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fortnightly student magazine

volume 17 — issue 8

More Than Just A Tweet

p. 7

Q&A: 26 BATS!

p. 16

The Olympians of Minnesota

p. 9

Are You There Congress?

p. 18

A Starving Artist

p. 11

Group Punishment

p. 21


MAR 2 @ Orchestra Hall

CAMPUS NIGHT

Presented by our Student Ambassadors

WORLD-CLASS CONCERT:

Debussy’s La Mer Rachmaninoff’s powerful Third Piano Concerto and Debussy’s shape-shifting picture of the sea, La mer.

$

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EXTRAS FOR STUDENTS:

FREE with your ticket: • Complimentary refreshments • Ocean-themed activities & games • Meet the musicians!

STUDENT TICKETS NO FEES! Buy online.

#mnorch / minnesotaorchestra.org/studentrush / Orchestra Hall PHOTOS Courtney Perry (left) and Greg Helgeson (right)


VOLUME 17, ISSUE 8 EDITORIAL: Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor Cities Editor Voices Editor Music Editor Online editor Copy editors Multimedia Editor Multimedia Producer

Emma Klingler Jake Steinberg Megan Hoff Tala Alfoqaha Liv Martin Alex Wittenberg Chris Shea Kikki Boersma Gracie Stockton Julie Malyshev

Editorial Interns: Claire Redell, Emily Ness, Farrah Mina, Hannah Haakenson, Luci Bischoff

BMMEBZ

PRODUCTION: Executive Director Production Manager Creative Director Finance Manager PR/Ad Manager Social Media Manager Art Director Designers

Web Manager Distribution Manager

Holly Wilson Olivia Novotny Kate Doyle Rakshit Kalra Sophie Stephens Grace Steward Katie Heywood Andrew Tomten Kellen Renstrom Megan Smith Nikki Pederson Cassie Varrige

Production Interns: Darby Ottoson (PR), Jamie Rohlfing, Macie Rasmussen, Art Interns: Emily Hill, Jade Mulcahy, Jaye Ahn, Lauren Smith, Mariah Crabb, Natalie Klemond, Peyton Garcia, Sophie Stephens, Stevie Lacher

THIS ISSUE: Writers Ariana Wilson, Andrew Tomten, Caitlin Anderson, Claire Redell, Cody Perakslis, Emily Ness, Farrah Mina, Hannah Haakenson, Hannah Olund, Liv Martin, Sadie Bozyk, Sam Boundy, Sylvia Rani, Tala Alfoqaha Š2017 The Wake Student Magazine. All Rights Reserved. Established in 2002, The Wake is a fortnightly independent magazine and registered student organization produced by and for students at the University of Minnesota. The Wake was founded by Chrin Ruen & James DeLong. Disclaimer: The purpose of The Wake is to provide a forum in which students can voice their opinions. Opinions expressed in the magazine are not representative of the publication or university as a whole. To join the conversation email eklingler@wakemag.org . The Wake Student Magazine 126 Coffman Memorial Union 300 Washington Avenue SE Minneapolis, MN 55455

Art 1 Peyton Garcia, 2 Morgan Wittmers-Graves, 3 Jade Mulcahy, 4 Katie Heywood, 5 Jaye Ahn, 6 Katie Heywood, 7 Claudia DubĂŠ, 8 Ruby Guthrie, 9 Morgan Wittmers-Graves, 10 Will Hanson, 11 Claudia DubĂŠ, 12 Stevie Lacher, 13 Peyton Garcia, 14 Ruby Guthrie Cover by Jade Mulcahy

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wink! one page magazine

our desig n team as an anim al band

Check out our artist’s online! 4

Claudia DubĂŠ claudiadubedesign.com

Katie Heywood katieheywood.com

Stevie Lacher stevielacher.com

Morgan Wittmers-Graves morganwittmers-graves. myportfolio.com

Peyton Garcia peytongarciadesign.com

Will Hanson willnhanson.myportfolio.com


INSIDE

UPCOMING EVENTS

6

Letter from the Editor

2/16-3/4

7

More Than Just a Tweet

Screaming Females

8 9 10

Feline Good at Cafe Meow The Olympians of Minnesota Art by Olivia Novotny

11

A Starving Artist

14

Art by Jaye Ahn

15

Art by Stevie Lacher

16

Q&A: 26 BATS!

18

Are You There Congress? It’s Us, America

19

Football Season Ends, Sex Trafficking Continues

20

Censorship In Schools

21

Group Punishment

22

Six Reviews

3/6 A

w/ Radiator Hospital, Kitten Forever Turf Club

2/17 U of M Symphonic Band Concert Ted Mann Concert Hall

3/2

B

Percussion-centered concert series presented by TaikoArts Midwest, with a Women In Taiko panel discussion following the performance O’Shaughnessy Auditorium

3/9 Queer Xicano Chisme

C

Workshop and discussion hosted by La Raza Student Cultural Center Coffman Gallery

Early Eyes w/ 26 BATS!, Heart to Gold 7th St. Entry

3/2 Tune-Yards w/ Sudan Archives First Avenue

A

3/3 Resistance with Immigrant Movement for Justice Dinner and forum - next steps to defend DACA, TPS and the 11 million undocumented who are in the shadows Indigenous Roots Cultural Arts Center

THE WAKE

Women in Taiko

B

C

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Letter from the Editor Dear Reader, I find many creative (read: wasteful) ways to fill my free time, yet one activity in particular stands out amongst the rest: searching for long-term weather forecasts. I love to read these ridiculously far-reaching reports, to bask in the comfort and security that such false predictability offers. The farther ahead, the better. Whenever my friends catch me perusing AccuWeather with the intensity and dedicated fervor of a millennial unraveling a twitter fight that just exploded on their timeline, they immediately resort to incredulity or mockery: When will you ever need to know the weather in 90 days? They ask. How often is the forecast even accurate? They pry. The answer to both questions, beloved reader, is likely never. And that’s okay. You see, I’ve learned that I can derive as much joy from planning as I want, but I can rarely predict the outcome. And as long as I accept that fact of reality, the world and all its long-term weather forecasts become much less disappointing. I began this school year with many plans and even more uncertainty. I knew that I wanted to be involved with The Wake, but as I nervously waited in the hallway of Folwell for the first meeting to begin, I could’ve never predicted that I’d meet such a creative and passionate group of people who would welcome me with open arms. Nor would I have guessed that by second semester I’d work as a Voices Editor. And above all, I definitely did not expect to accept a position as Editor-in-Chief for next year. As spring break nears and the school year (slowly) approaches a close, I’ll continue to check long-term weather forecasts, and I’ll continue to discover how wrong they are. I’ll make plans for next year as an individual and a student and editor, and I’ll watch them fall apart. And that’s alright. In the meantime, I’ll have my winter jacket ready for the predicted snow on April 18th. Just in case.

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Tala Alfoqaha Voices Editor

MAR 5—18


CITIES

BY CLAIRE REDELL

Founder Tarana Burke speaks about what’s next in the revolution “...And as she was telling me her story, I kept thinking, ‘that happened to me too.’” That was black activist Tarana Burke, speaking to hundreds of individuals in Coffman’s Great Hall on Friday, Feb. 16, sharing the story of the birth of the #MeToo movement. Burke described her upbringing as being from a “liberal, activist family,” raised on black feminist books with influences from her grandfather and mother. By the time she was just 14, Burke had such a strong grasp on the problems facing African-Americans that she joined the 21st Century Leadership Movement to begin advocating for rights of people of color in her community and around the country. “This is why you know me now,” Burke stated, explaining that the support she gained through 21st Century catalyzed her emergence into the field of activism. As a teenager, Burke played a key role in organizing protests in the 1989 Central Park jogger case. Burke’s involvement in the case solidified her desire to be an organizer, later narrowing her focus to addressing issues facing AfricanAmerican women in her community. After leaving college, Burke became a camp director at 21st Century Leadership Movement, where she eventually developed a curriculum to foster open discussions amongst campers. At this point, Burke heard instances of sexual violence from her campers on a regular basis yet failed to show her empathy after having experienced it herself. It wasn’t until speaking with a young girl at camp that Burke realized she needed to step up in the fight against sexual violence.

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More Than Just a Tweet “I wanted that courage, I was looking for that courage,” Burke said, admiring the vulnerability and the trust the girl had placed in her. Another individual with a similar story once told her, “you were the second person I ever told, but the first person to believe me.” From then on, Burke was certain she would dedicate the coming years to the disruption of sexual violence. Later, Burke ran an after-school program that focused on providing resources for AfricanAmerican survivors of sexual violence. She explained it as a 21-week rite of passage program that she developed the course curriculum for in a single night. “It makes me tired just saying that,” Burke stated, laughing at her over-ambition for the program. Still, high school teachers were approaching her regularly, saying that the change they were seeing in the participants was remarkable. Burke transformed the program by making it shorter and unique from other programs for girls. She centered it around the two words “just be,” signifying that they were worthy for existing, and that their self-worth has potential to become greater self-esteem. Burke encouraged girls to forget about media’s skewed representation of African individuals, and rather to remember their history and culture is only truly understood by themselves.

Burke reflected on the lack of resources in crisis centers that has remained unfortunately common throughout time. She shared an anecdote in which she went to a local center to gain more information on their services as a young adult and was disturbed when she was told “we don’t take walk-ins.” From then on, Burke devised a list of resources for young women based on what she wished she had access to at a young age: “I couldn’t find what they knew they needed, so I created it.” She devoted much of her time to establishing language surrounding sexual violence so girls could communicate their feelings after experiencing trauma in an effective manner. On Oct. 15, 2017, the #MeToo movement took over the internet after Alyssa Milano tweeted, “if you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘#metoo’ as a reply to this tweet.” Immediately, thousands of responses poured in. Burke’s initial response was panic, worried that her activism behind the hashtag would be lost in the coming days. “I spent the entire day thinking I lost my work, but, this was my work.” Burke realized. Finally, Burke cleared up the 3 most common misconceptions surrounding the movement: 1. #MeToo is not about taking down powerful men 2. #MeToo is not just about sexual violence in the workplace 3. #MeToo is not just for women Rather, #MeToo is a global movement of survivors working together to interrupt sexual violence wherever it lives and providing healing points to those who need it. Burke concluded the talk proclaiming, “You don’t say #MeToo and stop there, it’s where you start… So please, let’s work together, let’s heal together, let’s change the world together.”

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CITIES

Feline Good at Cafe Meow

Cafe Cafe Meow Meow opened opened February February 16th 16th … … No No kitten kitten BY HANNAH HAAKENSON A few weeks ago, the Cafe Meow opened its doors to all coffee and cat lovers alike. This unique cafe features a coffee shop serving a variety of (fairly overpriced) drinks and snacks—and a cat lounge next door where customers can interact with a few furry friends. Separating the two areas is a wall with huge windows, giving the customers an opportunity to watch the cats play while sipping their tasty beverage. The coffee shop portion of the cafe was pretty overwhelming in the sense that it was very crowded, loud, and hectic. There was no method to the madness of furniture placement, so people were constantly weaving around chairs and tables to get where they needed to go. The drinks themselves were tasty (my roommate tried the peach tea and loved it) but again, overpriced. There is artwork on the walls that is up for sale, although I don’t know too many people who would buy a painting done by a cat. Granted, there are some paintings created by actual humans, but that cat is clearly trying to make a name for himself. He even left his signature paw print on more than one canvas. Since this place just recently opened, I understand why it was so chaotic. While it is not a place to study and do homework, the atmosphere is great for catching up with friends over a cup of coffee. If you want to actually go in the lounge where the kitty cats are, you have to pay $10, and then you have an hour to

pet the cats to your heart’s content. When I went into the lounge, there seemed to be a lot more people than cats at first. However, once people dispersed around the room, there was a little bit more space to walk around and find a cat. I discovered Mittens, a very chill black and white cat who loved to be pet, so I spent the majority of my time stroking his soft ears. While I was sitting there, petting Mittens, I couldn’t help but notice all the people on the other side of the window looking in. It was a little weird sitting inside the lounge area and being able to see all the people observe me as I pet the cats… I sort of felt like I was in some hidden psychology experiment. However, being able to cuddle with Mittens was a comforting and pawsitive experience. The staff there was very helpful and offered up information on how the cats typically behaved, what their names were, and how long they’ve been at Cafe Meow. They also had additional information posted up on the wall, offering an in-depth biography for each cat in case anyone is interested in adopting one. Since their opening, there have already been two cats, White Sox and Nani, who have both found a new home to live in with a loving family. Overall, the Cafe Meow did not disappoint. If you plan on going there, I would recommend reserving a time (which you can do online) to visit with the cats, so you don’t have to worry about getting a spot. While you wait, the coffee shop provides a great area to socialize with friends while enjoying a sweet treat or drink. Spending time with the cats is extremely relaxing and can turn any bad day into a good one. Located on Hennepin Avenue, which is only a short ten-minute drive from campus, Cafe Meow offers a lively place to take a break from daily stressors and hang out. I’m not kitten when I say that Cafe Meow is the purrfect way to spend your Caturday. Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/thecafemeow/ Cafe Meow website: https://thecafemeow.com/

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MAR 5—18


CITIES 3

The Olympians of Minnesota

Meet the Hockey Players Representing the North Star State at the Olympics BY EMILY NESS Minnesota has a long history of representing Team USA in the Winter Olympics. After all, the state has a wide variety of winter sports to offer. This year, 22 of the 244 athletes on Team USA are from Minnesota, and 9 of them—eight on the women’s team and one on the men’s—played hockey for University of Minnesota schools. Hailing from Andover, MN, 20-year-old Maddie Rooney is the youngest to compete from Minnesota. The first-time Olympian made her international debut at the world championships last March after a solid season with the University of Minnesota Duluth hockey team. She has since become the top goalie for Team USA. Originally from Plymouth, MN, 22-year-old Kelly Pannek’s college career at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities was put on hold after an outstanding 2016-2017 season led to a spot on the U.S. team for last spring’s world championships. There, Pannek was ranked second in the nation in scoring and first in the nation in assists. These accomplishments resulted in a nomination for the Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award—an award presented to the top player in NCAA Division I women’s ice hockey annually. This was quite the honor for the one-time Olympian.

Dani Cameranesi, 22, was born and raised in Plymouth, MN. She attended the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, earning two NCAA titles. Later, she helped the U.S. win the Four Nations Cup. This will be her first Olympic games. From Minnetonka, MN, 22-year-old Sidney Morin was one of the final additions to the U.S. Olympic Team. The 2017 WCHA defensive hockey player of the year was a three-time state champion at Minnetonka High School before heading to the University of Minnesota Duluth. There, Morin was fifth on UMD’s career chart for most goals by a defenseman and sixth in assists by a defenseman. This will be her first Olympic games. 23-year-old Lee Stecklein is a three-time NCAA champion from Roseville, Minnesota. A student at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Stecklein made her Winter Games debut at age 19. A twotime Olympian, Stecklein is known for being the tallest player on the team, standing at six feet. Hannah Brandt, 24 of Vadnais Heights, Minnesota, was a leading scorer for the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. A one-time Olympian, Brandt finished her Gopher career with 286 points. Since then, Brandt has scored 34 points in 54 games with USA Hockey teams.

26-year-old Amanda Kessel participated in the 2014 Sochi Olympics, where she suffered a concussion that nearly ended her career. In 2016, she had a miraculous comeback with the University of Minnesota Twin Cities Gophers that resulted in an NCAA title. This two-time Olympian’s 248 career points are the second highest in Gopher history. Originating from Warroad, 30-year-old Gigi Marvin is one of the oldest Olympians to compete from Minnesota. The University of Minnesota graduate was a five-time gold medalist at the world championships, as well as the National Women’s Hockey League defensive player of the year in 2015-16. This two-time Olympian has played both forward and defense this season. Finally, one of the oldest Olympians to compete from Minnesota is former University of Minnesota Gopher hockey captain Ryan Stoa of Bloomington, Minnesota. Since playing for the Gophers, Stoa was selected by Colorado in the second round of the 2005 NHL draft, where he played 40 games in the league as a pro in North America. This one-time Olympian spent the past four seasons in Russia’s Kontinental Hockey League, where he was an all-star last season.

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THE WAKE

9


ART

Olivia Novotny


FEATURE

What I learned from an artist named Lloyd BY EMILY NESS

Art by Will Hanson

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FEATURE

“The I once met a man who viewed not only himself, but everyone around him as a cartoon character. His name was Lloyd and he claimed that this was the way it had always been. In the whimsical world of Lloyd’s imagination, every person from every memory embodied an alluring animation—they had explored the world around them and embraced the world within them. And every second of every moment encompassed a timeless vibe in which magic was as real as music and illusion was as imminent as identity. In his refined reality, Lloyd was the character of all characters. He was the superhero, the savior, and the star. Childish as they may seem, his holy trinity of attributes was actually quite the opposite. I’d listen closely as Lloyd told me of his travels.

As a superhero, Lloyd flew many places—some familiar and others unfamiliar. "The road to selfdevelopment," he told me. "Is not a road at all. Rather, it is a maze.” I eyed Lloyd with wonder. "Though this maze is where we lose ourselves," he continued. "This maze is also where we find ourselves once more, and believe me, the best parts of who we are don’t need to be rescued. They will simply resurface time and time again.” I nodded my head.

As a savior, Lloyd touched many souls—but not in the way that one would expect. "People take life so seriously," he told me. "I respect the struggle—don't get me wrong. But at the end of the day, it's either funny or it’s forgivable, right?" I thought about this for a second as he pressed onwards toward his next point. As a star, Lloyd shined in a way that made the dismal reality around us fade. "If you feel yourself," he told me, "And I mean truly feel yourself, everyone around you will feel you too. After all, a self-assured aura can be felt. And, if you believe that you're special, then by God, you are! Use this to light up the world of those around you. Many people need it." Over time, I learned a great deal about Lloyd. It seemed that the more I learned, the more I wanted to know. Lloyd was an artist—a homeless artist that is. He was 63 years old, yet the way that Lloyd lit up when he saw someone he knew made him seem young. And, it seemed that Lloyd knew everyone! As we walked down the street together, he waved to the owner of the print shop handing out coupons, bumped knuckles with a local tattoo artist dragging from the day’s first cigarette and opened the door for a mother and her son running errands. “Thank you so much sir,” said the young mother looking flattered and impressed. “You bet,” Lloyd said with a wink. His eyes were warm and soft. They led the way to wrinkles that appeared to have formed from laughter, and they hung framed by curly gray hair that had seen better days. Walking down the street, you wouldn’t have known that Lloyd was homeless. On this particular day, Lloyd wore Timberlands, dark wash jeans, a button up shirt, a sweater and a trench coat. In addition to this, he dragged behind him a brief case in which he stored all of his art supplies. Paper—some of it wrinkled and torn— pencils of all colors and types, newspaper clippings depicting various people and places that he hoped to draw, cigarettes of course, and more recently, business cards! He used to just take requests in person, and though they were

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MAR 5—18


FEATURE

road to self-dev elop ment “is no ta , ” he to road ld me. at a ll. r ” . ather, e z a it is a m simple—portraying a picture that Lloyd drew, followed by his name and number—Lloyd’s business cards were quite the game changer. He started receiving calls from individuals with special requests, which he’d take from his prepaid flip phone.

“I can draw all kinds of things,” Lloyd told me as we continued our walk down 14th Street. It was especially cold this afternoon and though I enjoyed my interactions with Lloyd, I was looking forward to getting home. “Could you draw Prince?” I asked him, thinking about the poster awaiting me in my warm and cozy bedroom. “Psssh, Prince,” he replied, “I went to high school with Prince.” No way, I thought to myself. “You knew Prince?” I asked him excitedly. “Yes,” he replied matter of factly. “We were pals.” How do people end up on such different paths? I looked down at the path that Lloyd and I were taking and watched as he hobbled along. Lloyd walked with a limp, but he seldom used a cane. He claimed that would take away his super powers. I guess that Lloyd noticed I was watching him limp. “Oh honey, don’t worry about that,” Lloyd said, pointing to his foot. “I’m great!” he continued as he began to shuffle in place. “Check it out,” he said, raising his palms to the sky. “I can still dance!” Students heading to school walked around Lloyd, looking annoyed that he was blocking the sidewalk, while I stood in place, also blocking the sidewalk, taking in the marvelous moment in front of me. “Here’s some Purple Rain right here!” he said, moving his fingers freely.” I couldn’t lie. He had great rhythm. We walked to the end of the sidewalk and I looked at Lloyd sadly as we stopped in front of my apartment. “Time to go make some money!” he said tapping the pencil behind his ear with a mischievous grin. I got the feeling that Lloyd never wanted me to feel bad for leaving him. “Goodnight Lloyd!” I said as we parted ways. “And good luck!”

hard to say no to a starving artist. Often, those that didn’t buy his work bought him a coffee or bummed him a cigarette instead. A lot of people did both.

The city had come to know Lloyd, and many had come to like him too. The bus drivers, for example, let him ride for free. The train drivers too. He spent the past twenty-plus years without a home and the past ten of those riding the bus all night long. Though he was glad to be warm, he wished that he slept better. I asked Lloyd about his family and he told me they’re all dead. Later on, however, I learned that Lloyd was the father of seven daughters. I wondered why he didn’t see them. I wondered why they didn’t see him. I was aware that Lloyd had issues. He drank whisky every day, for example. On one occasion, he gave me a small bottle of my own. I told him that he shouldn’t have, but Lloyd told me not to worry because he stole it. I told him that he definitely shouldn’t do that, and he told me that in his world, he is completely free. As time went on, I began to see more of Lloyd. He started stopping at my workplace every day to say hello. I started packing two lunches and we began having an afternoon date of sorts. According to Lloyd, he used to woo all of the women. I thought that this was funny. I listened to Lloyd’s stories, and I understood why a woman would fall in love with him.

pulling me over. I was being jolted back and forth by the start and stop of the gears. Ohhhh, my mom beat me real good after that,” he said with a laugh. I could see the thrill in Lloyd’s eyes as he described the incident. Lloyd also told me about the first time he picked up a pencil, the first time he smoked a cigarette, and the first time he drank alcohol. In my mind, I pictured each scenario. The more that I thought about it, the more that these habits seemed to reflect Lloyd’s self-proclaimed trinity of attributes. I suppose that there is a good side and a bad side to all of us, or an animated side and an authentic side, in this case. Just yesterday, Lloyd stopped by my work to deliver a gift for me. It was a picture. Scribbled out in purple, yellow and black, there he was, Prince! I couldn’t believe it! I thanked Lloyd profusely and promised to hang it in my home. As I stare at Lloyd’s abstract rendition of Prince (which is indeed hanging on my wall), I am reminded of Lloyd himself. The more that I think about Lloyd and the things he told me, the more his animated persona makes sense. To have charisma is to be a character—in all senses of the word. And sometimes, the only way to be something is to see yourself and others as exactly such.

Lloyd told me about the time he stole a car. A Volkswagon to be specific. “I didn’t know how to drive a stick,” he told me. “The cops had no problem

Lloyd’s masterpieces typically went for $20–$100, and people bought them all the time. After all, it’s

THE WAKE

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ART

Art by Jaye Ahn

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MAR 5—18


ART

Art by Stevie Lacher

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Q&A

26 BATS! BY LIV MARTIN 26 BATS! is a Minneapolis-based band that fuses multiple genres–funk, soul, jazz, alternative rock and hiphop–to create a unique sound. I spoke with lead singer Bailey Cogan and bandmate Karl Remus, representing the 5-person ensemble, at Hard Times Café. Read on to discover how they got to sell tacos while attending the country’s top music festivals, how music impacts their lives every day, and what new projects the band is working on.

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Images courtesy of 26 BATS!

: How did you come up with your name? What does it mean? Bailey Cogan: That’s a very common question. I have a few answers. The first one–the one that weirds people out–is that 26 is my god and bats are my angels. That one’s a fun one because I just leave it at that. That’s only when I don’t want to explain it. But, 26 is my birthday. I started seeing it everywhere when I was a teen. And, I started thinking of it as a good omen. I noticed it was a common number in my life. Like, I was a runner and there’s 26 miles in a marathon. I’m a writer and there’s 26 letters in the alphabet. And, I meditate and there’s 26 vertebrae in the spine. So, it’s a very potent number in my life. I got into numerology later and 26 is a power number. It adds up to 8 which symbolizes abundance. So, I was like, that’s dope! It’s always been with me, so I wanted for it to be in the title of my band. And bats have always been like my angels, and for lack of a better word, my spirit animals. Someone told me that when they listen to our music, it feels like a ton of bats fluttering within them. I like that!

: How would you describe your music? BC: It’s hard for me to do that. Recently we found some cool words that are inspiring. Someone said, “Doom groove” and I was like “Word. That’s cool.” Also, we came up with “punk jazz,” which I think works because of the attitude behind it. But, I also think “soul” is appropriate. And we have moments of alternative rock. So like genres? Also... ok so I’m gender fluid so I recently said we’re “genre-fluid.” Really my music is a reflection of my insides.

: What’s been the best experience you’ve had playing live so far? BC: I feel like we’re both gonna have different answers. Our last song at the Turf Club... I felt like that was our best show. I just felt really present and my voice was on point. Sometimes I just sing, but in that performance, I was putting myself in it. It also helped that the audience was also very present and very responsive. So that was dope. And, I was good at stage banter, which is sometimes really awkward and really hard. And, we did choreographed toe touch! Really cute and really engaging.

MAR 5—18


Q&A

: What is your music all about? Who does it speak to?

“...When I’m on stage with 26 BATS! I feel okay to be my weird self fully.”

BC: It’s about trying to love ourselves... or me trying to love myself in this broken society. I’m anti-capitalist and anti-racist, but here we are in this racist, capitalist world. And, being a white person in that and confronting my privileges. But also, seeing where I fit as a queer, genderfluid person that is femme-presenting. It’s all about me trying to figure out who I am, but also trying to inspire others to spread the word of how to love yourself within this weird situation we have to exist in collectively. That’s like the lyrical content. Also, though, I do have long songs to nature. So, you know... But that could also be like “Try and love the Earth, bro!” KR: I think 26 BATS! is for the weirdos. Out of all of the bands that we’re in, I like being in 26 BATS! a lot because I feel comfortable being my weirdest self. Just like, promoting that and promoting that it’s okay to be who you are and be really weird about it if that’s who you are. BC: Specifically, when I’m on stage with 26 BATS! I feel okay to be my weird self fully.

: How did the members of your band find each other and form the band? KR: Berklee [College of Music] was actually a huge component. I go to college and I’m randomly roommates with our drummer. While we were there we were kind of friends, but more so just roommates. And then I left and that summer I was putting together an album of my own music and I wanted him

THE WAKE

to come out and drum on it. Ever since then, he would come out to Minnesota every couple summers. Then eventually I convinced him to move here. So, he’s been here for almost 3 years. During one of those summers, we met the guy who’s our bass player now, Christian, at a show for my music. Then I met Bailey somewhere in between there. We’ve known each other for like 4 years now. BC: 5 years. We met on Twitter. We went to the same high school but he’s 4 years older than me. [Karl] was good friends with my best friend. Then we started dating and then we went to Hawaii together. I didn’t want to go to college because I just wanted to be a musician. I wasn’t feeling like spending a lot of money just to be a musician. Some people do that, and I’m not judging. But, I didn’t see the value in that. And, I just wanted to travel too because I was not feeling Minnesota. You know, there were just a few bad winters or whatever. So, we went to Hawaii in January 2014, and we lived there for 3 months. There, we met this guy Jesse who asked us if we wanted to sell tacos at music festivals all summer. So, we were like “yes, yes.” So, we worked for “Peace Love Tacos” which was at a bunch of these huge festivals, which was really cool and inspiring. We got to see a lot of our heroes for free and we got paid fat. It was

so sweet. And that’s where we met our trumpet player, Chavo. We met his brother at Coachella because they’re from LA. We were jamming at Firefly and then we were at Electric Forest, and then he came home with us just to hang out for like two weeks. We had a gig and were like, “You can just jam with us.” And, that went really well. So, we said, “How about you stay for the BATS! gig on Halloween?” which was a month out. He was sleeping in my room and I was sleeping in Karl’s room. It kind of worked There was like 5 of us in that house.

: You released your last single, “No Limit,” in October of 2017. What other music projects have you been working on since then? BC: We are recording our next album; it’s called “Sweet Fang.” I’m really excited about it. We’ve got a lot of work to do. We’ve got 2 songs—3— songs recorded. I really want this one to be a masterpiece. I don’t have a specific date where I want to release it. It’s because I feel like “Cave Cuts”—that’s our first album—I wanted to be just from our basement... very like “we’re doing this thing.” And, we got it out. But with this one, I want to take our time with it and have it feel more like a movie, with scenes. I love albums that are cohesive and have atmospheres that you can feel like you can enter when you close your eyes. I want it to be like that.

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VOICES

Are You There Congress? It’s Us, America What happens when our thoughts and prayers can only get us so far? BY ARIANA WILSON I never thought that I would have to fear for my life while in high school.

no active threat. Everyone safely returned to their families that afternoon. We were lucky that day.

My entire fifth period class was rehearsing for our choir concert on the stage of our auditorium. Unbeknownst to us at the time, our principal had received a threatening phone call minutes before we had picked up our sheet music and sang our first notes.

But unfortunately, that was not the case for the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida, last Wednesday.

Over the intercom it was announced that our school was in a lock-down with intruder or interior threat. I was in shock as my choir teacher calmly ushered us all into the scene shop that was tucked in the corner of the auditorium stage. Our school had had numerous lock-down drills and although they were put in place to prepare us for moments like this, it seemed hard to believe that one day we would actually have to put that practice to test. After securing all of the doors our teacher began to take attendance. Names were quietly being called as the sense of fear grew. It was very clear that this was unexpected and not a drill. The teachers present kept a close eye on their emails as we waited for directions. I took out my phone and began drafting text messages to my parents and friends. I never thought that I would have to quickly reduce all of my fear, appreciation, and love into a series of messages, as I sat on the cement floor of my high school’s scene shop. Suddenly, the handle to the door of the scene shop began to rattle. My choir teacher signaled us to be quiet and barricaded himself in front of it to keep it shut. I looked towards another exit door and jumped towards it. My initial thought was, “If that’s the intruder, they can get me trying to get to safety. I won’t let them kill me standing still.”

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My feet touched the ground as the door opened and revealed another teacher and a police officer. Our class was next to be evacuated and we were safe. Looking back over a year and a half later, my literal leap of faith is pretty comical to me. We were one of the many schools across the country that received the same bomb threat via phone call. There was no active shooter and technically

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The resilience and the determination that the survivors of that massacre have is a remarkable example of the human condition. Despite some having to witness their teachers and classmates fall in front of them, they are committed to being vocal about taking actions to make schools safer and to enact stricter laws around gun violence. Students have called for rallies, walkouts, and marches to protest our government’s inaction to fight this nationwide issue and to make it clear that student safety should be a top priority in this country. “Every kid in this country now goes to school wondering if this day might be their last. We live in fear.” writes March For Our Lives, a group that is organizing a march in Washington D.C., scheduled for March 24, on their website. Why should our children have to fear a place where they’re meant to feel safe? The problem of gun violence in our country cannot be solved by arguing that our real problem lies within the country’s lack of religion or respect. It cannot be solved by refuting every supporter of the NRA with poorly fact-checked crime statistics from other countries. This issue cannot be solved without the support of our government. Parents should not have to keep burying their children. Our nation’s teachers should not have to become human shields to protect students from a rainstorm of bullets. Students should not be afraid to go to school. How many more vigils and memorials do we have to plan before we realize that enough is enough? You’ve heard our screams and seen our cries. Congress, it’s your move.

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VOICES

Football Season Ends, Sex Trafficking Continues

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What happens when the games are over? Nothing different. BY FARRAH MINA With the Super Bowl drawn to a close and the Winter Olympics one week in, the issue of sex trafficking has been on the mouths of many. Accompanied by fearful suspicion, the throngs of out-of-town people have created the optimal environment for trafficking to take place, facilitating abduction and subsequent exploitation. Though these sporting events ultimately come to a finish and the crowds eventually disperse, sex trafficking continues to lurk, a hanging, silent threat.

Know your enemy. What really is sex trafficking? Sex trafficking, a blatant violation of human rights, is a modern form of slavery. It falls under the umbrella term human trafficking, involving human exploitation in the form of forced labor or the sale of commercial sex acts. The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence estimates that close to 80% of human trafficking comes in the form of sex trafficking. The victims are forced, coerced, and manipulated to perform all kinds of sex acts by their traffickers, from as young as the age of 9.

Let’s talk numbers… The thing about sex trafficking is that it is grounded in secrecy. What makes it more difficult to identify is that the fear of getting caught by the trafficker often prevents the victim from reporting the crime. The traffickers protect themselves from this by manipulating their victims into believing that they themselves are committing the crime. Having said this, many of these cases are lost in the cracks. According to the International Labor Organization, approximately 20.9 million people are victims of human trafficking. 96% of the victims of sex trafficking are female, and 2 million of them

THE WAKE

are children. Traffickers have made a multibillion-dollar criminal industry off of these victims, making it the third largest criminal industry.

Minnesota nice? It may have been easy to dismiss the hidden issue before, but the Twin Cities could not be in denial when the Super Bowl rendered sex trafficking a visible danger. And though this confrontation has not been Minnesota’s first, it has inarguably shed light on the issue. The Prostitution Project: Community-Based Research on Sex Trading in North Minneapolis has found that each month in Minnesota, a minimum of 213 girls are sold for sex an average of five times per day through the Internet and escort services. This number does not include hotel, street or gang activity. In fact, Minnesota is ranked as number 13 in the nation for sex trafficking—a testimony to the prevalence of the crime beyond the scope of the Super Bowl.

Action Plan The Women’s Foundation of Minnesota has created the “MN Girls Are Not For Sale” program in order to combat sex trafficking through research, raising awareness, and changing policies. They have funded projects such as the “Don’t Buy It” campaign that has put up advertisements around the state, educating the public on this pressing issue. Their PSA echoes, “Women are not products. People are not products. Men are more than consumers.” This month, they will be releasing a free, online training module to better prepare us to face this problem and start conversations. Another funded project is the “I am Priceless” campaign, created by former victims of trafficking. They are

spreading the message “My body is not for sale,” across murals and billboards in the state. The Women’s Foundation of Minnesota has also been informative about what signs to look out for in potential victims. Their website has listed the follow warning signs: “Signs of violence: unexplained bruises, black eyes, cuts, or marks. Behaviors including fear, anxiety, depression, hypervigilance, nervousness. Easily startled, agitated, or afraid. Accompanied by older “boyfriend”/ companion. Dressed to look older or inappropriately for the weather. Name and/or symbol tattooed or branded on neck, chest, or arms.”

The Bottom Line? Whether or not you believe the Super Bowl creates a spike in sex trafficking does not matter. It is not the question at hand. The fact is, sporting event or not, sex trafficking is happening. It is ever present and needs to be talked about after the channels are changed and the flights are booked. If you know somebody who is a victim to this, make sure to call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or seek out the appropriate resources.

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VOICES

Censorship In Schools To Kill A Mockingbird in Duluth BY HANNAH OLUND This February the Duluth school district decided they were going to drop “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Huckleberry Finn” from the school’s curriculum. Michael Cary, director of curriculum and instruction for the district said to the Star Tribune that their reason for banning the books was because “the feedback that we’ve received is that it makes many students feel uncomfortable.” Cary stated that this decision was made after years of complaints and concerns from both parents and students. The greatest concern is over the use of the n-word and the discussion of rape within the books, and how that affects the students. If the important aspects can be taught and comprehended by students through another book without the explicit topics of these two specifically, that would be a great choice for school districts. It would be unacceptable for the schools to completely withdrawal all teaching of these issues if they decided to remove the books from their curriculum. For some students, without the books addressing these complicated issues they may never have exposure to them.

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This is not a new issue and has been argued about since the books first became prevalent in school curriculum. The concerns are justified, but it is important to understand that the way these complicated issues are understood by students is based on the way the book is taught. We cannot deny this country’s past, and it would do great injustice to the student to ignore the important issue of racism as it is still apparent today. With the guidance of a teacher the students are able to understand the harm intended behind the words used during the time period the book was written, the racist and harmful mindset people in the south had against African American people, and how this struggle against racism is still continuing.

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How Can You Be A Conscious Consumer? Your Tips for Ditching Fast Fashion BY SADIE BOZYK Most of us are familiar with the term fast fashion, and most of us might know what it entails. Yet for those of us that may need a refresher: it’s the term that is most related to apparel stores like H&M, Forever 21, Zara, and sadly, many more. Fast fashion companies are known for producing their clothing in non-ethical and non-sustainable ways. They use cheap resources to mass produce their items while paying the laborers unreasonably low wages and working them in harmful conditions just so these stores are able to sell their trendy clothes at low prices. Environmentally, it takes over 2,500 liters of water to make one cotton shirt—now think about how many cotton garments are being produced hourly… We now can see why there is a new wave to remove ourselves from supporting fast fashion brands. But how can we be thoughtful consumers? First, get friendly with thrifting. Be that person who finds a dream pair of high-waisted Levi jeans (like yours truly) (*wink* *wink*). Not only are you finding unique pieces for your wardrobe and saving amounts of money by thrifting, but you’re also being involved in recycling clothing which is so beneficial for the environment! Second, get your research on (or keep reading for some helpful tips). Find clothing brands that have the label “Fair Trade” which means that they pay the laborers fair prices and demand safe working conditions. Or search for brands that use organic or recycled materials and sustainable fabrics. Okay, but what brands are ethical? Everlane, Matt & Nat, Patagonia, Levi’s, and Reformation are a few examples. And third, when in doubt, borrow your pal’s clothing! Can we bring back this bond of fashion between friends? I hope we are all inspired to be a more conscious consumer and strive to shop ethically to help our world and the people in it.

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MAR 5—18


VOICES

Group Punishment Dissent over Rule Changes at the U BY CODY PERAKSLIS Groups are not supposed to be above the organization that grants them existence. This general principle is built into our systems of checks-and-balances and stretches from the heights of political domain to student groups here at the University of Minnesota and beyond. This is the reasoning of the Board of Regents for the U to enact a controversial change in the Student Conduct Code, but it is neglecting to take into account a crucial factor: group solidarity. The change in question is to section 8.4 of the Student Conduct Code. This section states a student group can be punished for the actions of its members if that group sponsored, organized, or endorsed the conduct. People are up-in-arms over the addition to this section, allowing student groups to be punished for any conduct an officer knew (or should have known about) but did not prevent that occurs during or directly related to a group event or activity. Now we know the game, let’s meet the players. The purpose of this change is to target Fraternities and any other clubs that throw parties, according to Darrin Rosha in the City Pages piece on this issue. The reasoning behind this boils down to underage drinking, the hope being that the change will push student groups to the straightand-narrow. Given the anti-drinking overtones of the change, one would expect the outcry to come from party-heavy groups. This is not the case. The real outcry has come from the usual denouncers of the party-heavy groups. The protestors, as I will refer to them, are those socially conscious groups who make their voices heard, an example being Differences Organized. The protestors feel this change is a dangerous step in squelching their right to protest. They worry that the change would allow the group to be shut down if their members form some sort of demonstration outside of the organization. They would be culpable if, for example, they hosted a discussion on a sensitive topic that resulted in some members protesting in a manner that disrupted the academic environment (section 4.2 of the Student Conduct Code).

reasons). To these groups, the Board’s actions are just another step to silence them. Both sides seem to be talking right past each other. I disagree with both sides in some ways. My issues with the student groups’ stance are twofold. First, the change is not made to target the groups who are fighting it. They are worried about an unjustified slippery slope, which leads into the second issue: the intent of protest. If the University were to use this addition to shut down a group for protest, the action would backfire tremendously. The result would be more than the small gathering before the vote.

something punishment-worthy even. If the group were to go to the higher authority of the University, then they could be punished. This incentivizes the groups to handle matters internally, making them act as the de facto authority, a move that obviously runs counter the Board’s intent. They could allow for groups who remove and report the member to be safe, but these groups often act as support structures, so pushing groups to turn away members in need would not be ideal. This policy change moves in directions I don’t agree with, but as a move in-and-of itself, it seems to be of little consequence.

This use of the policy seems unlikely, but I can see it from the University’s side. They provide groups organization assistance, so why shouldn’t they be able to sanction groups when their members act out of turn? Besides, I have little patience for a protest that gives in at the first stumbling block. If restructuring yourself as a non-profit or just a grassroots gathering is too much, why should anyone take your protest seriously? The Board is overlooking a crucial factor in these discussions, what I alluded to at the start: group solidarity. Let’s look at what happens when someone within a student group does something stupid,

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A few student groups spoke out against the change in a small gathering on February 8th for the vote that was postponed (for unrelated

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SIX REVIEWS

Black Panther: The Album 9

Here Come the Runts AWOLNATION BY CAITLIN ANDERSON AWOLNATION is known for their interesting play on an alternative sound with bold electronic elements, so much so that it is difficult to compare them to any other band in their genre. Their latest album, “Here Come the Runts,” continues to show that AWOL’s style is unlike any other group. The new album drifts away from the band’s old style by focusing more onan indie rock sound while also bringing in the electronic elements that they’re known for. Originally a rock project by lead singer Aaron Bruno, AWOLNATION blew up overnight after the release of the single “Sail.” Their subsequent albums, “Megalithic Symphony” and “Run,” both focused on a heavy electronic sound, a sound anyone familiar with the band would instantly recognize. This album focuses on the voice of Bruno, along with instrumental elements, rather than on synthetic sounds, giving a feeling of pureness. There isno shortage ofupbeat songs, like “Jealous Buffoon”and“Handyman”which are sprinkled throughout the album and stay true to indie rock style. As a longtime AWOL fan, I am intrigued by their latest album’s fresh sound; however, I amhesitant to say that I am all for it. While parts of the album reflect the same sounds that made me such a fan of theirs, the focus hasmoved away from that to a more simplistic feel. Itwillbeinteresting to see where they take the indie rock style, especially with their tour dates just being announced. After many times seeing them live, I am still in love with the old electronic-heavy AWOLNATION. But, I am excited for the future of the band, the new sound of the album, and the uniqueness that they continue to produce.

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Kendrick Lamar BY SYLVIA RANI Kendrick Lamar’s curated soundtrack for “Black Panther” hit the top of the Billboard 200 tracks as the Marvel masterpiece set newbox office records during its $201.7 million opening weekend. The movie follows T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman), the leader of the fictional nation of Wakanda, as he tries to protect his throne and kingdom against its rivals. Black Panther director Ryan Coogler couldn’t have chosen a better person for the job of creating a soundtrack for the film. For years, Lamar’s artistic vision has been grandiose and Afrocentric with a focus on identity and loyalty. “Black Panther: The Album” features many of the top voices in hip hop, including SZA, 2 Chainz, Khalid, Future, and The Weeknd, to name a few. While only three tracks are featured in the movie itself, the similarities in aesthetics are clear. Lamar’s home state ofCalifornia is incidentally where the film’s villain grew upasan orphan on the streets of Oakland. His father’s life and death in America surrounded by institutional racism drovehim to Wakanda, where he aimed to use the nation’s resources to avenge his father and liberate the oppressed through violent means. Lamar explores the idea of conflict with injustice throughout the album, taking on the voice ofboth the film’s hero and villain, all the while maintaining his signature, no-holds-barred style oflyricism: “Sisters and brothers in unison, not because ofme / Because we don’t glue with the opposition, we glue with peace / But still’d f*** up your organization ifany beef.” Perhaps the album’s strongest element is Lamar’s overarching presence. Even on tracks in which his name is absent from the credits, his vocals are on deck, driving the Black Panther narrative forward. It’s a vision that is uniquely Kendrick, and a work of art that can be enjoyed long after the movie credits roll.

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Kimbra @ The Cedar Cultural Cventer BY SAM BOUNDY he Cedar Cultural Center opened its doors to Kimbra on Monday, Feb 5 with a glance at her year-long tour for her latest album “Primal Heart.” Though Kimbra became famous from tracks like “Cameo Lover”andher appearance in Gotye’s Top 40hit “Somebody That I Used to Know,” she only indulged the audience with one ofherolder songs: a reimagined and improvisational rendition of“Settle Down.” She focused on showcasing her newest project, “Primal Heart.” The album ,” which illustrates Kimbra’s philosophies on human emotion, describing how a heart cries out for love as a primal need. Kimbra, originally from New Zealand, acted right at home on stage, reveling in the friendly Minneapolis crowd. She welcomed a diverse and enthusiastic audience, some who knew all ofher lyrics by heart. Kimbra’s edgy black and white lined dress matched well with her impeccable confidence on stage. The compositional genius behind the music andher ability to improvise during her live performances made for an amazing set. Kimbra showcased her wide range as she impressed the crowd with technical runs sung with precision. The band’s bass player— an extremely talented musician with long, rocker hair— helped to add to the pop rock flavor with funky basslines. The venue was grooving with the futuristic electropop atmosphere. At the endof the concert, Kimbra changed the tone with a heart-wrenching acoustic song from “Primal Heart.”This song— the final song of the night— was a desperate cry for love that surely impacted every audience member.

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SIX REVIEWS

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RETRO REVIEW 14

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Rejuventation (1974) The Meters

Little Dark Age

BY ANDREW TOMTEN

MGMT

One of the most iconic funk records of all time, The Meters’ “Rejuvenation” is widely considered an important benchmark in the evolution of American music. Produced by Allen Toussaint, it paved the way for major R&B, rock, and hip hop records, and is the poster child of New Orleans funk. One of The Meters’ many strengths is their ability to start a song. It may sound silly, but opening the album with the isolated guitar riff on “People Say” is nothing short of genius. It allows plenty of room for the groove to build, and its sparsity suggests shit’s going down. This suggestion is accepted the moment the chorus roars in. I challenge anyone to listen to the opening track and not be on their feet shouting “People Say” by the first chorus. A similar song-opening technique is used in “Just Kissed My Baby,” a tune with lyrics boasting about a funky smooch. The groove is light, bouncy and steeped in soul, sung with such poise it puts you in the shoes of a smitten dude on a sunny day. While some tracks on the album are lighthearted and carefree, “It Ain’t No Use” is more grandiose, harmonically rich and complete with the backing vocals of a gospel choir. The eight-minute instrumental breakdown in the middle starts low and develops to an epic climax, allowing drum legend Zigaboo Modeliste to flex. If you’re in a good mood, or looking to get in one, put this record on. Its combination of silliness and genuine, dirty funk is infinitely groovy, and it is considered by many to be one of the greatest albums of all time.,

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BY CLAIRE REDELL If you are tempted to turn off MGMT’s “Little Dark Age” halfway through your first listen, give itanother chance— you won’t regret it. The electro-indie duo emerged once again from the shadows with a 10-track album that is perhaps their most notable work yet. Made famous bysummer staples “Electric Feel” and “Kids,” MGMT returned to the spotlight by reminding their devout followers that they have not lost their psychedelic-pop roots. The album kicks off with the bizarre but equally captivating “She Works Out Too Much,” which showcases their limitless creativity by tying in the narration ofan80’s-inspired workout instructor that just barely borders on cheesy. The track pokes fun at society’s strong obsession with technology alongside relationship struggles in a ridiculously catchy way. The cadence ebbs and flows as they transition into their title track, sung inan eerie minor key, that is supported byan upbeat and simple chorus. Later, “When You Die” showcases MGMT’s ability to procure effortless hooks coupled with seamless transitions between synthesizers and percussion. The album’s finale encapsulates the band’s triumphant return to the music scene with the downtempo track “Hand It Over.” The song is a perfect cool down following the sensory overload you are bound to experience after listening to the album from beginning toend. Although MGMT has been met with criticism in the past due to their lack of thematic consistency, “Little Dark Age”has a distinct sound that is reminiscent of their “Oracular Spectacular” album that rocketed them to the top of the charts. Thanks to“Little Dark Age,”MGMT has cemented their spot as the true pioneers of the 2000’s synth-pop revolution.

The Post BY CAITLIN ANDERSON It’s no wonder why “The Post” movie is attracting so many people – especially journalists and those interested in news. The Postcame out on Jan. 12 in all theaters, and I eagerly went to see it that day. Directed by Steven Spielberg, the trailers had the potential to catch anyone’s eye. They included scenes between the main characters, Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks) and Katharine Graham (Meryl Streep), in deep conversation, newspapers being thrown from moving trucks, and intense background music. I had to see more. “The Post,” based on a true story,describes the hard decision that The Washington Postfaced about whether or not to release The Pentagon Papers: documents that revealed the Nixon administration’s willful lying to the public about the Vietnam War. The film is a testament to the decisions the press often has to make between providing information for the good of the public or facing the repercussions of government intervention and possible prosecution. “The Post” examines and beautifully portrays all elements— all the positives and negatives— ofthe decision. It showed the effects, on a personal and public scale, that releasing the papers entailed. The ending of the film is thrilling, so you’ll have togo see it for yourself. If you’renot interested in the First Amendment, journalistic integrity,or news in general, “The Post” may not be for you. The plot can get a bit dull at times, but the movie as a whole is inspiring. Any journalist would beproud to say they carry the values that the movie portrayed. It’s worth going to see, and as a journalism student, I absolutely loved it.

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K(NO)W MORE Fund Aurora 2018 | April 15 - 21

The Wake Issue 8 Spring 2018  
The Wake Issue 8 Spring 2018  
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