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WESTCHESTER

W E S T C H E S T E R H E A LT H

health&life THE GOOD LIVING MAGAZINE from WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

October 2009 $3.95

& LIFE ■

OCTOBER 2009

The Great Wellness Quiz!

+

Buying beauty? Facts on five top cosmetic procedures

INSIDE 3 AREA SHOW HOUSES

Hot springs, coast to coast

Where to: •

Buy cakes and cannolis— for your pup

Find a ghost hunter

Give raw-food meals a try

health

watch

A ‘blue baby’ no more

Today’s ‘awake’ brain mapping Your guide to kids’ cold meds ■


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Contents

36

32

40

WESTCHESTER

health&life

October 2009

Features 28 32

The great wellness quiz Are you up to speed on recent health developments?

Buying beauty? Before you sign up for a cosmetic procedure, know the facts.

20 Health watch · A ‘blue baby’ no more · The new ‘awake’ brain mapping · A new service for pacemaker patients · A child’s sniffles: what to give? · Second-career nurses

52 Glorious food ’Bello the banquet The coveted ingénue among

36 At home /

Stealing the show

A revealing look at 3 stylish rooms, each from a celebrated area show house

40 Escapes /

Nature’s hot baths

4 glorious springs where you can soak your way to serenity

Departments 4 Welcome letter

mushrooms, portobellos inspire foodies and health devotees alike.

54 Westchester gourmet Sizzling, but lean With its clever Economic Stimulus Specials, The Willett House in Port Chester offers fine dining for many a budget.

56 Where to eat Your Westchester County dining guide

60 Be there! A listing of local events you won’t want to miss

52

6 Editor’s letter 13

Westchester whispers · Ripe for the picking · Lucky puppies · Local haunts · ‘What I’m listening to …’ · Veg out

62 What’s happening

at Westchester Medical Center

64 Faces of Westchester Tractor factor

16

Flash

Captured moments around the county COVER IMAGE : GETTY IMAGES


BEAUTIFULLY AFFORDABLE

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2009 Knockout Showroom

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Welcome LETTER

Community caring AS THE ONLY REGIONAL RESOURCE FOR ADvanced care in the Hudson Valley, Westchester Medical Center partners with many community hospitals and physicians in the area, and we are constantly working to build upon and strengthen these relationships. For example, starting just last month, Westchester Medical Center’s perinatal specialists (also known as perinatologists) began providing services at two local hospitals—Orange Regional Medical Center and Hudson Valley Hospital Center. Perinatologists specialize in caring for women with high-risk pregnancies. These hospitals identified a need for this specialty in their communities, and we are pleased to be able to work with their fine obstetricians to provide this service to expectant mothers closer to home. Partnering with area organizations so that specialty services are available in the communities we serve is critical, but we remain equally committed to having the finest staff and facilities available to those who need to come to Westchester Medical Center. Over the past few years, the number of patients transferred to the medical center from local community hospitals has grown to more than 600 each month. Whether patients are transferred by medevac helicopter or critical care ground transport, they can rely on us for lifesaving care. Some of these “countless lives” are the stars of our latest advertising campaign, which focuses on the amazing stories of real people whose lives have been changed by Westchester Medical Center. A retired teacher who was given an 8 percent chance to live before his heart transplant, a high school student with leukemia, a teenager who went through emergency neurosurgery—these are just a few of the people you will meet through the campaign and at a new website: www.CountlessLives.com. I guarantee the stories will inspire you as they have inspired us.

Sincerely,

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MICHAEL D. ISRAEL President and CEO Westchester Medical Center

For additional information about Westchester Medical Center, visit our website at www.worldclassmedicine.com.

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Retired from 35 years of teaching. Given 8 percent chance to live after heart attack. Flown to Westchester Medical Center. Kept alive with breakthrough cardiac assist devices. Daughter married at his beside in I.C.U. Received heart transplant.

Danced at daughter’s reception.

David Holt, heart transplant patient

Just last year, David Holt suffered a massive heart attack. Faced with only an 8 percent chance of survival, and in desperate need of a heart transplant, he was own to Westchester Medical Center. Because of David’s dire condition, our doctors used a TandemHeartÂŽ device to help his body overcome the shock of the heart attack. Because of this technology, he was able to see his daughter married—right at his bedside in the Cardiac I.C.U. Once he was stable, a ventricular assist device was implanted to give David the time he needed to wait for a donor heart. And six months later, after successful heart transplant surgery, David was thrilled to dance with his daughter at her wedding reception. Westchester Medical Center ranks among the top ďŹ ve percent in the nation for “coronary interventionsâ€? and in the top 10 percent for “overall cardiac care,â€? according to the Tenth Annual Healthgrades Hospital Quality in America Study. Westchester Medical Center. One hospital, changing countless lives.

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A D VE RT ISE M E NT

Does Your Child Have Special Needs? Why Not Give Him Something Fun To Do? By Isa Marrs, MA CCC-SLP

P

arents of children with special needs often tell me that it is scary to enroll their children in “fun” activities because they fear that their child will not succeed. Or, that he or she will be ridiculed and possibly asked to leave the class. Unfortunately this fear often comes from experience. That’s not a worry in the innovative “Where I Can Be Me®” social skills classes with art and play. They are designed to be inclusive… and fun! The only program of this kind, every class works to improve each child’s self-confidence and self-expression while expanding their creative imagination. Who knows where their imagination will take them? What I do know is that while they are creating beautiful works of art they are also learning essential social skills to empower them in their everyday lives. (But we don’t have to tell them that, they can think they’re just here to have fun.)

Not Just Anybody

These classes are taught by board-certified experts. And by utilizing a unique blend of behavior techniques, social-communication, music, art and social skills training these experts will work to improve your child’s play skills, social interaction and behavior. And they’ll make sure your child has fun. Having fun makes it easier for us to reach our goals with your child. While the goals for each child and each class are different, one of the main goals is to teach your child how to make and keep friends.

We’re All Friends Here

These classes are provided in a safe and accepting environment where you don’t have to worry about how other people will respond. And to make certain that you believe you have made the right decision our classes have a 5-week, no strings attached, money back guarantee. There are many more things about these classes that makes them unique. I’d like to tell you about them but unfortunately I’m out of room.

Editor’s LETTER

A healthy curiosity WE’RE A STAFF OF HEALTH JUNKIES HERE. STUDies and stats, news and opinions, high-tech breakthroughs and tried-and-true folk cures: We love reading about—and discussing—them all. So, needless to say, we had a lot of fun stuffing this issue with all sorts of interesting, sometimes quirky, facts and figures. You’ll find 25 such tidbits in “The Great Wellness Quiz” on page 28. There we pull together a slew of underthe-radar health revelations you may have missed. We also delve into the world where health and beauty meet by giving the need-to-know facts on five popular cosmetic procedures. Starting on page 32, you’ll learn about the pain, recovery time, costs and more involved with each. In addition to facts, stats and tidbits, we adore health stories with a human touch—and we have a real heartwarmer in our Health Watch section, courtesy of Westchester Medical Center. In “A ‘Blue Baby’ No More” on page 20, you’ll read about the plight of a newborn boy suffering from grave congenital heart problems—and the Westchester doctors who went “above and beyond” (to quote the boy’s mother) to save him. Also in Health Watch you’ll read about two cuttingedge advances—an imaging study that makes brain-tumor surgery a good deal safer, and a laser technology that simplifies a once-complicated pacemaker repair—and get guidance on navigating the tricky world of children’s cold medicines. Since we’re also of the mindset that a stress-free life is a healthier, happier one, in our Escapes article on page 40 we share four rejuvenating vacations where you can literally soak your cares away, thanks to natural hot springs. Finally, we pause for a brief moment of indulgence as we spotlight our reviewer’s lovely meal at The Willett House in Port Chester, page 54. We hope you’re able to enjoy similar moments of indulgence—in moderation—as part of your own healthy Westchester life.

RITA GUARNA Editor in Chief

You can, however, get more information by calling me directly at (914) 488-5282, or by calling my tollfree, hassle-free, 24hr recorded message information hotline 1-866-380-8340, or by visiting www.SocialSkillsWestchester.com

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WESTCHESTER

health&life OCTOBER 2009

Westchester Health & Life Staff

editor in chief RITA GUARNA

art director SARAH LECKIE

senior editor TIMOTHY KELLEY

managing editor JENNIFER CENICOLA

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assistant editor KRISTIN COLELLA

art interns PATRICE HORVATH , ALEXANDRIA PATE

executive vice president, sales & marketing JOEL EHRLICH

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publisher SUZANNE TRON

advertising account executives LOUISE DEMMEL , MOLLY DIMILLO ,

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MARY MASCIALE

director, internet & new media NIGEL EDELSHAIN

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CHRISTINE HAMEL

advertising services manager THOMAS RAGUSA

senior art director, agency services KIJOO KIM

circulation director LAUREN MENA

editorial contributions: The editors invite letters, article ideas and other contributions from readers. Please write to Editor, Westchester Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201-571-7003; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail

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editor@wainscotmedia.com. Any manuscript or artwork should be accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope bearing adequate return postage. The magazine is not responsible for the return or loss of submissions.

advertising inquiries: Please contact Suzanne Tron at 212-756-5049 or suzanne.tron@wainscotmedia.com

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Westchester Medical Center Staff

president & ceo MICHAEL ISRAEL

chairman, board of directors JOHN F. HEIMERDINGER

senior vice president, marketing and corporate communications KARA BENNORTH

director media relations/photography DAVID BILLIG

director, community relations and outreach ISABEL DICHIARA

director editorial information management LESLIE MILLS

director of communications, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center ANDREW LAGUARDIA

photo/digital imaging BENJAMIN COTTEN , GORDON TUNISON

WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER Valhalla, N.Y. For general information, call 914-493-7000. Visit Westchester Medical Center on the Internet at www.worldclassmedicine.com.

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA

chairman CARROLL V. DOWDEN

president MARK DOWDEN

executive vice president JOEL EHRLICH

vice presidents AMY DOWDEN NIGEL EDELSHAIN RITA GUARNA SHANNON STEITZ SUZANNE TRON

subscription services: To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Westchester Health & Life, Circulation Department, PO Box 1788, Land O Lakes, FL 34639; telephone 813-996-6579; e-mail lauren.mena@wainscotmedia.com.

CC

The Caravan Connection™ Hand-Knotted Antique and New Oriental Rugs, Custom Tibetan Carpets. Cleaning, Appraisals and Repair Services Available.

Westchester Health & Life is published six times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645, in association with Westchester Medical Center. This is Volume 5, Issue 5. ©2009 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14.00 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Mike and Mary Lynn McRee 14 Main Street, Bedford Hills, New York 10507 |

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How does it work? Spinal Decompression uses state of the art technology to apply a distraction force to relieve nerve compression often associated with low back pain and sciatica. Spinal Decompression not only significantly reduces back pain in many patients, but also enables the majority of patients to return to more active lifestyles. SUCCESSFULLY TREAT CONDITIONS SUCH AS:

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Westchester WHISPERS YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL TRENDS, TREASURES, PEOPLE & WELL-KEPT SECRETS

Lucky puppies

MASTERFILE; GETTY

Ripe for the picking If that slight nip in the air has your thoughts turning to fresh-baked autumn pies, check out this trio of farms where you can pluck your own ingredients during the day, then bake up a treat that night! Hop on the hayride at WILKEN’S FRUIT AND FIR FARM in Yorktown Heights (914-245-5111, www.wilkensfarm.com) to access the apple orchard and pumpkin patch (Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) Love apple pie, but not keen on the cooking? Head to the farm’s bake shop for its signature pies, as well as cider made in the farm’s own cider mill. More apples—18 varieties, to be exact—can be picked 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily at STUART’S FARM in Granite Springs (914-245-2784, www.stuarts farm.com), which offers a 3,000-tree orchard bearing Jonagolds, Ida Reds and Macouns—as well as the more standard Red Delicious and Empire varieties. The farm also offers pumpkin picking and hayrides. Historic and organic is AMAWALK FARM in Somers (914-245-2319, www.amawalkfarm.org), which has been peddling produce since 1825 and is certified organic by the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York. Act fast to harvest raspberries, available through October 18. Also up for grabs are pumpkins of all sizes—plus sweeping views of the Muscoot River and its valley. Pickers are welcome Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m.; and Sundays, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. (Call before visiting, as hours may change due to weather and crop availability.)

Organic cannolis—and rawhide bones? An odd pairing perhaps, but one that gives the eclectic ALL PAWS GOURMET PET STORE in Rye (914921-1690) its charm. Indeed, those cannolis are specially made to suit Fido and his fellow four-legged friends—as are the organic cupcakes, black-and-white cookies, birthday cakes and biscotti whipped at the upscale shop’s “barkery.” “The cakes are like a banana bread, while the biscottis are more of a peanut-butter base, so they’re all edible by humans as well,” notes store owner Claudia Baker. “The dogs love them.” But the shop is more than good eats. In addition to the rawhide bones, it also peddles hip collars, leashes, toys and more. Popular items include the Luna Ball—a glowin-the-dark orb for your pup to fetch—and human-sized caps that let owners proudly display their breed of choice. “I love shopping there and my dogs really enjoy the products,” says Ellen Strongwater of Rye, who’s purchased all manner of goodies for her Newfoundland and four Great Danes. “It’s a pretty store, and the staff is extremely knowledgeable.” Want to give your pet a true treat this month? Check out All Paws’ Halloween costumes, including skeletons, prisoners, pumpkins and more.

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Westchester WHISPERS

‘What I’m listening to …’ “I tend to like snappy, intelligently wry lyrics, and rootsy beats that have a tinge of the unusual in them,” says Lisa Reilly, executive director of the Emelin Theatre in Mamaroneck (914-6980098, www.emelin.org). “Most of all, I love anything and everything that I can dance to— especially in my living room with the stereo turned up loud.”

Local haunts

1. “ATHENS COUNTY,” Jonathan Edwards, from

Jonathan Edwards 2. “SHORT SKIRT/LONG JACKET,” Cake, from

Think your home’s harboring things that go bump in the night? Find out for sure with help from the Westchester Paranormal Society (914-450-5352, www.westchesterparanormal.com), which has been investigating ghostly happenings since 2007. “Westchester is a big area for paranormal activity because it’s such an old part of the country,” says founder Jeff Roberts. And he should know—his Scarsdale abode houses a spirit of its own: “a middle-aged woman wearing a blue dress with her hair in a bun.” The nonprofit group investigates spooky occurrences free of charge, using infrared cameras, digital thermometers and recorders and other high-tech equipment. Roberts says he learned the art of ghost hunting under the tutelage of other paranormal investigators and by conducting “hundreds of hours of research” on the subject. “People we’ve visited have reported seeing everything from shadow figures to unexplained light,” says Roberts. One case was Scarsdale’s Candlelight Inn restaurant, which called the group due to unexplained footsteps and utensils shifting on their own. “We got our best recording of a spirit there,” says Roberts. “You can clearly hear an unexplained voice say ‘Please leave.’” Those with an especially active curiosity can even join in on an investigation. “We welcome skeptics,” Roberts says.

VEG OUT

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OCTOBER 2009

3. “TOM’S DINER,” Suzanne Vega, from

Solitude Standing 4. “BESAME MUCHO,” Danny Aiello, from

Live From Atlantic City 5. “REDEMPTION SONG,” Bob Marley & the

Wailers, from Bob Marley & the Wailers (Gold) 6. “BABY PLEASE DON’T GO,” Guy Davis, from

Sweetheart Like You 7. “EVERY DAY I WRITE THE BOOK,” Elvis

Costello and the Attractions, from The Best of

Elvis Costello: The First 10 Years 8. “SPRING WIND,” Greg Brown, from

Dream Café 9. “FIXING A HOLE,” the

Beatles, from Sgt. Pepper’s

Lonely Hearts Club Band 10. “HAVE YOU HEARD,” Toshi

Reagon, from Have You Heard

Step away from the General Tsao’s. Put down the pepperoni-meatball pie. For a takeout experience you won’t regret in the morning, try ANDY’S PURE FOOD in Rye (914-967-2332, www.andyspurefood.com). “Everything we make is vegan and served raw or lightly steamed, since we believe the body is meant to digest this kind of food,” says owner Andy Ozgur, a practicing vegan for three years. “About 95 percent of our ingredients are also organic.” But even those who don’t mind a little grilling can be tempted by the creative fare Ozgur’s shop prepares, from sandwiches, wraps, soups and salads to juices and smoothies. Consider the Pad-Thai salad (featuring zucchini, red and yellow peppers, sprouts, almonds, scallions and cilantro; $4.95 for a small, $7.95 for a large), the almond hummus–sprouts sandwich (almond hummus, sunflower sprouts, mixed greens, tomato and olives; $7.95) or the Exotic Breeze smoothie (passion fruit, mango, papaya, melon and goji juice; $7.95). Though most of its business is takeout, Andy’s offers seating for about 14. And if you’d like to whip up your own vegan feast, the shop also sells a selection of fresh organic produce.

MASTERFILE; JOHN COLLINS; ALAMY

14

Comfort Eagle


We’ve created a place with many advanced imaging technologies. Where we can see everything.

Westchester Medical Center Advanced Imaging is where patients and staff alike have access to the very latest advanced diagnostic technology. We have pediatric ultrasound and CT capabilities and offer full field digital mammography. And with our state-of-the-art 256 Channel CT scanner, we provide coronary and peripheral angiography as well as perfusion imaging. This innovative equipment allows our doctors, nurses and staff to capture clearer, more detailed images in shorter amounts of time. For you, this not only means less exposure to radiation but faster and more accurate results and diagnoses. At Westchester Medical Center, we’ve created our Advanced Imaging services with our patients in mind, so we could provide you with a place where convenience and quality of care add to health.

We offer evening and weekend hours. s7-#s$/#3 worldclassmedicine.com

ADVANCED IMAGING

1.5 TESLA MRI • 256 CHANNEL CT • DDR & CR DIAGNOSTIC RADIOGRAPHY • HIGH-SPEED ULTRASOUND • DIGITAL MAMMOGRAPHY • BONE DENSITY

Come Experience the Wines of the World. Please join us on Thursday, November 19, 2009•6:30 p.m. Trump National Golf Club, Briarcliff Manor, NY For a light supper, a tasting of the world’s finest wines, and a spectacular auction of food, wine, travel and leisure experience. For further information please contact Margie Ostrower at Ostrowerm@wcmc.com or 914.493.5414. www.worldclassmedicine.com/WINE

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FLASH GOLFERS CAME OUT SWINGING AT WINGED FOOT GOLF Club in Mamaroneck for the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club’s 16th annual golf classic, which featured auctions, a dinner reception and more. The group offers a variety of enrichment programs to more than 14,000 children in the Bronx. At Old Salem Farm in North Salem, meanwhile, the Westchester Land Trust hosted a “Party With a Purpose,” complete2with live music, dancing and auctions. The event raised more than $300,000 to help the group protect land and create parks throughout Westchester County. And finally the Teatown Lake Reservation, a Hudson Valley environmental organization, held “A Night in the Woods” bash. Among the 3 event’s highlights was a menu of food prepared with local ingredients. 1

3

2

4

KIPS BAY GOLF CLASSIC 1. Scott Gress, Debralee Nelson and Daniel Quintero 2. Buddy Johnson, Orlando Ashford and George Jackson 3. John Preis and Stephen Hearty

WESTCHESTER LAND TRUST PARTY

5

4. Larry and Lori Fink, Jackie and Peter Kamenstein, George Bianco and Ben Spinelli 5. Tom Starace and Debbie Costa

6 7

‘A NIGHT IN THE WOODS’ 6. Ray Sanchez, Gabriela Sinnreich, Marguerite Pitts, Kathy Murray and Reid Pitts

8

7. Norma Burnette, Karen Goldschmidt and Barbara McKeegan 8. Jennifer Grossman and George Contos

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OCTOBER 2009

KATHY KING

Think you belong in Flash? Send photos from your gala or charity event to Westchester Health & Life, att: Flash editor, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; or e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Include your contact information, a short event description and names of all who appear. (Submissions are not guaranteed to appear and must meet the following image specs: 4x6 color prints or 300 dpi jpg, tif or eps files. Prints must be accompanied by an SASE in order to be returned.)


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W H AT ’ S N E W I N M E D I C I N E A N D H O W Y O U C A N S TAY W E L L

A ‘blue baby’ no more TOMMY BLACK WAS BORN WITH SERIOUS HEART DEFECTS, BUT HIS PARENTS FOUND THE RIGHT DOCTORS TO FIX THEM

THINGS HAPPEN FOR A REASON—SO LEE ANN Black believes—but you don’t always know what that reason is. It’s unclear, for example, why her son Tommy was born with a set of grave congenital heart defects called tetralogy of Fallot (the “t” is silent). The condition results in low oxygen levels in the blood that can cause cyanosis, a bluish-purple skin coloration—thus the term “blue baby.” But Black calls it providential that Tommy was born in Danbury, Connecticut—not far from Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center, which excels at the intricate challenge of pediatric cardiac surgery—just after a job change brought his father to this area. “We were in the perfect spot for Tommy to have his surgery,” says Black, 39. “It was total fate.” Her husband, Ken Black II, is a finance manager for Procter & Gamble, which hired him to work at Duracell in Bethel, Connecticut, in August 2007. Lee Ann became pregnant that December. There was no family history of heart defects, and the pregnancy progressed normally. Tommy was born September 5, 2008, at Danbury Hospital. The next day the on-call pediatrician detected a heart murmur. Other tests revealed that Tommy’s heart was deformed. Because Danbury Hospital has a working relationship with Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, the doctor called the cardiac specialists there for help. Michael Gewitz, M.D., Chief, Pediatric Cardiology and Physician-in-Chief of the Children’s Hospital, drove to Danbury, ordered more tests and confirmed that Tommy had tetralogy of Fallot. The condition is termed a “tetralogy” Bernard Fish, M.D. because it comprises four defects that occur together. (See “The 4 Defects That Make Up Tetralogy of Fallot” on the next page.) Together, these phenomena meant that not enough blood was able to reach Tommy’s lungs to get oxygen, and oxygen-poor blood was 20

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Tommy Black is healthy and meeting his growth targets today, thanks to intricate surgery that corrected a set of severe heart defects.

therefore flowing to his body. “It’s the most common cyanotic heart defect in children,” says Bernard Fish, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, who took over Tommy’s case. Surgery—sometimes more than one procedure—is the only way to correct the problem and save the baby’s life. But only advanced pediatric cardiology experts working as a team, like those at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, can pull it off. Dr. Fish immediately sent the family to Suvro Sett, M.D., Chief of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, who performs about 10 of these operations every year. “He is very experienced with newborns,” says Dr. Fish. “I have full confidence that when I send him a baby, he will get results as good as anyone in the world.” Dr. Sett and Dr. Fish explained to the Blacks that the operation is best tolerated when a child is 3 to 6 months


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The 4 defects that make up tetralogy of Fallot About 4,000 babies are born each year in the U.S. with

one and then through the aorta, the main artery leading to

tetralogy of Fallot, the combination of defects that endan-

the rest of the body.

gered little Tommy Black (see main article). The defects are:

• OVERRIDING AORTA, a defect in the location of the

• PULMONARY STENOSIS, a narrowing of the pulmonary

aorta. In a healthy heart, the aorta is attached to the left

valve and the passageway through which blood flows from

ventricle, allowing only oxygen-rich blood to be sent to the

the right ventricle (the ventricles are the lower heart cham-

rest of the body. In tetralogy of Fallot, the aorta is between

bers) to the pulmonary arteries that take blood to the

the left and right ventricles, directly over the VSD, and the

lungs. This forces the heart to work harder than normal to

mixed, oxygen-poor blood flows through it.

pump blood, making it difficult for enough blood to reach

• RIGHT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY, a thickening of

the lungs.

the right ventricle that develops because the pulmonary

• VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECT (VSD), a hole in the wall between the left and right ventricles that allows oxygenpoor blood to flow from the right ventricle into the left

old. Until Tommy reached 3 months, he required close attention to make sure he was getting enough oxygen in his blood. So Dr. Fish examined him every Friday on regular trips to Danbury. Between visits, the Blacks were told to watch Tommy and take him to the emergency room if he ever turned blue. In late October, Tommy’s oxygen levels were only about 70 percent (they should be close to 100 percent), so Drs. Fish and Sett agreed that action was required— even though the baby was not yet 2 months old. On November 3, Dr. Sett attached a 4-millimeter shunt made of Gore-Tex to the pulmonary artery to help direct more blood into the lungs. “It was a temporary fix,” Dr. Sett says, “to get the baby to the age where he could handle the full repair.” That worked—until February, when Tommy began to turn blue whenever he cried. “Dr. Fish put everything aside, drove out to see Tommy, and decided it was time for the corrective operation,” Black says. “And Dr. Sett cancelled his vacation to do it. I was in Dr. Fish’s office when they talked on the phone. I still can hear Dr. Fish saying, ‘This baby needs to have his surgery. Would you be willing to do it now?’ And Dr. Sett said yes.” Dr. Fish called the family every day in the week leading up to the operation, which was scheduled for February 23. “He was amazing, like an old-school doctor,” says Black. “At every turn there were people doing things I consider above and beyond.” The procedure took about eight hours. Tommy was put on a heart-lung machine and his heart was

stenosis forces the heart to pump harder than it would otherwise need to.

Source: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

stopped. Dr. Sett first patched the hole between the two ventricles with synthetic material and corrected the blood flow to the aorta. He then removed the shunt and did a permanent repair of Tommy’s pulmonary valve. (The thickened right ventricle was not repaired; it should heal on its own after the other problems are fixed.) Tommy was in intensive care for about a week. He tolerated the surgery beautifully. And today, with the family (which includes 5-year-old Ken III) now relocated to the Cincinnati area, Tommy’s only lasting effect is the scar on his chest. “He’s developmentally right on target,” says his mom. He will continue to be checked every year by a local pediatric cardiologist. “He’s a big boy and he’s getting bigger, and that’s what you want to see,” says Suvro Sett, M.D. Dr. Sett, who may have to replace the new pulmonary valve again in 10 years or so, as Tommy grows too big for the current one. Drs. Sett and Fish credit the hospital’s 100 percent success rate in this procedure to the teamwork among all the pediatric cardiac specialists at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. “It’s very gratifying,” says Dr. Fish, “when these babies come out all healthy and pink.” ■ To find out more about treatments available at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center, please call 1-877-WMC-DOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com/MFCH.

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Health

Watch Westchester Medical Center surgeons use a new “awake” brain mapping technology to find a safe surgical path to a brain tumor noninvasively. At right is P. Charles Garell, M.D.

The new ‘awake’ brain mapping AN ADVANCE IN IMAGING HELPS SURGEONS FIND THE SAFEST ROUTE TO A TUMOR

OPERATING ON A BRAIN TUMOR IS A DELICATE business. Surgeons want to remove cancerous material without harming nearby tissue that controls vital functions such as vision, speech and muscle movement. One way to do that is to keep the patient conscious (though sedated) and stimulate the exposed brain during the surgical procedure. This isn’t new—it’s been done for half a century. But it can now be done at Westchester Medical Center in a dramatically safer, noninvasive way, thanks to a pair of technologies: diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The technologies work together to create a map showing the surgeon’s safest path to the tumor, according 22

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to P. Charles Garell, M.D., Director of Functional Neurosurgery, whose team does about 15 operations every year that involve awake brain mapping. “DTI has been studied for more than a decade,” says neuroradiologist Hasit Mehta, M.D. “But it has only recently been applied to general clinical use.” The new tools were employed recently for a Yonkers woman named Taledia Hairston, who had already been through surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments for her lung cancer. This spring, she experienced difficulty in speaking, right arm weakness and a muscle droop on the right side of her face. A conventional MRI revealed a mass fairly deep within the left


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side of her brain, near centers that control speech, as well as arm and facial movement. “We couldn’t just go in and take the tumor out,” says Dr. Garell, “because cutting right through might have left her with permanent deficits in speech and motor function.” What he needed was a way to navigate around these critical areas to the tumor. That’s where DTI came in. As Dr. Mehta explains, DTI works by measuring the motion of water molecules, which are constantly on the move, spreading out and diffusing in different ways depending on the structures around them. Water in human tissues with a large number of fibers—such as skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and brain tissue—diffuses fastest in the directions the fibers are pointing in, and slowest at right angles to it. In contrast, water diffuses in a spherical pattern in tissues that contain few fibers. DTI thus can help locate fibers that carry important information, as well as more “empty” areas through which it is safer to cut. “It lets us see where the important tracks are in the brain, and where they may be infiltrated or distorted by the tumor,” says Dr. Mehta. “With DTI the surgeon can see things he or she otherwise can’t—the deep pathways below the surface of the brain.” The DTI scan takes just five to 10 minutes, and is followed by the fMRI, which takes another 15 to 20 minutes. This scan, not quite as new as DTI but still of relatively recent origin, maps the changes in the brain related to the patient’s activity. “The machine scans the entire brain while I ask the patient to do certain things, such as speak or open and close a hand,” says Dr. Mehta. “From small changes in the magnetic signal I can make a color map of the brain and show the surgeon where the hand or speech control is.” “We can follow all the important connections of the motor cortex with this map,” says Dr. Garell. “We used it to map out an anatomical track to get me to the tumor.” Hairston had her head shaved and marked with incision locations. “All the while I was having a conversation with her,” Dr. Garell says. “I’d seen her several times before, and we’d developed a rapport, but this was a stressful moment. It was important to reassure her.” Her head was immobilized with a clamp, and the surgeon applied a strong topical anesthetic to the scalp. He then opened the skin, talking to Hairston at all times. “I tell patients the next part is like having the dentist drill a tooth,” says Dr. Garell. “You feel vibrations and hear the clanking of instruments, but that’s normal.”

“We were able to map out an anatomical track to get me to the tumor safely.” P. Charles Garell, M.D.

The surgeon next removed a palm-size piece of skull, and then opened the leathery brain covering called the dura. Now the brain was exposed. Armed with his map, Dr. Garell could find the pathway to the tumor. First, though, he confirmed what the DTI and fMRI predicted. He asked the patient to talk or open and close a hand, then placed a small electrical charge in the area that he thought controlled that function. “I was looking for areas where the stimulation made no perceptible change in activity,” he says. That told him it was safe to cut there. If the speech slurred or the hand contracted, he knew to avoid that area. He put little 5-millimeter square tags of sterilized paper on the brain to mark the areas related to different functions. (They’re peeled away when the path to the tumor has been identified.) Next, an ultrasound located the tumor several centimeters under the brain’s surface. “Then it was relatively simple to find the corridor to get to the tumor,” Dr. Garell says. Once the corridor was confirmed, the anesthesiologist fully sedated the patient for the tumor removal. Dr. Garell sent an instrument into the tumor that released ultrasound waves, which broke it up. He then aspirated—sucked out—the pieces. He sewed up the dura, replaced the skull piece and sent the patient to the ICU. Hairston spent one day there, and was discharged a few days later. “I was surprised at how quickly she recovered,” says Dr. Garell. “By the next morning she was wide awake and eating eggs.” And she had full movement in her right hand to do so, thanks to the DTI and fMRI scans. “Awake brain mapping told us to shift to a longer, less direct route,” says the doctor, “so we were able to spare her any impairment of hand movement or other vital functions.” ■ For more information about neurosurgery at Westchester Medical Center, call 1-877-WMC- DOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com.

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Watch

A NEW SERVICE for pacemaker patients LASER TECHNOLOGY NOW LETS SPECIALISTS

24

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ALAMY

REPLACE WORN-OUT WIRES MORE EFFECTIVELY

FILE THIS ONE UNDER “good problems to have.” The thousands of Americans with surgically implanted electronic pacemakers and defibrillators are now surviving much longer than they did a few decades ago. As they do, the electronic “leads”—the special wires that connect the devices to the heart muscle—eventually wear out or burn out, and new ones need to be installed. In the past, for the few patients who lived long enough to need replacements, the old wires were often left in place, because it wasn’t worth major open surgery to take them out. But now, with laser technology, removing these used-up wires is a much simpler matter—and Westchester Medical Center is alone in the area in providing this service. Pacemakers, which keep the heart from beating too slowly or erratically, and defibrillators, which shock the heart out of a too-fast rhythm, work in similar ways, explains Martin Cohen, M.D., an interventional cardiologist and electrophysiologist at Westchester. They consist of a battery, a computerized generator and wires. The generator sends electrical pulses that set or correct the heart rhythm, and the wires, which are implanted directly into the heart muscle, carry pulses to and from various chambers of the heart. Once pacemakers were installed exclusively as a secondary treatment after a patient had suffered an arrythmia event such as a fainting episode or a dangerously accelerated heartbeat. Today, many devices are used as a primary prophylactic treatment. “That means we are putting more devices into younger and otherwise healthier people,” says Dr. Cohen. Removing the leads is especially desirable when a


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patient needs to change from one device to another (each needs its own wires) or if an infection sets in around the lead, the doctor explains. “You can’t clear an infection completely without removing the lead,” he says. Until recently, however, techniques to remove the leads were primitive. “In the 1950s, you’d take the lead off the device and tie a weight to it,” Dr. Cohen says. “It would hang outside the body and the weight would gradually pull the lead out. It sounds crazy now, doesn’t it?” Not surprisingly, the success rate was less than 50 percent and complications such as infection were common—one reason why, if no infection was yet present, the leads were often simply left in place. Nowadays, the laser procedure is done in the hospital’s cardiac catheterization lab. The patient is put under heavy sedation, but not full anesthesia. Dr. Cohen cuts a small opening in the chest up near the shoulder, where the device’s power pack is located. He cuts the connection between the pack and the wire, then slides a sheath over the wire and guides it down to where it connects to the heart. The laser is located at the Today’s last millimeter of the sheath. cardiac Using X-ray fluoroscopy to see pacemakers what he’s doing in real time, weigh as little Dr. Cohen then uses the laser as 1 ounce. to cut the adhesions and scar –National Library tissue that hold the lead in of Medicine place. He then pulls the lead up through the sheath, removes it and attaches a new lead from the device to the heart muscle. The entire procedure takes about an hour and a half, says Dr. Cohen, and requires a one-night stay in the hospital. There are some risks—the laser could possibly cut a hole in neighboring tissue or cause excessive bleeding—but he has never had any such problems, he says. And a heart surgeon is always standing by, just in case. This procedure has been available at Westchester for about two years. “Before that,” says the doctor, “you had to travel out of the area.” ■ To learn more about the treatment of heart problems at Westchester Medical Center, please call 1-877WMC-DOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com.

If you get a pacemaker . . . 7 tips for keeping you and your device healthy • Your doctor may ask you to avoid any vigorous exercise or heavy lifting for a short time after your surgery. After you have fully recovered from the procedure, discuss with your doctor how much physical activity is safe for you—and what kinds are best. • Avoid close or prolonged contact with electrical devices or those with strong magnetic fields, including cell phones, iPods, microwave ovens and electrical generators. These devices can disrupt the electrical signaling of your pacemaker and stop it from working properly. Do not put your cell phone or iPod in a shirt pocket over your pacemaker (if they are turned on). Hold the cell phone up to the ear that’s opposite the site where your pacemaker was implanted. If you strap your iPod to your arm while listening to it, put it on the arm farthest from your pacemaker. • Avoid certain medical procedures that can disrupt your pacemaker, such as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. • You can walk through security system metal detectors at your normal pace. You also can be checked with a metal detector wand as long as it isn’t held for too long over your pacemaker site. You should avoid sitting or standing close to a security system metal detector. • Let all your doctors, dentists and medical technicians know that you have a pacemaker. You also should notify airport screeners. Your doctor can give you a card that states what kind of pacemaker you have. Carry this card in your wallet. • Have your pacemaker checked regularly. Some pacemaker functions can be evaluated remotely through a telephone call or a computer connection to the Internet. Your doctor may ask you to come to his or her office to check your pacemaker. • Pacemaker batteries need to be replaced every five to 15 years, depending on how active your pacemaker is. The wires of your pacemaker also may need to be replaced eventually. Your doctor can tell you whether you need to replace your pacemaker or its wires. Source: National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

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Vicki Iannotti, M.D.

A child’s sniffles: what to give? TIPS FROM A PEDIATRICIAN ON NAVIGATING YOUR DRUGSTORE’S MEDICINE AISLE

ACCORDING TO THE AMERICAN LUNG Association, a typical child in the U.S. gets six or eight colds per year. For parents, that’s six or eight chances to wonder what over-the-counter (OTC) medications they should give to relieve their kids’ coughs, sniffles, sneezes and stuffy noses. But sometimes the best answer is no medication at all, says Vicki Iannotti, M.D., Associate Chief of General Pediatrics at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. “A cold virus needs to run its course, and usually parents don’t need to give medicines,” says the doctor. Instead, she recommends increasing the child’s fluid intake, using saline solutions (available in a nasal spray at To learn more about Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center, call 1-877-WMCDOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com/MFCH.

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any drugstore) to irrigate nasal passages and hooking up a humidifier (or sitting in a steamy bathroom) to loosen congestion. Only if cold symptoms don’t clear up in five to seven days, or if they worsen, are medicines needed— consult the child’s doctor. If your child has a fever, it may be the flu rather than a cold that is causing discomfort, so see your pediatrician. He or she may be able to prescribe antiviral drugs to help the child feel better and get well sooner, but these must be given in the first couple of days. Last fall, manufacturers of pediatric cough-andcold medications agreed to change their labels to note that the products aren’t recommended for children under age 4. Doctors say studies have shown that these medications have only a sedative effect—and that in the very young, sedation can sometimes complicate the breathing problems brought on by a cold or the flu. But if your child is 4 or older, you may wish to choose an OTC medication to relieve his or her symptoms. Dr. Iannotti offers five easy-to-remember tips for navigating your drugstore’s pediatric-medicine aisle: • For fever and body aches, give acetaminophen for a temperature under 102.5 degrees, but switch to ibuprofen if the fever is higher than that. “It’s more effective with higher temperatures,” says the doctor. • For congestion, choose products with phenylephrine, the active ingredient in most OTC decongestants. • For wet, mucus-laden coughs, pick an expectorant—an agent that promotes the discharge of mucus—containing guaifenesin, which makes coughs more productive. • Don’t give a cough suppressant. “Coughing is the body’s way to get rid of mucus,” says Dr. Iannotti. “You want some coughing. But if a child is up all night coughing, he or she should be seen in the doctor’s office the next day so we can be sure it’s not being caused by pneumonia or reactive airways, as with asthma and allergies.” • Choose single-ingredient items. Some products are combinations—for example, an expectorant may also include a fever reducer such as acetaminophen. “If parents give this product and also administer acetaminophen separately, they may not realize they’re double-dosing their child, and that can cause trouble,” says Dr. Iannotti. She encourages parents to call the doctor’s office with any questions. “Most pediatricians’ offices have a nurse on the phone all day doing triage,” she says. “The nurse may ask you to come in or may just offer guidance.” ■


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Second-career nurses THESE DEDICATED PROS CAME TO THE BEDSIDE BY WAY OF

COURTESY OF WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

EDDY PAGEOT, R.N. MATH AND ENGLISH study sessions with a group of nursing students at Rockland Community College led Eddy Pageot, who was working as an acting transportation supervisor at the U.S. Post Office in Manhattan, to revive an old dream. “Growing up in Haiti, I wanted to become a doctor but I didn’t have the opportunity,” says Pageot, 48, of Spring Valley. “I guess the desire to work in healthcare was always there.” He earned his associate’s degree in nursing in 2003 and enrolled in the bachelor of science in nursing program at the State University of New York in New Paltz. In 2004 he left his job and joined Westchester Medical Center as a part-time nurse in the ICU step-down unit while attending college. He completed his BSN degree in May 2009, and in September entered the master of science/family nurse practitioner program at Mount Saint Mary College in Newburgh. He’s now a full-time nurse. “I enjoy working in critical care, because here I can act quickly and save lives,” he says. Pageot, the father of sons Edson, 22, and Jerry, 19, and daughter, Yrvane, 16, hopes to teach clinical nursing someday.

STAFF NURSE, MEDICAL/SURGICAL UNIT

IVE S. FRANCIS, R.N. CHILDREN HAVE BEEN A unifying theme in the two careers—and the volunteer work—of nurse Ive S. Francis. Francis, now 32, taught for several years in northern New Jersey schools. And though she found that rewarding, she switched careers two years ago and studied nursing at Dutchess Community College in Poughkeepsie. “I wanted a fulfilling career that would let me balance family life with my husband, Leonard, and my girls, Sara, 5, and Zarya, 4,” says the Valley Cottage resident. Francis works the overnight shift in Westchester Medical Center’s cardiothoracic ICU, caring for critically ill patients with heart disease and those who are recuperating from heart surgery. “The way a nurse takes care of a patient has an immediate and positive effect,” she says. “It’s extremely satisfying to experience this firsthand.” Francis enjoys cooking and crafts, but volunteer work is also a priority. Last year, she organized a concert in Newburgh called “Praise in the Park” that raised funds for World Vision, a group that helps children who have been devastated by natural disasters, war, famine or AIDS.

STAFF NURSE, ICU STEP-DOWN UNIT

STAFF NURSE, CARDIOTHORACIC ICU

OTHER PLACES IN THE WORK WORLD

LISA PALMIERI, R.N. LISA PALMIERI, 43, BECAME a nurse five years ago after two decades as a hair stylist/cosmetician. “Both professions require excellent listening skills, nurturing, trust and supportive conversation,” she says. In high school, Palmieri had aimed at a nursing career, but quit the technical program she was in to join friends in other classes. After graduation, she attended beauty school and followed in her mother’s profession as a hair stylist. A divorce in 2003 led her to make a mid-life career change to boost her earning potential—and return to her first vocational choice. She received her associate’s degree in nursing in 2005 from Dutchess Community College and her bachelor of science degree in nursing this year from Dominican College in Orangeburg. At Dominican, she is pursuing a family nurse practitioner degree. A Westchester Medical Center nurse since 2006, Palmieri cares for patients with chronic medical illnesses, including diabetes, sickle cell anemia, end-stage renal disease and cancer. She is a volunteer emergency medical technician with the ambulance corps in Beacon, where she lives with her partner, Christian, their Japanese Chin, Tiffany, and their cockapoo, Heidi. ■ WESTCHESTER

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QUIZ by Maria Lissandrello

The

GREAT WELLNESS QUIZ You keep tabs on your blood pressure, BMI, LDLs and HDLs. You slather sunscreen, shun tobacco and nibble salmon and broccoli. But are you missing out on other, lesser-known wellness behaviors because you’re not fully up to speed? See how well you know your facts by taking our quiz, then turn the page to read the answers. What you learn could add years to your life and life to your years!

1

Your boss is giving a—what else?—boring presentation. Which of the following will help you recall the info more easily?

4

The symptoms of stroke are usually similar in men and women. True

False

a. doodling 5 Besides avoiding common triggers like pollen and pet dander, people with asthma should steer clear of:

b. making eye contact with her c. pressing your pulse points

a. dryer lint

d. all of the above

b. deodorizing room sprays 2 Which of the following is associated with a greater risk of osteoporosis?

c. aspirin d. soy milk

a. hot flashes and night sweats during menopause 6 Drinking a glass a day of which beverage may help keep your arteries clear?

b. drinking more than three cans of cola a day c. depression

a. skim milk

d. all of the above

b. tonic water c. orange juice

3

d. peach nectar

True 28

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False

CORBIS

A pill containing a tiny video camera can now scan the colon for abnormal growths.


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15

Stuck in front of a computer all day? Eyes feel strained and dry? Give them a break by:

7 Trying to ward off type 2 diabetes? This can help:

a. looking away from the monitor every 20 minutes or so to focus on an object 20 feet away

a. brushing your teeth after every meal b. sleeping at least seven hours a night c. getting 10 minutes a day of sunshine

b. blinking frequently

d. eating breakfast every day

c. alternating computer tasks with computer-free tasks

8 Which of the following may increase your glaucoma risk?

d. all of the above

a. thyroid disorders b. high blood pressure c. diabetes d. all of the above 9 The incidence of cancer deaths could be cut by more than _____ percent if people would stop smoking, achieve a healthy weight, follow a nutritious diet and get regular physical activity.

a. 30

b. 45

c. 60

d. 80

16 Which of the following can cause sperm to die?

a. vaginal lubricants b. the vagina’s natural secretions c. a hot shower immediately after intercourse d. a. and b.

10 Adult smokers who quit the habit can expect to live as many as ____ years longer than those who continue to smoke.

a. 3

b. 5

c. 10

d. 20

e. all of the above 17 If you’re looking to lower your risk of cardiovascular disease, avoid eating ______ for breakfast:

a. low-fat yogurt 11 The use of indoor tanning booths increases the risk of

skin melanoma by ___ percent when tanning begins before age 30, a new study found. a. 10

b. 25

c. 50

d. 75

Consuming meat-free sources of protein can help lower blood pressure. 12

True

False

13 Mid-afternoon snack attack: Which of these choices

will satisfy your hunger for just 100 calories? a. 2 cups of raspberries

b. cornflakes c. canned pineapple d. oatmeal 18 Adding extra laughter to your day may raise your levels of “good” cholesterol.

True

False

19 Cubital tunnel syndrome—which can lead to numbness or weakness in the hand as well tingling in the pinky and ring finger—is caused by:

b. half of mini bagel with 1 ounce smoked salmon

a. sitting in an enclosed space, such as a cubicle, for more than three hours

c. 5 Nilla wafers

b. playing excessively with a Rubik’s Cube

d. 45 steamed edamame pods

c. using a laptop in bed

e. 1⁄2 cup low-fat cottage cheese with 5 strawberries

d. extended cell phone conversations

SHUTTERSTOCK

f. all of the above 14 Migraine sufferers have a lower risk of breast cancer.

20 There’s nothing you can do to slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration.

True

True

False

False

continued

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QUIZ

ANSWERS 21 Which of the following sexually transmitted diseases can cause arthritis?

a. HIV b. HPV

1. a. doodling. Researchers at England’s University of Plymouth found that doodlers were able to recall 29 percent more data than nondoodlers. Researchers suspect the squiggling forces you to use just enough cognitive energy to keep your mind from wandering off.

c. chlamydia

2. d. all of the above. A study in the journal Menopause

d. genital herpes

found lower bone density among women with hot flashes and night sweats, while researchers at Tufts University linked a three-can-plus-a-day caffeinated soda habit to a 4 percent decrease in bone density. And studies at Jerusalem’s Hebrew University and elsewhere found a connection between depression and osteoporosis, though a cause is yet to be established.

22 Balancing your checkbook, filing your taxes or just fig-

uring out how much that shirt on sale will really cost you will be easier after you eat: a. salmon

3. True. It’s called the PillCam Colon capsule endoscope, and a study in The New England Journal of Medicine found

b. chocolate c. spinach

it to be effective—but not as effective a colonoscopy (recommended for all adults starting at age 50).

d. mango 23 Whether you just stubbed your toe or got stung by a

bee, this can help lessen the pain instantly: a. doing a squat b. holding your nose c. closing your eyes d. saying your favorite four-letter word 24 Healthier—and happier—relationship tip: To help ensure your partner really hears what you’re saying, try:

a. writing it down

4. False. A research team at the University of Michigan found that women are more likely than men to experience nontraditional symptoms of stroke, such as confusion, disorientation and loss of consciousness. Traditional stroke symptoms include numbness or paralysis on one side of the body, speech difficulty, vision and coordination problems, sudden and/or unexplained headache or dizziness. 5. c. aspirin. Doctors suspect aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, naproxen and ketoprofen, may trigger an immune response that narrows the airways. A safer way to ease pain: acetaminophen. 6. c. orange juice. Research out of France found that hes-

b. using your hands when you talk c. speaking into his/her right ear d. asking after you’ve made love

peridin, an antioxidant in OJ, improves the function of the arterial lining, helping to fight plaque buildup. What’s more, it lowers diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number).

7. d. eating breakfast every day. Harvard researchers reported that starting the day with a healthy breakfast not only cuts the risk of developing insulin resistance by 35 percent to 50 percent, it also prevents obesity.

8. d. all of the above. The good news? All three conditions

25 Coffee raises your risk of breast cancer. True False

can be treated, which, in turn, helps prevent glaucoma.

9. c. 60. According to the American Cancer Society, 169,000 cancer deaths in 2009 will be the direct result of tobacco use, while an additional 186,000 will result from obesity, poor nutrition and lack of exercise. In all, 562,340 cancer deaths are expected this year.

10. c. 10. Smokers who quit by age 30 added the most years to their life expectancy, according to report by the American Cancer Society, but even those who waited until age 60 to kick the habit could still expect to gain 3 years. was higher than doctors previously believed the risk to be.

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SHUTTERSTOCK

11. d. 75. This figure, published in The Lancet Oncology,


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And that’s not all: The researchers also found a link between sun beds and melanoma of the eye.

12. True. Beans, soy products and whole grains are excellent sources of glutamic acid, a protein proven to reduce blood pressure. These protein sources are also rich in magnesium and potassium, which regulate blood pressure. 13. f. all of the above. Enjoying healthy snacks has been shown to increase satiety, control daily calorie intake, boost energy, regulate insulin levels and improve overall nutrition. 14. True. Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer

ter a day saw a 26 percent increase in levels of HDL (good) cholesterol, plus significant decreases in stress hormones and inflammatory chemicals linked to heart disease.

19. d. extended cell phone conversations. Keeping your elbow flexed during marathon chats compresses the ulnar nerve, leading to the syndrome. 20. False. Mounting evidence suggests that supplementing with vitamins A, C and E, as well as zinc and copper, can slow degeneration by as much as 25 percent. And a new Irish study found that the supplements may even improve vision!

Research Center in Seattle discovered that a history of migraines decreases breast-cancer risk by 26 percent. The doctors suspect migraine sufferers have lower levels of estrogen, a hormone that has been linked to the condition.

21. c. chlamydia. Within two to four weeks of exposure to

15. d. all of the above. Computer-induced eyestrain can

rich in flavonols, chemicals that increase blood flow to the brain. Researchers at Northumbria University think that’s why study subjects who drank hot cocoa were able to count backward in increments of seven more quickly and efficiently than subjects not given the chocolaty beverage.

lead to burning or itching eyes, blurred vision and headaches and can make you feel tired. Constantly focusing on the screen is one culprit; that’s why looking away every so often is helpful. And people’s tendency to blink less when sitting at the computer contributes to eye dryness.

16. d. a. (vaginal lubricants) and b. (the vagina’s natural secretions). Studies have shown that most lubricants, including water-based varieties, are toxic to sperm. And believe it or not, the vagina’s acidic secretions normally kill sperm—except during ovulation, when secretions become more alkaline so sperm can survive.

17. b. cornflakes. This breakfast favorite is a high-glycemic carbohydrate, which means it causes blood sugar levels to rise. The problem? Elevated glucose levels set the stage for atherosclerosis and heart disease, according to a study from Israel’s Chaim Sheba Medical Center. On the other hand, low-glycemic carbs, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, help keep blood sugar levels steady and can help control weight by boosting satiety.

18. True. Loma Linda University researchers recently found that people with diabetes who added 30 minutes of laugh-

chlamydia, the bacteria can travel to the joints via the bloodstream, causing reactive arthritis.

22. b. chocolate. Chocolate, especially dark chocolate, is

23. d. saying your favorite four-letter word. In a study at Keele University in England, subjects instructed to swear were able to keep their hand submerged in ice water significantly longer than those told to utter words describing a table. Researchers say swearing triggers the fight-or-flight response, which raises our ability to withstand pain. 24. c. speaking into his/her right ear. Scientists in Pescara, Italy, have found that verbal data entering the right ear receives preferential treatment. They speculate that it’s because sound that enters the right ear is processed by the left side of the brain, which is the seat of language.

25. False. Harvard’s Women’s Health Study found no elevated risk for breast cancer among women who drank four or more cups of coffee a day—and researchers followed the subjects for 10 years. Other studies suggest coffee can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes, colon cancer and Parkinson’s disease, and slow the progression of Alzheimer’s.

What’s your wellness IQ? SCORE:18–25 Surgeon General. Someone’s been keeping up with the medical news—good for you! Knowing the latest recommendations on keeping a healthy lifestyle empowers you to make important choices for wellness. Of course, you should always talk to your doctor before heeding a health tip you heard on the 6 o’clock news. Still, adopting good habits now may very well put you on the road to longevity. SCORE: 9–17 Major Knowledge. You’ve kept tabs on the key health-related developments, but often let the minutia fly under your radar. Frankly, we can’t say we blame you—taking to heart every wellness study published could drive a person batty. Our advice: Stay abreast of major trends and landmark developments to help keep you on the path to lifelong health. SCORE: 0–8 Captain Obvious. With any luck, you make healthy decisions without even knowing it. But having solid health awareness is too important a task to neglect. One way to start: Take a moment to scan the health headlines whenever you go online. Whatever your home page—CNN, MSN, Yahoo—you’ll find the latest info with a click. And to bone up on the basics, try a reputable site like www.mayo.com or www.webmd.com. ■


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HEALTH & BEAUTY by Kristin Colella

Buying

beauty? BEFORE YOU SIGN UP FOR A COSMETIC PROCEDURE, KNOW THE FACTS

FROM

SLIMMING

FLABBY

THIGHS

TO

RESTORING

sun-damaged skin, it seems there’s a doctor-approved treatment for nearly every imperfection these days. Once an industry for the rich, cosmetic treatments have gone mainstream; Americans spent a staggering $11.8 billion on both surgical and nonsurgical procedures last year, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. But while fixing a flaw that troubles you can be a confidence-booster, there’s much to consider before booking a treatment. “You have to weigh the risks, rewards, costs—and reality,” says Alan Schliftman, M.D., Director of Dermatology in the Department of Medicine at Westchester Medical Center. “By ‘reality,’ I mean that it may only be possible to remove part of a problem, or you may be bruised for a few days, or the solution may be only a temporary one.” Some 35 percent of his patients who

MASTERFILE

inquire about a procedure end up not choosing it when he explains these factors, says the doctor. Here are the facts on five top treatments to help you decide.

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

VEIN ELIMINATION

SKIN TAG REMOVAL How it’s done: These benign skin growths can be removed with one of several simple procedures performed in a doctor’s office. These may include snipping the growths with scissors, freezing them using liquid nitrogen or burning them off using a cautery. Pain: Small tags may be removed without anesthesia, so 34

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activity immediately, but may experience itching, redness or temporary discoloration. Depending on how much of the body is treated, skin should be fully recovered after one to two weeks. Cost: $250 to $500 per treatment; multiple treatments may be required Insider tip: Intense pulsed light therapy isn’t the best option for all types of scars. Thickened, raised scars often need to be injected with a steroid or cut out so the

“FAST FACT” SOURCE: AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR AESTHETIC PLASTIC SURGERY; IMAGE: GETTY

you might experience a pinch. If How it’s done: You can bid this concerns you, ask about a those unsightly spider and varitopical anesthetic. For larger cose veins farewell with two tags, the area will be numb—the minimally invasive procedures only pain will be the injection of performed in a doctor’s office. the lidocaine. Squiggly, branch-like veins can Time: On average, about two be treated with sclerotherapy, minutes per tag; several tags which involves injecting a solumay take up to 30 minutes. tion directly into the veins Recovery/rehabilitation: through minute needles. Long, Slight bleeding may occur if straight veins can be treated the tag is snipped with scissors, with endovenous laser ablation, but generally no recovery time in which laser energy causes is needed. damaged veins to collapse and Cost: $100 to $250, depending seal shut. on the number of tags removed Time: 15 to 30 minutes for scleInsider tip: Don’t try popular rotherapy; 1 hour for endovenous “at-home” skin-tag removal laser ablation remedies, such as snipping tags Pain (both procedures): Minimal with a nail clipper or tying a Recovery/rehabilitation (both string around their base to cut procedures): Patients can return off blood circulation—doing so to work immediately, but will be can lead to a possible infection. asked to wear a compression stocking for up to a week. Sclerotherapy patients will generally Americans be fully recovered after about two days. SCAR CORRECTION underwent Full recovery for endovenous laser ablaHow it’s done: For newer, red scars, a more than tion takes about two weeks, during non-invasive treatment called intense 10 million cosmetic which time some bruising and cramping pulsed light therapy can often help. procedures last may occur. Performed in a doctor’s office, the proceyear. Cost: $200 to $950 per treatment for scledure uses light waves to reduce redness. rotherapy; $3,000 and up per leg for endoveTime: 10 to 20 minutes nous laser ablation Pain: A numbing cream is often used before the proInsider tip: Take a walk! If you’re looking to sit back cedure, so any pain is minimal. You might, however, and rest up after the procedure, think again. Experts experience a slight burning sensation in the hour or two encourage patients to walk—sometimes several miles— after the procedure. following both procedures. Recovery/rehabilitation: You can return to normal


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cific parts of the body, such as the abdomen, thighs or buttocks. While various liposuction techniques exist, a popular option today is ultrasonic liposuction, in which fatty tissue is turned into a liquefied state with highfrequency sound waves and then gently vacuumed out. BROWN-SPOT REMOVAL Time: 45 minutes to 2.5 hours or more How it’s done: You can thank years of sun Pain: Moderate aches and soreness can genexposure for those annoying brown spots The erally be expected for about two to three dotting your skin, but luckily a number of number of days after the procedure. noninvasive procedures can make them liposuction Recovery/rehabilitation: Although paappear less conspicuous. These include procedures done tients must wear a compression garment intense pulsed light therapy (described in the U.S. nearly for about four weeks, they typically can on the previous page); laser treatment, doubled between return to work in two to four days and using a tool such as the 755 Alexandrite 1997 and begin exercising again after one to two weeks. laser; or chemical peels. 2008. Cost: $2,000 and up Time: Chemical peels generally take 10 to 15 Insider tip: You can inquire about the ultrasonic minutes. Times for light and laser treatments vary procedure, but your doctor will decide which treatment depending on the area covered and number of spots taroption is best for you after conducting a full evaluation. ■ geted, but are often less than 30 minutes.

“FAST FACT” SOURCE: AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR AESTHETIC PLASTIC SURGERY; IMAGE: CORBIS

skin can be restitched. Your doctor will be able to recommend the most appropriate treatment option for you.

Pain: For the pulsed light and laser treatments, pain is minimal, though you might feel a mild burning afterwards. During a chemical peel, you can expect your skin to feel warm or hot, and you may experience stinging following the procedure. Recovery/rehabilitation: Though you can expect your brown spots to darken just after a laser or pulsed light procedure, they typically flake off in a few days to a few weeks; you can return to work and normal activity the day of your procedure. Patients who undergo light chemical peels can also return to work immediately, though full healing may take several days; those who have deeper peels may need to recover at home for up to a week. Cost: Prices vary, but may be around $400 for an entire face treatment using intense pulsed light therapy and $350 for 20 minutes’ treatment with the 755 Alexandrite laser. Chemical peels can range from about $175 up to $1,500, depending on how deep the peel goes; several treatments are often required. Insider tip: It’s best to avoid scheduling treatments in the summer, since you’ll need to avoid getting a lot of sun just after these procedures.

LIPOSUCTION How it’s done: Intended to improve body contour, this surgical procedure involves suctioning out fat from spe-

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Stealing the show A REVEALING LOOK AT 3 STYLISH ROOMS,

EACH FROM A CELEBRATED AREA SHOW HOUSE At first glance, a designer’s show-house room may seem effortless. But look more closely and you’ll see it has stories to tell—a challenge overcome, an unlikely motif made triumphant. Recently, stunning spaces in three states told such enlightening tales. And in doing so, offered design ideas aplenty. 36

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At

HOME

by Diane Szulecki

CHIC IN THE CITY

DANIEL EIFERT PHOTOGRAPHY

“The Lounge” by Charles Pavarini, Kips Bay Decorator Show House, Manhattan

A

color palette with almost no actual color may not

strove to reflect the artwork’s icy quality throughout the

seem an enticing design choice, but in the deft

room, coupling spots of shine with dashes of warmth

hands of designer Charles Pavarini of Charles Pavarini III

thanks to pale mauve and taupe touches.

Design Associates, New York City, this singular palette

A sparkling mother-of-pearl floating fireplace and

was transformed into a breathtakingly sleek lounge befit-

a custom-carved Steinway piano by John Eric Byers

ting a grand boutique hotel.

anchor the opposite end of this “new contemporary”

“I wanted it to feel very clean and light,” Pavarini

room, while a trio of fancifully looped hangings add

says of the space. His color inspiration? A striking iceberg

whimsy upon the walls. The designer’s few splashes of

photograph by Camille Seaman that sits at one end of the

hue—pale teal and lavender—come from a decidedly

room, overlooking a chic seating area with a swanky tête-

futuristic source: a computerized cyclical color-fading LED

à-tête sofa, an amorphic bronze-and-pewter Silas Seandel

lighting system, incorporated into the Pavarini-designed

coffee table and a glittering rock-crystal geode. Pavarini

plaster crown molding.

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HOME POWDER PERFECT “Reflections” by Felicia Zwebner, Sheep’s Run Show House, Rumson

S

mall and dark. Such was the space designer Felicia Zwebner, owner of Art de Triomphe in

Teaneck, faced at the beginning of the design process. Her mission: Transform the dim nook into a room that would be bright but not overbearing, a nod to the past but not stuffy. The posh result? A glamorous powder room fused with English and Asian elements. “The inspiration for the room was The Great

Gatsby—that feeling of ‘20s elegance and opulence,” Zwebner says. So to make the space appear larger, the designer used some decidedly luxurious tricks: She added pleated silk to the ceil-

ing and embellished the closet doors with antique mirrors that reflect the hand-painted silver metallic wallpaper by Gracie. To evoke a sense of British opulence, she chose a mahogany demilune and mirror from the Althorp Living History collection by Earl Spencer, then incorporated Eastern touches with cherry blossom–print wallpaper, a lightly striped woolen silk rug from Starr Carpets and bamboo-reminiscent window treatments that softly diffuse light, creating an ethereal glow. A luxurious silk adds a cushy spot to “sit, reflect and relax.”

PETER RYMWID

velvet-upholstered ottoman—Zwebner’s own creation—


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COZY CONTEMPORARY “The Grand Salon” by Eric J. Schmidt, Society of the Arts Designer Show House for the Allentown Art Museum, Allentown, Pennsylvania

W

hen it comes to home design, bigger is often not better.

“Most people would look at this space and feel very intimidated,” admits Eric J. Schmidt, principal of Eric J. Schmidt Interiors, North Caldwell, of this 22-foot by 32foot room. “They’ll think, ‘How could I live here? I need to have a million dollars’ worth of furniture!’ But you don’t

PETER GOURNIAK

need to stuff a large space to make it lovely and usable.” Thus, Schmidt opted to keep the space clean-

Schmidt-designed console and bold Venetian Ribbon mir-

lined, functional and tailored using the mantra “modern-

ror from Mirror Fair occupy the other. The space’s com-

ized tradition” as a guiding vision. Sticking with a soft,

fortable center, meanwhile, is adorned with a Ralph

soothing color palette, he began by balancing two pure-

Lauren sofa and Duralee chenille daybed and further

white Cavallini leather-hide floor coverings on each side,

accented by Lucite antlers on the mantle, while Ralph

thereby creating three distinct areas: A white baby grand

Lauren Modern Hurricane candles in the fireplace add a

piano anchors one end of the room, while a curvilinear

warm, homey glow. ■

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ESCAPES

Nature’s hot baths

4 GLORIOUS SPRINGS WHERE YOU CAN SOAK YOUR WAY TO SERENITY

Healing waters—they’re a phenomenon often described in myths and lore, but do they really exist? Many believe the mineral-rich natural hot springs that dot America’s landscape, with water bubbling up from deep below the earth’s surface, are a cure-all. And it’s a safe

bet the four dazzling destinations described here, which range from coast to coast, will provide therapeutic relaxation and rejuvenation, thanks to their arrays of luxury pools, soothing spas and other amenities. Read on for all you’ll need to know to take the most memorable bath of your life.

Calistoga, California ocated at the northern end of lush Napa Valley, this charming area attracts families and couples alike with its numerous spas and spa-hotels featuring pools and baths filled with mineral-rich water piped from local hot springs. Water temperature: Because water straight from the springs is often too scorching for humans (some reach 350 degrees), most spas and resorts cool water to a more comfortable 92 to 104 degrees. Fee: Spa fees vary; popular treatments include the private mineral bath at Roman Spa Hot Springs Resort ($65 for 60 minutes; 1-800-404-4772, www.romanspahot springs.com), and the mineral whirlpool bath with a 30minute massage at Dr. Wilkinson’s Hot Springs Resort ($117; 707-942-4102, www.drwilkinson.com).

L

Where to stay: Luxury and eco-consciousness flawlessly

Where to eat: For innovative American cuisine made 40

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OCTOBER 2009

Other attractions: This is Napa, silly. Oenophiles can

savor sips at some 700 wineries, including Merryvale Vineyards in St. Helena (707-963-7777, www.merry vale.com), which offers two-hour wine-tasting seminars on weekends ($25 per person); and V. Sattui (707-9637774, www.vsattui.com), also in St. Helena, which gives tastings and tours in its castle-like stone winery building and features 2.5 acres of shaded picnic grounds, where guests can enjoy food and wine purchased from the vineyard’s European-style marketplace. For a family-friendly activity visit the Old Faithful Geyser of California in Calistoga (707-942-6463, www.oldfaithfulgeyser.com), which sprays 60 to 100 feet of scalding water into the air every 30 minutes ($10 for adults; $7 for seniors; $3 for children 6 to 12; free for children under 6).

CORBIS

combine at the Solage Calistoga resort (1-866-942-7442, www.solagecalistoga.com), which features 89 environmentally friendly studios and suites, a 20,000-square-foot spa offering baths in natural geothermal mineral waters and 22 open acres surrounded by the Mayacamas and Palisades mountain ranges ($475 to $875 per night).

with fresh, locally farmed ingredients, head to JoLe in Calistoga (707-942-5938, www.jolerestaurant.com), where you can feast on watermelon and feta salad, Alaskan halibut in tomato mint jam, roasted duck breast with corn and chipotle pancakes—and more. Don’t forget to order a glass or bottle from the sweeping wine list, which offers regional and international selections.


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Warm Springs and Hot Springs, Virginia hese two historic towns nestled in the Allegheny Mountains of Bath County once welcomed Thomas Jefferson, who visited their hot springs in 1818 in hopes of healing his recurrent rheumatism. Modern-day visitors can bathe in spring water at the European-style spa of The Homestead resort (1-866-354-4653, www.thehome stead.com) in Hot Springs, which offers 36 treatment rooms and a magnificent indoor pool; and Jefferson Pools in Warm Springs, which offers two covered soaking pools (clothing optional between 1 p.m. and 6 p.m.).

T

Water temperature: The water at Jefferson Pools is

kept at 98 degrees—the spring’s natural temperature— while the pool at The Homestead spa is cooled to about 89 to 92 degrees. Fee: $17 per person per day for Jefferson Pools; the pool

at The Homestead spa is free for guests and open to visitors who book spa treatments, such as the 15- to 20minute herbal-infused bath ($58). Where to stay: In addition to its world-class spa, the

breathtaking Homestead resort offers 483 impeccably

adorned guest rooms and suites—each complete with LCD TVs, plush robes and plump feather pillows—plus three championship golf courses, a downhill ski area and a 48-stable equestrian center and show ring. To experience it all, book the Unlimited Activities Package ($275 and up per night), which includes room accommodations, limitless carriage rides, golf, fly-fishing, kayaking and more. Where to eat: For a taste of fine country fare with a

side of history, take in a meal at the Waterwheel Restaurant (540-839-2231, www.gristmillsquare.com), located in a century-old mill building at the Inn at Gristmill Square in Warm Springs. Selections include fresh local trout, roast duckling and tournedos au poivre. Other attractions: With more than 170,000 acres of the George Washington National Forest set in Bath County, back-to-nature opportunities abound, from boating, waterskiing and fishing on Lake Moomaw to hiking and biking on some 120 trail miles. Afterwards, relax with a chamber music concert at the Garth Newel Music Center in Warm Springs (540-839-5018, www.garthnewel.org).

COURTESY OF THE HOMESTEAD RESORT

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ESCAPES

Ouray, Colorado ituated 7,792 feet above sea level amid the rugged peaks of the Rockies, this quaint mountain community in southwestern Colorado is home to numerous hot springs that travelers can enjoy at both private hotels and lodges and the city-operated Ouray Hot Springs Pool, a large public swimming pool featuring three different soaking sections.

two-bedroom, two-bath suite with kitchen.

Water temperature: The area’s natural hot springs are about 150 degrees, though pools available for soaking and swimming range from 88 to 114 degrees.

Other attractions: Coloradans love the outdoors, so make like the locals and hike through Box Canyon Waterfall and Park, which features a 285-foot waterfall plummeting into a narrow, quartzite canyon. Visit the Ouray County Historical Society Museum (970-3254576, www.ouraycountyhistoricalsociety.org)—hailed by the Smithsonian Institution as the “best little museum in the West”—which features exhibits focusing on mining, ranching and railroading in the area’s Wild West days. (Don’t miss the 1882 piano from The Gold Belt Theatre with its telltale bullet hole.) Admission is $5; $3.50 for seniors 60 and over and $1 for children under 12. Or catch a chauffeured mule-and-buggy ride through town (970708-4946; www.ouraymule.com). Run by Tim Saunders and his wife, Lezah, the 45-minute tours depart hourly 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $15; $5 for children under 12.

S

Fee (public pool): $10 for adults; $8 for seniors and students; $5 for children ages 3 to 6; free for children 2 and under Where to stay: Box Canyon Lodge & Hot Springs

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New York strip steak with three spicy shrimp; $26.95) to lamb chops in brown cognac sauce ($23.95), the casual but beloved Outlaw Restaurant (970-325-4366, www.out lawrestaurant.com) offers fine tastes in a rustic, Westerninspired setting.

COURTESY OF BOX CANYON

(1-800-327-5080, www.boxcanyonouray.ccom) offers rejuvenating springs first used by the Ute Native American tribe. Outdoor tubs, situated on a multilevel redwood deck, offer 360 degrees of stunning mountain views yearround, and the 103- to 108-degree water lacks the sulfurous odor that marks some hot springs. Distinctive rooms feature pine tongue-in-groove paneling; in the low season (October 13 to December 13 and April 1 to May 15) they range from $75 for a small room to $190 for a

Where to eat: From the 12-ounce “scorpion steak” (a


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Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas or more than 200 years people have flocked to this sanctuary in central Arkansas to experience its 47 hot springs, which contain high levels of silica, calcium and other minerals. Today visitors can drink the spring water in various hot water “jug fountains” located throughout the park (you can even fill bottles to take home), or soak in the water at two bathhouses located in the park on Central Avenue, which pipe cooled-down water from the springs. Buckstaff bathhouse (501-623-2308, www.buckstaff baths.com) offers traditional baths of yore, while the Quapaw Baths & Spa (501-609-9822, www.quapaw baths.com) bathhouse provides a contemporary spa experience with four soaking pools and a variety of massages and body polishes.

F

Water temperature: Water straight from the spring

is 143 degrees, while baths are generally kept at 98 to 100 degrees. Fee: It’s free to enter the park; one-hour traditional

baths at Buckstaff cost $24 per person; aromatherapy baths at Quapaw Baths & Spa cost $35 per person and $45 per couple. Where to stay: Located in the city of Hot Springs’ his-

toric downtown, the Arlington Resort Hotel & Spa (1-800-643-1502, www.arlingtonhotel.com) provides the ambience and hospitality of a grand old Southern hotel with modern-day conveniences, including a full-service spa. Room rates range from $79 to $89 for a standard room to $495 for a historic suite. COURTESY OF QUAPAW BATHS AND SPAS

Where to eat: For elegant Mediterranean- and

French-inspired cuisine, dine at Chef Paul’s (501-5204187, www.chefpaulsfinedining.com) in Hot Springs. Menu highlights include cranberry chicken ballontine, veal tenderloin with foie gras and baked orange roughy. Other attractions: If all that soaking has you longing to stretch your legs, take a leisurely stroll through the Garvan Woodland Gardens in Hot Springs (1-800-366-

4664, garvangardens.com), which offer 2.5 miles of nature trails through 40 landscaped acres. The botanical gardens feature camellias, magnolias, azaleas, roses, chrysanthemums and more. ■

Spring on 3 MORE LUXURY SPA-HOTELS WHERE YOU CAN REALLY GET INTO HOT WATER • An idyllic mountain retreat, Glenwood Hot Springs resort in Glenwood Springs, Colorado (1-800-537-7946, www.hotspringspool.com) features the largest hot springs pool in the world—its 405-foot by 100-foot, 92-degree main pool—fed by the “Yampah” hot spring. (Rooms start at $139 per night.) • The hot springs at Two Bunch Palms Resort & Spa in Desert Hot Springs, California (1-800-4724334, www.twobunchpalms.com) are thought to stabilize moods due to their high content of lithium. Test that theory by dipping in the resort’s grotto-style pool or booking a “water therapy” spa treatment. (Rooms start at $185 per night.) • A national historic landmark dating back to 1778, The Greenbrier resort in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia (1-800-453-4858, www.green brier.com) contains a sulphur water spring on its grounds. Enjoy the liquid’s reputed healing powers during a luxe treatment at the resort’s 40,000square-foot spa. (Rooms start at $379 per night.)

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

is

good AssistLiv_WCH_1009REV1.indd 46

Your guide to

senior living

9/18/09 8:30:42 AM


S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

As CONsUMERs HAVE BECOME sAVViER, sENiOR COMMUNiTiEs HAVE REsPONDED WiTH THE ADDiTiON OF AMENiTiEs AND sERViCEs TAiLORED TO MEET THE NEEDs OF THEiR CLiENTs—NEEDs THAT CAN VARY

A sENiOR LiViNG siTUATiON, THOUGH, ONE sHOULD BECOME FAMiLiAR WiTH THE GENERAL TYPEs OF COMMUNiTiEs THAT ARE AVAiLABLE:

iNDEPENDENT adults in search of a community lifestyle filled with recreational, educational and social activities with their peers often gravitate to homes in what is referred to as retirement communities, congregate living or senior apartments. Many independent communities offer planned activities, local transportation, meals or access to meals and various forms of linen or laundry service, and add an abundance of amenities such as swimming pools, spas, clubhouses, libraries and much more. AssisTED LiViNG combines many of the features of independent residential living with personalized nonmedical services and healthcare support. These communities make every effort to maximize an individual’s independence while providing assistance for those needing just a little help with the activities of daily living, such as dressing, grooming, bathing or monitoring a medication regimen.

Traditional NURsiNG HOMEs are designed specifically for

adults in need of on-site 24hour skilled nursing care for personal hygiene, protection, supervision and therapy. Some also provide specialized subacute, rehabilitative care to people who’ve been weakened by illness or injury, but who want to return to more independent living once their treatment allows them to become self-sufficient. And then there are those facilities that offer options across the spectrum: CONTiNUiNG CARE retirement communities are residential campuses that provide a continuum of care—from individual homes for active seniors to assisted living to skilled nursing—all at one location. Having services that address all potential phases of senior life is not only convenient but often less disruptive for the resident as well. Some people, though, prefer to stay in their own home. Once taking care of themselves becomes difficult, family members have the option of hiring a HOME CARE service that can offer assistance anywhere from

a few hours a day to around the clock. Home care is often used by recovering, disabled or terminally ill people in need of medical, nursing, social or therapeutic treatment.

{ life is good }

TREMENDOUsLY FROM PERsON TO PERsON AND EVEN DAY TO DAY. BEFORE EMBARKiNG ON A sEARCH FOR

Although many assisted living communities and nursing homes provide care for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other memory disorders, a growing number of communities specialize in this type of adult care by providing an environment and programs that diminish confusion and agitation. Short-term respite care is an additional service that some assisted living and nursing home facilities provide on an as-needed basis. This allows caregivers to receive temporary relief—ranging from hours to days— so they can take a well-needed vacation or enjoy some personal time away from the stress of taking care of a loved one. If the search for new housing arrangements is something that’s on your mind, you may find the following profiles of nearby topquality communities particularly of note.

INDEPENDENT COMMUNITIES • ASSISTED LIVING • CONTINUING CARE • HOME CARE F i n d o u t M o r e At:

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{ life is good } S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

The Place to Be C L A s s i C R E s i D E N C E B Y H YAT T i N YO N K E R s i s A D i s T i N C T i V E R E T i R E M E N T C O M M U N i T Y that is both ideally located in a quaint Westchester County neighborhood and only 20 minutes to the many attractions of midtown Manhattan. Its convenient location makes it easy for residents to partake in enriching activities as well as for family to come visit. There are three senior living options available in Yonkers: independent, assisted and memory support. Many of the spacious one- and two-bedroom homes have spectacular views of the Hudson River and all of the communities were designed to provide the most spirited lifestyle possible. Active adults can socialize with friends over taste-tempting, healthy cuisine prepared by the classically trained executive chef … or energize in the fully equipped fitness center … or join one of the many exciting excursions. For those in need of additional attention, licensed personal assistance is provided in accordance with individually developed care plans. And dementia services are also available in a self-contained, safe and secure environment. “Many of our staff have hospitality backgrounds and understand the value of personal attention. The level of care

we provide at Classic Residence by Hyatt in Yonkers is consistent and of the highest caliber,” says Nancy Campagna, sales director. “Having familiar faces in all roles, from housekeeping and dining to nursing, is comforting to both the residents and their families.”

537 Riverdale Avenue | Yonkers | 914-709-1234 | 1-888-451-2244 | www.hyattclassic.com

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{ life is good }

Distinctive Lifestyle Worth Discovering T H E O s B O R N ’ s P i C T U R E s Q U E 5 6 - AC R E CA M P U s i N RY E is a well-known landmark in Westchester County. Just 40 minutes by Metro North train from Manhattan, close to the Sound and 10 minutes from Greenwich, Connecticut, it’s a location that offers a uniquely compelling, maintenance-free lifestyle at the region’s premier senior living community. With our wide range of residential options for independent living, you can continue to enjoy the lifestyle you live today, without the effort and expense of maintaining a private home. A full array of services, onsite amenities, social and cultural events and more are the perfect complement to your daily life. Independent residences are available through a 100 percent refundable entry fee, with apartments in the main Osborn building available for a monthly rental with no entry fee. The Osborn also offers a continuum of care with

assisted living apartments, dementia care and long-term skilled nursing in private rooms, short-term rehabilitation on a residential or outpatient basis, respite care and hospice. The same exceptional quality care and personal assistance services are also available to Westchester residents in their own homes through Osborn Home Care.

101 Theall Road, Rye | 914-921-2200 | www.theosborn.org

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Generations of Caring

AT UNiTED HEBREW iN NEW ROCHELLE, iT is THE siMPLE ACTs OF CARiNG that make getting older a lot easier. United Hebrew is a not-for-profit, nonsectarian, multi-service organization marking its 90th year with the opening of an expanded and enhanced nursing and rehabilitation center. Its gracious 7.4-acre campus overlooks Long Island Sound and is home to an array of residences, programs and services including a skilled nursing and rehabilitation center; Willow Towers Assisted Living; Soundview Apartments for independent seniors; and home health care.

The new state-of-the-art nursing and rehabilitation pavilion offers private rooms, private baths, sweeping views of the Sound, a courtyard garden and specialized amenities. Exemplary short-term rehabilitation is provided on-site by the nationally-renowned Burke Rehabilitation Hospital. Willow Towers Assisted Living is licensed by NY State Deptartment of Health for maximum reimbursement on LTC policies. Willow Towers holds the highest level of licensure from DOH and was among the first in the industry to obtain the new assisted-living residence certifications. Amenities include restaurant-style meals, housekeeping, transportation and extensive recreational programs. The Phoenix memory-support program caters to residents with Alzheimer’s and related disorders.

Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

Willow Towers Assisted Living

391 Pelham Road | New Rochelle, NY 914-632-2804 | www.uhgc.org

355 Pelham Road | New Rochelle, NY 877-636-6565 | www.willowtowers.com

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{ life is good }

Independence and Care You Deserve

V NA H O M E H E A LT H s E RV i C E s (VNA HHS) is a not-for-profit licensed home care agency that provides certified home health aides, personal care assistants, registered nurse visits and multidisciplinary therapies for residents of Westchester & Putnam who require assistance to remain at home. “We offer a geriatric care management service, VNA CaringLink, which provides a full assessment and recommended care program for seniors, clients of elder lawyers and families living too far to manage the needs of an elder relative themselves,” says Charlotte Smith, vice president of VNA HHS. “There are so many options available to the individual, that the task can be

overwhelming; we help streamline the process.” Committed to quality and service, VNA HHS recently re-implemented a home aide training program, approved by the NY State Department of Health, to increase the number of qualified aides in the area. For individuals who reside in areas with limited access to public transportation, vans supplied by VNA HHS can transport aides to homes. When you or a loved one need assistance to remain in the comfort of your own home, let VNA HHS help you. As a member of the VNA of Hudson Valley family of organizations, we have over 111 years of experience and resources to offer.

914-666-7079 | www.vnahv.org

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{ life is good } S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

A Caring Neighborhood

sOMERs MANOR NURsiNG HOME HAs BEEN sERViNG the community for 50 years and is nestled on more than 100 acres in a bucolic country setting in northern Westchester County. Responding to customer expectations, it recently built new living areas and redesigned existing ones to provide the utmost in 24-hour skilled nursing care as well as short-term rehabilitative and subacute care services. Somers Manor has a committed staff of about 300 caring professionals who offer services, comfort, medical care and companionship. Medical providers are available on-site at least 40 hours each week and Internet access to medical data helps provide 24 hour/7 day coverage. “We have incorporated the concept of ‘neighborhood’ and ‘neighbors’ for our long-term residents. Residents often invite families and friends to events at their home at Somers Manor, and there is an active, in-house Red Hat Society that works on projects that benefit the larger community,” explains Joy Bloomer, Administrator.

189 Route 100 | Somers | 914-232-5101 | www.somersmanor.com

somers Manor Nursing Home & Rehabilitation Center

One patient at a time sPRAiN BROOK MANOR, A REsPECTED MEMBER of the Westchester County community for more than 30 years, has a well-earned reputation for personalized care. The center specializes in both long-term care and short-term rehabilitation, offering individualized care in a modern, comfortable setting. Residents receive physical and occupational therapy toward a goal of helping them return to the most independent standard of living possible. Family members are also welcome to tour the facility and/or participate in their loved one’s therapy sessions. Please call to schedule an appointment or take a tour.

77 Jackson Avenue | Scarsdale | 914-472-3200 | www.sprainbrookmanor.com

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{ life is good }

WEsTCHEsTER MEADOWs HAs iT ALL— garden-style apartment living on 30 pristinely manicured and wooded acres, a host of on-site amenities and New York City at its doorstep. “We have a very energetic group of residents,” observes Peter Sanna, executive director at Westchester Meadows. “People move here as much for our health and wellness offerings as for our gracious lifestyle and beautiful setting in the heart of Westchester County.” Amenities include an indoor Olympic-sized swimming pool, a mile-long winding path, a fitness coordinator and a wellequipped exercise spa. “We also offer our residents peace of mind, knowing that enriched housing and skilled nursing are available under one roof, should they ever need it,” points out Janice Murphy, director of marketing.

S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Make the Most of Your Retirement

55 Grasslands Road | Valhalla | 914-989-7800 | www.westchestermeadows.org

Westchester Meadows

Is your child having learning problems? Is reading a struggle? Did your child’s last eye exam include an evaluation of the visual skills related to reading and learning? Do you have a bright child who is struggling or underachieving?

IT COULD BE THEIR EYES! EVEN IF THEY SEE 20/20 FOR MORE DETAILS, PLEASE CALL:

Dr. Ira J. Bernstein, OD, FAAO, FCOVD Dr. Paul R. Bernstein, OD, FCOVD 701 WESTCHESTER AVE., WHITE PLAINS, NY 10604

914-682-8886

www.cfvl.com

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Glorious Food Portobello stuffed with sausage,

’Bello the banquet

spinach and smoked mozzarella SERVES 4 3 4

⁄ pound mild Italian sausage 1 medium Spanish onion, sliced 6 tablespoons olive oil 1

⁄2 cup dry red wine

8 ounces fresh spinach leaves, stems removed and coarsely chopped 1

⁄2 cup water

Salt and freshly ground

black pepper 4 tablespoons chopped fresh basil leaves 4 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 12 ounces fresh smoked mozzarella, cut into small cubes 4 large portobello mushrooms, stems removed 2 plum tomatoes, thinly sliced

• Preheat grill to medium-high heat. • Brush sausages and onion slices with olive oil and place on the grill. Cook until browned on all sides. • Transfer the sausage and onion to a sauté pan and add wine. Cook until wine is completely reduced, all the while breaking up the sausage into small pieces.

THE COVETED INGÉNUE AMONG MUSHROOMS,

• Add spinach and water. Season with salt and pep-

PORTOBELLOS INSPIRE FOODIES AND HEALTH

per and cook until the spinach has wilted, about

DEVOTEES ALIKE

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OCTOBER 2009

spoons of basil and 2 tablespoons of parsley and the cheese and let cool slightly. • Turn the grill to high heat. Brush the mushroom caps on both sides with the remaining oil and season with salt and pepper. Place the mushrooms on the grill and cook until golden brown, about 4 minutes. Remove the mushrooms from the grill and place on a flat surface, cap side down. • Fill the mushrooms with the sausage mixture and top each with a few slices of tomato. Season with salt and pepper and place them on the grill, cap side down. Close the grill cover and cook until the mushroom and filling have heated through, the cheese has melted and the tomatoes are soft—about 5 minutes. Remove to a platter and sprinkle tops with the remaining parsley and basil.

RECIPE SOURCE: FOOD NETWORK (WWW.FOODNETWORK.COM); STOCKFOOD

THINK OF THEM AS THE GEN-XERS OF THE gourmet world. After slipping quietly onto the culinary scene in the 1980s, portobello mushrooms exploded in popularity in the early- to mid-90s. True, many a mushroom enthusiast assumes the humungous fungus to be a long-beloved delicacy with an exotic pedigree. But in reality, a portobello is simply an overgrown version of the long-unpopular crimini mushroom, grown mostly in Pennsylvania—not on some lush Tuscan hillside. Still, despite these decidedly commoner origins, portobellos today reign as recipe royalty. Thanks to a hearty flavor and surprisingly steak-like texture, they’re a versatile indulgence, acclaimed as both a complement to and an alternative for meat ingredients in many a gourmet creation. Equally excellent grilled, sautéed and roasted, in sauces, sandwiches and salads, the mushrooms are a healthy as well as tasty treat, with a mere 40 calories per cup and high levels of potassium, niacin, cancer-fighting selenium and antioxidants. Choose portobellos that are firm and plump with an earthy aroma. Refrigerate in a paper bag to keep them fresh for up to five or six days. Then cook them up however you please. ■

2 minutes. Remove from the heat, stir in 2 table-


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Westchester GOURMET

by Sean Ryan

Because the eatery sits about 100 yards from the New England border, it seems natural that seafood features heavily in the appetizers. We started with the crabmeatstuffed scallops—three hefty, satisfying offerings filled with what other restaurants would serve as standalone crab cakes. Our lobster bisque was so rich and buttery, we were surprised to find the large lobster pieces tasted, well ... stale. It’s no secret that soups often contain leftovers, so maybe we got a lobster from a previous tank. And the Gorgonzola salad featured a variety of lettuces and a hefty portion of cheese, but more oil than was necessary in the dressing. For our entrées we chose the T-bone (recommended by our server) and the rack of lamb “stimulus” selection. The aged T-bone was served almost blackened outside, but inside was cooked precisely to order and bursting with flavor. A cup of the house steak sauce had a horseradish flavor so surprisingly strong we expected to find shrimp ringing its edge. Though the tanginess was pleasant with the T-bone, the meat worked just fine by itself. A baked potato (served with sour cream and a nearfrozen cup of butter) and sautéed mushrooms (in butter of a much warmer temperature) made for satisfactory sides. The rack of lamb was served atop lip-smacking smashed potatoes featuring onions and garlic and topped TIMES HAVE BEEN TOUGH FOR HIGHER-END with a gravy peppered with capers, which added pleasingly restaurants, but we didn’t notice many empty tables at bitter bites. The meat itself was enjoyably mild, and cut easThe Willett House, in Port Chester’s vibrant restaurant disily from the ribs. It was tempting to slice them into lollipops trict. Located in a brick building on the Byram River that and suck the meat from the bones, but decorum prevailed. had previous lives as a granary, a plumbing-supply house At dessert time, we felt victims of a bait-and-switch: and a mattress factory, The Willett House has been serving We ordered the crème brûlée cheesecake and the key lime porterhouses since 1990. Its décor mixes traditional steakpie—only to find that the latter was not a pie, but another house elements—dim lighting, dark carpeting, polished cheesecake. Both were huge wedges about two inches high, brass accents—with nods to the structure’s past: exposed with graham cracker walls and fluffy creamy interiors. The pipes and valves, a pulley hanging from the main dining thin scorched caramel top of the crème brûlée added delecroom, massive metal sliding doors leading to the kitchen. table depth to the airy cheesecake underneath, while the Perhaps the reason this walletkey lime—the appropriate yellow, not indulgent eatery was still bustling was a fake green—had a delicious tartness The Willett House the restaurant’s clever Economic that melted into creamy satisfaction. 20 Willett Avenue, Port Chester; 914Stimulus Specials, found among The Its misnomer was promptly forgiven. 939-7500; www.thewilletthouse.com Willett House’s classic regular menu In the end, we can’t say our Hours of choice beef and seafood. Consisting meal at The Willett House was a boon Monday through Friday, noon–10 p.m.; of smaller portions—a 12-ounce New to our bank account. Still, the prospect Saturday, noon–10:30 p.m.; Sunday and York strip, an 8-ounce filet mignon— of well-prepared fare at a wide range of holidays, 4–9 p.m. plus a vegetable or potato, the specials price points would certainly weigh in What you should know offer a nice alternative to the traditional its favor when considering a repeat • Regular entrées range from $28 to procedure of ordering your (much visit. After all, a fine dining experience $60, Economic Stimulus Specials larger, costlier) cut and sides separately. is, in a sense, priceless. ■ range from $24 to $30

Sizzling, but lean

54

• Private parties accommodated /

OCTOBER 2009

• Major credit cards accepted

DEREK WIESEHAHN

• Full bar


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HEALTH & L IF E PRESENTS YO U R O NL INE G U ID E T O

senior living AS CONSUMERS HAVE BECOME SAVVIER, SENIOR COMMUNITIES HAVE RESPONDED WITH THE ADDITION OF AMENITIES AND SERVICES TAILORED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THEIR CLIENTS THAT CAN VARY TREMENDOUSLY FROM PERSON-TO-PERSON AND EVEN DAY-TO-DAY. TO GET STARTED ON ANY SEARCH, THOUGH, ONE SHOULD BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE GENERAL TYPES OF COMMUNITIES THAT ARE AVAILABLE:

I N D E P E N D E N T adults in search of a community lifestyle filled with recreational, educational and social activities with their peers often gravitate to homes in what is referred to as retirement communities, congregate living or senior apartments. Many independent communities offer planned activities, local transportation, meals or access to meals and various forms of linen or laundry service, and add an abundance of amenities such as swimming pools, spas, clubhouses, libraries and much more.

To receive a complimentary copy,* please call 847.763.9525 or email nyspacesrequests@ wainscotmedia.com.

A S S I S T E D L I V I N G combines many of the features on independent residential living with personalized non-medical services and healthcare support. In this case, the community makes every effort to maximize an individual’s independence while providing assistance for those needing just a little help with the activities of daily living such as dressing, grooming, bathing or the monitoring of a medication regiment.

IS

good

Traditional N U R SI N G HO M E S are designed specifically for

folks in need of onsite 24hour skilled nursing care for personal hygiene, protection, supervision and therapy. Some also provide specialized subacute, rehabilitative care to people who’ve been weakened by illness or injury, but who want to return to more independent living once their treatment allows them to become self-sufficient. And then there are those facilities that essentially have it all. CO N TI N U I N G CA R E retirement communities are residential campuses that provide a continuum of care from individual homes for active seniors to assisted living through skilled nursing all at one location. Having services that address all potential phases of senior life is not only convenient but often less disruptive for the resident as well. Some people, though, really prefer to stay in their home. However, if taking care of oneself becomes difficult, family members has the option of hiring a HO M E CA R E service that can come to a home for

anywhere from a few hours a day to around the clock. Home care is also often used by recovering, disabled or terminally ill people in need of medical, nursing, social or therapeutic treatment. Although many assisted living communities and nursing homes provide for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other memory disorders, there are a growing number who specialize in this type of adult care by providing an environment and programs that diminish confusion and agitation. Short-term respite care is an additional service that some assisted living and nursing home facilities provide on an as-needed basis. In this case, caregivers receive temporary relief ranging from hours to days so they can take a well-needed vacation or enjoy some personal time away from the stress of taking care of a loved one. If the search for new housing arrangements is something that’s on your mind, you may find the following profiles of a few nearby top-quality communities particularly interesting.

YOUR GUIDE TO

SENIOR LIVING

INDEPENDENT COMMUNITIES • ASSISTED LIVING • CONTINUING CARE • HOME CARE F I N D O U T M O R E AT:

www.Tri-StateSeniorLivingGuide.com

Also view it online at NEWYORKSPACESMAG.com * $2 POSTAGE CHARGE WILL APPLY.

055_WCHL_OCT09.indd 55

INDEPENDENT COMMUNI TIES | ASSISTED LIVING CONTINUING CARE | HOME CARE

www.Tri-StateSeniorLivingGuide.com

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where TO EAT

If you’ve got a craving, there’s a dining establishment in Westchester County (or nearby) that will satisfy it. Tur n to this listing next time you want a wonderful meal out.

ARMONK

• 4 W. Main St., Irvington • 866-933-5478

PEEKSKILL

OPUS 465 Contemporary cuisine in an unpretentious environment. • 465 Main St., Armonk • 914-273-4676

IRVINGTON-ON-HUDSON

DIVISION STREET GRILL Food with a contemporary American flair. • 26 N. Division St., Peekskill • 914-739-6380

RED HAT ON THE RIVER Upscale eatery

featuring contemporary American cuisine. • 1 Bridge St., Irvington-on-Hudson • 914-591-5888

ZEPHS’ Global soul food. • 638 Central

French bistro fare. • 391 Old Post Rd. (Rt. 22), Bedford • 914-234-7333

LARCHMONT

PORT CHESTER

PLATES New American menu with Italian,

F.I.S.H. Mediterranean take on seafood. • 102

BRIARCLIFF MANOR

French and Asian accents. • 121 Myrtle Blvd., Larchmont • 914-834-1244

Fox Island Rd., Port Chester • 914-939-4227

BEDFORD

Avenue, Peekskill • 914-736-2159

BISTRO TWENTY-TWO Romantic setting for

GUADALAJARA Festive Mexican including

favorites like fajitas. • 2 Union St., Briarcliff Manor • 914-944-4380

MAMARONECK

TERRA RUSTICA Classic Italian with salads,

porterhouse steak. • 974 E. Boston Post Rd., Mamaroneck • 914-381-7233

pastas and seafood. • 550 N. State Rd., Briarcliff Manor • 914-923-8300

TOLLGATE STEAKHOUSE Known for prime

THE WILLETT HOUSE Fine steakhouse • 120 Willett Ave., Port Chester • 914- 939-7500

RYE LA PANETIÈRE Contemporary French cuisine. • 530 Milton Rd., Rye • 914-967-8140

C H A P PA Q U A

SCARSDALE

CRABTREE’S KITTLE HOUSE An award-

MERITAGE New American cuisine in a chic

winning wine cellar complements American fare. • 11 Kittle Rd. (off Rt. 117), Chappaqua • 914-666-8044

Manhattan-style setting. • 1505 Weaver St., Scarsdale • 914-472-8484

SLEEPY HOLLOW

DON EMILIO’S AT LOBO’S CAFÉ Vibrant,

WASABI Relaxed atmosphere serving sushi,

upscale Mexican eatery. • 57-59 King St., Chappaqua • 914-238-2368

CORTLANDT MANOR

sashimi and hot dishes. • 279 N. Broadway, Sleepy Hollow • 914-332-7788

M I L LW O O D

MONTEVERDE Fine Continental menu with a

view of the Hudson River. Fresh lobster, beef and lamb. • 28 Bear Mountain Bridge Rd., Cortlandt Manor • 914-739-5000

C R O T O N FA L L S PRIMAVERA Regional Italian cuisine. Try the

jumbo shrimp parmigiana or grilled Scottish salmon. • 595 Rt. 22, Croton Falls • 914-277-4580

CROTON-ON-HUDSON OCEAN HOUSE New England–style seashore fare including steamers, grilled wild salmon and fried clams. • 49 N. Riverside Ave., Croton-onHudson • 914-271-0702

DOBBS FERRY TOMATILLO Authentic Mexican fare featuring

in-season local ingredients. • 13 Cedar St., Dobbs Ferry • 914-478-2300

HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON HARVEST-ON-HUDSON Mediterranean cuisine, with river views. • 1 River St., Hastings-on-Hudson • 914-478-2800

IRVINGTON FLIRT SUSHI LOUNGE Japanese eatery

known for provocatively named sushi rolls.

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OCTOBER 2009

SPACCARELLI’S RISTORANTE

Neighborhood eatery emphasizing Abruzzese cuisine. • 238 Saw Mill River Rd., Millwood • 914-941-0105

MOHEGAN LAKE BELLA VITA Italian spot known for home-

made pumpkin ravioli. • 1744 E. Main St., Mohegan Lake • 914-528-8233

MOUNT KISCO COCO RUMBA’S Nuevo Latino menu

spotlighting seafood and exotic drinks. • 443 Lexington Ave., Mount Kisco • 914-241-2299

NEW ROCHELLE CITY CHOW HOUSE Asian-Latin fusion

cuisine in a modern setting. • 1 Radisson Plaza, New Rochelle • 914-576-4141

NORTH SALEM JOHN-MICHAEL’S AT PURDY’S HOMESTEAD

Inspired modern fare set in a Colonial home. • 100 Titicus Rd., North Salem • 914-277-2301 VOX French bistro serving eclectic fare from foie gras to burgers. • 721 Titicus Rd., North Salem • 914-669-5450

SOUTH SALEM LE CHÂTEAU Classic French dishes in a Tudor mansion built by J.P. Morgan. • Rts. 35 and 123, South Salem • 914-533-6631

TA R R Y T O W N EQUUS RESTAURANT French fare served at Castle on the Hudson. • 400 Benedict Ave., Tarrytown • 914-631-3646

THORNWOOD ABIS JAPANESE RESTAURANT Traditional Japanese cuisine plus steakhouse hibachi. • 14 Marble Ave., Thornwood • 914-741-5100 AZZURRI Mediterranean fare served in a

Tuscan villa atmosphere. • 665 Commerce St., Thornwood • 914-747-6656

TUCKAHOE AN AMERICAN BISTRO Bright eatery featuring quesadillas, lamb and chicken. • 296 Columbus Ave., Tuckahoe • 914-793-0807

WEST HARRISON AQUARIO Brazilian and Portuguese cuisine specializing in seafood. • 141 E. Lake St., West Harrison • 914-287-0220

WHITE PLAINS BLUE Asian-influenced American fare


featuring osso bucco. • 99 Church St., White Plains • 914-220-0000 MORTON’S, THE STEAKHOUSE

Chicago-based steakhouse. • 9 Maple Ave., White Plains • 914-683-6101

YONKERS ZUPPA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE Innovative Italian with homemade pasta. • 59 Main St., Yonkers • 914-376-6500 ■

WHERE TO EAT BY CUISINE

AMERICAN: An American Bistro, Tuckahoe • Crabtree’s Kittle House, Chappaqua •

Division Street Grill, Peekskill • JohnMichael’s at Purdy’s Homestead, North Salem • Meritage, Scarsdale • Morton’s, The Steakhouse, White Plains • Ocean House, Croton-on-Hudson • The Olde Stone Mill, Tuckahoe • Red Hat on the River, Irvington-on-Hudson • Tollgate Steakhouse, Mamaroneck • The Willett House, Port Chester ASIAN: Abis, Mamaroneck and Thornwood • Flirt Sushi Lounge, Irvington • Wasabi,

Sleepy Hollow CONTINENTAL: Monteverde, Cortlandt

Manor • Opus 465, Armon FRENCH: Bistro Twenty-Two, Bedford •

Equus Restaurant, Tarrytown • La Panetière, Rye • Le Château, South Salem • Vox, North Salem ITALIAN: Bella Vita, Mohegan Lake •

Primavera, Croton Falls • Spaccarelli’s Ristorante, Millwood • Terra Rustica, Briarcliff Manor • Zuppa Restaurant & Lounge, Yonkers

The Center for Cosmetic Dentistry

Visit our brand new state-of-the-art facility for a complimentary cosmetic consultation We

know your time is valuable. That’s why we’ve invested in CEREC technology that allows for a faster, experience when you need crowns, fillings or veneers. with CEREC, there’s no need for a temporary and return visit. Everything is done in one visit, in about an hour-for what is important to you. G

MEDITERRANEAN: Azzurri, Thornwood • f.i.s.h., Port Chester • Harvest-on-Hudson,

Hastings-on-Hudson MEXICAN: Don Emilio’s at Lobo’s Café, Chappaqua • Guadalajara, Briarcliff Manor • Tomatillo, Dobbs Ferry MULTI-ETHNIC: Aquario, West Harrison • Blue, White Plains • City Chow House,

New Rochelle • Coco Rumba’s, Mount Kisco • Plates, Larchmont • Zephs’, Peekskill

057_WCHL_OCT09.indd 57

George L Rioseco, DDS,PC Robert L Rioseco, DMD, LLP 914•761•8229

147 Underhill Avenue•East White Plains, NY 10604

WWW.ZENDENTIST.COM

9/17/09 12:44:29 PM


YOUR GUIDE TO HEALTH AND HEALING What would motivate you to become healthy and fit again? Where would you go to find the healing touch that you or a member of your family needs? Tending to your mind, body and soul should be a priority. After all, physical health and healing leads to emotional health and healing—read here to find the perfect resources, right in your backyard.

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an artistic and functional approach to aesthetic injections, such as

Master trainer Steve, owner of A Better Body by Steve, has been

Botox, Dysport and a variety of injectable gels, as well as to supervise

training people of all ages and fitness levels for more than 10 years.

customized low-level laser hair regrowth system sessions, a technology

He comes to you and brings all the equipment necessary to help you

used in Europe for more than 20 years.

tone, strengthen and get fit, within the privacy and convenience of your

245 MAMARONECK AVENUE | WHITE PLAINS

own home. Steve’s in-depth understanding of both the human body

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and psychology allows him to motivate his clients, as well as create

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individualized programs that really work! STEVE SCHLENKERMAN 914.447.5894 | ABETTERBODYBYSTEVE@YAHOO.COM

Marc L. Epstein, M.D.— Demirjian Laser Hair & Skin Center Dr. Marc Epstein has joined the renowned Demirjian Laser Hair & Skin Center, practicing aesthetic medicine. His expertise in the use of injectables will help soften, and in many cases erase, that worried, sad

Many parents of struggling readers may not know that 20/20 is not

and tired look on your face. Dr. Epstein feels strongly that age, time and

perfect vision. A child may have an eye-focusing dysfunction or a

environment need not dictate how we look. The artful administration

convergence insufficiency (an eye teaming dysfunction), which has

of injectables, such as Botox, Dysport and gels, allow you to recapture

been found to be one of the most common vision disorders that

a rested and rejuvenated appearance. Aging—with “a little help”—

interferes with reading, according to the National Institutes of Health

restores both physical beauty and inner confidence. Call for your free

and the National Eye Institute. Over 60 percent of problem learners

consultation.

have misdiagnosed vision problems and are often diagnosed

MARC L. EPSTEIN, M.D.

with ADD/ADHD, LD and dyslexia. For more information about

245 MAMARONECK AVENUE | WHITE PLAINS, NY 10605

developmental optometrists and the link between vision and learning,

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{ Mind, Body and Soul }

The Bernstein Center for Visual Performance

S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

A Better Body by Steve

visit the center’s website or call. IRA J. BERNSTEIN, O.D., AND PAUL R. BERNSTEIN, O.D.

Kinetogenics Spine & Sports Therapy

701 WESTCHESTER AVENUE | WHITE PLAINS

For chronic muscle and joint pain that does not respond well to

914.682.8886 | WWW.BERNSTEINCENTERFORVISUALPERFORMANCE.COM

traditional physical therapy, Vito DiMatteo, D.C., suggests active-release technique (ART), a patented treatment that quickly and permanently

Bodicures

resolves the condition. ART evaluates the tightness and movement of

Bodicures, known for its exceptional facials, laser hair removal,

muscles and other tissue, which is then treated by combining precisely

electrolysis, body treatments, massage and gel manicures, celebrates

directed tension with specific patient movements to free the soft tissue.

its 14th anniversary by launching two new customized

VITO DIMATTEO, D.C.

services. Bodicures is the first in Westchester to offer the Italian

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Dermomagnetic Facial, a patented 12-step treatment using a mask

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and magnet duet to attract and remove impurities while firming skin. In addition, Bodicures introduces Westchester’s first Perfume Studio

Healthy Fit for Women

where clients can create their own custom-blended fragrances. Check

Healthy Fit for Women, voted #1 Readers Choice Awards 2007-2009 for

Bodicures’ website and Facebook page for anniversary specials.

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Company readers, offers an innovative fitness and proprietary

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weight-loss program based on healthy eating in a friendly, nurturing environment. The Healthy Fit program includes a complete fitness/

The Center for Cosmetic Dentistry

nutrition assessment, easy-to-follow exercise program and two follow-

Robert Rioseco, DDS—best known for porcelain veneers, implants,

up assessments to ensure clients reach their individual goals. Exercise

whitening and all phases of general dentistry—has doubled the size

classes for all levels are included and babysitting is available. Call for a

of his state-of-the-art office and teaching facility. Dr. Rioseco offers the

complimentary 45-minute weight-loss consultation!

newest, most comfortable dental technology, including Invisalign clear

1000 EAST BOSTON ROAD | MAMARONECK

braces for adults and teens. In addition, the center’s Cerec machine

914.670.0600 | WWW.MYHEALTHYFIT.COM

digitally designs a perfect-fitting crown in one day, eliminating the need for temporary crowns and multiple visits.

Larchmont Laser Medical Spa

ROBERT RIOSECO, DDS

Barbara Robinson, a veteran Manhattan cosmetic and plastic surgical

147 UNDERHILL AVENUE | WEST HARRISON

nurse, offers revolutionary treatments without the down time and

914.761.8229 | WWW.ZENDENTIST.COM

harmful side effects of plastic surgery at Larchmont Laser Medical Spa. Her sharp eye, accurate hand and gentle touch are coupled with

Demirjian Laser Hair & Skin Center

a vast knowledge of the field of cosmetic surgery and the use of lasers

Hilda Demirjian, considered one of the country’s best laser hair removal

in plastic surgery. The full-service medical laser spa specializes in

specialists, is also known for her personal collagen laser treatment,

Revitalash conditioner for eyelashes, photofacials, epifacials, leg vein

which resolves many skin conditions including fine lines, sun damage,

removal, Skintyte treatment, Bodytyte treatment, face-lift treatment,

rosacea, acne and scars. Hilda offers Laser Light Hair Therapy, an

reflexology and more.

advanced scientific discovery for the treatment of hair loss and skin

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rejuvenation. Marc Epstein, M.D., has also joined her staff to provide

914.834.1204 | WWW.LARCHMONTLASERSPA.COM

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Be THERE OCTOBER

DIONNE WARWICK

October 17—Feel your

November 13—See this five-time

spine tingle during MUSIC INSPIRED BY POE, in which the Chappaqua Orchestra will perform songs by Rachmaninoff, Bob Dylan, the Beatles and more inspired by Poe’s eerie writings, 8 p.m. at the Chappaqua Library auditorium in Chappaqua. A reception with the artists follows. Call 914-921-4642 or visit www.chappaquaorchestra.org for more information.

Grammy Award–winning singer per-

FREE

FREE

October 20, 25 and 29—

Take a curator-led tour of an elegant century-old mansion and learn how its style influenced early 20th-century interior design during a HISTORIC MANSION TOUR AT MERESTEAD, 1 p.m. on October 20 and 25 and 10 a.m. on October 29 at Merestead in Mount Kisco. Reservations required. Call 914666-4258 or visit www.westchester gov.com/parks for more information. October 24—Rock out with your little ones to the children’s band THE SIPPY CUPS, 3 p.m. at Tarrytown Music Hall in Tarrytown. The concert will include the band’s original rock songs plus kid-friendly covers of music by The Velvet Underground, The Ramones and more. Tickets: $28. Call 1-877-840-0457 or visit www.tarrytownmusichall.org for more information.

form at the Paramount Center for the Arts in Peekskill, 8 p.m. Tickets: $35 to $67.50. Call 914-739-2333 or visit www.paramountcenter.org for more information. FREE October 25—Take the kids on a fright-free scavenger hunt at BOO WALK, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Muscoot Farm in Somers. Hayrides also offered ($2 fee). Call 914-8647282 or visit www.muscootfarm.org for more information.

Through October 31—Walk

among 500 scarecrows representing famous artists and historical figures created by local students, participate in a scavenger hunt and more during SCARECROW INVASION, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily at Lyndhurst in Tarrytown. Admission: $5; free for children 12 and under and Friends of Lyndhurst members. Call 914-631-4481 or visit www.lyndhurst.org for more information.

NOVEMBER November 5—Enjoy a night of

laughter with the girls at STAND UP: LADIES’ COMEDY NIGHT, featuring stand-up comedian Andy Pitz, 7 p.m. at the Rye Arts Center in Rye. Tickets: $50; includes a light

16TH ANNUAL WESTCHESTER CRAFT SHOW

treasures at the 42nd annual CHAPPAQUA ANTIQUES SHOW,

hosted by the New Castle Historical Society and featuring honorary chairman Bill Clinton, plus appraisals, design consultations, some 55 dealers and more, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Westorchard Elementary School in Chappaqua. Admission: $10 donation. Call 914-238-4666 or visit www.newcastlehistorical society.org for more information. November 22—Enjoy a classical a concert by the JASPER STRING QUARTET as they perform three quartets from Eastern Europe, 4 p.m. at the Rosen House Music Room at the Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts in Katonah. Tickets: $25. Call 914-232-1252 or visit www.caramoor.org for more information. ■ SEND EVENT LISTINGS TO:

Westchester Health & Life, 110

crafted furniture, jewelry and more during this prestigious juried

Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ

a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday at the Westchester County Center in White Plains. Admission: $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, free for shows.com for more information.

OCTOBER 2009

07645; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received four months in advance of the event and must include a phone number that will be published.

SHUTTERSTOCK

children under 12. Call 914-995-4050 or visit www.craftsamerica

/

November 7 and 8—Hunt for

October 16 to 18—Browse hand-blown glass, porcelain, handshow and sale, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 11

60

dinner. Call 914-967-0700, ext. 25, or visit www.ryeartscenter.org for more information.


Are you ready to lose weight? We’ll get you started with 3 easy steps: 1. Book your nutrition and weight loss evaluation 2. Schedule your weekly one-on-one weight loss coaching sessions 3. Enjoy the feeling of your new, lighter self! Introducing Healthy Fit for Women. Personalized fitness and weight loss programs. Join now and we’ll make it as easy as 1, 2, 3. Call 914.670.0600 to schedule your nutrition and weight loss evaluation now.

FOR WOMEN Formerly Simply Fit Under New Management 1000 East Boston Post Rd, (next to CVS) Mamaroneck, NY 10543 914.670.0600

Leslie M. Marra, OTR Pediatric Occupational Therapist

Unique therapeutic environment with large sensory-motor clinic for one child at a time. 20 years experience in pediatrics and specializing in: Sensory Integration and Praxis Testing • Sensory Integration Treatment Therapeutic Listening • Home Programs/”Sensory Diet” Interactive Metronome • Extensive Evaluation and Treatment

351 MANVILLE ROAD, PLEASANTVILLE, NY 10570 TEL. 914-843-4095 • FAX. 914-801-2548

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What’s HAPPENING SUPPORT GROUPS For more information, visit www.worldclassmedicine.com. ■

Congestive Heart Failure Support Group

Meets on the first Tuesday of every month, 3:30– 4:30 p.m. Call 914-493-1730 for additional information. ■

Hepatitis C Support Group

Meets every other Wednesday, 6–8 p.m., in the Cedarwood Hall Conference Room on the first floor. Call 914-493-7641 to learn more. ■

Living With Multiple Sclerosis

For information, call the Behavioral Health Center Outpatient Department at 914-493-2621. ■

Pulmonary Hypertension Support Group

Meets Saturday, October 10, 10 a.m.–noon. Conference Center, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. Call Yusetty Ovalle, CA Accredo Therapeutics, 1-800-526-5113, ext. 5519, for additional information. ■

Stroke Support Group

Meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month, 6–7:30 p.m. Call 914-493-1573 for more information. ■

at W e s t c h e s t e r M e d i c a l C e n t e r

Westchester Running Festival

Sunday, October 11. Westchester Medical Center pre-

sents an event that features a half marathon and 10K. The festival also includes a free half-mile Fun Run for Kids. To learn more, visit www.worldclassmedicine.com. ■ Fifth Annual 100.7 WHUD Children’s Miracle Network Radiothon

Wednesday, November 11 through Friday, November 13. Broadcasting live from the lobby of Maria Fareri

Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center, the Fifth Annual WHUD 100.7 Children’s Miracle Network Radiothon benefits the world-class advanced pediatric care at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. ■

Wines of the World

Thursday, November 19. Join us for a light supper, a tast-

ing of the world’s finest wines and a spectacular auction of food, wine, travel and leisure experience at Trump National Golf Club in Briarcliff Manor. To learn more, contact Margie Ostrower at ostrowerm@wcmc.com or 914-4935414; or go online at www.worldclassmedicine.com/WINE.

Weight-Loss Surgery Support Group

Meets twice monthly at 6 p.m. at the Medical Arts Atrium, 19 Bradhurst Avenue, Suite 1700, Hawthorne. LEARNING FOR LIFE Learning for Life is Westchester Medical Center’s series of free seminars held in the Conference Center at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. Parking is available in the Children’s Hospital lot; check in at the security desk. For additional information or to register, call 1-877-WMCDOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com. ■

Weight-Loss Surgery Seminars

Thursdays, October 8 and 22, 4:30–6:30 p.m. If you are

overweight, you may be a candidate for bariatric (weightloss) surgery. Here, bariatric surgeons explain the details of the latest minimally invasive surgical procedures. SPECIAL EVENTS 10th Annual Westchester Medical Center Golf Tournament ■

Monday, October 5. The prestigious Trump National

62

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OCTOBER 2009

Sale to Benefit Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital

Thursday, November 12 through Sunday, November 15. Two’s Company, a leader in the home decor busi-

ness, will open its warehouse doors and sell items at 90 percent off—including home furnishings and gifts, bags, vases, tabletop, jewelry, furniture, ceramic items, candles, wall art and more. Cash and credit cards accepted. Two’s Company’s warehouse is located at 500 Saw Mill River Road, Elmsford. For more information, call 1-800896-7266 or 914-493-5414. ■

SHUTTERSTOCK

Golf Club in Briarcliff Manor is the setting for this event, co-chaired by Harold Moskowitz, partner, Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP, and David Asprinio, M.D., Chairman and Director, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Westchester Medical Center. Reservations for this annual event will go quickly. For information on sponsorship opportunities, please call 914-493-8029.


JG<:@8CGIFDFK@FE

WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

in the news

Artery Disease Treatment. We are one of only 27 hospitals to be recognized as a 2009 Triple Performance Achievement recipient. In addition, Westchester Medical Center has once again been recognized with a five-star rating for “overall bariatric surgery” by HealthGrades, the nation’s leading independent healthcare ratings organization. This means we ranked in the top 5 percent in the nation for bariatric surgery (our fourth year in a row to reach this milestone), and we are among the top 10 hospitals in New York State (#6) for overall bariatric surgery. These rankings are directly tied to the fact that our numbers are dramatically lower than many other hospitals in terms of mortality rates, complication rates and patient lengths of stay.

ANNIE GEVERTZ, 13, OF SCARSDALE, NY, SITS IN THE LOBBY OF MARIA FARERI CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER AMONG THE 100 AGE-APPROPRIATE ACTIVITY BAGS SHE CREATED FOR DISTRIBUTION TO THE PATIENTS.

Teen Brings Kits2Kids to Children’s Hospital Recently, 13-year old Annie Gevertz of Scarsdale, New York, stopped by Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center to complete her Mitzvah project. Annie, already a long-time supporter of the children’s hospital, celebrated her Bat Mitzvah this year. As her Mitzvah project, Annie started a program she called “Kits2kids” in which she created over 100 age-appropriate craft and activity kits for the children in the hospital. Creating the kits involved securing donations from national chain stores including Staples, A.I. Friedman and other local vendors—which Annie accomplished by writing letters and visiting the stores. Her goal was to help provide a small distraction to hospitalized children as well as bring a little bit of fun into their often difficult days at the hospital. The kits are filled with simple craft projects and activities for three different age groups. WAY TO GO ANNIE!

Little Ones Enjoy 5th Annual Sail4Kids A day on the water is one of the most enjoyable ways to spend a summer afternoon and thanks to members of the American Yacht Club in Rye, 20 young patients treated at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital did just that with a relaxing and fun-filled day on Long Island Sound during the Sail4Kids “Make a Memory” Cruise on July 19. The event was a positive distraction for children and families challenged with complex medical issues. This year marked the fifth voyage of the Sail4Kids Cruise. As in previous years, members of the American Yacht Club donated their vessels and sailing skills for the day and played host to a child and his or her family. The night before the cruise, the American Yacht Club hosted a fundraiser for the hospital that brought in approximately $30,000.

WMC Clinical Achievements Rewarded Westchester Medical Center has recently been recognized as a 2009 Triple Performance Achievement recipient for success in using evidence-based guidelines to provide the best possible care to patients through the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With the Guidelines program. More specifically, WMC received a Gold Achievement Award in Stroke Treatment and Silver Achievement Awards in Heart Failure Treatment and Coronary

063_WCHL_OCT09.indd 63

MFCH HEART PATIENT DOMENICK D’ADDONA, 2, AND HIS FAMILY SPENT THE DAY ON THE WATER AT THE SAIL4KIDS EVENT.

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faces of WESTCHESTER

Tr a c t o r f a c t o r Young Lawrence Flinn considers a future career in the agricultural arts at the Muscoot Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market in Somers.

CHARLES WIESEHAHN

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2009


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Westchester Health & Life's October 2009 issue  

The Good Living Magazine from Westchester Medical Center