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WINNERS Deacon football team caps winning season with bowl game triumph over Temple

FEBRUARY 2017

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HOME STRETCH: Head coach Danny Manning’s Wake Forest men’s basketball team looks to climb in the ACC standings in February. (Photo by Donnie Roberts)

VOL. 26 // ISSUE 5 (USPS 014-373) EDITOR

Jim Buice PHOTOGRAPHERS

Donnie Roberts, Brian Westerholt WRITERS

Sam Walker, Stephanie Hudson, Rachael Bari, Lauren Close Design & Layout

Summit Athletic Media www.summitathletics.com Advertising

IMG College Jeff Salisbury, Ike Fullard, Neil Bishop, Melissa Sexton For information on advertising, please call (336) 758-7230

Gold Rush is published eight times a year in August/ September, October, November/ December, January, February, March, April, May/June and July by IMG College in conjunction with Wake Forest Athletics. Periodicals postage paid at Winston-Salem, NC 27102 and at additional mailing offices. The price of an annual subscription is $20. Members of the Deacon Club receive a one-year subscription as part of their membership. Persons wishing to subscribe to Gold Rush should send a check or money order (credit cards not accepted) to:

CONTENTS

4 20 22

// F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

FROM THE AD 100% COTTEN INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

26 27 30

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? CALENDAR COMPLIANCE CORNER

// 6 KEY ADDITION Keyshawn Woods, a transfer from Charlotte, has played an important role for the Wake Forest men’s basketball team in many ways.

IMG College 540 N. Trade St. Winston-Salem, NC 27101 All material produced in this publication is the property of Wake Forest University and IMG and shall not be reproduced in whole or in part without permission.

// 10 SPANNING THE GLOBE The Wake Forest women’s basketball coaching staff has extended recruiting efforts across international borders to find the very best for the Deacon program.

POSTMASTER: Please send all address changes to the attention of Stephanie Hudson, Wake Forest Athletics, 519 Deacon Blvd. Winston-Salem, NC 27105. The appearance of advertising in this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the advertiser and/or the advertiser’s product or service by Wake Forest or IMG. The use of the name of the University or any of its identifying marks in advertisements must be approved by WFU and IMG.

// 14 A FOOTBALL GIANT Ernie Accorsi, who graduated from Wake Forest in 1963, started his career writing sports before transitioning to being an NFL general manager, where he was recently honored by the New York Giants as part of the franchise’s Ring Of Honor.

ON THE COVER ON THE COVER: Wake Forest celebrates its victory over Temple in the Military Bowl on Dec. 27. (Photo courtesy of the Military Bowl) FEBRUARY 2017

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FROM THE A.D.

// R O N W E L L M A N

Men’s soccer and football cap 2016 with fantastic finishes Dear Demon Deacons,

RON WELLMAN DIRECTOR O F AT H L E T I C S

4

Happy New Year! I trust that your holidays were enjoyable and produced many great memories for you and your family, and I hope that 2017 will be a tremendous year for you. The 2016 calendar year concluded on a high note for our teams, especially men’s soccer and football. Our soccer team ended an amazing season as runner-up in the national championship. One of the best seasons in school history, the Deacons finished the year with a 19-3-3 overall record, captured their second straight ACC regular season championship and claimed the program’s first ACC Tournament title since 1989. The on-field successes earned head coach Bobby Muuss his secondstraight ACC Coach of the Year honor while the coaching staff was named the NSCAA South Region Coaching Staff of the Year. Jacori Hayes, Ian Harkes and Alec Ferrell were named first team NSCAA All-Americans – marking the first time in team history three Deacs have earned the honor in the same season. Harkes was named the NSCAA Scholar-Athlete of the Year and earned first team Scholar All-American honors along with Hayes. Harkes also claimed the MAC Hermann Trophy – the top individual award in college soccer – becoming just the second Deacon all-time to accomplish that feat. Hayes was named the Men’s Soccer Senior CLASS Award winner, becoming the second in program history, while Harkes was the first player in conference history named the ACC Midfielder of the Year, ACC Tournament MVP and NCAA College Cup Most Outstanding Offensive Player in program history. Bobby Muuss has done a superb job in his first two years as our head coach. Not only has he earned back-to-back ACC Coach of the Year honors, but he has led our team

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

to national honors by advancing to the quarterfinals of the NCAA Tournament last year and the College Cup finals this year. What a start to his career with us! Football’s victory in the Military Bowl was an exhilarating performance by our team, defeating a ranked Temple team 34-26 as the Deacs exploded for 31 first-half points against the No. 3 nationally ranked Temple defense. That victory not only ended the season on a very high note and produced a winning season (7-6), but it also provided a glimpse into what will be an exciting 2017 season. With many of our outstanding players returning, next season should be a season in which our program takes another significant step forward. Once again, our fans showed up and played a major role in our Military Bowl victory. Bowl representatives recognize that our fans travel to bowl games, which makes the Deacs an attractive team to invite. You came through again this year with more than 5,000 Demon Deacon fans attending the game. Not only did you attend, but you were also an enthusiastic group that inspired our team to

victory. Thank you for all that you did to make this a tremendous experience for our team. The 2016 season was not only a really good year for our football team, but it was also a year to remember for the ACC. In addition to our victory in the Military Bowl, the ACC recorded a 9-3 bowl record, including the national championship. That record far surpasses the other Power 5 conferences’ bowl records (Pac-12: 5-4; Big Ten: 6-7; SEC: 5-8 and Big 12: 3-5). Additionally, the ACC is the only conference with a winning record against Power 5 opponents this year with a 16-9 mark, ahead of the Pac 12 (8-8), Big Ten (9-11), SEC (11-14) and Big 12 (5-8). Of course, the conferences that the ACC competes with most often are the SEC and Big Ten. The ACC records versus those conferences this year were 10-4 vs. the SEC and 6-2 vs. the Big Ten. The emergence of the ACC as the best football conference in the country this year is undoubtedly a result of outstanding coaches and a commitment to excellence as demonstrated by top-notch facilities. The Deacs are certainly in that mix as our facility improvements over the last few years have thrust us to the top of the ACC. And Dave Clawson is the coach who can lead our program in a manner that will allow us to realize all of our goals and aspirations. Thanks again for the support that you give all of our teams! Without you we would not be able to chase ACC championships and national honors. See you at our games as we cheer the Deacs on to victories!

Go Deacs!

Ron Wellman


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// K E Y S H AW N W O O D S

CONSISTENT ACROSS THE BOARD TRANSFER KEYSHAWN WOODS OFFERS CONTRIBUTIONS ACROSS THE STAT SHEET AND MUCH MORE 6

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE


By Sam Walker

K

eyshawn Woods had much of what the Wake Forest basketball program needed. The 6-3 guard, who sat out last season under transfer rules, offers the team another guard, another ball-handler, an adept shooter, a playmaker and a rebounder. But possibly the biggest intangibles he offers are insight and experience.

“PEOPLE HAVE DIFFERENT PATHS, AND I HAD TO TAKE A DIFFERENT PATH TO GET TO THIS ONE. IT WAS NEVER MY PLAN TO LEAVE CHARLOTTE, BUT THIS IS A DIFFERENT SITUATION, AND I LIKE THE SITUATION I’M IN. IT WAS AN OPPORTUNITY I NEEDED TO PURSUE.”

“He is consistent across the board,” Deacon head coach Danny Manning said. “He scores it on all three levels, he rebounds it, passes it, competes on the defensive end, and he’s vocal. He brings a lot to the table and is spoiling us as a staff because we have come to expect that from him every day. But the thing he brings outside of the scoring, rebounds and assists is his leadership. He can talk and communicate with his teammates. He is playing well, still has room to grow and get better, As a freshman at Charlotte, the Gastonia but we are happy with his production.” native played in 32 games, averaged over 25 The path to Wake Forest may have gone minutes per contest and led Conference USA through Charlotte, but the conversation about in 3-point shooting percentage at 46.6 percent. Last season he sat out as NCAA transfer rules playing for Manning began while he was still require, but he was far from idly waiting. He in high school, playing his final two seasons at Northside Christian Academy. studied the team, studied the playbook, studied “Coach Manning recruited me when I was film, built chemistry with his teammates and KEYSHAWN WOODS coming out of high school when he was at Tulsa, went to work on his strength and skills. so I had a connection to him and already had a So the good news for Wake Forest is that even after sitting out a season of competition, Woods has gotten better connection with Coach (Steve) Woodberry,” Woods said. “And once he compared to his freshman campaign. His body of work this season has (Manning) came back to North Carolina, Wake Forest and the ACC, and he still wanted me to play for him, it was big for me because I’m big on been quiet, yet diverse, and overall effective. By each game’s end, there relationships. I came on my visit, and they made me feel like I was at home, are contributions across the stat sheet – just another workmanlike and the big thing that got me was the academics. Once I met with the outing for a player wanting to make an impact in Wake Forest’s basketball fortunes. people at the business school, I knew immediately I wanted to come here. Through 17 games, Woods is Wake Forest’s third-leading scorer, “Growing up in this area, ACC basketball is big, and I wanted to play in the ACC. People have different paths, and I had to take third-leading rebounder and second most accurate overall shooter at a different path to get to this one. It was never my plan to leave 50.7 percent. He has 25 3-pointers, 57 assists (second on the team only Charlotte, but this is a different situation, and I like the situation I’m to Bryant Crawford’s 99), and is averaging less than two turnovers per in. It was an opportunity I needed to pursue.” contest. He contributes in almost every phase of the game. And Woods has played significant minutes in every game, starting seven times, Woods immediately began to get a handle on how he could make including every league game. Woods has scored in double figures in 13 Wake Forest’s team better although he was a year away from seeing the court. He watched intently, was engaged in every phase of the of 17 games. FEBRUARY 2017

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// K E Y S H AW N W O O D S

KEYSHAWN Woods POSITION: Guard CLASS: R-So. MAJOR: Communication HOMETOWN: Gastonia, N.C. FAVORITE FOOD: Good home-cooked food FAVORITE BOOK: “Ender’s Game” by Orson Scott Card FAVORITE ATHLETE: Kobe Bryant FAVORITE WAKE FOREST MOMENT: “Watching old film on Coach Chill (assistant head coach Randolph Childress). Watching Coach Childress during that ACC Tournament run (1994-95) is just part of Wake Forest basketball history I love.”

program and prepared his body for the rigors of a physical college season. It was a year not lost but re-purposed. “It helped me pay more attention to film and my teammates,” Woods said. “Although I didn’t have film on myself, I had film on us, so it made me realize the little things, like where everybody should be on defense and there are things you don’t get to view when you are playing. You get to see the game from a coach’s point of view, so you understand why they want to run certain plays or defensive sets. It was a great opportunity to see things that way, and physically I got a lot stronger. “If I wasn’t working out with Coach (Randolph) Childress or Coach Woodberry, I was with Coach (Ryan) Horn (Director of Athletic Performance). I lived with Coach Horn my offseason, and I gained a lot

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GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

“COACH CHILDRESS KIND OF TREATS ME LIKE HIS OWN SON. DURING MY OFFSEASON, I WORKED OUT WITH HIM ALL THE TIME BEFORE PRACTICE, BEFORE GAMES AFTER PRACTICE, BUT WAS ALWAYS WITH HIM.” KEYSHAWN WOODS of weight and got stronger. My strength allows me to play the two and guard the four. Coach Manning trusts me, so if I’m not making shots, I can contribute getting rebounds, making assists, getting the ball to my teammates. I know I can contribute in different ways.” Woods also picked the brains of his coaches, working on honing his basketball acumen. He bonded with Childress, and hours have been spent learning from the former Wake Forest All-American. “Coach Childress kind of treats me like his own son,” Woods said. “During my offseason, I worked out with him all the time before practice, before games after practice, but was always with him. I have a good relationship with him, and his son (Brandon) is like my little brother. I know I’m going to try to make Brandon better, and he’s going


to try to make me better, so it’s a special relationship. I’m glad to have them.” Woods is also a well-rounded person who realizes there’s more to life than basketball and that basketball affords him special opportunities. He has been nominated for the Allstate NABC (National Association of Basketball Coaches) Good Works Team. The award recognizes a select group of men’s and women’s college basketball student-athletes who stand out for their charitable achievements and community involvement. The team is determined each season by separate voting panels of former coaches, student-athletes and media, and recognized each year at the Final Four. Woods was nominated for his work in various community service groups at Wake Forest and his role as a member on the Student Athletic Advisory Committee. “I do a lot with Brenner Children’s Hospital, and we do a lot as a team with Brenner’s,” Woods said. “I know I want to make sure I get out to see the kids there. I also do a lot with the Santa’s Helper (a program to provide Christmas presents to children in WinstonSalem). And being on the Student Athletic Advisory Committee, any time they need somebody to do something in the community I don’t mind because it’s good to give back. It’s good to see a smile, and some kids just aren’t as fortunate as we are. I’ve always been a family person, so I just know whatever I’m doing, I can always do something to put a smile on somebody else’s face.”

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

// G L O B A L A P P E A L

GLOBAL THE NATIONAL FLAGS THAT HANG FROM THE LJVM COLISEUM RAFTERS INCLUDE THOSE OF AUSTRALIA, ITALY, GREECE, FRANCE AND GREAT BRITAIN AND REPRESENT THE GROWING INTERNATIONAL PRESENCE ON WAKE FOREST’S WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM, AS WELL AS THE MEN’S PROGRAM. By John Justus

M

aintaining competitiveness in the Atlantic Coast Conference isn’t easy regardless of the sport. Winning a league championship or achieving a conference standing that translates to postseason play is a challenge of an even higher degree.

The Wake Forest women’s basketball program, which advanced to the second round of the WNIT a year ago, has certainly faced the demands of the ACC throughout its history. This year, as a most recent example, eight ACC teams were ranked in the USA Today/Coaches Top 25 poll as conference play began in earnest. Competing with that level of opponent begins with recruiting high quality players, and head coach Jen Hoover and her staff have extended their efforts across international borders to find the very best for their program. That doesn’t mean that they can’t have success closer to home, of course. Starting point guard Amber Campbell earned Parade All-American honors in Charleston, S.C., while backcourt mate Ariel Stephenson was rated as a top 50 recruit out of high school in Prince George, Va. But two other current starters and key performers for Hoover’s squad are sophomore Elisa Penna from Bergamo, Italy, and freshman Alex Sharp from Melbourne, Australia.

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GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

Penna, the team’s most accurate three-point shooter and a double-figure scorer, has been a fixture in the starting lineup since joining the Demon Deacons in December last year. Sharp has started this season after an injury to guard Kortni Simmons in late November and is assuming a more prominent role while averaging almost 30 minutes per game. In addition, a key reserve on this year’s club, Clarisse Berranger, is a graduate student from Remiremont, France.

“WE HAVE GREAT SUPPORT FROM THE UNIVERSITY, AND IT FEELS LIKE YOU ARE HOME, EVEN THOUGH HOME IS THOUSANDS OF MILES AWAY.” CLARISSE BERRANGER


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FEBRUARY 2017

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

// G L O B A L A P P E A L

“Elisa, Alex and Clarisse have all been ELISA PENNA key contributors to our team this season,” Hoover says, “and it’s not surprising that Elisa and Alex are doing so early in their careers. They are mature, hard-working and understand the game. “They have all played in their home countries against tough competition – grown women really – at a level that there is no equivalent to here in the United States. “They are great kids, great teammates and great for our program.” A reasonable question might be, “How did these three young women end up at Wake Forest?” There is no single or simple answer. Needless to say that it has required a great deal of time and effort on the part of Hoover and her staff to establish international contacts in different countries, evaluate prospects through lengthy recruiting trips and other means, acquaint those prospects with Wake Forest University and the ACC, then work with athletic department and university administrators to make sure all the proper documents, paperwork and records are reviewed and approved. And the final step – get the players to commit to WFU. “We have some good contacts, particularly in Australia, right now,” Hoover says, “but we want to make the investment to visit them in their home country to let them know the value of playing here and of a Wake Forest degree. “Recruiting internationally is a challenge, but it’s something we feel we can be successful at and that it will benefit our program. However, there are a lot of boxes to check along the way.” Hoover, as well as assistant coaches Mike Terry and Gayle Coats Fulks, have all made international recruiting trips. Coats Fulks, the program’s recruiting coordinator, has been to Australia seven times herself. “International players have a very high level of skill,” Coats Fulks says. “If Elisa or Alex had been playing high school ball here in the states, they would have been very highly ranked as prospects. “A Wake Forest education is a definite plus for them, but they also come here to play against great competition like they see in the ACC so that they can be prepared to hopefully one day play for their native country.” Both Penna and Sharp confirm the dual appeal that Wake Forest and Wake Forest Basketball offered them. “Wake Forest was recruiting me, but I never visited the campus,” Penna says. “I wasn’t really sure at first about coming to the U.S., but I decided on Wake Forest because it was one of the best academic schools and it was in a great conference.” Sharp knew that playing collegiately in America was her goal. “It was my dream to play college ball,” she says. “Wake Forest was one of the first schools to recruit me. When I visited, I decided a couple weeks later to come here. It was very much a family atmosphere, plus there was the ACC and the great academics.” Berranger actually received an undergraduate degree in France and was looking for an opportunity to continue her education and improve her basketball skills, something she says was not an option in her native country. She remains excited with her decision. “My team and my coaches – it’s like a big family,” Berranger states. “We have great support from the university, and it feels like you are

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GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

ALEX SHARP

home, even though home is thousands of miles away (4,561 to be exact).” Wake Forest has long prided itself on being just such a community – for the student from a nearby county, the adjacent state, or even a foreign country. The WFU Center for Global Programs and Studies, which works with students on the Reynolda Campus who wish to study abroad, has been instrumental in helping the athletic department navigate the numerous challenges involved with bringing international student-athletes to Winston-Salem, senior associate athletic director for compliance Todd Hairston says. “We work closely with Global Studies and in turn work with our coaches who are recruiting international students,” Hairston says. “We inform the coaches what information is necessary, and they have to be diligent in obtaining the proper records and documentation needed.” Academic transcripts, student visas, proper health insurance – all are items that must be addressed. Previous athletic experience and financial aid records are other important areas that must be reviewed. “There is no NCAA (in foreign countries),” Hairston notes, “and the definition of amateurism can vary from our regulations. We have to take a close look – regardless of the sport.” Wake Forest currently has more than 30 international studentathletes from nearly 20 different countries, notes senior associate athletic director Jane Caldwell, who heads up the Student-Athlete Services division within WFU Athletics. “Our international student-athletes are typically very good students,” she says, “and our record for them is very good in terms of GPA (grade point average) and graduating. “Their language skill level is always a factor, but if they need assistance we try to connect them with other students from their home country and tutors who speak their language. But they learn quickly and usually are communicating very well in a couple of months.” The athletic department hosted a special dinner this fall for all of its international student-athletes at the home of athletic director Ron Wellman. The response was so positive that Caldwell says the hope is to have another such event in the future. “Wake Forest is small, so you get to meet and know a lot of people,” Penna says. “You build great relationships not only with your teammates but with other athletes and other students.” “Everyone (at Wake Forest) works together,” Sharp says. “Even with classes, where it is very competitive, everyone helps each other so that we can be successful together.” Success academically and athletically at the highest level. Despite the challenges, the results – and the people involved – say it is being achieved.


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FOOTBALL

//

ERNIE ACCORSI

WRITING HIS TICKET

TO THE NFL ERNIE ACCORSI MAKES IT TO THE TOP WITH THE NEW YORK GIANTS

Photos by Evan Pinkus, New York Giants

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GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE


By Steve Shutt

E

rnie Accorsi graduated from Wake Forest in 1963 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in speech communication. He went on to earn a Master’s degree in the National Football League.

What? You didn’t know the NFL offered postgraduate degrees? Accorsi was a writer. Always has been, always will be. After arriving on campus in 1959, he began his career writing sports for the Old Gold and Black. That led to a stint in the Army and then a position as a sportswriter with the Charlotte News where he covered the NBA. After transitioning to being a college sports PR director, Accorsi landed positions at St. Joseph’s and then Penn State before being hired as the Baltimore Colts’ PR director in 1970. In 1982, Accorsi was named the Colts’ general manager and spent three years with the club before joining the Cleveland Browns in 1985. He became an assistant GM with the New York Giants in 1994 and was promoted to GM in 1998. He retired from the Giants in 2007 but not before leaving the foundation for a team that would win Super Bowl XLII. His success with the Giants resulted in Accorsi being inducted into the New York Giants’ Ring of Honor in November. Accorsi was inducted along with Tom Coughlin, the man Accorsi hired to coach the Giants, and Justin Tuck, an Accorsi draft pick. “It’s pretty much the ultimate honor from a franchise,” said Accorsi from his home in New York City. “It’s not something I ever expected. I’ve been in so many stadiums in the NFL, and you see all the names up there, and 99 percent of them are players and coaches, and you never expect to see your name up there. The franchise has been in existence 92 years, and I’m only the second general manager, and that overwhelms me. The other is George Young, and he’s the one that brought me here. I have the feeling that 30 years from now people will be saying, ‘Who’s that guy next to Frank Gifford?’ Accorsi joined the NFL in a different era than today, an era where there was no specialization. Scouting and talent evaluation was the lifeblood of the organization, and everybody played a role. “The great break I got in 1970 when I joined the Colts, there were only five of us in the front office,” he recalled. “Everybody scouted. The equipment manager scouted. I scouted. They taught us how to scout. My first year on the job, I took my first scouting trip to Penn State. When I turned in the reports, (Colts GM) Joe Thomas argued with me and challenged everything I wrote. I also was very lucky that Pete Rozelle was the commissioner. He was a PR guy originally, and he brought PR people to the league office for major administrative positions and sent them back to teams mainly as assistant general managers. It was an era where you had the commissioner as a major benefactor.” Accorsi gradually made the transition from PR director to general manager and talent evaluator. “General managers in the NFL are not the glamour positions – the coaches are, they’re the ones on the field,” Accorsi said. “Early on when I came into the league, I had my eye on becoming a general manager. I kept lots of notebooks, and I asked a million questions. I worked with George Young – he was a scout and I was a PR guy. I worked for guys like Don Klosterman, who was a FEBRUARY 2017

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FOOTBALL

//

ERNIE ACCORSI

great general manager (with the Colts in the 1970s) who made two trades in a month and won the Super Bowl for us in 1971. The two guys who taught me how to scout were Upton Bell, the commissioner’s son, he was our player personnel director, and Joe Thomas, who was a brilliant and very simple evaluator of talent. I used a lot of what he taught me. Then I was around people like Jim Finks (Vikings/Bears/ Saints GM) and (NFL Commissioner) Pete Rozelle.” Perhaps foremost among the lessons Accorsi learned on his trek through the NFL was how to build a winning franchise and the ingredients needed for success. “I got to three championship games with the Browns, and we lost all three to (John) Elway,” Accorsi said. “Two went down to the final play of the game, and the other went to overtime. You could say we just didn’t get the breaks. When I analyzed why we didn’t do it, it was because we didn’t have a pass rush. We had the two best corners in the league as a tandem. I learned right there you can have good corners and a great pass rush, and you can win

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it. If you have a moderate pass rush and great corners, you’re not going to win it. The Giants have had very few, if any, Pro Bowl secondary people, and they have won four Super Bowls. You have to have great pass rushers, and I drafted them until the cows came home. I got criticized for it when we had (Michael) Strahan, (Osi) Umenyiora and (Justin) Tuck, and we drafted (Mathias) Kiwanuka and the media said, ‘Don’t you have enough pass rushers?’ and I said ‘The Red Sox thought they had too much pitching and then four guys got hurt.’” Accorsi’s other commandment for building a winning team is to have a franchise quarterback. “Day one with the Colts, I walked in and we had Johnny Unitas, and I knew the value that you have to have a great quarterback if you want to be a great team,” he said. “There have been teams that won a title once by circumstances with good quarterbacks, not great quarterbacks. For the most part, Super Bowl champions have Hall of Fame quarterbacks.” His days on campus at Wake Forest came at a time when a number of legendary sports figures were also roaming the grounds of Mother So Dear. Accorsi remembers how he and Brian Piccolo used to attend mass together. “Neither one of us had a car,” Accorsi said. “St. Leo’s was too far to walk. I would venture to say there were no more than five Catholics on campus, and Piccolo and I were the only two to go to church. Billy Packer went to church, but he was married and lived off campus. I’d try and hitchhike, and I hardly ever got a ride unless I borrowed a fraternity brother’s car. Once Piccolo started hitchhiking, people would skid to a stop, and I’d get a ride, that was the only way I got there. “The other thing that really helped was I had been a sports writer. I knew their job and I never got caught up in criticism. I knew that came with the job, and I knew they had a job to do. Plus, I was a critical writer when I covered the NBA, and I criticized players and coaches, and I wasn’t about to be a hypocrite when I got into that position. So that helped a lot by the time I got to be a general manager.” Accorsi is quick to share the secret of his tremendous success in the NFL. “Being around George Young and Upton Bell and especially Joe Thomas, I just got a master’s degree in how to scout and what to look for,” Accorsi said. “In order to be a good evaluator, you have to learn how to be one but you have to have the instincts. I don’t care how long you study it, if you don’t have the instincts for it, you’re not going to be one.” Accorsi also expressed gratitude for a number of guests who were able to attend the Ring of Honor ceremony at halftime of the Giants’ Monday Night game with Cincinnati on Nov. 14. “I was really surprised and really appreciate Ron Wellman being there,” he said. “That was so classy. For Ron and his wife Linda to come up there in November, it was terrific. To have Ron there, it was a great honor and I am so appreciative. It was really a wonderful honor and not anything I ever dreamed about.”


for donating those blue jeans. At Goodwill, we sell your donated items to fund our employment and training programs – which help local people in northwest North Carolina find opportunity and jobs. For more information, please visit goodwillnwnc.org.

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F OO LD//E R M I L I TA R Y PA GT E BHAELA

BOWL

THE 2016 MIL WAKE FOREST

OVER

34 -26

Photos courtesy of the Military Bowl

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TEMPLE


LITARY BOWL

T U E S D A Y, D E C E M B E R 2 7, 2 0 1 6 | J A C K S T E P H E N S F I E L D A T N A V Y - M A R I N E C O R P S M E M O R I A L S TA D I U M | A N N A P O L I S , M A R Y L A N D

Photo by Brian Westerholt FEBRUARY 2017

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100% COTTEN

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Winning ways for football team

S TA N COTTEN VOICE OF THE DEMON DEACONS

We are well on our way into the deep pockets of the cold winter and ACC basketball, but there’s still a warmth in this chill provided by the way the Demon Deacons finished their football season, the third under head coach Dave Clawson. The win over Temple in the Military Bowl two days after Christmas was a present worth waiting to unwrap, and the satisfaction of beating a 10-win team, finishing with a winning record and ending the season on a high note made it, indeed, a Happy New Year. The seven wins were more than the number of the 2014 and 2015 seasons combined, and Coach Clawson and his staff seem right on their proven pace of the past to rebuild programs and do it sooner rather than later. Clawson had said as early as late spring that he felt his third team would be good enough to earn a postseason game. After six wins in two seasons that might have seemed to some a rather bold take, but Clawson proved that nobody knew his team as well as he did. The Deacons bolted out of the gates with four straight wins. And as redshirt freshman safety Jessie Bates bolted down the west side of BB&T Field with an interception return for a touchdown and the

winning points against Virginia in week nine to secure for Wake bowl eligibility, a celebration began that boiled over into a raucous locker room the likes of which hadn’t been seen around here in too many seasons. But the Deacons had only earned a bowl bid – their first since the 2011 Deacs accepted an invitation to oppose the SEC’s Mississippi State Bulldogs in the Music City Bowl in Nashville. Wake entered that game with a 6-6 record, the same record it would take to Annapolis to face Temple. Many of us still remember the sting of losing that game in Nashville and ending the season 6-7. It was a humbling, bowled-over feeling. Win the bowl game, and you, well, win. You have a winning record. But lose a bowl game with a 6-6 record, and you fail in the court of public opinion – even though you were a postseason team. So Wake Forest entered the Military Bowl with work to be done and the pressure of beating American Athletic Conference champion Temple on the same field where the Owls had upended the Naval Academy in the AAC title game three weeks before – a home game for Navy – not a simple task. Sometimes the first few moments of a game are the fastest,

and before you knew it Wake had been intercepted on its third play from scrimmage and quickly scored on when Temple delivered a haymaker of a 48-yard pass on its very first play. Be careful what you wish for, right? But any doubts that the Deacons were not prepared and ready to play were quickly erased as Wake sprinted to 31 consecutive points, enough to win, and the defense kept the Owls settling for mostly field goals the rest of the afternoon on the way to a 34-26 victory. Wake Forest had won more than the Military Bowl. It won its season. Clawson’s spring assertion that the Deacs should go to a bowl game was voted down by the media in mid-summer when they decided the Deacs would finish last in the ACC’s Atlantic Division. But Wake beat ACC teams, beat teams away from home, beat state schools, private schools, beat both ranked and unranked and beat a conference champion. The Deacons did their part in an ACC blitz that led the conference to a 9-3 postseason record and a national championship. They won. The winter will be warmer now. Spring will come sooner. And Wake Forest football will enter fall camp a winner again.

THE WAKE FOREST UNIVERSIT Y SPOR TS HALL OF FAME IS N O W A C C E P T I N G N O M I N A T I O N S F O R T H E C L A S S O F 2 0 1 7. The Wake Forest University Sports Hall of Fame was established in 1970 with the induction of former basketball coach Murray Greason, the late football star Brian Piccolo, former football coach Peahead Walker and former director of athletics Jim Weaver, who later became the first commissioner of the ACC. Anyone can nominate a person to the Hall of Fame. Eligibility for Hall of Fame members is defined by 10 criteria,

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which include being out of school for 10 years (or deceased); receiving national recognition as an athlete, coach or administrator; being of good character and reputation; and having no stronger connection with another university. Send nominations to: Steve Shutt, Associate Athletic Director/Athletic Communications, 519 Deacon Blvd, Winston-Salem, N.C. 27105 Or via e-mail at shuttsj@wfu.edu.


Winston-Salem Downtown 125 S. Main Street

336.714.2800

Proud to be a Demon Deacon!

FEBRUARY 2017

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INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

Where Will Wake Forest Athletics Take You?

BA R RY FA I R C L O T H SENIOR A S S O C I AT E AT H L E T I C DIRECTOR, DEVELOPMENT

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As the Deacon Club aims to realize our vision of Developing Champions, we help provide operating support to our programs in addition to the many resources necessary for our student-athletes to succeed, which includes state-of-the-art facilities for both practice and competition. With that said, we also strive to create the ability for donors and fans to engage with our athletic programs through various events and travel opportunities. This past fall season serves as a prime example of how the success of our teams can provide the ability to travel to unique destinations and partake in special events, surrounded by loyal Deacon fans. If there was ever any uncertainty as to how well Wake Forest fans travel, the 2016 Men’s Soccer College Cup and 2016 Military Bowl undoubtedly cleared it up. As the men’s soccer team prepared to battle for the College Cup in Houston, the presence of Deacon fans could be felt before even leaving North Carolina, beginning at the Greensboro airport. Upon arriving in Houston, the contingent of fans only grew stronger. It was impossible to walk even 10 steps without encountering another Deacon and exchanging an excited, “Go Deacs!” Prior to the start of the semifinal game versus Denver, fans were able to gather for a memorable tailgate at the Streakin’ Deacon RV, which traveled all the way from Winston-Salem to show support and help boost the Wake Forest presence. After winning that first matchup to advance to the championship game, Deacon fans found themselves in Houston for a full day without a contest to be played. The lack of a game didn’t stop Wake Forest supporters from keeping the energy level up, and if anything, raised it even higher. The extra time allowed for an event to be held at Little Woodrow’s, which drew more than 100 fans. Coach Bobby Muuss even stopped by to share his appreciation for the level of support on behalf of the program, commenting that it was obvious to the team that Wake Forest had the greatest number of fans in the stadium the previous day. Come Sunday morning, Deacon fans showed up in full force to BBVA Compass Stadium, where they led cheers and chants throughout the duration of the game, relentless in their support. After the game had ended, it was extremely evident how lucky we are to have such great fans. That feeling carried on and remained consistent as the football team headed to the Washington, D.C. area. The crowd of Wake Forest fans was 10,000 strong, all waving gold pom-poms, which was a fantastic tribute to our team for the Military Bowl. The event at City Tap House in downtown D.C. the night before the game drew in over 300 Wake Forest

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

alumni, supporters and friends, all of whom were ecstatic about the following day. On the day of the game, the Wake Forest tailgate, combined with the supporting Streakin’ Deacon RV, saw approximately 1,000 fans. That level of support created a truly incredible atmosphere, which did not go unnoticed. Not only was this our first bowl game since 2011, it was the first time ever that Wake has defeated a ranked opponent in a bowl game. To top it off, the football team finished the season with a winning record, sending our very own Big Daddy out in style and rewarding the efforts of Coach Clawson and his staff. To all of our fans who have traveled near and far to show your support – we can’t thank you enough. With that said, let’s build off of our current momentum and continue to show a strong presence. As you begin to contemplate your spring plans, there will plenty of upcoming travel opportunities to exciting destinations that we hope you will consider as our winter and spring teams participate in their respective ACC Championship Tournaments: • ACC Indoor Track & Field Championships Feb. 23-25 – South Bend, IN • ACC Women’s Basketball Tournament March 1-5 – Conway, SC • ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament March 7-11 – Brooklyn, NY •A  CC Women’s Golf Championship April 13-15 – Pawleys Island, SC • ACC Men’s Golf Championship April 21-23 – Clinton, SC • ACC Tennis Championships April 26-30 – Rome, GA • ACC Outdoor Track & Field Championships May 12-14 – Atlanta, GA • ACC Baseball Championship May 23-28 – Louisville, KY Again, thank you to all of our loyal fans for the impressive support we’ve witnessed this fall. I look forward to seeing many of you at some of these upcoming destinations! Let’s make the Wake Forest presence be felt wherever we go! Go Deacs!


INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

EVERY GIFT COUNTS! RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP BY THE 2017 PLEDGE DEADLINE ON MARCH 15 When you make a pledge by the 2017 Pledge Deadline, it allows the Athletic Department to better plan for the upcoming year and ensure that we can continue offering the best athletic and educational opportunities for our talented student-athletes. If you haven’t already, please consider making your gift or pledge today. Gifts and pledges can be made online at deaconclub.com/donate or by calling (336) 758-5626.

Keep up with the Deacon Club on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram! For the latest news and information from the Deacon Club and to connect with other members, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram! @WFUDeaconClub Facebook.com/DeaconClub @WFUDeaconClub | @DeacOnTheRun | @BarryFaircloth

DEACON CLUB DONATION DEADLINE

MOVING TO MAY 31 In an effort to finalize our annual budgets earlier, the Deacon Club annual membership renewal deadline will be moved from June 30 to May 31 — beginning with May 31, 2017. If you have questions as we transition to this new renewal deadline, please contact us at (336) 7585626 or deacclub@wfu.edu.

IS WAKE FOREST ATHLETICS IN YOUR WILL? Planned giving ties your legacy with the future of Wake Forest Athletics. To learn more about the many ways you can support Wake Forest Athletics through planned giving, please contact Paul Kennedy at (336) 758-3875 or kennedpj@wfu.edu.

SAVE THE DATE:

FOOTBALL SPRING GAME AND REUNION WEEKEND HONORING COACH BILL FAIRCLOTH The football Spring Game will be held on April 8 at BB&T Field. We also invite all football alumni to reconnect with friends and former teammates and stay engaged with Wake Forest Athletics by attending the reunion April 7-8. This is always a special weekend and this year will be no different as we will be honoring Coach Bill Faircloth, who after 38 years on the Demon Deacon football staff, is retiring. Remain on the lookout for more information coming soon!

FEBRUARY 2017

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DONOR PROFILE

// C Y N T H I A T E S S I E N

Cynthia Tessien chooses different path but support for WFU has always been steadfast

R

alph Waldo Emerson once said, “Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” This is the mindset that Cynthia Tessien (’82) has embodied since she was young. Growing up in Greensboro, where her mother was a high school guidance counselor and her father was a civil engineer and business owner, she always enjoyed exploring things off the beaten path. When it became time to start looking into colleges, Cynthia’s thought process remained the same – she knew she wanted to take a different path. While many of her classmates seemed to be interested in applying to the same school, Cynthia set out to explore various other colleges in an attempt to find the best fit. “I looked at Wake Forest because I wanted to look at something different,” she said. On her first visit to campus, Cynthia fell in love with all that Wake had to offer. Aside from the size and reputation of the school, Cynthia connected with the feel of the campus as she walked around, immediately convincing her that

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this is where she belonged. Her love of Wake Forest may have been born on that day of her campus visit, but it has lasted through the years, only growing as time goes on. An avid pianist with a strong love and passion for music, Cynthia wanted to be a rock and roll star. Although her dream of being a professional musician didn’t become a reality, it left the door open for Cynthia to explore other career options. Not knowing exactly what she wanted to major in upon entering college, the liberal arts foundation at Wake Forest was extremely appealing. As classes began, economics stood out, and Cynthia thought that might be the subject she ended up majoring in. At the time, however, there was a required prerequisite course in accounting that Cynthia had to enroll in. It was at this point that the uncertainty that fogged her mind dissipated, and the realization that accounting was the perfect choice as a major became clear. Cynthia largely attributes that revelation to Dr. Lee Knight, who was the professor of that accounting class and who continues to act as a valuable mentor for Cynthia to this day.

Cynthia’s love for Wake Forest Athletics began during her time as a student and has continued to evolve over the years. One of her finest athletic memories from her undergraduate years is the football team playing in the 1979 Tangerine Bowl in Orlando and having the opportunity to travel down to Florida with friends to watch the Deacs take on LSU. After graduating from Wake in 1982 and passing the exam to become a Certified Public Accountant, Cynthia once again traveled in her own direction. At that time, most of her friends found jobs and moved to Charlotte, but Cynthia chose to go to Raleigh instead, where she spent 10 years with EY, formerly known as Ernst & Young. In 1992 she moved back to the Piedmont Triad for personal reasons and specifically chose to live in WinstonSalem so she could easily attend Wake Forest basketball games. Shortly after coming back to Winston-Salem, where she was transferred to the local EY office, she was offered and accepted a job with Inmar. By 2005, Cynthia was putting in many long hours at work, and she and her husband, Bill, had just had their third child. With that said, she didn’t


feel that the pace and demands of her position were conducive to the lifestyle she was looking for. Contemplating other options that would be a good fit for her, Cynthia decided to contact Dr. Jack Wilkerson, who was the Dean of the Wake Forest School of Business at the time. While inquiring what it would take to get a PhD, Wilkerson introduced Cynthia to the concept of professionally qualified faculty and invited her to consider applying for a faculty position. In the fall of 2010, Cynthia finally decided to make the career change and started teaching at Wake Forest. Although she never thought she would be a teacher, Cynthia has found it to be something she truly loves and hasn’t looked back since. “What I tell students is that I came to Wake Forest for me, but I stay for them,” she said. “The relationships I have with the students and being able to follow their successes is very truly one of the most rewarding aspects of my life.” In her current position, things have come full circle for Cynthia. Not only is she now a colleague of Knight’s, her first accounting professor that inspired her to go into the profession, Cynthia now has the opportunity to act as a mentor and help shape the future of current students, including many student-athletes.

At the beginning of every semester, Cynthia makes sure to ask the studentathletes whom she teaches which sports they play. Once she gathers this information, she makes every effort to attend their competitions and watch them play. Cynthia’s continued support of Wake Forest Athletics and the student-athletes has even landed her the opportunity to act as a guest coach for volleyball and women’s soccer on two separate occasions. Cynthia’s support of Wake Forest Athletics doesn’t stop there, however. In addition to encouraging the student-athletes on the field and in the classroom, she also shows her support through the Deacon Club, where she has been a member for 23 years. Realizing the value and need for it to

be a priority, Cynthia and Bill have both made career changes that allow them to be involved in education, including a tutoring center they own in Clemmons, NC called A Step Ahead Academic Center. Cynthia and Bill’s contributions to the Deacon Club go hand-in-hand with wanting to help kids learn and grow, while obtaining a quality education. “When I came to Wake Forest, my family didn’t have much money at all, and I know what a struggle it was,” she said. “Wake Forest provided a window to a larger world, and I want to help students have the same great experience that I did.” Looking ahead to what’s in store for Wake Forest Athletics, Cynthia realizes the importance of providing our studentathletes and coaches with the resources they need to succeed both during competition and in the classroom. “We have to be mindful to continue bringing the resources necessary to make our programs competitive,” she said. Cynthia’s journey to Wake Forest started with her traveling off the beaten path, and that same mindset ultimately led her back to Wake years later. “As Deacs we get to stand apart and be different,” she said. “We don’t have to follow the mainstream. We get to stand for something higher. We’re proud to wear our Black and Gold!”

deacon club photos Deacon Club members are encouraged to submit photos for publication in the Gold Rush. Send your photos in digital format to deacclub@wfu.edu. Submission of a photo does not guarantee that it will be published. Thanks for showing off your Demon Deacon pride!

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1 Charlie Knott, grandson of Deacon Club members Chip (’65) and Sarah Owen, spends time with the men’s basketball team.

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2 An impressive crowd followed the Deacs to the College Cup in Houston and enjoyed a tailgate with the Streakin’ Deacon.

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3 D  eacon Club members cheer on the Deacs at the Military Bowl in Annapolis on Dec. 27.

FEBRUARY 2017

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

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PAT T Y S M I T H

n each issue, Where Are They Now showcases a former Wake Forest student-athlete. Patty Smith (’75) was a member of the Wake Forest women’s basketball team from 1971-75, serving as captain her senior season. She was also a member of the field hockey team from 1971-74, starting one game as a freshman, as well as the women’s tennis team in 1973 and volleyball team in 1974.

Patty Smith When did you graduate from Wake Forest? 1975 What was your major and/or minor? Health and Physical Education What does being a Demon Deacon mean to you? Being a Demon Deacon means being a pioneer and meeting challenges “head-on” as opportunities. It means “when the going gets tough, the tough get going” and that I can trust that I already have everything I need to be who I was created to be. In other words, the universe is open to me, to all possibilities and that my responsibility is to listen, to stay in alignment with the best of who I am and to give everything my best shot. Why are you still involved in Wake Forest Athletics? I always thought that sports represented a microcosm of life and that we should support anyone who was involved in athletics to be the best as athletics taught us about ourselves, others, our relationships and life itself. I came to Wake in 1971 and arrived in my first physical education class to find out that women would have competitive teams as a result of Title IX. Many young women need sports, teams and competition as much as men, and I want to support that as it made a huge difference in my life. Why do you feel it is important to give back to the University? As I have grown and reflected back, I realize how fortunate I was to attend such a great university. For me, it was a pretty big sacrifice by my parents and I know how important it is to be able to be educated regardless of means. In an ideal world, everyone would be able to have such an opportunity, and I enjoy giving from the abundance and gratitude that I am fortunate to have. What is your current occupation? After coaching basketball and volleyball (tennis and softball at some point) at Lenoir Rhyne University (Hickory) from 1977-82, I became a financial advisor (CFP®, CLU®, ChFC®, APMA®) and am still with Ameriprise Financial. I think of myself more as a “life coach” as I am teaching and coaching about one’s life — money and investments are just a part of it. What is your favorite memory of your time at Wake Forest? I loved being a junior advisor on a freshman hall of women and all the adventures we had together. Also, getting to play more than one sport in those days – I played three years of field hockey, one year of volleyball (we went to the regionals that year in Kentucky), four years of basketball and one year of tennis. What makes you most proud of Wake Forest? There was (and continues to be) a healthy balance of academics and athletics, and there were wonderful role models, mentors and great professors. It is a place where one can develop long-lasting friendships and feel prepared to be successful in one’s chosen career.

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When you come back to Wake Forest, you always… Love to walk around campus to see all the changes and to be reminded of how young all the students look and how they are all still studying hard like we did. I was there when… AIAW competitive teams for women first began, the first co-ed dorm was opened, we had Winter Term in January, Richard Nixon resigned and Gerald Ford became President, U.S. Representative Barbara Jordan (D-Texas) gave the commencement address to my graduating class, Skip Brown played on the men’s basketball team. Who is your favorite coach at Wake Forest, current or past? Coach Nora Lynn Finch — she was the first coach hired for the women’s competitive program in 1971, and she coached all of the sports. She was my field hockey, basketball and tennis coach my freshman and sophomore years. She did an amazing job of getting the program off the ground and coaching some competitive teams in those early years without any scholarships.


SUN FEB 05

MON 06

TUE 07

WED 08

THUR 09

FRI 10

Track JDL Team Challenge

Women’s Basketball vs. Pittsburgh 2pm

SAT 11 Women’s Tennis vs. William & Mary 10:30am, Liberty 3pm

FEBRUARY // MARCH 2017

WAKE FOREST ATHLETICS

Men’s Basketball vs. NC State 12pm

Deacon Club members at or above the Deacon Bench level may present their 2016-17 membership cards for free admission to Olympic Sport events (immediate family only). Olympic Sport single game tickets and season passes are available at wakeforestsports.com or by calling (336) 758-3322. SPORTS MARKETING (336) 758-5011 TICKET OFFICE (336) 758-3322 GROUP TICKETS (Football & Basketball) (336) 758-4030 DEACON CLUB (336) 758-5626 www.deaconclub.com deacclub@wfu.edu

GoldRushCalendar_Feb_Mar_2017.indd 1

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Women’s Basketball vs. Duke 7pm

18 Women’s Tennis vs. Clemson 11am, App State 3:30pm Track UCS Invitational

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Baseball vs. USC 1pm

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Baseball vs. UNCG 4pm

Men’s Basketball vs. Pittsburgh 7pm

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MAR 01

Baseball vs. Davidson 6pm

Men’s Basketball vs. Louisville 9pm

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Baseball vs. USC 4pm

Baseball vs. USC 4pm

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Baseball vs. Quinnipiac 4pm

Baseball vs. Kent State 2pm, 6pm

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Men’s Tennis vs. UNC 1pm

Baseball vs. NC State 4pm

Women’s Basketball vs. Louisville 2pm

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Baseball vs. Radford 2pm

Baseball vs. NC State 6pm

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Baseball vs. NC State 1pm

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Men’s Tennis vs. Virginia Tech 4pm

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Women’s Tennis vs. Notre Dame 4pm

Deacon Club Pledge Deadline

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Baseball vs. Georgia Tech 6pm

Baseball vs. Georgia Tech 4pm

EVERY GIFT COUNTS! RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP BY THE 2017 PLEDGE DEADLINE ON MARCH 15 When you make a pledge by the 2017 Pledge Deadline, it allows the Athletic Department to better plan for the upcoming year and ensure that we are able to continue offering the best athletic and educational opportunities for our talented student-athletes. If you haven’t already, please consider making your gift or pledge today. Gifts and pledges can be made online at deaconclub.com/donate or by calling (336) 758-5626.

FOOTBALL SPRING GAME SET FOR APRIL 8 The football Spring Game will be held on April 8 at BB&T Field. We also invite all football alumni to reconnect with friends and former teammates and stay engaged with Wake Forest Athletics by attending the reunion April 7-8. This is always a special weekend and this year will be no different as we will be honoring Coach Bill Faircloth who, after 38 years as a Demon Deacon football coach, is retiring. Remain on the lookout for more information coming soon!

1/13/17 3:13 PM


DEACONS IN THE PROS BASEBALL Coaches/Scouts Ross Atkins Neil Avent TJ Barra Development Danny Borrell George Greer John Hendricks Michael Holmes Crosschecker Kevin Jarvis Bill Masse Matt Price Mike Rikard Eric Schmitt Adam Wogan Tommy Gregg

WOMEN’S SOCCER

MLB MLB MLB

Toronto Blue Jays Oakland A’s New York Mets

General Manager Area Scout Manager of Baseball Research &

MLB MLB MLB MLB

New York Yankees St. Louis Cardinals New York Mets Oakland A’s

Rehab Pitching Coordinator Minor League Offensive Strategist National Pitching Crosschecker Asst. Scouting Director/National

MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB AAA

Los Angeles Angels Seattle Mariners Kansas City Royals Boston Red Sox New York Yankees Boston Red Sox Kansas City

Special Assignment Scout Area Scout Area Scouting Supervisor Director of Amateur Scouting Director of Minor League Operations Area Scout Omaha Storm Chasers Hitting Coach

MAJOR LEAGUES Mac Williamson

San Francisco Giants (AAA)

MINOR LEAGUE RANKS Pat Blair Tim Cooney Will Craig Michael Dimock Aaron Fossas Brian Holmes Connor Kaden Garrett Kelly Nate Mondou Joe Napolitano Matt Pirro

Tampa Bay Rays (AA) St. Louis Cardinals (AAA) Pittsburgh Pirates (Short Season A) San Diego Padres (AAA) Cincinnati Reds (Rookie) Houston Astros (AA) San Francisco Giants (A) Minnesota Twins (Rookie) Oakland Athletics (Short Season A) New York Mets (Rookie) Washington Nationals (Rookie)

WOMEN’S GOLF Laura (Philo) Diaz LPGA Played in 21 tournaments in the 2015 season Jean Chua Symetra Played in 16 events in 2016, best finish t-11th at Island Resort Championship Nannette Hill LPGA Played in 14 tournaments in 2016, qualified for U.S. Women’s Open Natalie Sheary Symetra Played in 22 tournaments in 2016, won W.B. Mason Championship in May Michelle Shin Symetra Played in 13 events in 2015 Cheyenne Woods LPGA Played in 20 events in 2016 Marissa Dodd Symetra Played in 18 events in 2016 with two top-30 finishes Olafia Kristinsdottir LET Plays on the Ladies European Access Tour Allison Emrey Symetra Played in 21 events in 2016, had first top-10 at Tullymore Classic in July

MEN’S SOCCER Corben Bone Brian Carroll Sam Cronin Austin da Luz Chris Duvall Sam Fink Akira Fitzgerald Jack Harrison Tolani Ibikunle Michael Lahoud Andy Lubahn Collin Martin Justin Moose Ben Newnam Ike Opara Sean Okoli Michael Parkhurst Jalen Robinson Ross Tomaselli Jared Watts

FC Cincinnati Philadelphia Union Colorado Rapids Carolina RailHawks New York Red Bulls Saint Louis FC Carolina RailHawks New York City FC Ekenas Sport Club (Finland) Miami FC Louisville City FC D.C. United Wilmington Hammerheads Louisville City FC Sporting Kansas City FC Cincinnati Columbus Crew DC United FC Cincinnati Colorado Rapids

COACHES/MLS FRONT OFFICE James Riley Kurt Schmid Zack Schilawski

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MLS Director of Player Relations Seattle Sounders (Head Scout) Carolina RailHawks U23s (Assistant Coach)

Aubrey Bledsoe Kim Marshall Annick McBryar Katie Stengel Kelsey Zalimeni

Orlando Pride (NWSL) Boston Breakers (Reserves) Boston Breakers (Reserves) Washington Spirit (NWSL) Crystal Palace Ladies FC

MEN’S BASKETBALL Al-Farouq Aminu James Johnson Chris Paul Ishmael Smith Jeff Teague Justin Gray C.J. Harris Jamaal Levy Travis McKie Codi Miller-McIntyre Aaron Rountree Devin Thomas Ty Walker David Weaver

NBA NBA NBA NBA NBA Belarus Turkey Argentina Lebanon Belgium Slovakia Turkey Bahrain Japan

Portland Trail Blazers Miami Heat L.A. Clippers Detroit Pistons Indiana Pacers Tsmoki-Minsk Sakarya BSB Bahia Basket Louaize Leuven Lucenec TED Kolejilier Al Muharraq Shiga L-Stars

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Dearica Hamby Sandra Garcia Chelsea Douglas Alex Tchangoue

WNBA Puerto Rico Germany France

San Antonio Stars Manatee Freiburg Lyon

FOOTBALL Tommy Bohanon K.J. Brent Josh Bush Michael Campanaro Brandon Chubb Chris Givens Josh Harris Kevin Johnson Joe Looney Nikita Whitlock Kyle Wilber

NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL CFL NFL NFL NFL NFL

FB WR S WR LB WR RB CB OL FB/DL LB

Free Agent Oakland Free Agent Free Agent Detroit Free Agent BC Lions Houston Dallas NY Giants Dallas

COACHES/STAFF Jim Caldwell Charlie Dayton Pat Flaherty Joe Kenn Ricky Proehl John Spanos Brad White Jeff Triplette James MacPherson

NFL Detroit NFL Carolina NFL NY Giants NFL Carolina NFL Carolina NFL San Diego NFL Indianapolis NFL NFL Chargers

Head Coach Vice President Offensive Line Coach Strength Coach Wide Receivers Coach Executive VP of Football Operations OLB Coach Referee Scout

MEN’S GOLF Billy Andrade Bill Haas Jay Haas Gary Hallberg Scott Hoch Len Mattiace Kyle Reifers Webb Simpson Curtis Strange

Champions Played in 22 events in 2016 with nine top-10s, 9th in 2016 Charles Schwab Cup PGA Played in 24 events in 2016, first major top-10 at British Open, No. 44 in World Golf Rankings Champions Played in 18 events in 2016 with one win, 26th in 2016 Charles Schwab Cup Champions Played in 16 events in 2016 with one top-10, 65th in 2016 Charles Schwab Cup Champions Played in 19 events in 2016 with two top-10s, 59th in 2016 Charles Schwab Cup Web.com Played in 17 events in 2016 PGA Played in 34 events in 2016 with five top-10s, No. 114 in World Golf Rankings PGA Played in 20 events in 2016 with seven top-25s, No. 72 in World Golf Rankings Champions Played in three events in 2016

FIELD HOCKEY Lauren Crandall (Captain) Michelle Kasold

USA National Team USA National Team

MEN’S TENNIS Noah Rubin

ATP


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FEBRUARY 2017

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COMPLIANCE CORNER

// T O D D H A I R S T O N

DRAFT DAY CENTRAL:

To Go Pro or Not to Go Pro

TODD HAIRSTON A S S O C I AT E AT H L E T I C DIRECTOR, COMPLIANCE

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With the conclusion of the college football season, the annual mass exodus of underclassmen declaring for the NFL draft has begun. While the NCAA’s rules regarding collegiate athletes who choose to test the professional waters are fairly consistent across the board, there are some differences among various sports. In football, an enrolled student-athlete may enter the NFL draft one time during his collegiate career without jeopardizing his eligibility, provided he is not drafted and withdraws his name from the draft within 72 hours following the NFL draft declaration date. The student’s declaration to withdraw from the draft must be in writing to the institution’s athletic director. Similarly, in men’s basketball, an enrolled student-athlete is allowed to enter the NBA draft each year during his collegiate career, provided the request to withdraw from the draft occurs within 10 days after the conclusion of the NBA draft combine. As with football, the declaration must be made in writing to the athletic director.

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

In women’s basketball, the NCAA allows a 30day window during which to withdraw from the WNBA (or other professional league) draft. Student-athletes in other sports have a 72-hour window to withdraw their name from the date of the professional draft for which they have declared. At any time, a student-athlete may request information about professional market value without affecting his or her amateur status. Further, the individual, his or her parents or legal guardians or the institution’s professional sports counseling panel may enter into negotiations with a professional sports organization without the loss of the individual’s amateur status. Wake Forest, like many schools, has a professional sports counseling panel, which has assisted a number of student-athletes in the process of assessing draft status or selecting a sports agent. In all sports, however, if a studentathlete hires an agent, he or she would lose all remaining eligibility.


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From rookie to Rookie of the Year. Wake Forest Baptist Health offers athletes of all ages and skill levels a full range of orthopaedic treatment and physical therapy delivered by the region’s most experienced sports medicine team. In most cases, we can see you within 48 hours and we accept most insurance. And our Stratford location offers extended and weekend hours.

SPORTS MEDICINE To make an appointment, call 888-716-WAKE or visit WakeHealth.edu/SportsMedicine

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Profile for Wake Forest Athletics

Gold Rush - February 2017  

The official publication of Wake Forest Athletics.

Gold Rush - February 2017  

The official publication of Wake Forest Athletics.