internet access throughout the school

Three science labs

Academic Support Classroom

CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES Cobourg West provides students with a wide range of co-curricular activities that encourage leadership, positive self-esteem and lead to a sense of belonging to the school community. By getting involved in co-curricular activities, students develop a sense of pride in themselves and their school. The resulting school spirit is evident in the level of participation and positive attitude displayed by West students on a daily basis, both in and out of the classroom. STUDENT LEADERSHIP – There are many opportunities for students to develop their leadership, organizational and interpersonal skills. Students can become involved in: • • • •

Student Government Interact Club (Rotary Youth) Environmental Action Team Student Voice

• • •

Yearbook Peer Helpers Viking Leaders

In addition, students are encouraged to organize clubs when they feel there is a student need or interest. •

Athletics – Interschool teams have a long-standing tradition of excellence at the West. Teams are available for males and females in basketball, volleyball, soccer, rugby, hockey, badminton, tennis, crosscountry running, track and ield, swimming, mountain biking, wrestling and ultimate.

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST •

The Arts – Student creativity is encouraged and celebrated through opportunities in visual arts, music and drama. A variety of instrumental and vocal musical groups, dramatic art productions, bi-yearly drama productions, ilm festivals and art displays allow our students to showcase their talents. Our recording arts studio and Mac Lab keep our students on the cutting edge of the animation, ilm, music and recording arts industry.

Camp Enterprise – This Rotary sponsored event provides our students with the opportunity to spend four days at Trent University learning about business, entrepreneurship, leadership and team building. The West sends more students annually than any other high school in the board.

Community Involvement – The staf and students of the West have been tremendous supporters of the community. Our school has been a major supporter of the Terry Fox Run each September and the United Way. Our students participate in the Students Supporting Seniors days, organize an annual Community Christmas Dinner for people in need and participate in the Big Brothers’/Big Sisters’ Bowling for Dollars event each year. Our Students’ Council faithfully enters a loat each year in the Cobourg Christmas Parade. Members of the Interact Club support our community by raising money for causes such as the United Way, Me to We, Habitat for Humanity, the “Halloween for Hunger” food drive for the Fare Share Food Bank, as well as collecting gifts and donations for needy children at Christmas through the Giving Tree and Salvation Army Christmas Drive. Each year the Interact Club also takes on an international project and has raised thousands of dollars to support organizations like the “Canadian Landmine Foundation”, “Sleeping Children Around the World”, “Polio Plus”, “Kids Can Free the Children” and “The Stephen Lewis Foundation”. Thousands of dollars have been raised to support AIDS orphans in Africa through a variety of school initiatives including our annual Reading for Life Program. Our students also support the Foster Child Association.

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES •

Student Exchange/Study Abroad – Students have many opportunities to experience life in other countries, as well as in other communities. One month (summer), three month or one year exchanges are available in countries like Costa Rica, France, Luxembourg, Japan, Germany, Italy and many more. Students may earn credits in summer courses in other countries as well as in specialized camps, right here in Ontario.

Encounters with Canada – Heritage Canada sponsors this unique experience that brings young Canadians from across the country together to spend a week in Ottawa, touring our nation’s capital and becoming more familiar with what it means to be Canadian. Thanks to the generous support of our local service clubs, many West students can take advantage of this amazing opportunity.

UNIQUE PROGRAMS The teaching staf at the West is committed to providing innovative learning opportunities for our students. The following is a sample of a few of these unique opportunities that help students to stay engaged and ind relevance in their education: •

Communications and Integrated Computer Technology – All students are encouraged to integrate the available technologies at the West to enhance the overall efectiveness of their assignments and presentations in all courses. Students are often required to go beyond the written report and mix technology and creativity to produce multimedia presentations. Students can create interactive web pages which can be linked to our extensive school web site. Digital still and video cameras can also be used to record material that can be edited to produce professional quality products.

Mac Computer Lab – The Mac Lab has allowed the technology department to ofer courses specializing in digital video production (AWR 3M1), computer animation (IDC 4U1) and music and computers (AMM 3M1 and 4M1). This high tech equipment also allows specialized computer graphics programs to be added to the communications technology courses.

www.cdciwest.com - The West website allows our students to communicate with their teachers as well as keep up on special events, daily announcements and student achievements. There are dozens of pictures of students who are active and involved in school life at the West. The site is also an excellent education resource that can link students to other educational web sites.

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UNIQUE PROGRAMS WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST •

Camp Viking - In the fall, every Grade 10 student is invited to participate in a unique four day outdoor adventure experience at Camp Arowhon in Algonquin Park. West staf members organize activities that allow students to get to know each other, as well as develop teamwork, problem solving, co-operation and leadership skills. This outstanding educational experience promotes a sense of belonging, class unity and school spirit.

Adventures in History – The history department runs several events and learning activities outside of the school. Each year, the Grade 12 students have the opportunity to be members of historic re-enactments of either the American Civil War or the War of 1812. Re-enactments often consist of two or more battles, dress balls, workshops and parades. The students dress in full uniform and equipment appropriate for the time period and drill, ight, dance and interact as soldiers from the time. Female students may dress as soldiers by day and belles of the ball in the evenings. History students also assist with the research, recording and teaching of local history within Northumberland County.

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CAREER AND PROGRAM PATHWAYS A Program Pathway is a collection of courses and other supports that will prepare students for career sectored employment or postsecondary studies upon graduation. Program Pathways provide the opportunity for students to: •

Complete secondary school graduation diploma or certiicate requirements

Meet the entry level requirements of a speciic industry or postsecondary institution

Develop employability and industry-speciic skills

Obtain experience in the workplace

Earn industry-recognized certiication

At the West, we are committed to providing programs that help our students to ind relevance in their learning and to provide them with opportunities that will enhance their preparation and readiness for college, university, apprenticeships and the world of work. Information on careers and their potential pathways is available on the Guidance link at www.cdciwest.com.

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SPECIALIST HIGH SKILLS MAJOR WEST WELCOME TO COBOURG THE SPECIALIST HIGH SKILLS MAJOR (SHSM) program enables students to customize their high school experience to suit their interests and talents and prepare for a successful postsecondary transition to apprenticeship training, college, university or employment, while meeting the requirements of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). The major enables students to gain specialized preparatory credits, skills and knowledge that will allow them to make informed career decisions. Students are able to enter the SHSM based on their readiness and the alignment of the program with their interests and postsecondary goals. Entry should occur no later than Year 3 in order for the student to be appropriately scheduled into the required courses. A student may exit the SHSM before completion without jeopardizing progress towards the OSSD, retaining credits and certiications earned up to that point. What does a student need to do to complete a SHSM? Students in the Specialist High Skills Major program are required to do the following: 1. Have a parent/guardian sign a registration form; 2. Select a bundle of required credits in a ministry approved framework including: • ‘Major’ credits that provide sector speciic knowledge and skills in the specialized ields; • Required credits from the Ontario curriculum are delivered in the context of the specialized sector; 3. Earn sector-recognized certiications; 4. Engage in experiential learning through cooperative education, job shadowing and work experience; 5. Use the Ontario Skills Passport (OSP) to document demonstration of essential skills and work habits; 6. Engage in ‘reach ahead’ experiences, e.g., earn ministry approved dual credits for college and/or university courses and/or participate in Level 1 Apprenticeship in-school training and other ‘next step’ experiences. Students in the SHSM program will: •

receive an education that is focussed in their area of interest

earn First Aid and CPR qualiications

earn a special red seal on their OSSD; this indicates their success in SHSM

be eligible to receive special incentives from some post-secondary institutions.

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SPECIALIST HIGH SKILLS MAJOR

The West ofers 4 diferent SHSM programs ARTS & CULTURE SHSM This SHSM is intended to assist students who love the arts (drama, music and visual arts). Students explore a variety of career possibilities, from studio art to performance to stage and costume design, sound and lighting technology and even recording technology. With a state-of-the-art drama facility including a recording studio and access to MacIntosh computers for music composition, students develop the knowledge and practical skills to create personal portfolios that demonstrate their artistic skills and abilities. Experiential opportunities as well as ‘reach ahead’ opportunities to explore “Arts” related programs at college and university allow students to fully explore the career choices that are available to them. THE ENVIRONMENT SHSM The Environmental SHSM will allow students to study issues concerning the state of our planet such as: global climate change, alternative energy, pollution, water treatment, natural resource management, agriculture and endangered species. This program will enhance the students’ environmental literacy and ofer students many opportunities for experiential learning. Students will visit postsecondary institutions that specialize in the environmental sector and gain certiication and training related to the environment. INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY SHSM The ield of communications technology is constantly growing and changing and the career opportunities are endless. Computer graphics, web design, computer animation, ilm, digital video and music production are just a few of the career areas for which we are preparing our students. West students will have opportunities to develop skill sets that can cross many sectors of the technological service workplace. The West is committed to strengthening and continuously developing our communication courses. Our new MacIntosh Lab is providing our students with “hands-on” access to the most current technology in the industry. Our graduates have conirmed that MacIntosh computers are the “industry standard” in the “real world” of communications technology. Students involved in this pathway will have the opportunity to obtain the skill sets and practical experience necessary to successfully pursue education and employment opportunities in the world of business, ilm, animation and technology. HEALTH & WELLNESS SHSM The health and wellness sector of our economy continues to grow as the demographic of our country, and town, changes. The health and wellness of those in our community is important. Students who enrol in the Health & Wellness SHSM program will be able to explore health careers such as medical doctor, registered nurse, chiropractor, massage therapist, physiotherapist, itness instructor, dietician and many more. Our Medical Technology course visits the Northumberland Hills Hospital once a week to explore the many aspects of hospital care. The Physical Education department ofers courses in itness and healthy active living. Students interested in the ield of health and wellness will beneit from the many certiication and training opportunities.

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THE LAPTOP COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR LEARNING STRATEGIES WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST The Learning Strategies Course is designed to assist students in achieving success in high school. The goal of the course is to help students become responsible, independent learners who will develop improved self advocacy skills and gain a better understanding of the wide variety of resources available to them, including those using the computer. In this course, students work to improve reading, writing, presentation, problem solving, collaboration, organizational and time management skills. To enhance their learning, each student uses a laptop computer. The computer has a variety of programs that support learning - each of these programs will be available for use on the student’s home computer. These programs include: • Premier Assistive Technologies - Scan & Read, Talking Word Processing, Text to Audio, etc. - email, documents, calendars, podcast, video • Google Apps for Education

ENRICHMENT PROGRAM The West ofers ENRICHED programs (subject to enrolment) in the following Grade 9 and Grade 10 core subjects: • • •

English Mathematics Science

These enriched courses explore all aspects of the regular Ontario Grade 9 and 10 academic curricula but then delve deeper into related curriculum topics. The pace of the enriched class will be faster and expectations of research, critical thinking, organization, evaluation and presentation will be higher than for the regular academic courses. The enriched courses are designed to allow our strongest students to learn at a speed and level equal to their abilities.

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REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA Students are able to choose those courses, from the list above, that they would like to take at the enriched level. For example, a student may choose Grade 9 mathematics and science at the enriched level, while their English may be at the academic level. Regardless of the combination of enriched courses, this program prepares students very well for the higher level thinking that is part of the Grade 11 university stream. (For students entering Grade 9 in September, 1999, or later) Deinition of a Credit: One credit is deined as a minimum of 110 hours of instruction. COMPULSORY CREDITS (total of 18) Students must earn the following compulsory credits in order to obtain the Ontario Secondary School Diploma: •

4 credits in English (1 credit per grade)

1 credit in French as a second language

3 credits in mathematics (at least 1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)

2 credits in science

1 credit in Canadian history

1 credit in Canadian geography

1 credit in the arts

1 credit in health and physical education

.5 credit in civics

.5 credit in career studies

PLUS Group 1: one additional credit in English, or French as a second language, or classical languages, or international languages, or Native languages, or Canadian and world studies, or Native studies, or social sciences and humanities, or guidance and career education or cooperative education Group 2: one additional credit in French as a second language, or the arts, or business studies, or health and physical education or cooperative education Group 3: one additional credit in French as a second language, or science (Grade 11 or 12), or computer studies, or technological education or cooperative education OPTIONAL CREDITS (total of 12) In addition to the 18 compulsory credits, students must earn 12 optional credits. ADDITIONAL DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS In addition to completing 30 credits a student must: •

perform 40 hours of community involvement activities

pass a Provincial Secondary School Literacy Test (administered in Grade 10).

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GRADE NINE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST Students must take the following SIX COMPULSORY COURSES: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

English French Mathematics Science Canadian Geography Health and Physical Education

Students must choose TWO OPTIONAL COURSES from the following: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Communications Technology Visual Arts Music Dramatic Arts

We strongly RECOMMEND that students choose the following format for options: 1. Integrated Computer Technology 2. ONE of Art, Music or Drama The Computer Technology curriculum will provide students with a comprehensive technological program. Skills gained in this program will provide students with a fundamental background in computers and technological design that will be applicable to a wide variety of subject areas. NOTE: Students entering Grade 9 may substitute the Learning Strategies course in place of a compulsory or elective course, with the recommendation of their elementary school teacher and/or the Special Education Resource Teacher (SERT). Students who are exempt from French are also encouraged to take the Learning Strategies course. In addition, students coming from a French Immersion background may move directly into Grade 10 French.

GRADE TEN PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Grade 10 students must take the following FIVE COMPULSORY COURSES: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

English Mathematics Science Canadian History Civics and Career Studies

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TYPES OF COURSES IN GRADE 9 & 10 Grade 10 students must also choose THREE OPTIONAL COURSES. Mathematics, science, English, French, Canadian geography and Canadian history will be ofered as either ACADEMIC or APPLIED. Courses in all other areas will be ofered as OPEN. Students may select courses from a variety of streams; these courses should relect their strengths, interests and goals. In an ACADEMIC course, the essential concepts of a subject are learned and related material explored as well. Although knowledge and skills in the subject will be developed through both theory and practical applications, the emphasis will be on theory and abstract thinking as a basis for future learning and problem solving. An APPLIED course also covers the essential concepts of a subject. Knowledge and skill will be developed through both theory and practical applications, but the focus will be on practical applications. In applied courses, familiar, real-life situations will be used to illustrate ideas, and more opportunities will be given to experience hands-on applications of the concepts studied. OPEN courses are comprised of a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students. They are designed to prepare students for further study in a subject and to enrich their education generally. LOCALLY DEVELOPED courses have been designed by the school board to meet the speciic learning needs of students. Locally developed courses can be ofered in Grades 9 and 10 English, mathematics and science. These courses count as compulsory courses toward a student’s graduation requirements and are similar in nature to ‘Workplace’ level courses that are ofered in Grades 11 and 12. Cobourg DCI West ofers locally developed courses in mathematics.

EXPLANATION OF COURSE CODES Example - ENG 1D1 •

The irst three characters identify the subject

The fourth character indicates the year associated with the grade level of the course 1 = Grade 9

2 = Grade 10

3 = Grade 11

4 = Grade 12

The ifth character indicates the level of diiculty D = Academic P = Applied O = Open

E = Workplace Preparation C = College Preparation U = University Preparation

Therefore, ENG 1D1 is the code for English, Grade 9, Academic.

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M=University/CollegePreparation T = Transfer L = Locally Developed


DIFFERENCES APPLIED & WEST ACADEMIC STREAMS WELCOMEBETWEEN TO COBOURG

NOTE: Students who are successful in any academic or applied course in Grade 9 will be able to proceed to either the academic or the applied stream in the same subject in Grade 10, for any subject except mathematics. Students who successfully complete the applied mathematics course in Grade 9 will be required to complete Grade 9 academic math if they wish to take the Grade 10 academic mathematics course. For all other courses, if a student plans to switch from one course type in Grade 9 to the other in Grade 10, the student may be strongly encouraged to successfully complete additional course work.

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LOOKING BEYOND GRADE TEN •

Courses in Grades 11 and 12 are designed to prepare students for a postsecondary destination - that is, for university, college, apprenticeship training or the workplace.

•

Students should choose Grade 10 courses that meet the prerequisite requirements for the Grade 11 courses they plan to take. Some Grade 11 courses in English, French, mathematics and science have speciic Grade 10 requirements. Course prerequisites are listed along with each of the course descriptions in the following pages. Below are descriptions of the STREAMING MODEL FOR GRADES 11 & 12

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COURSE OFFERINGS 2012-2013 WEST WELCOME TO COBOURG CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES

ARTS ADA 1O1 ADA 2O1 ADA 3M1 ADA 4M1 AMU 1O1 AMG 2O1 AMU 2O1 AMV 2O1 AMG 3M1 AMM 3M1 AMU 3M1 AMV 3M1 AMG 4M1 AMM 4M1 AMU 4M1 AMV 4M1 AVI 1O1 AVI 2O1 AVI 3M1 AWM 3M1 AVI 4M1

Dramatic Arts - Grade 9 Open Dramatic Arts - Grade 10 Open Dramatics Arts – Grade 11 U/C Dramatic Arts – Grade 12 U/C Music – Grade 9 Open Music/Guitar – Grade 10 Open Music – Grade 10 Open Music/Vocal – Grade 10 Open Music/Guitar – Grade 11 U/C Music and Computers – Grade 11 U/C Music – Grade 11 U/C Music/Vocal – Grade 11 U/C Music/Guitar – Grade 12 U/C Music and Computers – Grade 12 U/C Music – Grade 12 U/C Music /Vocal – Grade 12 U/C Visual Arts – Grade 9 Open Visual Arts – Grade 10 Open Visual Arts – Grade 11 U/C Visual Arts/Drawing & Painting – Grade 11 U/C Visual Arts – Grade 12 U/C

CGC 1D1 CGC 1P1 CGG 3O1 CGW 4U1 CHC 2D1 CHC 2P1 CHV 2O5 CHW 3M1 CHY 4U1 CHY 4C1 CLU 3M1 CLN 4U1

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION WRK 5O1 WRK 5O2 WRK 5O4 WRK 5OY

BUSINESS BBI 2O1 BAF 3M1 BDI 3C1 BMI 3C1

Geography of Canada – Grade 9 Academic Geography of Canada – Grade 9 Applied Geography: Travel & Tourism – Grade 11 Open Canadian & World Issues – Grade 12 University Canadian History – Grade 10 Academic Canadian History – Grade 10 Applied Civics – Grade 10 Open, Half Credit World History to the 16th Century – Grade 11 U/C World History – Grade 12 University World History – Grade 12 College Understanding Canadian Law – Grade 11 U/C Canadian & International Law – Grade 12 University

Introduction to Business – Grade 10 Open Financial Accounting – Grade 11 U/C Entrepreneurship – Grade 11 College Marketing – Grade 11 College

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1 Credit Peer Tutor 2 Credit Coop – Half Day 4 Credit Coop – Full Day 4 Credit Coop – OYAP


COURSE OFFERINGS 2012-2013 ENGLISH ENG 1D1 ENG 1P1 ENG 2D1 ENG 2P1 ENG 3U1 ENG 3C1 EMS 3O1 ENG 4U1 ENG 4C1 EWC 4U1 EWC 4C1 IDC 4UL IDC 4OL

NATIVE STUDIES English – Grade 9 Academic English – Grade 9 Applied English – Grade 10 Academic English – Grade 10 Applied English – Grade 11 University English – Grade 11 College Media Studies – Grade 11 Open English – Grade 12 University English – Grade 12 College The Writer’s Craft – Grade 12 University The Writer’s Craft – Grade 12 College Studies in Education, L3 – Gr 12 University Studies in Education, L3 – Gr 12 Open

FRENCH FSF 1D1 FSF 1P1 FSF 2D1 FSF 3U1 FSF 4U1

Core French – Grade 9 Academic Core French – Grade 9 Applied Core French – Grade 10 Academic Core French – Grade 11 University Core French – Grade 12 University

GUIDANCE & CAREER EDUCATION GLE 1O1 GLC 2O5 GLE 2O1

Learning Strategies – Must be recommended Career Studies – Grade 10 Open, Half Credit Learning Strategies – Must be recommended

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION PPL 1OB PPL 1OG PPL 2OB PPL 2OG PAD 3O1 PAF 3OG PPL 3O1 PPZ 3O1 PSE 4U1 PLF 4C1 PPL 4O1

Healthy Active Living Ed (Boys’) – Grade 9 Open Healthy Active Living Ed (Girls’) – Grade 9 Open Healthy Active Living Ed (Boys’) – Grade 10 Open Healthy Active Living Ed (Girls’) – Grade 10 Open Outdoor Recreation – Grade 11 Open Live Fit (Cardio & Fitness for Girls) – Grade 11 Open Healthy Active Living Ed - Grade 11 Open Health for Life – Grade 11 Open Exercise Science – Grade 12 University Recreation & Fitness Leadership – Grade 12 College Healthy Active Living Ed – Grade 12 Open

NDA 3M1

SCIENCE SNC 1D1 SNC 1P1 SNC 2D1 SNC 2P1 SBI 3U1 SBI 3C1 SCH 3U1 SPH 3U1 SVN 3M1 TPJ 3C1 SBI 4U1 SCH 4U1 SCH 4C1 SPH 4U1

Science – Grade 9 Academic Science – Grade 9 Applied Science - Grade 10 Academic Science – Grade 10 Applied Biology – Grade 11 University Biology – Grade 11 College Chemistry – Grade 11 University Physics – Grade 11 University Environmental Science – Grade 11 U/C Health Care – Grade 11 College Biology – Grade 12 University Chemistry – Grade 12 University Chemistry – Grade 12 College Physics – Grade 12 University

SOCIAL SCIENCES & HUMANITIES HIF 2O1 HSP 3M1 HNC 3O1 HPC 3O1 HZT 4U1 HHS 4M1 HSB 4M1 HNB 4O1

Individual and Family Living – Grade 10 Open Anthropology, Psychology & Sociology – Grade 11 U/C Fashion and Creative Expression – Grade 11 Open Parenting – Grade 11 Open Philosophy – Grade 12 University Families in a Diverse Society – Grade 12 U/C Challenge & Change in Society – Grade 12 U/C The Fashion Industry – Grade 12 Open

TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION TGJ 1O1 ICS 2O1 TGJ 2O1 AWR 3M1 TGJ 3M1 IDC 4U1 TGJ 4M1

MATHEMATICS MPM 1D1 MFM 1P1 MAT 1L1 MPM 2D1 MFM 2P1 MAT 2L1 MCR 3U1 MCF 3M1 MBF 3C1 MEL 3E1 MCV 4U1 MDM 4U1 MHF 4U1 MAP 4C1 MEL 4E1

Aboriginal Issues in Canada – Grade 11 U/C

Principles of Math – Grade 9 Academic Foundations of Math – Grade 9 Applied Essential Mathematics – Grade 9 Essential Principles of Math – Grade 10 Academic Foundations of Math – Grade 10 Applied Essential Mathematics – Grade 10 Essential Functions – Grade 11 University Functions & Applications – Grade 11 U/C Foundations for College Math – Grade 11 College Math for Work & Everyday Life – Grade 11 Essential Calculus & Vectors – Grade 12 University Math of Data Management – Grade 12 University Advanced Functions – Grade 12 University Foundations for College Math – Grade 12 College Math for Work & Everyday Life – Grade 12 Essential

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Communications Technology – Grade 9 Open Introduction to Computer Studies – Grade 10 Open Communications Technology – Grade 10 Open Computer – Film/Video – Grade 11 U/C Communications Technology – Grade 11 U/C Computer Animation – Grade 12 University Communications Technology – Grade 12 U/C


ARTS - DRAMA TO COBOURG WEST WELCOME DRAMATIC ARTS (Grade 9 Open) ADA 1O1 This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms and techniques, using material from a wide range of sources and cultures. Students will use the elements of drama to examine situations and issues that are relevant to their lives. Students will create, perform, discuss, and analyse drama, and then relect on the experiences to develop an understanding of themselves, the art form, and the world around them. DRAMATIC ARTS (Grade 10 Open) ADA 2O1 This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms, conventions, and techniques. Students will explore a variety of dramatic sources from various cultures and representing a range of genres. Students will use the elements of drama in creating and communicating through dramatic works. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will relect on their experiences. DRAMATIC ARTS (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) ADA 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 or 10 Dramatic Arts, Open This course requires students to create and perform in dramatic presentations. Students will analyse, interpret, and perform dramatic works from various cultures and time periods. Students will research various acting styles and conventions that could be used in their presentations, and analyse the functions of playwrights, directors, actors, designers, technicians, and audiences. DRAMATIC ARTS (Grade 12 University/College Preparation) ADA 4M1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Dramatic Arts, University/College This course requires students to experiment individually and collaboratively with forms and conventions of both drama and theatre from various cultures and time periods. Students will interpret dramatic literature and other text and media sources while learning about various theories of directing and acting. Students will examine the signiicance of dramatic arts in various cultures, and will analyse how the knowledge and skills developed in drama are related to their personal skills, social awareness, and goals beyond secondary school.

ARTS - MUSIC MUSIC (Grade 9 Open) AMU 1O1 This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity, and imagination. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of relective and analytical activities. Students will develop an understanding of the conventions and elements of music and of safe practices related to music, and will develop a variety of skills transferable to other areas of their life. MUSIC (Grade 10 Open) These courses emphasize the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of relective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures. Students may take one or more of the following Grade 10 music courses:

Guitar AMG 2O1 This course is designed as an introduction to playing the guitar - metal, pop, all modern styles, through the use of tablature. All guitars must be acoustic. Students may enter the course with no previous musical experience.

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ARTS - MUSIC Instrumental AMU 2O1 Music performance is the focus of this course. All styles of music are embraced with a wide variety of performances presented from classical chamber music to jazz, to pop. Recommended preparation, AMU 1O1. Students will spend the majority of their classroom time playing their instruments. Vocal AMV 2O1 The study of choral music will give students valuable experience in working with a group of individuals to reach a common goal – a great performance. Vocal students will also be given the opportunity to experience the recording studio, as they develop their most available musical instruments – their own voices. MUSIC (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) These courses provide students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when relecting on, responding to, and analysing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers. Students may take one or more of the following Grade 11 music courses:

Guitar AMG 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Guitar, Open Students will continue to increase their understanding of the elements of music while developing their guitar playing. All guitars must be acoustic (nylon or steel string). Music and Computers AMM 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 or 10 Music (Instrumental or Guitar), Open (or department approval) Most music today is inluenced by computers. This course ofers the opportunity to explore music through the use of computers and synthesizers. Students will learn how to make professional quality recordings and will analyse new and existing works. Video soundtracks will be created using I Movie, Final Cut Express, Logic Express and Garageband. Instrumental AMU 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 or 10 Music, Open Music performance is the focus of this course and all students will be expected to play in the Wind Ensemble or Stage Band. Students will be given the opportunity to develop their playing skills at an appropriate Conservatory level.

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ARTS - MUSIC TO COBOURG WEST WELCOME Vocal AMV 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Vocal, Open (or by audition) The study of choral music will give students valuable experience in working with a group of individuals to reach a common goal – a great performance. Vocal students will also be given the opportunity to experience the recording studio, as they develop their most available musical instruments – their own voices. MUSIC (Grade 12 University/College Preparation) These courses enable students to enhance their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music. Students will perform traditional, commercial, and art music, and will respond with insight to live and recorded performances. Students will enhance their understanding of the function of music in society and the impact of music on themselves and various communities and cultures. Students will analyse how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers. Students may take one or more of the following Grade 12 courses:

Guitar AMG 4M1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Guitar, University/College Students will continue to increase their understanding of the elements of music while developing their guitar playing. All guitars must be acoustic (nylon or steel string). Music and Computers AMM 4M1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Music and Computers, University/College In this second year Music and Computers course, we will further create and arrange music using GarageBand and Logic Express. There will be further study of the recording of music in a studio environment and the uses of music in the entertainment industry. Instrumental AMU 4M1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Music, University/College Music performance is the focus of this course and all students will be expected to play in at least one large ensemble (Wind Ensemble or Stage Band). Students will be given the opportunity to develop their playing skills at an appropriate Conservatory level. In addition, students will be given the option to write the theory-based AP exam. Vocal AMV 4M1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Vocal, University/College The study of choral music will give students valuable experience in working with a group of individuals to reach a common goal – a great performance. Vocal students will also be given the opportunity to experience the recording studio, as they develop their most available musical instruments – their own voices.

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ARTS - VISUAL ARTS VISUAL ARTS (Grade 9 Open) AVI 1O1 This course is exploratory in nature, ofering an overview of visual arts as a foundation for further study. Students will become familiar with the elements and principles of design and the expressive qualities of various materials by using a range of media, processes, techniques, and styles. Students will use the creative and critical analysis processes and will interpret art within a personal, contemporary, and historical context. VISUAL ARTS (Grade 10 Open) AVI 2O1 This course enables students to develop their skills in producing and presenting art by introducing them to new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation. Students will apply the elements and principles of design when exploring the creative process. Students will use the critical analysis process to relect on and interpret art within a personal, contemporary, and historical context. VISUAL ARTS (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) AVI 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 or 10 Visual Arts, Open This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, sculpting, and printmaking, as well as the creation of collage, multimedia works, and works using emergent technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others. This course will be delivered as a comprehensive program. VISUAL ARTS - DRAWING AND PAINTING AWM 3M1 (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) Prerequisite: Grade 9 or 10 Visual Arts, Open This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, as well as the creation of collage, multimedia works, and works using emergent technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others. This course will be delivered as a program focused on drawing and painting art forms. VISUAL ARTS (Grade 12 University/College Preparation) Prerequisite: Grade 11 Visual Arts, University/College This course focuses on enabling students to reine their use of the creative process when creating and presenting two- and three-dimensional art works using a variety of traditional and emerging media and technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process to deconstruct art works and explore connections between art and society. The studio program enables students to explore a range of materials, processes, and techniques that can be applied in their own art production. Students will also make connections between various works of art in personal, contemporary, historical, and cultural contexts.

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AVI 4M1


BUSINESS STUDIES WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (Grade 10 Open) BBI 2O1 This course introduces students to the world of business. Students will develop an understanding of the functions of business, including accounting, marketing, information technology, human resources, and production, and of the importance of ethics and social responsibility. This course builds a foundation for further studies in business and helps students develop the business knowledge and skills they will need in their everyday lives. Students will create their own business plan which details the organization, management, marketing and advertising for a business that they create. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING FUNDAMENTALS BAF 3M1 (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop inancial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, inancial analysis, and current issues and ethics in accounting. This course will provide an introduction to the accounting skills necessary for running a small business. This course in accounting is open to students in Grades 10, 11 or 12. ENTREPRENEURSHIP: THE VENTURE BDI 3C1 (Grade 11 College Preparation) This course focuses on ways in which entrepreneurs recognize opportunities, generate ideas, and organize resources to plan successful ventures that enable them to achieve their goals. Students will create a venture plan for a student-run school-based or summer business. Through hands-on experiences, students will have opportunities to develop the values, traits, and skills most often associated with successful entrepreneurs. MARKETING: GOODS, SERVICES, EVENTS BMI 3C1 (Grade 11 College Preparation) This course introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing, which includes the marketing of goods, services, and events. Students will examine how trends, issues, global economic changes, and information technology inluence consumer buying habits. Students will engage in marketing research, prepare advertising, develop marketing strategies, and produce a marketing plan for a product of their choice.

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CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES - GEOGRAPHY GEOGRAPHY OF CANADA (Grade 9 Academic) CGC 1D1 This course explores Canada’s distinct and changing character and the geographic systems and relationships that shape it. Students will investigate the interactions of natural and human systems within Canada, as well as Canada=s economic, cultural and environmental connections to other countries. Students will use a variety of geo-technologies and inquiry and communication methods to analyse and evaluate geographic issues and present their indings. GEOGRAPHY OF CANADA (Grade 9 Applied) CGC 1P1 This course focuses on geographic issues that afect Canadians today. Students will draw on personal and everyday experiences to learn about Canada’s distinct and changing character and the natural and human systems and global inluences that shape the country. Students will use a variety of geo-technologies and inquiry and communication methods to examine practical geographic questions and communicate their indings. REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY: TRAVEL AND TOURISM (Grade 11 Open) CGG 3O1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 Geography of Canada, Academic or Applied Bon Voyage! Through fascinating videos, ield trips, and hands-on activities, this course takes your mind to unique travel destinations throughout the world. Using the Internet and other technologies, students plan real trips, design travel brochures, and prepare slide shows. This course focuses on travel and tourism as a vehicle for the study of selected world regions. Using a variety of geo-technologies and inquiry and communication methods, students will conduct and present case studies that develop their understanding of the unique characteristics of selected world regions; the environmental, cultural, economic and political factors that inluence travel and tourism; and the impact of the travel industry on communities and environments around the world. *This course will be ofered every other year. It is available for the 2012-13 school year. CANADIAN AND WORLD ISSUES: A GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS CGW 4U1 (Grade 12 University Preparation) Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English or social sciences and humanities Major issues like pollution, poverty and human rights violations continue to plague our planet. In this course, students view powerful videos and participate in simulations, debates and group activities in an efort to understand these problems and propose and evaluate interventions. This course will investigate current local, provincial, national and international issues through incredible videos, exposure to fascinating technologies, and participating in a variety of ield studies, simulations and debates. Students will learn how to become active participants in our global community and continue to maintain the reputation of Canadians as global citizens and humanitarians. This course examines the global challenges of creating a sustainable and equitable future, focusing on current issues that illustrate these challenges. Students will investigate a range of topics including cultural, economic and geopolitical relationships, regional disparities in the ability to meet basic human needs and protection of the natural environment. Students will use geo-technologies and skills of geographic inquiry and analysis to develop and communicate balanced opinions about the complex issues facing Canada and a world that is interdependent and constantly changing. *This course will be ofered every other year. It is available for the 2012-13 school year. THE ENVIRONMENT AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT CGR 4M1 (Grade 12 University/College Preparation) Prerequisite: Any university, university/college or college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English or social sciences and humanities This course investigates the complexity and fragility of ecosystems and the pressures human activities place on them. Students will examine ecological processes, the principles of sustainability and strategies for resource management, with a focus on the challenges of environmental degradation and resource depletion. Students will use geotechnologies and skills of geographic inquiry to explain and evaluate various approaches to achieving a more sustainable relationship between people and their environment. *This course will be ofered every other year. It will be available in the 2013-14 school year.

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CANADIAN AND TO WORLD STUDIES - HISTORY WELCOME COBOURG WEST CANADIAN HISTORY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (Grade 10 Academic) CHC 2D1 This course explores the local, national and global forces that have shaped Canada’s national identity from World War I to the present. Students will investigate the challenges presented by economic, social and technological changes and explore the contributions of individuals and groups to Canadian culture and society during this period. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to evaluate various interpretations of the issues and events of the period and to present their own points of view. They will also learn to develop and support a thesis; conduct research and analysis; and efectively communicate the results of their inquiries in media such as scrapbooks, letters, debates, political cartoons, audio/visual presentations and web pages. CANADIAN HISTORY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (Grade 10 Applied) CHC 2P1 This course explores some of the events and experiences that have inluenced the development of Canada’s identity as a nation, from World War I to the present. By examining how the country has responded to economic, social and technological changes and how individuals and groups have contributed to Canadian culture and society during this period, students will develop their ability to make connections between historical and current events. Students will have opportunities to formulate questions, locate information, develop informed opinions and present ideas about the central issues and events of the period. As well, they will be given opportunities to formulate appropriate questions, develop informed opinions, and present information in a variety of ways including scrapbooks, letters, debates, political cartoons, audio/ visual presentations and web pages. CIVICS - Half Credit (Grade 10 Open) CHV 2O5 This course explores what it means to be an informed, participating citizen in a democratic society. Students will learn about the elements of democracy in local, national and global contexts, about political reactions to social change and about political decision-making processes in Canada. They will explore their own and others’ ideas about civics questions and learn how to think critically about public issues and react responsibly to them. WORLD HISTORY TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY CHW 3M1 (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) Prerequisite: Grade 10 Canadian History in the Twentieth Century, Academic or Applied Everything from mummies and the pyramids through gladiators and into knights and castles is covered in this course. You will use ield trips, re-enactments, computer simulations, research assignments, video and re-creations to learn about our fascinating past. This course investigates the history of humanity from earliest times to the sixteenth century. Students will analyse diverse societies from around the world with an emphasis on the political, cultural and economic structures and historical forces that have shaped the modern world. They will apply historical inquiry, critical-thinking and communication skills to evaluate the inluence of selected individuals, groups and innovations and present their conclusions. WORLD HISTORY: THE WEST AND THE WORLD CHY 4U1 (Grade 12 University Preparation) Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English or social sciences and humanities While this course is primarily for teaching you the skills required for university, you may also choose to learn the skills needed to re-enact the American Civil War - in parades, full scale battles and full dress balls. In addition, students also have the option of preparing for and writing the European AP exam. The rest of the course focuses on the fascinating history of the world from the Three Musketeers through the youth movement of the 1960’s to American policy in Iraq. This course investigates the major trends in Western civilization and world history from the sixteenth century to the present. Students will learn about the interaction between the emerging West and other regions of the world and about the development of modern social, political and economic systems. They will use critical-thinking and communication skills to investigate the historical roots of contemporary issues and present their conclusions.

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CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES - HISTORY WORLD HISTORY: THE WEST AND THE WORLD CHY 4C1 (Grade 12 College Preparation) Prerequisite: Any university, university/college or college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English or social sciences and humanities This course explores the history of the world since the sixteenth century, emphasizing the interaction between the emerging West and other regions of the world. Students will learn about a variety of economic, social and political systems and the changes they have undergone over time. Students will apply their developing skills of historical inquiry to understand and communicate ideas about the forces that have formed our modern world.

CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES - LAW AND ECONOMICS UNDERSTANDING CANADIAN LAW CLU 3M1 (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) Prerequisite: Grade 10 Canadian History in the Twentieth Century, Academic or Applied This course explores Canadian law with a focus on legal issues that are relevant to people’s everyday lives. Students will investigate fundamental legal concepts and processes to gain a practical understanding of Canada’s legal system, including the criminal justice system. Students will use critical-thinking, inquiry and communication skills to develop informed opinions on legal issues and apply this knowledge in a variety of ways and settings, including case analysis, legal research projects, mock trials and debates. CANADIAN AND INTERNATIONAL LAW (Grade 12 University Preparation CLN 4U1 Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English or social sciences and humanities This course examines elements of Canadian and international law in social, political and global contexts. Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law, and the principles and practices of international law, and will learn to relate them to issues in Canadian society and the wider world. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to analyse legal issues, conduct independent research and present the results of their inquiries in a variety of ways.

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COOPERATIVE WELCOMEEDUCATION TO COBOURG WEST COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, TEACHER ASSISTANT / PEER TUTOR (1 Credit) WRK 5O1 Senior students are matched with a speciic class and teacher at the West High School. Peer tutors perform many functions including assisting with classroom routines, helping students with class work, objective marking, etc. Teacher Assistants must have completed a Grade 11 or 12 credit with a minimum of 70% in the subject they are assisting in. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (Grade 11-12 Open) (2 Credits) WRK 5O2 / (4 Credits) WRK 5O4 Cooperative Education is an exciting opportunity that allows students to combine school and work as a way of earning credits (University, College, Mixed, Open, or Workplace). Coop students select a career that interests them and are then placed with an employer in or near the community. The Coop program has two components: 1. School… Students participate in two weeks of pre-employment training and periodic integration sessions throughout the semester, 2. Workplace… Students spend two or more periods a day in the workplace with their employer / supervisor. Here, they will learn valuable employability and job-speciic skills, as well as complete their assigned duties and responsibilities. Coop at the West will allow students to: • • • •

“test drive” careers gain skills, knowledge, and experience to give them a “head start” on the competition make valuable contacts and open the door to future job opportunities explore opportunities for further education / training through apprenticeships, college, or university.

Participating in the Cooperative Education program is a privilege that is earned through: • • •

the successful completion of the compulsory Grade 10 Careers Studies course the demonstration of the necessary educational background the demonstration of the required level of maturity and responsibility.

The school retains the right to refuse the participation of any student in Cooperative Education if it is deemed that the student does not possess a reasonable level of maturity and responsibility.

ONTARIO YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM (OYAP) WRK 5OY This program allows Ontario secondary school students to fast track into the trade of their choice. Two types of OYAP programs exist. 1. The irst program consists of a unique combination of community college trades training and a high school Cooperative Education program. Students are registered as apprentices and attend the college one to three days a week to earn the Basic Level 1 of their trade qualiications. The remainder of the week is spent at a work placement with an employer, earning two to three high school credits while accumulating hours toward their apprenticeship requirements. This full day program usually takes place during the second semester. Positions in this program are only available to students who are in their Grade 12 year and eligible to graduate. Student involvement hours must be complete and documented at the time of indenturing. Candidates demonstrating success in recommended math, science, English and technological studies will be interviewed by a panel from both education and industry to gain entrance into the program. Successful candidates will require registration in a two or three credit Cooperative Education program and two dual credits during second semester. A related Cooperative Education placement, during Grade 11, is highly recommended. A transportation allowance will be available to subsidize the cost of attending the college program. The cost of college training is absorbed by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. Note: OYAP Level 1 program students will receive Dual Credits along with their Coop credits. For further information about Dual Credits, speak to a Guidance Counsellor.

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COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Tentative Accelerated Programs for February 2013

CVST – Commercial Vehicle Service Technician CDP – Child Development Practitioner (formerly ECE, Early Childhood Education)

2. A second form of OYAP participation is also available to any Cooperative Education student with a placement in an Apprenticeable Trade, who is at least 16 years of age and has 16 credits. These OYAP students will not complete their trade’s Basic Level 1 course at a community college. The student will have a Learning Plan developed which is based on the training standards for the trade. Students can be registered as apprentices and the competencies achieved through the Coop placement are recognized toward their apprenticeship. The student will potentially earn between two and four secondary school credits. An OYAP student in this program can participate in any of more than 150 recognized trades. Contact the Guidance Oice or Coop Department for more information.

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ENGLISH WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST ENGLISH (Grade 9 Academic) ENG 1D1 This course is designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to efective communication. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 academic English course, which leads to university or college preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12. ENGLISH (Grade 9 Applied) ENG 1P1 This course is designed to develop the key oral communication, reading, writing and media literacy skills students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will read, interpret and create a variety of informational, literary and graphic texts. An important focus will be on identifying and using appropriate strategies and processes to improve students’ comprehension of texts and to help them communicate clearly and efectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 applied English course, which leads to college or workplace preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12. ENGLISH (Grade 10 Academic) ENG 2D1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 English, Academic or Applied This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to efective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation course. ENGLISH (Grade 10 Applied) ENG 2P1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 English, Academic or Applied This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing and media literacy skills that students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will study and create a variety of informational, literary and graphic texts. An important focus will be on the consolidation of strategies and processes that help students interpret texts and communicate clearly and efectively. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 college or workplace preparations course. ENGLISH (Grade 11 University Preparation) ENG 3U1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 English, Academic This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course. ENGLISH (Grade 11 College Preparation) ENG 3C1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 English, Academic or Applied This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will study the content, form and style of a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from Canada and other countries and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms for practical and academic purposes. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 college preparation course. MEDIA STUDIES (Grade 11 Open) EMS 3O1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 English, Academic or Applied This course will equip students with the skills needed to critically assess and interact with today’s ever changing media landscape. Through interpretation, production and relection, students will learn to understand the impact that mass media (tv, ilm, advertisements, radio, social networking, internet) has on their daily lives. Students will develop critical thinking skills by engaging with various media texts and will also have multiple opportunities to produce their own media texts.

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ENGLISH ENGLISH (Grade 12 University Preparation) ENG 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 English, University This course emphasizes the consolidation of literacy, communication and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and conidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college or the workplace. ENGLISH (Grade 12 College Preparation) ENG 4C1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 English, College This course emphasizes the consolidation of literacy, communication and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from various countries and cultures and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms for practical and academic purposes. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for college or the workplace. THE WRITER’S CRAFT (Grade 12 University Preparation) EWC 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 English, University Do you love to write short iction, poetry and screenplays? This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will analyse models of efective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify and use techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and identify efective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also complete a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project and investigate opportunities for publication and for writing careers. THE WRITER’S CRAFT (Grade 12 College Preparation) EWC 4C1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 English, College Do you love to write short iction, poetry and screenplays? This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will investigate models of efective writing; use a workshop approach to write a variety of works; and make considered decisions for improving the quality of their writing. They will also complete a creative or analytical independent study project and investigate opportunities for publication and for writing careers. STUDIES IN EDUCATION, L3 (Grade 12 University) IDC 4UL / (Grade 12 Open) IDC 4OL This interdisciplinary program ofers secondary school students, specialized training in reading and writing strategies to support other learners, more speciically, elementary students and to promote essential literacy skill development. Capitalizing on the “learning through teaching” concept, this program, combined with one-to-one assistance, enriches the learning experience of both the mentor and the elementary child “at-risk” learner. Initially, secondary students are provided with training on instructional strategies and efective mentoring techniques. The program is designed to be delivered on a one-to-one basis where reading is modelled, practiced and supported. Strategies are utilized to promote reading development and self-conidence. Reading partners are given writing and response opportunities to further promote essential literacy skill development.

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FRENCH WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST CORE FRENCH (Grade 9 Academic) FSF 1D1 This course emphasizes the further development of oral communication, reading and writing skills. Students will build on and apply their knowledge of French while exploring a variety of themes, such as relationships, social trends and careers. Thematic readings, which include a selection of short stories, articles and poems, will serve as stepping stones to oral and written activities. CORE FRENCH (Grade 9 Applied) FSF 1P1 This course emphasizes the concurrent development of oral communication, reading and writing skills, using a broadbased theme such as the media. Students will enhance their ability to understand and speak French through conversations, discussions and presentations. They will also read short stories, articles, poems and songs and write brief descriptions, letters, dialogues and invitations. CORE FRENCH (Grade 10 Academic) FSF 2D1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 Core French, Academic This course enables students to increase their knowledge of the French language, further develop their language skills and deepen their understanding and appreciation of francophone culture around the world. Exploring a variety of themes, students will develop and apply critical thinking skills in discussion, in their analysis and interpretation of texts, and in their own writing. CORE FRENCH (Grade 11 University Preparation) FSF 3U1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Core French, Academic This course draws on a variety of themes to promote extensive development of reading and writing skills and to reinforce oral communication skills. Students will gain a greater understanding of French-speaking cultures in Canada and around the world through their reading of a variety of materials, including a short novel or a play. Students will produce various written assignments, including a formal essay. The use of correct grammar and appropriate language conventions in both spoken and written French will be emphasized throughout the course. CORE FRENCH (Grade 12 University Preparation) FSF 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Core French, University This course draws on a variety of themes to promote extensive development of French-language skills. Students will consolidate their oral skills as they discuss literature, culture, and current issues. They will read a variety of texts and will write a formal essay. The use of correct grammar and appropriate language conventions in both spoken and written French will be emphasized throughout the course.

GUIDANCE AND CAREER EDUCATION LEARNING STRATEGIES: SKILLS FOR SUCCESS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL (Grade 9 Open) GLE 1O1 / (Grade 10 Open) GLE 2O1 Each course focuses on learning strategies to help students become better, more independent learners. Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal-management skills and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace and the community. Each course helps students build conidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond. CAREER STUDIES - Half Credit (Grade 10 Open) GLC 2O5 This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities and ways to search for work. The course explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.

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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION HEALTHY ACTIVE LIVING EDUCATION (Grade 9 Open) PPL 1OG (Girls’) / PPL 1OB (Boys’) This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Students will learn movement techniques and principles, ways to improve personal itness and physical competence, and safety/injury prevention strategies. They will investigate issues related to healthy sexuality and the use of and abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs and will participate in activities designed to develop goal-setting, communication, and social skills. This course will focus on team activities. HEALTHY ACTIVE LIVING EDUCATION (Grade 10 Open) PPL 2OG (Girls’) / PPL 2OB (Boys’) This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Student learning will include the application of movement principles to reine skills; participation in a variety of activities that enhance personal competence, itness, and health; examination of issues related to healthy sexuality, healthy eating, substance use and abuse; and the use of informed decision making, conlict resolution, and social skills in making personal choices. This course continues to focus on team activities that will encourage lifelong participation. OUTDOOR RECREATION (Grade 11 Open) PAD 3O1 This course focuses on the development of skills for participation in a variety of outdoor recreational activities, including self-reliance, teamwork and planning. Students will acquire knowledge and skills related to the environment in which the activities take place in order to minimize the impact of those activities on the environment. They will also learn how to develop their own personal well-being through activities in which they can engage for the rest of their lives, as well as developing skills to ensure their own and other’s safety in those activities. This course will prepare students for college programs in outdoor recreation and leisure, as well as programs in environmental studies. There may be a course fee for ield trips.

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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION WEST WELCOME TO COBOURG LIVE FIT (Grade 11 Open) PAF 3OG (Girls’) This course focuses on the development of a healthy lifestyle and participation in a variety of enjoyable physical FITNESS activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. Students will be encouraged to develop personal competence in a variety of itness styles, and will be given opportunities to practice personal goal-setting, decision-making, coping, social, and interpersonal skills. Students will also study the components of healthy relationships, reproductive health, mental health and personal safety. The Grade 11 course will introduce individual activities that may be accessed in the community. There may be a course fee for ield trips.

HEALTHY ACTIVE LIVING EDUCATION (Grade 11 Open) PPL 3O1 This course focuses on the development of a healthy lifestyle and participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that have the potential to engage students= interest throughout their lives. Students will be encouraged to develop personal competence in a variety of movement skills, and will be given opportunities to practice goal-setting, decision-making, coping, social, and interpersonal skills. Students will also study the components of healthy relationships, reproductive health, mental health and personal safety. The Grade 11 course will introduce individual activities that may be accessed in the community. There may be a course fee for ield trips. HEALTH FOR LIFE (Grade 11 Open) PPZ 3O1 This course helps students develop a personalized approach to healthy living. Students will examine the factors that afect their own health and the health of individuals as members of the community. They will learn about the components of the Vitality approach to healthy living – an initiative that promotes healthy eating, an active lifestyle and a positive self-image. Throughout this course, students will develop the skills necessary to take charge of and improve their own health, as well as to encourage others to lead healthy lives. EXERCISE SCIENCE (Grade 12 University Preparation) PSE 4U1 Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 university or university/college preparation course in science, or any Grade 11 or 12 open course in health and physical education This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors, and principles involved in human development. Students will learn about the efects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution of physical activity and sports, and the factors that inluence an individual=s participation in physical activity. The course prepares students for university programs in physical education, kinesiology, recreation and sports administration.

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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION HEALTHY ACTIVE LIVING EDUCATION (Grade 12 Open) PPL 4O1 This course focuses on the development of a personalized approach to healthy active living through participation in a variety of sports and recreational activities that have the potential to engage students= interest throughout their lives. Students will develop and implement personal physical itness plans. In addition, they will be given opportunities to reine their decision-making, conlict resolution, and interpersonal skills, with a view to enhancing their mental health and their relationships with others. This course will continue to focus on individual activities that may be accessed in the community. There may be a course fee for ield trips. RECREATION AND FITNESS LEADERSHIP (Grade 12 College Preparation) PLF 4C1 Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 open course in health and physical education This course focuses on the development of leadership and coordination skills related to recreational activities. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills required to plan, organize and implement recreational events. The students will use these skills to develop recreational programs for their peers and Cobourg elementary schools. They will also learn how to promote the value of physical itness, personal well-being and personal safety to others through mentoring. The course will prepare students for college programs in recreational, leisure and itness leadership. There may be a course fee to cover the costs of ield trips to community and college facilities.

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MATHEMATICS WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS (Grade 9 Academic) MPM 1D1 This course enables students to develop understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the efective use of technology and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between diferent representations of a relationship. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional objects and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS (Grade 9 Applied) MFM 1P1 This course enables students to develop understanding of mathematical concepts related to introductory algebra, proportional reasoning, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the efective use of technology and handson activities. Students will investigate real-life examples to develop various representations of linear relationships, and will determine the connections between the representations. They will also explore certain relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional objects and two-dimensional shapes. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking. *NOTE: Students who successfully complete this course and want to proceed to MPM 2D1 will need to take MPM 1D1 irst. ESSENTIAL MATHEMATICS (Grade 9 Essential) MAT 1L1 This course provides students who have experienced signiicant diiculties in previous mathematics courses an opportunity to obtain suicient background and skill development to prepare them for Grade 11 and 12 workplace preparation courses. Whenever possible, ideas will be presented in a real-life context, providing students with the opportunity to explore, organize, interpret and use mathematical models to solve problems. Technology and manipulative materials will be used wherever appropriate. Assessment and evaluation will be done using a wide variety of strategies. PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS (Grade 10 Academic) MPM 2D1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Academic This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the efective use of technology and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relationships and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric igures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically as they solve multi-step problems and communicate their thinking. FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS (Grade 10 Applied) MFM 2P1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Academic or Applied This course enables students to consolidate their understanding of linear relations and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the efective use of technology, and hands-on activities. Students will develop and graph equations in analytic geometry; solve and apply linear systems, using real-life examples; and explore and interpret graphs of quadratic relationships. Students will investigate similar triangles, the trigonometry of right-angled triangles, and the measurement of three-dimensional igures. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking. ESSENTIAL MATHEMATICS (Grade 10 Essential) MAT 2L1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Essential or Applied This course provides students from Grade 9 essential mathematics an opportunity to continue reinforcing and developing skills from Grade 9 and to continue building the necessary base for success in Grade 11 workplace mathematics. Whenever possible, ideas will be presented in a real-life context, providing students with the opportunity to explore, organize, interpret and use mathematical models to solve problems. Technology and manipulative materials will be used wherever appropriate. Assessment and evaluation will be done using a wide variety of strategies.

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MATHEMATICS FUNCTIONS (Grade 11 University Preparation) MCR 3U1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Mathematics, Academic This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. FUNCTIONS AND APPLICATIONS (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) MCF 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Mathematics, Academic or Applied This course introduces basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric and exponential functions and their use in modelling real-world situations. Students will represent functions numerically, graphically and algebraically; simplify expressions; solve equations; and solve problems relating to applications. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. FOUNDATIONS FOR COLLEGE MATHEMATICS (Grade 11 College Preparation) MBF 3C1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Mathematics, Applied This course enables students to broaden their understanding of mathematics as a problem-solving tool in the real world. Students will extend their understanding of quadratic relations; investigate situations involving exponential growth; solve problems involving compound interest; solve inancial problems connected with vehicle ownership; and develop their ability to reason by collecting, analysing, and evaluating data involving one variable; connect probability and statistics; and solve problems in geometry and trigonometry. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking. MATHEMATICS FOR WORK AND EVERYDAY LIFE (Grade 11 Workplace Preparation) MEL 3E1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Academic or Applied This course enables students to broaden their understanding of mathematics as it is applied in the workplace and daily life. Students will solve problems associated with earning money, paying taxes, and making purchases; apply calculations of simple and compound interest in saving, investing, and borrowing; and calculate the costs of transportation and travel in a variety of situations. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking. CALCULUS AND VECTORS (Grade 12 University Preparation) MCV 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 12 Advanced Functions, University NOTE: The new Advanced Functions must either precede Calculus and Vectors or be taken concurrently. This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also reine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in ields such as science, engineering, economics and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university level calculus, linear algebra or physics course. MATHEMATICS OF DATA MANAGEMENT (Grade 12 University Preparation) MDM 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Functions and Applications, University/College or Grade 11 Functions, University This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also reine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences and the humanities will ind this course of particular interest.

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MATHEMATICS WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST ADVANCED FUNCTIONS (Grade 12 University Preparation) MHF 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Functions, University or Grade 12 Mathematics for College Technology, College This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also reine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs. FOUNDATIONS FOR COLLEGE MATHEMATICS (Grade 12 College Preparation) MAP 4C1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Foundations for College Mathematics, College This course enables students to broaden their understanding of real-world applications of mathematics. Students will analyse data using statistical methods; solve problems involving applications of geometry and trigonometry; solve inancial problems connected with annuities, budgets and renting or owning accommodation; simplify expressions; and solve equations. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course prepares students for college programs in areas such as business, health sciences and human services and for certain skilled trades. MATHEMATICS FOR WORK AND EVERYDAY LIFE (Grade 12 Workplace Preparation) MEL 4E1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Mathematics for Work and Everyday Life, Workplace This course enables students to broaden their understanding of mathematics as it is applied in the workplace and daily life. Students will investigate questions involving the use of statistics; apply the concept of probability to solve problems involving familiar situations; investigate accommodation costs, create household budgets and prepare a personal income tax return; use proportional reasoning; estimate and measure; and apply geometric concepts to create designs. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

NATIVE STUDIES CURRENT ABORIGINAL ISSUES IN CANADA (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) NDA 3M1 Prerequisite: Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, Grade 10, Open, or Canadian History in the Twentieth Century, Grade 10, Academic or Applied This course focuses on existing and emerging issues of importance to Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Students will investigate issues related to identity, relationships among Aboriginal peoples and between Aboriginal peoples and other Canadians, sovereignty principles as presented by Aboriginal peoples, and the contemporary challenges posed by these issues. Students will also examine such topics as language preservation, the responsibilities of Aboriginal women and men, and the need for dialogue between Aboriginal and nonAboriginal peoples.

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SCIENCE SCIENCE (Grade 9 Academic) SNC 1D1 This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics, and relate science to technology, society and the environment. Throughout the course, students will develop their skills in the processes of scientiic investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientiic theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and the principles of electricity. SCIENCE (Grade 9 Applied) SNC 1P1 This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics, and to apply their knowledge of science to everyday situations. They are also given opportunities to develop practical skills related to scientiic investigation. Students will plan and conduct investigations into practical problems and issues related to the impact of human activity on ecosystems; the structure and properties of elements and compounds; space exploration and the components of the universe; and static and current electricity. SCIENCE (Grade 10 Academic) SNC 2D1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 Science, Academic or Applied This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientiic investigation skills. Student will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientiic theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid-base reactions; forces that afect climate and climate change; and the interaction of light and matter. SCIENCE (Grade 10 Applied) SNC 2P1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 Science, Academic or Applied This course enables students to develop a deeper understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics, and to apply their knowledge of science in real-world situations. Students are given opportunities to develop further practical skills in scientiic investigation. Students will plan and conduct investigations into everyday problems and issues related to human cells and body systems; chemical reactions; factors afecting climate change; and the interaction of light and matter. BIOLOGY (Grade 11 University Preparation) SBI 3U1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Science, Academic This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study and helps students reine skills related to scientiic investigation.

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SCIENCE WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST BIOLOGY (Grade 11 College Preparation) SBI 3C1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Science, Academic or Applied This course focuses on the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will learn concepts and theories as they conduct investigations in the areas of cellular biology, microbiology, genetics, the anatomy of mammals and the structure of plants and their role in the natural environment. Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of concepts and on the skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related ields. CHEMISTRY (Grade 11 University Preparation) SCH 3U1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Science, Academic This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment. PHYSICS (Grade 11 University Preparation) SPH 3U1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Science, Academic This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; diferent kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientiic investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) SVN 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Science, Academic or Applied This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of and skills relating to environmental science that will help them succeed in life after secondary school. Students will explore a range of topics, including the role of science in addressing contemporary environmental challenges; the impact of the environment on human health; sustainable agriculture and forestry; the reduction and management of waste; and the conservation of energy. Students will increase their scientiic and environmental literacy and examine the interrelationships between science, the environment and society in a variety of areas. *This course will be ofered every other year. It is available in the 2012-13 school year. HEALTH CARE (Grade 11 College Preparation) TPJ 3C1 This course focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that will beneit students planning a career in the health care ield. Students will learn about human anatomy and physiology, homeostasis, vital signs, disease prevention and treatment, how lifestyle choices afect health and well being, and conventional and complementary methods of disease prevention and treatment. Students will develop an awareness of health and safety issues, environmental and societal issues related to health care and career opportunities in the ield.

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SCIENCE BIOLOGY (Grade 12 University Preparation) SBI 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Biology, University This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the reinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related ields. CHEMISTRY (Grade 12 University Preparation) SCH 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Chemistry, University This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes and will reine their ability to communicate scientiic information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment. CHEMISTRY (Grade 12 College Preparation) SCH 4C1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Science, Academic or Applied This course enables students to develop an understanding of chemistry through the study of matter and qualitative analysis, organic chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical calculations and chemistry as it relates to the quality of the environment. Students will use a variety of laboratory techniques, develop skills in data collection and scientiic analysis and communicate scientiic information using appropriate terminology. Emphasis will be placed on the role of chemistry in daily life and the efects of technological applications and processes on society and the environment. PHYSICS (Grade 12 University Preparation) SPH 4U1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Physics, University This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that afect motion and will investigate electrical, gravitational and magnetic ields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics and special relativity. They will further develop their scientiic investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data relating to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. PHYSICS (Grade 12 College Preparation) SPH 4C1 Prerequisite: Grade 10 Science, Academic or Applied This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore these concepts with respect to motion; mechanical, electrical, electromagnetic, energy transformation, hydraulic and pneumatic systems; and the operation of commonly used tools and machines. They will develop their scientiic investigation skills as they test laws of physics and solve both assigned problems and those emerging from their investigations. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. *This course will be ofered every other year. It will be available in the 2013-14 school year.

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SOCIAL SCIENCES WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY LIVING (Grade 10 Open) HIF 2O1 This course explores the challenges faced by all people: how to meet basic needs, how to relate to others, how to manage resources, and how to become responsible members of society. Students will acquire knowledge and skills that are needed to make the transition to adulthood. Teachers will instruct students in developing interpersonal, decision making, and practical skills related to daily life. Students will explore the functioning of families and the diversities found among families and within society. There may be a course fee for materials. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY HSP 3M1 (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) This course is for anyone interested in human behaviour - from the actions of hockey fans to why we fall in love. Besides research skills, you will learn how to conduct experiments, observations and simulations that will help prepare anyone for jobs and further studies that deal with interacting with other people. This course introduces the theories, questions and issues that are the major concerns of anthropology, psychology and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the way of social scientists approach the topics they study and the research methods they employ. Students will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues that have captured the interest of classical and contemporary social scientists in the three disciplines. FASHION AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION (Grade 11 Open) HNC 3O1 This course explores what clothing communicates about the wearer and how it becomes a creative and entrepreneurial outlet through the design and production processes. Students will learn, through practical experiences, about the nature of fashion design; the characteristics of ibres and fabrics; the construction, production and marketing of clothing; and how to plan and care for a wardrobe that is appropriate for an individual’s appearance, activities, employment and lifestyle. Students will develop research skills as they explore the evolution of fashion and its relationship to society, culture and individual psychology. There may be a course fee for materials. PARENTING (Grade 11 Open) HPC 3O1 This course focuses on the skills and knowledge needed to promote the positive and healthy nurturing of children, with particular emphasis on the critical importance of the early years to human development. Students will learn how to meet the developmental needs of young children, communicate and discipline efectively, and guide early behaviour. They will have practical experiences with infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, and will learn skills in researching and investigating questions relating to parenting.

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SOCIAL SCIENCES PHILOSOPHY: QUESTIONS AND THEORIES (Grade 12 University Preparation) HZT 4U1 Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English or Canadian and world studies This course addresses three (or more) of the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, logic, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students will learn critical-thinking skills, the main ideas expressed by philosophers from a variety of the world’s traditions, how to develop and explain their own philosophical ideas, and how to apply those ideas to contemporary social issues and personal experiences. The course will also help students reine skills used in researching and investigating topics in philosophy. INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY HHS 4M1 (Grade 12 University/College Preparation) Prerequisite: Any university, university/college or college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English or Canadian and world studies This course applies current theories and research from the disciplines of anthropology, psychology, and sociology to the study of individual development, family behaviour, intimate and parent-child relationships, and the ways in which families interact within the diverse Canadian society. Students will learn the interpersonal skills required to contribute to the wellbeing of families, and the investigative skills required to conduct and evaluate research about individuals and families. CHALLENGE AND CHANGE IN SOCIETY HSB 4M1 (Grade 12 University/College Preparation) Prerequisite: Any university, university/college or college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English or Canadian and world studies. This course examines the theories and methodologies used in anthropology, psychology and sociology to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will analyse cultural, social and biological patterns in human societies, looking at the ways in which those patterns change over time. Students will also explore the ideas of classical and contemporary social theorists and will apply those ideas to the analysis of contemporary trends. THE FASHION INDUSTRY (Grade 12 Open) HNB 4O1 This course provides a historical perspective on fashion and design, exploring the origins, inluence and importance of fashion as an expression of national, cultural, religious and personal identity. Students will learn about the many facets of the Canadian fashion industry, including large and small scale entrepreneurial enterprises, as well as the industry’s worldwide links. Students will gain practical experience in garment design, production and care. This course also reines students’ skills used in researching and investigating various aspects of the fashion industry.

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TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST Communication and Computer Technology is a unique integrated computer program designed to introduce students to applied science and technology. In the new Millennium, students face an ever changing complex technological world. This state-of-the-art facility is designed to help students acquire the skills and conidence needed to live and work in the 21st century!

EXPLORING COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (Grade 9 Open) TGJ 1O1 This exploratory course introduces students to concepts and skills in communications technology, which encompasses television/video and movie production, radio and audio production, print and graphic communications, photography and animation. Students will develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues and will begin to explore secondary and postsecondary pathways leading to careers in the ield. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER STUDIES (Grade 10 Open) ICS 2O1 Are you interested in new technology? Have you ever wanted to design your own applications for your iPod Touch or iPhone? This course will allow you to learn about the concepts of programming with Corona SDK (software development kit) development package. Complete a number of project based activities centred around game creation. Test and debug your applications on the iPod Touch simulator or test them on the real thing. This course introduces students to computer programming. Students will plan and write simple computer programs by applying fundamental programming concepts and learn to create clear and maintainable internal documentation. They will also learn to manage a computer by studying hardware conigurations, software selection, operating system functions, networking and safe computing practices. Students will also investigate the social impact of computer technologies and develop an understanding of environmental and ethical issues related to the use of computers. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (Grade 10 Open) TGJ 2O1 This course introduces students to communications technology from a media perspective. Students will work in the areas of TV/video and movie production, radio and audio production, print and graphic communications, photography and animation. Student projects may include computer-based activities such as creating videos, editing photos, working with audio, cartooning, developing animations and designing web pages. Students will also develop an awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology and explore secondary and postsecondary education and training pathways and career opportunities in the various communications technology ields. COMPUTER FILM/VIDEO (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) AWR 3M1 Prerequisite: Grade 9 or 10 Dramatic Arts or Grade 10 Communications Technology, Open Through use of digital video cameras and the editing program “Final Cut�, students will create ive ilm projects and will be assessed in the areas of technical ilmmaking, editing and storytelling. Students will be exposed to the entire continuum of movie production from idea generation, scripting, acting, shooting, editing and producing. This course provides students with opportunities to further develop their skills and knowledge in ilm making. Students will explore a range of subject matter through ilm studio/lab activities and will consolidate their practical technology skills. Students will also analyse ilm making and study aspects of Western ilm history, as well as ilms from Canada and other parts of the world. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (Grade 11 University/College Preparation) TGJ 3M1 This course examines communications technology from a media perspective. Students will develop knowledge and skills as they design and produce media projects in the areas of live, recorded and graphic communications. These areas may include TV, video and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues and explore college and university programs and career opportunities in the various communications technology ields.

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TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES, COMPUTER ANIMATION (Grade 12 University) IDC 4U1 Prerequisite: Any University or University/College course Through use of digital tablets, Toon Boom software and the editing programs Final Cut, iMovie and Quick Time, students will create a number of animation projects and will be assessed in the areas of technical animation, soundtrack creation, editing and storytelling. Students will be exposed to the entire continuum of animation production from idea generation, scripting, drawing, animating, editing and producing. This course will help students develop and consolidate the skills required for and knowledge of diferent subjects and disciplines to solve problems, make decisions, create personal meaning and present indings beyond the scope of a single subject or discipline. Students will apply the principles and processes of inquiry and research to efectively use a range of print, electronic and mass media resources; to analyse historical innovations and exemplary research; and to investigate real-life situations and career opportunities in interdisciplinary endeavours. They will also assess their own cognitive and afective strategies, apply general skills in both familiar and new contexts, create innovative products and communicate new knowledge. COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (Grade 12 University/College Preparation) TGJ 4M1 Prerequisite: Grade 11 Communications Technology, University/College This course enables students to further develop media knowledge and skills while designing and producing projects in the areas of live, recorded and graphic communications. Students may work in the areas of TV, video and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology and will investigate career opportunities and challenges in a rapidly changing technological environment.

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THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATE WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST The Ontario Secondary School Certiicate will be granted on request to students who leave school before earning the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, provided that they have earned a minimum of 14 credits distributed as follows: COMPULSORY CREDITS...(total of 7) - 2 credits in English, 1 credit in Canadian geography or Canadian history, 1 credit in mathematics, 1 credit in science, 1 credit in health and physical education, and 1 credit in the arts or technological education. OPTIONAL CREDITS...(total of 7) - 7 credits selected by the student from available courses.

THE CERTIFICATE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT Students who leave school before fulilling the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certiicate may be granted a Certiicate of Accomplishment.

SUBSTITUTIONS FOR COMPULSORY COURSES Substitutions may be made for a limited number of compulsory credit courses using courses from the remaining courses ofered by the school that meet the requirements for compulsory credits. Principals may replace up to three of these courses with courses from the remainder of those that meet the compulsory credit requirements. The principal will determine whether or not a substitution should be made.

THE ANNUAL EDUCATION PLAN Each student in Grades 7 to 12 will prepare an annual education plan. Students in Grades 7 to 11 will prepare their plan with the assistance of their parents, guidance counsellor, and teachers. Students will use the plan to set long and short term goals and to review and revise them each year.

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COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT As part of the diploma requirements, students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement activities. These activities may be completed at any time during their years in the secondary school program, or during the summer preceding Grade 9. Students, in collaboration with their parents, will decide how they will complete the community involvement requirement. Community involvement activities may take place in a variety of settings, including not-for-proit organizations, public sector institutions (including hospitals), and informal settings. Students may not fulil the requirement through activities that are counted towards a credit, through paid work, or by assuming duties normally performed by a paid employee. The requirement is to be completed outside students’ normal instructional hours. Students will maintain and provide a record of their community involvement activities. Completion of the required 40 hours must be conirmed by the organizations or persons supervising the activities. Our community provides valuable support to our school through awards, Co-operative Education placements as well as through volunteers and speakers. Our Board has a policy regarding community volunteers in the school and all volunteers must provide evidence of a recent police screening.

THE PROVINCIAL SECONDARY SCHOOL LITERACY TEST All students who entered Grade 9 in the 2000-2001 school year or in subsequent years must successfully complete the provincial secondary school literacy test in order to earn a secondary school diploma. The test will be based on the Ontario curriculum expectations for language and communication--particularly reading and writing--up to and including Grade 9. Students who are unsuccessful may try the test again each year when it is administered by the Education Quality and Accountability Oice (EQAO).

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THE PROVINCIALTO SECONDARY SCHOOL LITERACY TEST WELCOME COBOURG WEST PROVINCIAL LITERACY TEST ACCOMMODATIONS, DEFERRALS AND EXEMPTIONS... Accommodations. Accommodations are made to ensure that students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP) have a fair and equitable opportunity to demonstrate their learning on the literacy test. These accommodations relect the environmental, instructional and assessment accommodations, listed on the student’s IEP, which students receive regularly throughout the school year. Please consult the Special Education Department to discuss any speciic questions or concerns. Deferrals. If a parent or an adult student requests a deferral, the principal will determine whether or not a deferral should be granted and, if so, for what period of time. A principal may also initiate consideration of a deferral. Exemptions. Students whose IEP indicates that the student is not working towards the attainment of a secondary school diploma may, with parental consent and the approval of the principal, be exempted from participating in the secondary school literacy test. Students who do not successfully complete the literacy test will not be able to receive a secondary school diploma. The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC). The OSSLC may be ofered to those students who have attempted the literacy test but have been unsuccessful. Exemptions or deferrals also qualify as “opportunities”. Students who are successful in achieving a credit in the literacy course will be eligible to receive their secondary school diploma.

PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT AND RECOGNITION Prior learning includes the knowledge and skills that students have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside secondary school. This formal evaluation and accreditation process is known as Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR). The PLAR process involves two components: “challenge” and equivalency. The “challenge process” refers to the process whereby students’ prior learning is assessed for the purpose of granting credit for a course developed from a provincial curriculum policy document. Determining equivalency involves the assessment of credentials from other jurisdictions. The challenge process is complicated and must be completed independently. School and staf resources will not be provided. Information packages must be obtained from the Principal.

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ALTERNATIVE WAYS OF EARNING CREDITS The majority of secondary school students will earn their credits toward the Ontario Secondary School Diploma by enrolling in the courses ofered in their secondary school. However, a number will wish to consider alternative ways of earning the required credits. The options available to such students include: • • •

E-Learning courses ofered through KPRDSB Correspondence Courses ofered by the Independent Learning Centre Independent or Private Study

• •

Continuing Education (including summer school) Private School

Credit Recovery

Further information concerning these options is available from the Guidance Department.

eLearning – GET THE COURSES YOU NEED ONLINE Having trouble getting a course because it is not ofered at your school, it is illed, or it doesn’t it into your timetable? Perhaps eLearning is the answer … Are you self-motivated? Do you have good time management skills? Can you work independently? Do you like learning on a computer? If so, consider this … eLearning allows you to select from nearly 70 Ontario secondary school courses that you complete online in a virtual classroom. Like a regular classroom in your school, you will be enrolled in an Ontario Ministry of Education course, taught by an Ontario qualiied teacher. You will have classmates with whom you will interact and assignments and activities with which you will be engaged. The major diference, however, is that your classroom is virtual so you will not be in the physical presence of your teacher or your classmates. The major advantage is that you can access your course at any time from any place where you can connect to the Internet. Please know, however, that during your eLearning period you are expected to be working on your eLearning course on one of the computers in your school that has been designated for eLearning. Students are required to meet with their Guidance Counsellor if they are interested in taking eLearning courses. It is recommended that students are eligible for eLearning courses if the chosen course does not it into their regular school timetable or if it is not ofered in their home school. To see a list of courses available, please see your Guidance Counsellor or visit the KPR Board website at http://www.kprschools.ca/ (click on Student, then click on eLearning). For more information or to register for an eLearning course, please make an appointment with your Guidance Counsellor.

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THE ONTARIO STUDENT TRANSCRIPTWEST WELCOME TO COBOURG The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) provides a comprehensive record of a student’s overall achievement in high school. The transcript, which is part of the Ontario Student Record (OSR), will include the following information: • • • • • •

the student’s achievement in Grades 9 and 10 a list of all Grade 11 and 12 courses taken or attempted by the student, with the percentage grades earned and the credits gained identiication of any course that has been substituted conirmation that the student has completed the community involvement requirement inal results for the provincial secondary school literacy test an indication of any “extraordinary circumstances” afecting the student’s achievement in a Grade 11 or 12 course

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE... Grades 9 and 10 - Withdrawals from Grade 9 and 10 courses are not recorded on the OST. Only successfully completed courses are recorded on the transcript. Grades 11 and 12 - If a student withdraws from a course after ive instructional days following the issue of the irst oicial report card, the withdrawal is recorded on the OST. The student’s percentage grade at the time of the withdrawal is recorded. REPETITION OF A COURSE... Students who repeat a Grade 11 or 12 course that they have previously completed successfully earn only one credit for the course. However, each attempt and the percentage grade obtained is recorded on the OST.

PROCEDURES FOR COURSE CHANGES •

Students wishing to make course changes must do so through the Guidance department. This must be done within 5 days of the beginning of the semester, providing there is room in the class they wish to change to and they have parental consent (for students under 18 years of age)

All students must take four courses per semester until they are in their graduating year

Students in their graduating year must take a minimum of three credits per semester to maintain fulltime status

Full-time status is required in order to participate in school sports and co-curricular activities

Normally students are required to be full-time. A valid request for part-time status must be approved by the Principal.

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SCHOOL CODE OF BEHAVIOUR & STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES This is available online at www.cdciwest.com. It is the expectation that students and their parents will read and be aware of these responsibilities.

SPECIAL EDUCATION - PROVIDING ACADEMIC AND RESOURCE SUPPORT The goal of the Special Education Department at CDCI West is to provide students with the opportunity to be successful, responsible and independent learners. The Special Education Department provides academic resource support for all students including those with Individual Education Plans (IEP’s) via the Academic Support Classroom (room 202). This room is stafed by Special Education Resource Teachers (SERT’s) who work closely with teachers to design and implement educational plans that address the individual learning needs of students. Students requiring support are encouraged to utilize the Academic Support Classroom and to discuss their learning needs with their classroom teacher and/or SERT. To guide the process of providing support for students, an IEP may be developed. An IEP is a written plan describing the special education program and/or services required by the student. It outlines the accommodations and special education services needed. Each student with an IEP works with a SERT who writes the IEP, supports and oversees the programming and is a contact with parents. Accommodations are provided as outlined in each student’s IEP. A copy of the IEP is sent home within the irst 30 days of school to obtain parental input and copies are also sent home with each report card. IEP’s are working documents that are regularly updated to relect the growth and changing needs of the student. Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) The Special Education Advisory Committee is a legislated standing committee of the Board. The community representatives are nominated by their association and their appointment is approved by the Board. It is the role of the Special Education Advisory Committee to report and make recommendations to the Board regarding any matter afecting the establishment and development of special education programs and services for exceptional students. Please contact the Board Oice at 877-741-4577, or a committee member for information.

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SPECIAL EDUCATION - PROVIDING ACADEMIC AND RESOURCE SUPPORT WELCOME TO COBOURG WEST The Kawartha Pine Ridge SEAC endeavours to: • • •

Create an environment of quality education and equity, while promoting community awareness of the special needs of children Foster understanding and trust to improve family and school communication Review and respond to provincial legislation as it afects students with special needs

Ensure that the Board is able to make informed decisions as they relate to students with special needs

WEST LEARNING COMMONS The CDCI West Library Learning Commons supports all students in their individual and collaborative pursuits. The space is designed to facilitate and encourage dynamic learning experiences that utilize current and cutting edge resources, technologies, strategies and instructional interventions. Students can read, research, experiment, discover, perform and create in the West Learning Commons.

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GUIDANCE AND CAREER EDUCATION The Guidance and Career Education program is a vital and integral part of the secondary school program. Through the program, students will acquire the knowledge and skills that they need in order to learn efectively, to live and to work co-operatively and productively with a wide range of people, to set and pursue education and career goals, and to carry out their social responsibilities. The program is delivered through various means, including classroom instruction, orientation and exit programs, completion of annual education plans, career exploration activities and individual assistance and short term counselling. The goals of the Guidance and Career Education program are outlined in the policy document entitled Choices into Action: Guidance and Career Education Program Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools, 1999. As stated in this document, students are expected to: • • •

understand the concepts related to lifelong learning, interpersonal relationships (including responsible citizenship) and career planning; develop learning skills, social skills, a sense of social responsibility and the ability to formulate and pursue educational and career goals; apply this learning in their daily lives both at school and in the community.

To help students achieve these goals, the content of the Guidance and Career Education program is organized into three areas of learning: student development, interpersonal development and career development. SCHOOL SUPPORT SERVICES may include … •

In-school counselling, referrals and follow ups

Community Resources

Board Support Staf

Student Success Team

Public Health Nurse

Police Liaison Oicer

School Board Counsellor

Rebound Youth Services

Restorative Practices

Kinark Counsellor

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STUDENT SUCCESS THE WEST WEST WELCOME TOAT COBOURG At Cobourg West, we realize the importance and value of completing a secondary education and our school is committed to reaching every student to help them achieve a successful outcome from their experience at the West. The purpose of the Student Success initiative is to provide all students with the best possible opportunities for high quality learning and programs customized to their skills and interests within a caring and supportive environment. KEY GOALS OF STUDENT SUCCESS … • • •

connecting with students by providing new and relevant learning opportunities providing efective transitions from elementary to secondary schools and from secondary to postsecondary increasing graduation and reducing drop out rates

THE STUDENT SUCCESS TEACHER (SST) … The Student Success Teacher is a key facilitator and provider for direct student advocacy and mentoring as well as student monitoring. The SST supports students in risk as part of a Student Success Team which also includes the Principal, the Guidance Department Head and the Special Education Department Head. Through communication with elementary feeder schools, incoming in risk students are identiied and provided with the necessary support and program accommodations to assist in a smooth and positive transition to high school. The Student Success Teacher will continue to … • • • •

get to know and track the progress of students at risk of not graduating support school-wide eforts to improve outcomes from students struggling with secondary curriculum attempt to re-engage early school leavers provide direct support/ instruction to these students to improve achievement, retention and transitions work with parents and the community to support student success.

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CDCIWest Course Calendar 2012 - 2013