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W E S T C H E S T E R H E A LT H

WESTCHESTER

health&life T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E from W E S T C H E S T E R M E D I C A L C E N T E R

February 2009 $3.95

& LIFE ■

FEBRUARY 2009

SPRING STYLE: 31 THINGS WE LOVE

TAPAS: a local sampler

Plus

3 Valentine escapes

Kid couture in LARCHMONT FESTIVE FARE in Chappaqua

health

watch

life goes on—with a temporary heart partners in shedding pounds ■

peek inside a new labor and delivery suite ■


Faux you,Faux me

WESTPORT 1 Sconset Square 203.226.8777

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GREENWICH 28 E. Putnam Ave 203.629.4999

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Contents

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WESTCHESTER

health&life February 2009 Features 28

36

Flying colors Want your spring style to soar? Items in these uplifting hues will help your ensembles take flight.

Fit to be tied Take your favorite suit or sportcoat to the next level with a patterned tie in a great color.

38 Escapes /

20 Health watch · Life goes on—with a temporary heart · A sister’s precious gift · Partners in shedding pounds · Warm welcome for newborns · Caring for the sickest kids

42 Glorious food There will be blood Newly trendy but boasting

3 romantic retreats

Say “I love you” with one of these luxurious couples’ getaways.

a long history, the blood orange is one of winter’s finest fruits.

44 Westchester gourmet A fine fiesta Head to Don Emilio’s at Lobo’s Café in Chappaqua for a memorable Mexican meal.

Departments

42

46 Be there!

4 Welcome letter

A listing of local events you won’t want to miss

47 Shopping guide

6 Editor’s letter 15 Westchester whispers

· Magical mosaics · Tempting tapas · Kiddie couture · “What I’m listening to ...” · Winners’ circle

48 Where to eat Your Westchester County dining guide

50 What’s happening at Westchester Medical Center

18 Flash

Captured moments around the county

56 Faces of Westchester Fashion passions COVER IMAGE : MATTHIEU SPOHN


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Welcome LETTER

A look ahead 2008 WAS A YEAR OF CONTINUED GROWTH AT Westchester Medical Center. We made significant investments in the organization in terms of new technology and improved infrastructure, and we welcomed many new highly skilled and dedicated healthcare professionals. The longterm investments we’ve made are all the more important as we begin 2009 and a period of economic challenges for every industry, including healthcare. Given the national and state economies, it is equally important that we remain true to our mission to serve as the regional referral center providing high-quality advanced healthcare to the people of the Hudson Valley. At Westchester Medical Center, our wide range of advanced-care specialties includes many resources and services that are not offered anywhere else in the region—such as our Burn Center, our Transplant Center, our Level I Trauma Center and our award-winning Heart Center. As a regional resource, we provide closely coordinated care to our patients, often calling on a variety of specialists and programs. As an example, expert physicians from our Advanced OB/GYN Associates practice offer specialized prenatal care to pregnant women and their unborn babies considered “high risk” in a coordinated effort with our expert neonatolgists, who will care for these critically ill babies after they are delivered in the largest and highest-level Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the region, located at our Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. The intense need for this program has led to a complete renovation and upgrade of our Labor and Delivery Center (see story page 26). We remain committed to this service—and our other core mission services—because we know how vital they are to our community. In addition, we will keep focusing on and improving other areas of the medical center so that we can continue to care for our patients and their families when they need us the most. Thank you for your continued support of Westchester Medical Center and our mission.

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For additional information about Westchester Medical Center, visit our website at www.worldclassmedicine.com.

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We’ve created a medical center where people are treated like their lives depend on it. Because they do.

Patricia Sheiner, M.D., Chief, Liver Transplant

At Westchester Medical Center, we set the standard in healthcare. You can see it in every room, every hallway and every department. You can see it in the eyes of a heart transplant patient or on the faces of parents whose newborn weighs just over a pound. Our advancements extend across the entire medical facility – from our innovative Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital to the latest technology, lifesaving procedures and top doctors, nurses and staff. This is how we’ve achieved national recognition for clinical excellence and have become the region’s premier destination for advanced care. So we’re ready when you need us most.

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Leslie M. Marra, OTR Pediatric Occupational Therapist

Editor’s LETTER

A peek at spring

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HOLISTIC HE ALTH CENTER

NUTRITION DETOXIFICATION

LYMPHATIC DRAINAGE WEIGHT MANAGEMENT IRIDOLOGY YOGA HEALTH AND WELLNESS SEMINARS

EACH YEAR, THIS IS ONE OF OUR FAVORITE issues. Our staff is full of devoted recreational shoppers, and the process of sifting through oodles of fun new springtime clothes gets our pulse racing just a bit faster. For the ladies, we found a spectrum of cute items in a host of bright hues. We present them for your perusal in “Flying Colors,” an eightpage pictorial that starts on page 28. And for our debonair gentlemen readers, we offer similarly vibrant neckwear that will leave you “Fit to Be Tied,” page 36. Of course, this being our February issue, we could not neglect that sweetest of celebrations, Valentine’s Day. So turn, if you will, to Escapes on page 38 for three romantic getaways to die for. Widely disparate on the map, they share stunning scenery, luxurious digs and the power to reawaken that amorous spirit that may nestle, a bit snow-covered, in your February soul. If you’d rather wine and dine your Valentine a bit closer to home, see our review of Chappaqua’s lively Don Emilio’s at Lobo’s Café. Our writer’s meal was tasty, inspired and satisfying—but not without a heart-stopping snafu. Read all about it in Gourmet on page 44. And those who wish to wow their beloved with a romantic meal at home should check out our recipe for pan-seared ahi tuna with blood orange sauce, page 42. As always, in Westchester Whispers, page 15, we take a look at a few notable local finds. There you’ll get the scoop on three of the county’s top spots for tapas and learn about a Mamaroneck craftswoman who creates fun, fanciful mosaics. And, this being the style issue, we couldn’t resist offering some style guidance for the younger set, courtesy of a hip kids’ boutique whose offerings will appeal to even the most styleconscious ’tweens. We hope you enjoy the pages that follow, and that they inspire you to debut some new looks this spring. Until then, we’ll just cross our fingers and wait for warmer weather.

RITA GUARNA Editor in Chief

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WESTCHESTER

health&life FEBRUARY 2009 Westchester Health & Life Staff

editor in chief RITA GUARNA

art director SARAH LECKIE

senior editor TIMOTHY KELLEY

managing editor JENNIFER CENICOLA

assistant managing editor DEBBIE BOLLA

editorial assistant KRISTIN COLELLA

group publisher EDWARD BURNS

executive vice president, sales & marketing JOEL EHRLICH

publisher SUZANNE TRON

director of business development GRACE BEHRENS

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advertising account executives LOUISE DEMMEL , ELIZABETH LAUCKS , MARY MASCIALE

advertising sales assistant ASHLEY MCFADDEN

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director, internet and new media NIGEL EDELSHAIN

marketing director CHRISTOPHER KAEFER

production manager CHRISTINE HAMEL

advertising services manager THOMAS RAGUSA

advertising production coordinator KATHY GJOKAJ

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production assistants CHRISSY FALLIVENE , JULIA NIEDZWIECKI

senior art director, agency services KIJOO KIM

art associate, agency services DIANE TABUAS

circulation director LAUREN MENA

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editorial contributions: The editors invite letters, article ideas and other contributions from readers. Please write to Editor, Westchester Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201-571-7003; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Any manuscript or artwork should be accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope bearing adequate return postage. The magazine is not responsible for the return or loss of submissions.

advertising inquiries: Please contact Edward Burns at 201-782-5306 or edward.burns@wainscotmedia.com.

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WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER Valhalla, N.Y. For general information, call 914-493-7000. Visit Westchester Medical Center on the Internet at www.worldclassmedicine.com.

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1/16/09 8:55:20 AM PUBLISHED BY

CARPET

WORLD

WAINSCOT MEDIA

chairman CARROLL V. DOWDEN

president MARK DOWDEN

executive vice president JOEL EHRLICH

senior vice president EDWARD BURNS

vice presidents GRACE BEHRENS AMY DOWDEN NIGEL EDELSHAIN RITA GUARNA SHANNON STEITZ SUZANNE TRON

subscription services: To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Westchester Health & Life, Circulation Department, PO Box 1788, Land O Lakes, FL 34639; telephone 813-996-6579; e-mail lauren.mena@wainscotmedia.com.

Also featuring

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Westchester Health & Life is published seven times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645, in association with Westchester Medical Center. This is Volume 5, Issue 1. ©2009 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14.00 for one year. Single copies: $3.95.

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Westchester WHISPERS YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL TRENDS, TREASURES, PEOPLE & WELL-KEPT SECRETS

Magical mosaics From fairy mirrors to a “cow jumping over the moon” coffee table, mosaics by local artist Libby Denenberg of WISHFLOWER STUDIO in Mamaroneck (914-381-6027, www.wishflowerstudio.com) have taken on many fanciful forms. Gathering her inspiration from animals, nature, nursery rhymes and all things magical, Denenberg pieces her whimsical creations together using materials such as vintage china, stained glass, glass tiles and

TEMPTING TAPAS

mirror pieces. “I hunt for my materials at estate and tag sales and thrift shops—I’ve always loved collecting and putting things together,” says the artist. Want a colorful mosaic of your own? You can purchase Denenberg’s art through her website or at craft shows throughout the metropolitan area. Mirrors start at $15, picture frames at $16 and coffee tables at $125. For a totally custom creation, you can arrange a private appointment with Denenberg by phone. “I’m just trying to spread a little happiness in the world,” she says.

PETER DENENBERG

“Fairy Amber” is among the sweet mosaics offered by Wishflower Studio.

Q: Where can I find tapas restaurants in the area? A: At 44 TAPAS BAR AND LOUNGE in Croton-on-Hudson (914271-2690, www.44tapas.com), wrought-iron chairs, a full tile bar, brick archways and votive candles create the feel of a swanky Manhattan nightspot. Favorite plates include Mac & Cheese 44 (lobster, manchego, asiago and truffle) and Gambas “Pedro Ximenez” (shrimp with sweet sherry), reports owner Kyle Gallagher—and don’t forget to try the restaurant’s signature infused poached pear martini. Wine connoisseurs will love ESPAÑA WINE AND TAPAS BAR in Larchmont (914-833-1331, www.espanatapas.com), where you can complement your small plates with a choice of 150 bottles from Spain. Diners can enjoy their tapas— such as pisto manchego (Spanish ratatouille) and canalons de carn (hand-rolled pasta sheets filled with chicken, pork and veal baked in béchamel)—at tables throughout the space or at the restaurant’s grand oversized marble bar. For delightful Spanish/Portuguese-inspired bites, head to PENICHE in White Plains (914-421-5012, www.penichetapas.com), where Chef Anthony Goncalves puts a fresh spin on traditional favorites. Meat lovers can feast on such hearty dishes as paella (whole-grain farro, saffron, chourico, scallops, shrimp, lobster, clams and mussels), while the veggie-inclined will love the pimientos asados (roasted bell peppers, capers, Spanish olives, marjoram and sherry vinaigrette). For something sweet, check out the dessert menu’s tantalizing churros, mousse, sorbets and gelato. WESTCHESTER

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Westchester WHISPERS ‘What I’m listening to ...’

KIDDIE couture Why is Larchmont children’s boutique LORILYN AND COMPANY (914-833-9273, www.lorilynandcompany.com) so popular with its tiny patrons? “We sell items we think the kids will like—not just what we like,” asserts manager Stephanie Kole. For the ’tween and pre-’tween set, that means forgoing babyish attire in favor of funky tiedyed bags; clothing by such hip brands as Roxy, Junk Food and Paul Frank; and Gwen Stefani’s Harajuku perfume. For tots, owner Lorilyn Ross’ own line, the Lorilyn Collection, is a favorite among customers, especially its patchwork cotton blankets ($42) and baby girl dresses ($38 to $48). The boutique also carries brands such as Ella Moss and Splendid. While Kole says “big kids love to come in by themselves and shop with their own money,” wee ones will find special accommodations— bowls of candy, freshly baked cookies, coloring tables and toy cars—to entertain them while Mom and Dad shop. “We try to make our customers feel at home,” says Kole.

“It’s hard for me to make a short playlist—I could go on forever!” says Anthony Pellegrino, programs associate for cultural services at the Westchester Arts Council in White Plains and bass player for local rock band Urban Fetch. “As a musician, I listen to songs from many different time periods and genres.” But we put Pellegrino to the test, asking him for the top tunes in his current lis-tening rotation: 1. “CHINA CAT SUNFLOWER,” Grateful Dead, from

Aoxomoxoa 2. “I GOT A WOMAN,” Ray Charles, from Ray Charles

’ BATTERÍ,” Sigur Rós, from Ágætis Byrjun 3. “NY 4. “OVER THE POND,” The Album Leaf, from

In a Safe Place 5. “RAINY DAY WOMEN #12 & 35,” Bob Dylan, from

Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits 6. “ME AND MY BASS GUITAR,” Victor Wooten, from

Live in America 7. “I REMEMBER,” Damien Rice, from O 8. “ONE REASON,” Tea Leaf Green, from Rock ‘n’

Roll Band 9. “#41,” Dave Matthews Band, from Crash 10. “THE GIRL FROM IPANEMA,” Astrud Gilberto,

João Gilberto and Stan Getz, from Getz/Gilberto

WINNERS’ CIRCLE CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE WINNERS OF OUR GIFT GUIDE GIVEAWAY!

They are as follows:

//

H FOELBI R DU AA Y R2Y0 02 80 0 9

• Michele Steichen of Mamaroneck

• Diane M. Pucila of Mount Kisco

• Jo Ann Fannon of Croton-on-Hudson

• Alice Silano of Scarsdale

• Joe Scavera of Rye

• Eileen Ruggiero of Yonkers

• Veronique Van Pottelbergh of Larchmont

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1 16 6

• The Semerad family of Irvington


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FLASH IT WAS A FESTIVAL OF FURRY FRIENDS AT THE MARRIOT in Tarrytown as the SPCA of Westchester held its annual Top Hat and Tails gala. The evening featured dinner and a variety of animalthemed activities. Demirjian Salon in Mamaroneck, meanwhile, hosted “Hilda Helps Gilda,” a day of beauty for 35 Gilda’s Club members living with cancer. The stars were out in Pleasantville as the Jacob Burns Film Center held a tribute to Paul Newman. And at Cedarwood Hall on the campus of Westchester Medical Center, the Westchester Institute for Human Development (WIHD) hosted a gala fundraiser. Proceeds will help the group to improve the lives of people with disabilities.

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TOP HAT AND TAILS GALA 1. Chris Spence and Lisa Bonanno 2. Kay Petroff and Patti Vandia

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HILDA HELPS GILDA 4. Harry Morn and Hilda Demirjian 5

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FEBRUARY 2009

Think you belong in Flash? Send photos from your gala or charity event to Westchester Health & Life, att: Flash editor, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; or e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Include your contact information, a short event description and names of all who appear. (Submissions are not guaranteed to appear and must meet the following image specs: 4x6 color prints or 300 dpi jpg, tif or eps files. Prints must be accompanied by an SASE in order to be returned.)

PAUL NEWMAN TRIBUTE AT JACOB BURNS FILM CENTER 5. Alec Baldwin

WIHD GALA 6. Ansley Bacon, Patricia Higgins O’Callaghan and Harold O’Callaghan 7. Steven Swirsky

KATHY KING; COURTESY OF GILDA’S CLUB; LYNDA SHENKMAN CURTIS; COURTESY OF WIHD

3. Mason, Denise and Charlotte Santomero


Lace up and line up! Sunday, April 19, 2009 for the Annual “Go The Distance� Walk and Family Fun Day to raise funds for Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center.

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W H AT ’ S N E W I N M E D I C I N E A N D H O W Y O U C A N S TAY W E L L

Life goes on— with a temporary heart A PUMP INSERTED IN NEW JERSEY MAN’S ABDOMEN KEEPS HIM ALIVE WHILE HE AWAITS A TRANSPLANT

waiting for a heart transplant operation. But Newton is not in the hospital. He’s awaiting device, or LVAD, implanted in his new heart at home, walking up to 4 miles a day, the body of John Newton working via e-mail and living a fairly normal life. He is gives the New Jerseyan a tethered to a tube, though. It comes right out of a measure of independence machine in his chest and attaches to a battery pack he until he gets a new heart. wears around the clock. The battery powers a bloodpumping machine called a left ventricular assist device, or LVAD. Implanted by heart surgeons at Westchester Medical Center, it’s designed as a so-called “bridge to transplant”—a machine that keeps people alive until a matching heart becomes available. The LVAD can maintain adequate circulation for at least two years, and sometimes as long as five years. In some cases, it has even been found to give the left ventricle—the heart’s main pumping chamber—enough of a rest to heal and return to adequate function. Regrettably, that won’t be possible for Newton. He had always been a prime candidate for a myocardial infarction, or heart attack. His In father died of one when Newton was just one study, 7, and he himself had high blood presLVADs cut in sure, high cholesterol, smoked, drank half heart-failure too much and held a high-stress job. patients’ risk of “My doctor made a list of the five or six death in 6 months. top risk factors, and I was high in every —American Heart Association one,” he says. Newton suffered his first heart attack in 1988. “It was the day before Christmas,” he JOHN NEWTON NEEDS A NEW HEART. THE remembers. “I had chest pain I thought was indigestion, 53-year-old Wantage, N.J., executive has been experiencso I took Rolaids. Three months later, driving on I-287, ing heart attacks since he was in his early 40s. His heart I was sweating and hot, had trouble breathing and knew is so badly damaged that he can’t live long enough withit was a heart attack. I pulled over and called 911.” out artificial help to wait for a suitable donor heart— He had the first of what are now five stents put in which could take months or even years. For many to open his blocked arteries. He was treated with medpatients in a similar situation, that would mean being ications. He lost weight and cut back on his bad habits. confined to a hospital bed and tethered to tubes while A left ventricular assist

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“His left ventricle couldn’t squeeze to pump blood to the body,” explains Dr. Rosenblum.

PHOTOTAKE

Warren D. Rosenblum, M.D.

But his heart continued to deteriorate. “After three or four years, my doctor said it was getting to be more than he could handle,” he says. Newton was referred to Warren D. Rosenblum, M.D., Director of Heart Failure and Pulmonary Hypertension at Westchester Medical Center and an expert in heart-failure treatment. “That was five years ago,” Newton says. “He’s kept me alive ever since.” “The heart attacks had severely damaged his left ventricle so it couldn’t squeeze to pump blood to the body,” says Dr. Rosenblum. About a year ago, Newton noticed that his breathing had become more labored and his energy level had dropped. “It got to the point where if I walked to my mailbox, about 350 feet, I couldn’t breathe,” he says. In May 2008, he had another heart attack and was rushed to the hospital. At that point, he was listed as a candidate for transplant. But in July, in the middle of a conference with his doctors, he had yet another heart attack. Newton needed a new heart fast. But several factors were working against him. He is blood type O. That means he can only accept another type-O heart, limiting his choices. He is also a large man—6’1” and more than 200 pounds—so he would need a heart from a similarsized individual. “We knew he might have to wait a year or two for a heart,” Dr. Rosenblum says. “The LVAD is a last resort, when we can’t support the patient’s quality of life with medication. We have been using it for a decade or so and it is a reliable long-term bridge to transplant.” The LVAD is essentially a pump about the size of a fist, which is placed in a specially created opening in the abdomen, under the diaphragm. Small tubes connected to the pump take blood out of the damaged left ventricle and bring it directly to the aorta, the main artery sending blood to the rest of the body. A fingerwidth cable runs out of Newton’s abdomen to the battery that sits in a vest he wears at all times.

The LVAD is a fist-sized pump inserted into the abdomen that helps direct blood to the aorta, which sends it to the rest of the body.

Transplant coordinator Kathy Brown works with patients such as Newton and their communities to make sure everyone is up to speed on caring for an LVAD recipient. “I do a lot of education sessions with his local hospital’s nursing staff, his local EMS responders and of course his family,” she says. She also contacts the local power company. In case he should lose power, which he needs to recharge his batteries, she has the power company make him and other LVAD patients a high priority for repair. Newton comes in for a checkup every two weeks, she says, to evaluate the machine and tend to the line coming out of his body, which is prone to infection. “He’s doing terrifically on the LVAD,” Brown says. Even so, it’s not a particularly pleasant experience having a 6-pound motor in your body. It’s noisy. It vibrates. It makes bending and sleeping difficult. He has to remember to change the batteries every five hours. And the device has to be kept perfectly dry. “It would be nice to take a real shower,” Newton says. “There are good and bad days, but it’s better being at home than in the hospital. It’s keeping me alive.” And it will continue to do so until Newton gets his new heart. As of January 14, 2009, he says, “I’ve been on the transplant list 208 days. But who’s counting, right?” ■ To learn more about heart-disease treatment and heart transplants at Westchester Medical Center, call 1-877WMC-DOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com.

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A sister’s precious gift BY DONATING BONE MARROW, A LITTLE GIRL IS HELPING TO SAVE HER BROTHER’S LIFE

SEVEN-YEAR-OLD CAITLIN HAUSER OF Harriman has been like a “little mother” to her 5year-old brother, Eric Thomas, says their mom, Christina. But this winter she took on a new role: lifesaver. In 2009’s early weeks, the second grader prepared to donate some of her bone marrow to her brother to cure him of two rare, life-threatening inherited blood disorders. Then, on January 14, the transplant was successfully performed at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. The plan was that blood-cell–producing stem cells from Caitlin’s bone marrow would help her brother grow a new immune system to replace his defective one, which was destroying his own blood cells as it failed to wipe out dangerous infections. The transplant was made possible by a stroke of good fortune: Caitlin’s tissue turned out to be a perfect match for her brother’s. (See “Finding a Bone-Marrow Match” on the next page.) “Caitlin says Eric’s fighting a battle and she’s a soldier in his army,” says Christina Hauser. Eric has hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), which affects 1 in 1 million children under age 15. His difficulties first appeared last spring, when he and Caitlin were diagnosed with viral infectious mononucleosis. Caitlin rebounded quickly, but Eric had

3

KINDS OF BONE-MARROW TRANSPLANTS

AUTOLOGOUS: cells are collected from the patient’s own bone marrow prior to high-dose therapy and stored until the procedure SYNGENEIC: cells come from the marrow of an identical twin ALLOGENEIC: cells are collected from another donor

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swollen glands and high fevers for several weeks. “The symptoms stopped by early July, but Eric wasn’t himself,” recalls the boy’s father, also named Eric Hauser. “He had no energy, not even for his Thomas the Tank Engine trains, which he loves.” By August the fevers were back, and on the 14th Eric was taken to the emergency room at the Children’s Hospital, where doctors diagnosed him with hepatitis. The next day Eric vomited blood. He had an enlarged liver and spleen. His blood counts were so low from internal bleeding that he required several blood transfusions. And his blood underwent sophisticated testing at the Children’s Hospital as well as at an outside national reference laboratory. “Eric’s blood tested positive for HLH, which had caused the fevers and hepatitis,” says Somasundaram Jayabose, M.D., his pediatric hematologist, who is Chief of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the Children’s Hospital and a professor of pediatrics at New York Medical College. “If untreated, HLH can be fatal in two months. We began chemotherapy immediately.” Patients with HLH have a genetic defect of the immune system. The system normally activates to fight an infection, then calms down once its disease-fighting white blood cells have won that battle. But the immune systems of patients with HLH don’t “turn off ”; their histiocytes—a white blood-cell type—“eat” red blood cells, platelets and other white blood cells, eventually dooming the blood-cell–producing system in the bone marrow.


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Further tests ordered by Dr. Jayabose revealed that young Eric had developed HLH because of an underlying immune deficiency disorder called XLP2 (X-linked lymphoproliferative disorder-2). Children with XLP can’t control the Epstein-Barr virus infection that leads to very severe infectious mononucleosis— though they’re normal until they get Epstein-Barr. “It was simply a matter of time before Eric would be infected with mono, because everyone is exposed to it at some point, usually with minor annoyance,” says Dr. Jayabose. From August through November, Eric received chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The chemotherapy eradicated dysfunctional blood cells, while the immunotherapy boosted his white blood cells’ ability to fight infections. With treatment Eric achieved complete remission. To keep him healthy until the transplant, Eric was given a special maintenance regimen. However, the only cure for both HLH and XLP2 is a bone-marrow transplant. The procedure will give Eric a new, normal immune system, according to M. Fevzi Ozkaynak, M.D., Director of the Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation Program at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center and a professor of pediatrics at New York Medical College. A week prior to the transplant, Eric underwent rigorous chemotherapy that destroyed his dysfunctional immune system and hence rendered him defenseless against infection. The day of the transplant, Dr. Ozkaynak and colleague Claudio Sandoval, M.D., “harvested” Caitlin’s bone marrow from a marrow-rich area called the iliac crest at the top of her pelvic bone. The marrow Somasundaram was purified and introduced Jayabose, M.D. into Eric’s bloodstream via a transfusion the same day. Bloodcell–producing stem cells from Caitlin’s bone marrow traveled to Eric’s bone marrow, where they will settle in and manufacture new blood cells and an entire disease-free immune system for him within a year. During this period, Eric M. Fevzi Ozkaynak, M.D.

Finding a bone-marrow match When bone marrow is transplanted from one person to another, there is a risk of a complication called graft-versushost disease—when disease-fighting T cells infused along with the stem cells (the graft) attack the patient’s (the host’s) “foreign” tissue. But 5-year-old Eric Thomas Hauser of Harriman avoided this problem when he received bone marrow from his sister, Caitlin, in January. That’s because he and Caitlin matched up perfectly by all 10 criteria used in a process known as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing, which helps pathologists find a match. HLAs are proteins found on most cells in the body. The immune system uses these protein markers to recognize which cells belong in the body and which don’t. Because HLA types are inherited, the best chance of finding a suitable donor is a close blood relative. Identical twins are the most promising candidates, and fraternal twins or siblings have a 25-percent chance of matching.

will be extremely susceptible to infection. He’ll spend at least the first post-transplant month in a specially developed isolation room at the Children’s Hospital. He will take immunosuppressant medications to reduce his risk of developing graft-versus-host disease, a life-threatening complication. “Because Caitlin’s bone marrow was a perfect match for Eric and she did not carry the genetic mutation for XLP2, we were able to complete the transplant with no immediate complications,” says Dr. Ozkaynak. As the Hausers prepared to have two children undergo surgery, they were buoyed by the pediatrics “family” at the Children’s Hospital, they say. And the elder Eric Hauser has told the family’s story to the public on two local Children’s Miracle Network Radiothons, for WCBS-AM and WHUD-FM, to help raise money for the Children’s Hospital. “Hospital staffers, including Eric’s physicians and the child life specialists who work with kids, have been wonderful in caring for him—and in helping Caitlin understand how she will be participating in the transplant,” he says. “We want to do what we can to make sure the excellent care Eric has received is there for other children too.” ■ For more information on bone-marrow transplants at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center, please call 1-866-WMC-PEDS or log on to www.worldclassmedicine.com/MFCH.

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Partners in shedding pounds

250 lbs.

TWO FRIENDS GO THROUGH WEIGHT-LOSS SURGERY TOGETHER

MANY THINGS ARE EASIER WHEN YOU DO them with a pal, and it turns out that losing massive amounts of weight is one of them. When they met five years ago as fellow employees in a pediatric group office, Joseph DeSario of Wappingers Falls, now 26, and Stephan Hunt of Hyde Park, 24, found they both loved video games and the New York Yankees. “We realized we had similar interests, so we started hanging out,” says DeSario. The friends also shared two other traits: Both were severely overweight, and both 396 lbs. were up for a challenge. When they found out how modern weight-loss (bariatric) surgery could give obese people a second chance at good health, they Joseph DeSario (taller) and went for it—together. They Stephan Hunt still see a lot even had their operations at of each other. But there’s Westchester Medical Center on less of each of them to see. the same day: June 26, 2007. And by the end of 2008, they had lost a combined total of nearly 375 pounds. DeSario and Hunt both have family histories of obesity and had been heavy all their lives. Each had tried to reduce his weight many times with diet, exercise and medications, but had failed. DeSario had severe acid reflux and was borderline diabetic. He also had high blood pressure, and his joints ached from carrying all that weight. Hunt had no diagnosed illnesses, but he knew he was headed toward diabetes, which both his 24

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202 lbs.

430 lbs.


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parents have. At their heaviest, in have followed every instruction to a T.” early 2007, DeSario weighed 430 Recovery included slowly reintroducing foods to pounds and Hunt 396. And both the reconfigured digestive system. Each found that his say their self-esteem suffered too. tolerance for certain foods had changed. For example, Then, in January 2007, DeSario had early trouble consuming milk products. DeSario heard a radio commercial “Stephan said that after a couple of times I’d feel better, about Westchester’s free seminars and he was right,” DeSario recalls. for bariatric surgery. He and They talked often, discussing their trials and Anthony Maffei, M.D. Hunt decided to attend the meeterrors. They hit the gym together and kept one another ing together. “They talked about motivated. They supplied self-esteem boosts when trouthe pros and cons of surgery and how our health could bles arose. “He had my back, and I had his,” DeSario says. improve if we had it,” DeSario says. Those improvements It’s not unusual for spouses or parents and chilcan be dramatic. According to Anthony Maffei, M.D., dren to have weight-loss surgery together, says Dr. Maffei. bariatric surgeon and Director of the Surgical Skills But Hunt and DeSario are the first friends he has ever Laboratory at Westchester Medical Center, the average treated together, he says. morbidly obese 20-year-old male can expect to lose 13 “People who come in in pairs tend to do better,” years off a typical lifespan. But with the substantial weight he says. “When they go through it together, they have a loss bariatric surgery makes possible, many of the condispecial kind of social support. They can share what’s tions that cause premature death, such as diabetes and carworking and what isn’t, and help one another through diovascular disease, can be cured or put into remission. the challenging times. That leads to better results.” “We decided pretty quickly to have the surgery, And the results have been good. As of midand to have it at the same time,” says Hunt. “We figured December, DeSario was down to 250 pounds and Hunt we’d be our own support group.” was at 202. Also, says Dr. Maffei, DeSario’s high blood After a rigorous screening process that included pressure, acid reflux and borderline diabetes were gone. full physical and psychological exams, the two were Today, these fast friends still see a lot of each accepted for the surgery. (To qualify, patients need a other—though there’s a lot less of each to see. DeSario body-mass index—a measure of weight in relation to still works for the pediatric group as a medical height—over 40. “They were both in the high records and marketing specialist, while Hunt is There 50s,” says Dr. Maffei.) now a security officer. Each man reports are 9 million Both men had a procedure called improved energy and self-esteem. “severely obese” Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Done laparo“I hated being limited to shopping people in the U.S., scopically, the surgery involves creating at the ‘big and tall’ shops,” DeSario says. reports the an egg-sized pouch where the esophagus “Now I can go to the same stores as my American Obesity meets the stomach. This pouch acts as a friends.” He looks forward to taking his Association. new stomach. Its small size forces patients love of sports back onto the playing field to eat less—there simply isn’t room for more this spring, joining a baseball or softball team food. The surgeon then connects the pouch for the first time since he was 12. directly to the small intestine, bypassing much of the Hunt’s health has improved so much he was able digestive tract. “There are 15 feet of intestine altogether,” to become a volunteer EMT and firefighter. This winter Dr. Maffei says. “We bypass the first 5, leaving the he joined the Roosevelt Fire Department in Hyde Park. remaining 10 to absorb the nutrients, but that also limits “I come from a family of firefighters, and I could never the number of calories absorbed.” have done it before the surgery,” he says. “Now I have so The friends spent two nights in the hospital. much energy I just decided to go for it.” ■ Once released, they began the difficult process of changTo learn more about bariatric surgery at Westchester ing many habits and lifestyle choices. And that’s where Medical Center, visit www.worldclassmedicine.com or their partnership really helped. “They came in together call 1-877-WMC-DOCS. for all five of their post-op visits,” says Dr. Maffei. “They WESTCHESTER

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Warm welcome for newborns A NEW LABOR-AND-DELIVERY SUITE MAKES CHILDBIRTH MORE FAMILY-FRIENDLY

HAVING A BABY IS ONE OF A FAMILY’S MOST precious moments—even when there are special medical challenges. And soon a Westchester Medical Center childbirth facility will combine the most advanced clinical resources with an atmosphere of warmth and comfort that honors that joyful family experience. “We like to say we’re going to have high tech and high touch,” says Howard A. Blanchette, M.D., Director of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Westchester Medical Center has long been the top referral center for highrisk births in the lower Hudson Valley. In April, when its renovated Labor and Delivery Center is expected to open, it will be known as a family-friendly place as well. “We’ll still maintain the high-tech expertise to take care of the sickest mothHoward A. ers in the counties we serve,” says the docBlanchette, M.D. tor. “But now our suite will also meet the emotional and family needs of women giving birth.” Before the renovation, there were six rooms for mothers to labor in, but only two delivery rooms. “The suite was set up 1960s-style—the women labored in one room, then delivered in another,” says Dr. Blanchette. The redesigned unit has six labor-and-delivery rooms large enough to welcome the father, partner or other friends or relatives. The rooms feature softer color schemes, indirect lighting and comfortable furniture. “They have the feel of a nice hotel,” Dr. Blanchette says. There will also be two operat-

This artist’s rendering shows how a patient room will look in Westchester Medical Center’s new Labor and Delivery Center.

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SHUTTERSTOCK

ing rooms in which doctors can perform Cesarean sections or handle unexpected complications. And Dr. Blanchette has expanded the hospital-based practice, Advanced OB/GYN Associates, to 10 physicians, including specialists in several newly emerging fields. One of these fields is oncofertility, which helps young women undergoing chemotherapy maintain their fertility. Kutluk Oktay, M.D., an expert in ovarian transplants, recently removed one ovary from a 15-year-old girl now in chemotherapy and froze it. If the chemo makes her remaining ovary sterile, Dr. Oktay can re-implant the healthy one so she’ll still be able to have children someday. Another emerging field is urogynecology, or women’s urology. Huan-Sue Zhou, M.D., treats such conditions as uterine prolapse (fallen uterus) and urine leakage. She and the other surgeons in the practice offer minimally invasive procedures for hysterectomies and other surgeries. And surgeons will soon be using robotic technology to perform minimally invasive procedures to treat even more conditions, such as endometrial cancer. “We can cover every specialty in ob/gyn care,” Dr. Blanchette says. “You don’t need to go into the city, as all the expertise you could ever need is right here. Our motto is, ‘You don’t have to commute to deliver.’” ■


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Caring for the sickest kids THREE PEDIATRIC INTENSIVISTS THRIVE ON MAKING A BIG DIFFERENCE IN YOUNG LIVES

COURTESY OF WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

ALAN PINTO, M.D. MOVE OVER, BULL’S EYE barbecue sauce. “Big Al’s Q Sauce” is about to hit supermarket shelves, codeveloped by Alan Pinto, M.D., Associate Director of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Westchester Medical Center’s Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital and associate professor of pediatrics at New York Medical College, with the owner of Peter Pratt’s Inn in Yorktown Heights, where Dr. Pinto lives. The sauce isn’t the doctor’s first commercial culinary endeavor. He paid his college tuition at LaSalle University in Philadelphia by working as a restaurant cook. Slow-cooking meat in his Weber Smokey Mountain Bullet smoker is one way Dr. Pinto, 47, relaxes after a tense shift in the unit, where he and his colleagues care for seriously ill children and adolescents. Dr. Pinto has a master’s degree in genetics from George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and an M.D. from Philadelphia’s Hahnemann University Medical School, where he also did a pediatrics residency. Then came a fellowship in pediatric critical care at Jackson Memorial Hospital/ University of Miami. The Pintos— Alan; wife Ellen; daughter Francesca, 12; and son Christopher, 8—host legendary barbecues.

MATTHEW KAPKLEIN, M.D. MATTHEW KAPKLEIN, M.D., 41, made a name for himself—literally. On marrying, the young Matthew Kleinerman crafted a new combination surname with his wife, the former Colleen Kaplin. An attending physician in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and Emergency Room at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, he holds an M.D. from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons and a master’s degree from Columbia’s School of Public Health. He also did a pediatrics residency at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. “It is extremely rewarding to know that a child I have treated and returned to health may have another 80 years of life,” says this dedicated pediatric intensivist. He and Colleen live in Ardsley with their two children, daughter Casey, 12; and son Jamie, 6. They are members of the Ethical Culture Society, a nontheist humanist religion that teaches people to bring out the best in others. That’s a skill the doctor uses daily in teaching residents at the Children’s Hospital to be advocates for young patients and teaching biomedical ethics at New York Medical College, where he’s an assistant professor of pediatrics.

AALOK R. SINGH, M.D. IN COLLEGE AT THE UNIversity of Bombay (now Mumbai), Aalok R. Singh, M.D., did volunteer work in a nearby slum and learned firsthand how poverty can limit access to healthcare. “Children and women of childbearing age suffered most,” he recalls. “I became a physician to help vulnerable children.” He earned his M.D. at Bombay and did a residency in pediatrics at that city’s B.J. Wadia Hospital for Children. Then he came to the U.S. for a residency in pediatrics and a pediatric critical care fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco Cardiovascular Research Institute and Oakland Children’s Hospital, training in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, a treatment that does the work of the heart and lungs. He’s now an attending physician in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital and an assistant professor of pediatrics at New York Medical College. “Returning a child to his or her parents after hospitalization here is a rush I can’t put into words,” says Dr. Singh, 40. He and his wife, Shabnam Fidvi, M.D., a radiologist at New York City’s Montefiore Medical Center, live in Briarcliff Manor and enjoy movies at Pleasantville’s Burns Film Center. ■ WESTCHESTER

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photography by Daniel Springston styling by Nastassia Fernandez

FLYING COLORS WANT YOUR SPRING STYLE TO SOAR? ITEMS IN THESE UPLIFTING HUES WILL HELP YOUR ENSEMBLES TAKE FLIGHT

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TRUE blue THE SKY’S THE LIMIT WITH THESE SAPPHIRE SELECTIONS LEFT TO RIGHT, square-buckle crocodile belt by Leatherock; Tory Burch cashmere Inez cardigan in tile blue; Tory Burch printed cotton button-down; Catherine Malandrino ruffled silk blouse with pleated bodice; butterfly pendant courtesy of Hartly Fashions; Moschino Cheap and Chic tricolor open-toe sandal; Fatto a Mano by Carlos Falchi metallic clutch.

For stores that carry the product lines shown, see our shopping guide on page 47.


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STYLE GUIDE

Sunny SIDE UP STAY FRESH AS A DAISY WITH A BEVY OF BRIGHT BEAUTIES

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LEFT TO RIGHT, Abas crocodile Ella handle handbag; Tory Burch V-neck printed silk dress; Christopher Fischer puff-sleeve cashmere cardigan; Longchamp printed scarf; Christopher Fischer gauzy striped scarf; Longchamp Le Pliage expandable tote with leather trim.


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SAGE beauty THE GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER WITH A SPRINGY HUE IN YOUR STEP

LEFT TO RIGHT, linen zip-up rain jacket by Hartly Fashions; lightweight scarf from Christopher Fischer; Diane von Furstenberg tropical leaf–pattern tunic; Gustto’s Baca double-handle zip-top leather handbag; long-sleeve scoop-neck shirt by Longchamp; Cole Haan patent leather wedges.


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STYLE GUIDE

Bed of roses EVERYTHING’S COMING UP BOLD AND AND BEAUTIFUL WITH THIS VIVID BOUQUET


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LEFT TO RIGHT, Christopher Fischer cashmere hooded sweater; Gustto‘s Palba double-handle leather satchel with shoulder strap and bow detailing; Cole Haan T-strap sandal; Longchamp printed scarf; Catherine Malandrino silk blouse with cut-out detailing; patent leather belt by Longchamp.


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STYLE GUIDE

Fit to be tied TAKE YOUR FAVORITE SUIT OR SPORTCOAT TO THE NEXT LEVEL WITH A PATTERNED TIE IN A GREAT COLOR

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For stores that carry the product lines shown, see our shopping guide on page 47.


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Flaunt the season’s flaura and fauna with this patterned tie by CHARVET.

Orange flowers dot a rich brown background on KITON’s classic block print.

The abstract pattern in this pink woven tie by KITON has an almost hypnotic effect.

Woven medallions by CHARVET are reminiscent of hex signs on a Pennsylvania Dutch barn.

Groovy gradations of color lend a retro Rich hues give depth

feel to this striped

to this woven geometric

number by GUCCI.

pattern from CHARVET.


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ESCAPES

3 ROMANTIC RETREATS

SAY ‘I LOVE YOU’ WITH ONE OF THESE LUXURIOUS COUPLES’ GETAWAYS

Looking to rekindle your love this Valentine’s Day? Whether you’re an adventurous

twosome

or

prefer

lounging on the beach or relaxing by the fire, these 3 spectacular getaways are sure to get the sparks flying.

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BEACHSIDE HEAVEN: SEVEN STARS RESORT IN THE TURKS AND CAICOS

IF YOU AND YOUR SWEETIE SEEK A TROPICAL paradise with powder-white sands, clear-blue water and luxurious accommodations, Seven Stars Resort (1-866570-7777, www.sevenstarsresort.com) in the West Indies islands of Turks and Caicos will undoubtedly satisfy. Located on picturesque Grace Bay Beach on the northern coast of the island of Providenciales, the 22-acre resort—which takes its name from the seven stars of the Pleiades constellation that in Greek mythology represent the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione—features 81 stylish studios and suites offering stunning views of the bay or the resort’s lush gardens. Couples will relish breathing in the bay breeze from each room’s balcony or wraparound terrace, cuddling up in king-size beds set amid teak, mahogany and natural hardwood furnishings, and bathing in in-room Jacuzzis or soaker tubs. Our fourth-floor studio featured a flat-screen TV, galley


COURTESY OF SEVEN STARS RESORT

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kitchen with refrigerator stocked with bottles of Fiji water, Krups coffeemaker and espresso machine. Of course, the sumptuous rooms are just one bright part of the Seven Stars experience. Lovers can soak in the magnificent heated saltwater pool featuring a grand waterfall, or lounge poolside while enjoying succulent fruit kebobs and cocktails delivered by waiters. If you prefer a more natural aquatic experience, take a short walk to the pristine bay, where a barrier reef provides gentle surf. Relax under a tiki-roofed pavilion where the resort’s staff will bring chilled washcloths and fruit sorbet and spritz you with Evian when the sun gets too hot. More active couples can arrange scuba diving, snorkeling, deep-sea fishing, boat rides to secluded beaches, horseback riding and other activities through the resort’s “Miss Seven” concierge service. A fleet of Segways makes for extra-prompt service. In need of some pampering after all that exertion? Visit Seven Stars’ full-service spa, where you can enjoy a host of luxurious treatments side-by-side. Be sure to book the 30-minute hand and foot massage offered pool-

side. Yna, the therapist from the Philippines who did ours, was outstanding. For the ultimate romantic jaunt, consider booking the resort’s special packages for lovers, such as the Romantic Revival Package. Starting at $4,995 for four nights, they feature accommodations in a one-bedroom beachfront studio or one-bedroom beachfront suite and grand salon. Also included are a bottle of sparkling champagne and a plate of fruit awaiting your arrival in your suite, a one-hour couple’s massage, a bottle of wine and a romantic dinner for two served beachside. Indeed, you might both find yourselves so enamored that you dream of tying the knot under bright palm trees—and the resort can happily arrange an oceanfront ceremony. The only requirement? You and your honey must be present in the Turks and Caicos for at least 24 hours before applying for a marriage license.

continued

A TABLE TO TRY La Pergola (1-866-570-7777) Enjoy fine dining, drinks and cocktails without leaving the resort at this premier Seven Stars restaurant featuring international dishes as well as local Caribbean-inspired cuisine. Scrumptious menu options vary seasonally and include daily specials.


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ESCAPES

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COUNTRY GETAWAY: TWIN FARMS IN BARNARD, VERMONT

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A TABLE TO TRY The Prince and the Pauper Restaurant (802-457-1818, www.princeand pauper.com) Located just 10 miles from Twin Farms in the quaint village of Woodstock, Vermont, this rustic yet refined eatery offers a host of tasty eclectic dishes, such as grilled filet mignon and Hawaiian ahi tuna.

COURTESY OF TWIN FARMS

IF YOUR IDEA OF ROMANCE INVOLVES COZYing up by the fire in a quaint countryside sanctuary, discover Twin Farms in Barnard, Vermont (802-234-9999, www.twinfarms.com)—about a four-and-a-half-hour drive from Westchester County. Once the home of the Nobel-prize winning novelist Sinclair Lewis and his wife, journalist Dorothy Thompson, the sprawling 300acre estate features scenic wildflower meadows, enchanting forests, bountiful gardens and beautiful ponds. Guests stay on an all-inclusive basis, which encompasses daily breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea, dinner, beverages, wine, unlimited on-site activities and the use of recreational equipment. Couples can choose from 10 distinct private cottages (starting at $2,000 per night) and 10 guest suites (starting at $1,300 per night), each with a unique interior-design style. The Hillside suite, for instance, offers the ultimate in relaxation with a stone hearth fireplace, Jacuzzi tub and steam shower, while Meadow Cottage is an exotic, Moroccaninspired sanctuary featuring terra cotta floors, an inglenook fireplace of intricate mosaic tile work and moucharaby screens.

If you’re in search of storybook winter fun, you need only head outside to enjoy the picturesque snowcovered hills, fields and forests laced with cross-country trails, downhill ski slopes and a large 7-acre frozen lake for ice skating. Sleigh rides through the area can also be arranged with flasks of mulled wine to stay toasty. For indoor relaxation, couples can venture to the “Out of the Woods” spa for stimulating body treatments, facials and massages, or soak together in a 104-degree Japanese furo, a giant sunken stone tub. Don’t want to walk to the spa after a long day on the trails? Simply book an in-room couple’s massage. But don’t miss dinner, served to all guests at 8 o’clock in the Main House. No menu is given; instead, the hotel’s elite culinary team creates succulent selections based on guest preference forms. One recent main course was spiced citrus duck with nut-brown cabbage and wild hand-picked strawberries with minted vanilla crème fraîche. What could be sweeter?


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ROMANCE ON HIGH:

COURTESY OF HOTEL CAESAR AUGUSTUS

HOTEL CAESAR AUGUSTUS IN ANACAPRI, ITALY

ADVENTUROUS COUPLES WITH A PENCHANT for ancient history will fall in love with Hotel Caesar Augustus (www.caesar-augustus.com) in Anacapri, a hilltop community located on the mountainous island of Capri in southern Italy. Situated on a scenic cliff 1,000 feet above the Bay of Naples, the ancient Roman-style hotel—once the secluded manor of an early 20th-century émigré Russian prince—provides captivating vistas, lavish accommodations and other top-notch amenities. To arrive at this towering treasure, travelers must first take a ferry or hydrofoil from Naples to Capri’s port of Marina, then take a taxi, bus or shuttle to the hotel. Lovers can choose to stay in one of 55 luxurious deluxe rooms and junior suites equipped with king-size beds, plasma TVs and private balconies facing the water or gardens. Or choose one of four premier “special suites,” each with its own design scheme featuring kingsize beds, Jacuzzis and a living room area with terraces. By day, take a romantic stroll through the hotel’s fragrant gardens and relax on sun loungers near the sea-blue infinity pool. When night falls, enjoy a candlelit dinner together at Lucullo Terrace (see right), the hotel’s new poolside restaurant featuring local cuisine.

But why simply view Capri as a backdrop? A host of must-see attractions are accessible to the hotel: A 20minute chairlift ride to Mount Solaro—the highest point of the island at 1,932 feet—will take your relationship to new heights, while a tour of the ruins of Villa Jovis at Mount Tiberio—once home to Roman Emperor Tiberius—will provide a glimpse into Capri’s history. Finally, no trip to Capri is complete without visiting the famous Blue Grotto, a natural sea cave on the island’s coast, accessible by motorboat. It becomes illuminated by a magnificent blue glow when sunlight passes through its narrow entrance. To experience all Capri and Caesar Augustus have to offer, try the “Scent of the Blue Island” package. Offered for a three-night minimum, it provides couples with flowers and limoncello upon arrival, private guided walking excursions to various sites, a dinner at Lucullo, a visit to the Blue Grotto, a massage for two and more. (Rates start at $3,197 per couple.) ■ A TABLE TO TRY Lucullo Terrace (011 39 081 837 3395) Take in breathtaking views of the Bay of Naples while dining on authentic local cuisine at this elegant restaurant in Hotel Caesar Augustus. Executive Chef Giusepe Resta uses fresh produce to create tantalizing dishes such as black tagliolini pasta with sea urchins and crab.


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Glorious FOOD

by Debbie Bolla

There will be

BLOOD NEWLY TRENDY BUT BOASTING A LONG HISTORY,

THE BLOOD ORANGE IS ONE OF WINTER’S FINEST FRUITS

42

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FEBRUARY 2009

Pan-seared ahi tuna with blood orange sauce SERVES 4

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 medium shallot, minced

4 8-ounce ahi tuna steaks

1 clove garlic, minced

⁄2 cup white wine

2 cups blood orange juice

1

• In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Sear tuna on one side for about five minutes. Flip and sear other side for 2 to 3 minutes, or until tuna is cooked. Remove from skillet and allow to rest. • Return skillet to medium-high heat and add white wine. Reduce heat to medium and add shallot and garlic. Cook and stir until shallot is clear, approximately 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in blood orange juice. Boil until the liquid has reduced to half or until it thickens. Remove from heat. • Slice

the

tuna

across the grain. Fan the slices out onto a plate and drizzle with blood orange sauce.

TOP: STOCKFOOD; FOODPIX; RECIPE SOURCE: WWW.ALLRECIPES.COM

THIRSTING FOR BLOOD THIS SEASON? YOU’RE in good company. The blood orange has become one of winter’s most sought-after treats, inspiring foodies and cocktail craftsmen alike to develop some truly distinctive delicacies. Though this fruit is unexciting on the outside (the peel ranges in hue from plain-Jane orange to an almost off-putting chocolate), what lies beneath is something of a buried treasure: a scarlet-colored flesh with a sweetly distinctive taste. The most popular varieties—Moro (a bit tart) and Tarocco (slightly sweeter)—both possess hints of raspberry and are less acidic than traditional oranges. First discovered in Sicily several centuries ago, blood oranges are grown stateside today as well, in both Texas and California, brightening our cool-weather palates from December into spring. Just 70 calories each, these ruby gems are a good source of vitamin C and boast 35 percent more potassium than their navel counterpart. As for the trademark tinge—it comes from the antioxidant anthocyanin, also found in berries. At the market, choose fruit that are firm to the touch and heavy for their size. Skin should be smooth, not spongy. Opt for the fridge over the fruit bowl for storage—a chilled environment extends the blood orange’s lifetime up to two weeks. Then use slices of the sangria-hued fruit to add tang to a salad, pump up a salsa or give any citrus-based cocktail a bloody good twist! ■


SPECIAL PROMOTION

WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

in the news

likely to deliver a stillborn baby or one with birth defects than a mother of recommended weight. To provide local leaders and women of childbearing age with a better understanding of the negative effects of obesity on preconception health and pregnancy, as well as the as the impact of bariatric surgery on fertility, pregnancy and lactation, neonatologists at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center joined national experts at this year’s Hudson Valley Regional Perinatal Forum Conference to discuss these important topics. More than 300 people attended the event, including representatives from the Health Departments of Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Orange, Ulster, Dutchess and Sullivan Counties.

Westchester Medical Center named 2008 Compass Award Winner The Press Ganey Compass Award is a coveted symbol of

Blood Donations Make a Difference

achievement in the health care satisfaction industry that is

If you’re a blood donor, you should know that your blood

bestowed annually, and Westchester Medical Center is just

will touch the life of someone in need. In most cases,

one of thirty-four facilities Nationwide to receive this honor.

this is an anonymous gift, but what if you could meet

Press Ganey currently partners with more than 7,000 health

the patient who receives your blood? Three donors were

care facilities—including over 40% of U.S. hospitals—to

recently rewarded with this life-changing experience -- they

measure and improve the quality of their care and their

met the little girl whose life they helped save. Four-year-

bottom line.

old Simone Schultz was a patient at Maria Fareri Children’s

“We are pleased to have been recognized with the

Hospital at Westchester Medical Center in 2006 with acute

2008 Press Ganey Compass Award,” said Michael Israel,

lymphocytic leukemia. She received outstanding care from

President and CEO of Westchester Medical Center. “We

her team at the hospital, and she received four units of red

have a lot of talented and dedicated physicians, nurses

cells and three platelet transfusions from seven anonymous

and staff in many programs who continue to exemplify our

donors. Each one helped her fight the cancer and regain her

commitment to excellence. Additionally, our extraordinary

strength. This October, just after Simone’s 6th birthday, the

ancillary staff who support

New York Blood Center hosted a special event to introduce

these programs, allow us

Simone and her family to three of the blood donors who

to successfully implement

helped save her life. It was an unforgettable experience for

quality measures, which

them all. Simone is a healthy, happy first grader who would

continually raises our

not have survived without the kindness of these blood-

standards of excellence.”

donating heroes.

Dr. Melvin F. Hall, president and CEO of Press

Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center hosts Childhood Obesity Conference

Ganey noted, “We are proud

Obesity has become a national epidemic and maternal

dedication to continuous

obesity can have a profound effect on the health of

improvement serves as a

newborns. Statistics show that an obese mother is more

model for all.”

WMCintheNews_0209final.indd 1

partners of Westchester Medical Center. Their

1/20/09 10:12:06 AM


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Westchester GOURMET by Kristin Colella

seated and given heaping bowls of chips and salsa as we perused the impressive menu. “Do you have any questions?” we were asked by owner Don Emilio Martinez—an inquiry he repeated to each table that night. Our attentive waiter had already taken our drink orders, so we assured Martinez that we were content. But “content” was soon upgraded to “excited” with the arrival of our quesados. Similar to a quesadilla, six flour tortilla wedges were packed with melted cheese, topped with fresh tomato sauce and sour cream and accompanied by a dollop of guacamole. All was delicioso—we only wished the cheese had been oozing hot instead of slightly cooled. Our next appetizer, the panuchos, was a multilayered delight. Two soft corn tortillas filled with refried beans stood as sturdy foundations for tiers of citrus-marinated chicken, tangy cotija cheese, shredded lettuce, hard-boiled egg slices, pickled red onions and avocado. The ensalada de jicama (with watercress, jicama, orange and melon) provided a nice palate refresher before our stunning entrées arrived. The enchiladas de cangrejo feaIF NOT FOR A SMALL SNAFU AT THE END OF tured two grand tortillas stuffed with tender Alaskan king the evening, we would have nothing but raves for Don crab meat and topped with a sweet and savory green Emilio’s at Lobo’s Café. After all, the vibrant Chappaqua sauce and melted cheese. Small sides of guacamole, salsa cocina—with its bright lighting, orange walls, charming and shredded lettuce were perfect complements. The Mexican oil paintings and hip bar area—provided a colchicken chimichangas were daintier yet equally delecorful feast of tantalizing south-of the-border fare that left table, consisting of two small fried-but-not-greasy tortillas us happily satisfied. brimming with zesty chicken, served D o n E m i l i o ’s a t But our warm glow dissipated with rice, guacamole and sour cream. L o b o ’s C a f é when our waiter presented the check Looking to satisfy our sweet 57-59 King Street, Chappaqua; and uttered two dreaded words: “Cash tooth, we chose something chocolaty 914-238-2368 only.” Huh? We’d seen no notices to and something vanilla. The Kahlua Hours that effect, and no explanation was mousse was rich with a powerful punch LUNCH: Monday through Friday, offered. We were lucky to scrape of its namesake liqueur tempered with 11 a.m.–4 p.m. together appropriate funds. Puzzled, delicious layers of hot fudge and DINNER: Monday through Thursday, we called a few days later and were whipped cream. The Mexican fried ice 4–10 p.m.; Friday, 4–11 p.m.; told the credit card machine had been cream was also a treat: two balls of Saturday, 3–11 p.m.; Sunday, 3–9 p.m. down that night. Understandable, but creamy vanilla covered in honey-coated BRUNCH: Saturday and Sunday, why not explain that to patrons, or at corn flakes, with strawberry syrup, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. least alert them earlier in the meal? strawberries and blueberries on the side. What you should know It was all the more perplexing Payment debacle aside, we thor• Entrées range from $10 to $24 considering the spot-on service we oughly enjoyed our time at this lively • Major credit cards accepted received until that point. On a bustling eatery and would happily return. But Saturday evening, we were promptly we’ll hit the ATM first—just in case. ■ • Outdoor seating in warm weather

A fine

FIESTA

/

FEBRUARY 2009

CHRISTOPHER BARTH

• Full bar

44


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Be THERE F E B R UA R Y February 10—Get inside the

head of National Poetry Slam champion and HBO Def Jam poet BLAIR as he lectures to the public, 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. in Room 200 of the Westchester Community College in Valhalla, as part of the college’s Poets & Writers series. FREE. Call 914606-6600 or visit www.suny wcc.edu for more information. February 14 and 15—Browse

vintage clothing, accessories, textiles and jewelry from approximately 35 dealers at the VALEN-

CASABLANCA

TINE’S VINTAGE FASHION SHOW

followed by a champagne reception, 5 p.m. at the Jacob Burns Film

AND SALE, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at

Center in Pleasantville. Tickets: $20 for members, $25 for nonmembers.

the DoubleTree Hotel in Tarrytown. Admission: $7; FREE for children under 13. Call 914-2734667 or visit www.cordshows.com for more information.

Call 914-747-5555 or visit www.burnsfilmcenter.org for more information.

February 21—Hear Native American stories about the winter stars, learn to identify constellations and view the heavens through a telescope at STARS AND STORIES OF THE NIGHT SKY, 7:30 p.m. at Marshlands Conservancy in Rye. FREE. Call 914-835-4466 for more information. February 21—Search the

sky for birds of prey at EAGLES ON AN ISLAND,

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FEBRUARY 2009

Through February 22—View

artwork by some of the most influential feminist artists of the past four decades during GREAT WOMEN ARTISTS: SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION, noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday

through Sunday at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for students and seniors. Call 914-2516100 or visit www.neuberger.org for more information. February 27—Listen to

tenors Cris Groenendaal, Kevin Gray and Craig Schulman—all former leads in The Phantom of

the Opera on Broadway—sing solos, duets and trios from popular Broadway hits at THREE PHANTOMS IN CONCERT, 8 p.m. at the Paramount Center for the Arts in Peekskill. Tickets: $48 to $68. Call 914-739-2333 or visit www.paramountcenter.org for more information.

MARCH March 4—Celebrate Saint Patty’s Day early with a performance by one of the world’s most accomplished Irish fiddlers at EILEEN IVERS—VIOLINIST OF RIVERDANCE, 8 p.m. at Tarrytown Music Hall in Tarrytown. Singer Tommy

CROSS RIVER WINTER ANTIQUES SHOW March 1—Shop for antiques and collectibles from 70 dealers, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at John Jay High School in Cross River. An expert appraiser will also be on hand. Admission: $7; appraisal: $5 per item. Call 914-273-4667 or visit www.cordshows.com for more information.

EVERETT COLLECTION; SHUTTERSTOCK

10 a.m. at George’s Island Park in Montrose, presented by the Westchester County Parks Department. Bring binoculars. FREE. Call 914-862-5297 or visit www.westchester gov.com/parks for more information.

February 14—Take your sweetie to a screening of this classic romance,


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Be THERE

Shopping GUIDE Flying colors, pages 28–35 Abas, line available at Petticoat Lane, Chappaqua, 914-2382300, Bronxville, 914-337-0850, Scarsdale, 914-725-5200; La Dentelliere, Armonk, 914-273-4200, Scarsdale, 914-7232902; www.abas.net Carlos Falchi, line available at Petticoat Lane, Chappaqua, 914-238-2300, Bronxville, 914-337-0850, Scarsdale, 914-7255200; Lola, Rye, 914-921-3162; www.carlosfalchionline.com

MOUNT KISCO SAINT PATRICK’S DAY PARADE

Catherine Malandrino, line available at On the One, Mount

March 14—Don your favorite green attire for this

Kisco, 914-666-7787; www.catherinemalandrino.com

14th annual event, starting 2 p.m. on the corner of

Christopher Fischer, line available at Designer One,

Main Street and Moore Avenue. FREE. Visit

Larchmont, 914-834-5080; On the One, Mount Kisco, 914-

www.aohdiv16.org for more information.

666-7787; www.christopherfischer.com Cole Haan, line available at Plaza Too, Bronxville, 914-337-

“Pipes” McDonnell and Irish step dancers will accompany Ivers on stage. Tickets: $30 to $45. Call 914-631-3390 or visit www.tarrytownmusichall.org for more information.

8050, Larchmont, 914-834-2792, Mount Kisco, 914-241-1854, Rye, 914-967-1063; Cole Haan, White Plains, 914-997-7480; www.colehaan.com Diane von Furstenberg, line available at Bloomingdale’s, White Plains, 914-684-6300; Neiman Marcus, White Plains,

March 14—Take the little ones to a performance of

914-428-2000; www.dvf.com

ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO

Gustto, line available at Tru Grace, Armonk, 914-273-9600;

GOOD, VERY BAD DAY, a lively musical based on the

www.gustto.com

classic children’s book by Judith Viorst, 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at the Emelin Theatre in Mamaroneck. Tickets: $13 to $18. Call 914-698-0098 or visit www.emelin.org for more information.

Hartly Fashions, available at Hartly Fashions, Westwood, N.J.; 201-664-3111 Leatherock, 1-800-466-6667; www.leatherock.com Longchamp, line available at Plaza Too, Bronxville, 914-337-

March 21—Sharpen your sleuthing skills at TRACK-

8050, Larchmont, 914-834-2792, Mount Kisco, 914-241-1854,

ING THE WILD CHIPMUNK, an educational walk teach-

Rye, 914-967-1063; Phyllis’ Leather Shop, Chappaqua, 914-

ing you how to interpret animal tracks in the snow, 1 p.m. at Cranberry Lake Preserve in North White Plains. FREE. Call 914-428-1005 for more information.

238-2300; Petticoat Lane, Chappaqua, 914-238-2300, Bronxville, 914-337-0850, Scarsdale, 914-725-5200; www.longchamp.com Moschino Cheap and Chic, line available at Pamela Robbins,

March 29—Enjoy the sweet sounds of the violin, viola

Scarsdale, 914-472-4033; www.moschino.com

and cello during ARIEL STRING QUARTET II, a concert by the 2008–2009 Ernst Stiefel String Quartet-inResidence, 4 p.m. at Caramoor in Katonah. Tickets: $25. Call 914-232-1252 or visit www.caramoor.org for more information. ■

Tory Burch, line available at Plaza Too, Bronxville, 914-3378050, Larchmont, 914-834-2792, Mount Kisco, 914-241-1854, Rye, 914-967-1063; www.toryburch.com

Fit to be tied, pages 36–37 Charvet, line available at Neiman Marcus, White Plains,

SEND EVENT LISTINGS TO:

914-428-2000

Westchester Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail

Gucci, line available at Gucci, White Plains, 914-683-1428;

editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received

www.gucci.com

four months in advance of the event and must include

Kiton, line available at Kiton, New York, 212-813-0272; ALAMY

a phone number that will be published.

www.kiton.it

WESTCHESTER

H E A LT H & L I F E

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where TO EAT

If you’ve got a craving, there’s a dining establishment in Westchester County (or nearby) that will satisfy it. Tur n to this listing next time you want a wonderful meal out.

ARMONK

home furnishings for sale. • 156 S. Central Ave., Hartsdale • 914-683-1833

OPUS 465 Contemporary cuisine in an unpretentious environment. • 465 Main St., Armonk • 914-273-4676

HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON

BEDFORD

cuisine, with river views. • 1 River St., Hastings-on-Hudson • 914-478-2800

BISTRO TWENTY-TWO Romantic setting for French bistro fare. • 391 Old Post Rd. (Rt. 22), Bedford • 914-234-7333

IRVINGTON

BRIARCLIFF MANOR

known for provocatively named sushi rolls. • 4 W. Main St., Irvington • 866-933-5478

HARVEST-ON-HUDSON Mediterranean

FLIRT SUSHI LOUNGE Japanese eatery

GUADALAJARA Festive Mexican including

Plaza, New Rochelle • 914-576-4141

NORTH SALEM VOX French bistro serving eclectic fare from

foie gras to burgers. • 721 Titicus Rd., North Salem • 914-669-5450

PEEKSKILL DIVISION STREET GRILL Food with a contemporary American flair. • 26 N. Division St., Peekskill • 914-739-6380

PORT CHESTER

favorites like fajitas. • 2 Union St., Briarcliff Manor • 914-944-4380

IRVINGTON-ON-HUDSON

F.I.S.H. Mediterranean take on fresh seafood.

RED HAT ON THE RIVER Upscale eatery

TERRA RUSTICA Classic Italian with salads,

featuring contemporary American cuisine. • 1 Bridge St., Irvington-on-Hudson • 914-591-5888

Serves Sunday brunch. • 102 Fox Island Rd., Port Chester • 914-939-4227

pastas and seafood. • 550 N. State Rd., Briarcliff Manor • 914-923-8300

LA PANETIÈRE Contemporary French cuisine. • 530 Milton Rd., Rye • 914-967-8140

BRONXVILLE BABBONE FINE ITALIAN CUISINE Abruzzistyle Italian cuisine featuring calamari, pasta and veal. • 502 New Rochelle Rd., Bronxville • 914-665-4722

SCARSDALE MERITAGE New American cuisine in a chic

Manhattan-style setting. • 505 Weaver St., Scarsdale • 914-472-8484

C H A P PA Q U A

SLEEPY HOLLOW

CRABTREE’S KITTLE HOUSE An award-

WASABI Relaxed atmosphere serving sushi,

winning wine cellar complements American fare. Try the Sunday brunch. • 11 Kittle Rd. (off Rt. 117), Chappaqua • 914-666-8044 DON EMILIO’S AT LOBO’S CAFÉ Vibrant, upscale Mexican eatery. • 57-59 King St., Chappaqua • 914-238-2368

RYE

sashimi and hot dishes. • 279 N. Broadway, Sleepy Hollow • 914-332-7788

LARCHMONT PLATES New American menu with Italian,

SOUTH SALEM

French and Asian accents. • 121 Myrtle Blvd., Larchmont • 914-834-1244

LE CHÂTEAU Classic French dishes in a Tudor mansion built by J.P. Morgan. • Rts. 35 and 123, South Salem • 914-533-6631

MAMARONECK

TA R R Y T O W N

TOLLGATE STEAKHOUSE Known for prime

porterhouse steak. • 974 E. Boston Post Rd., Mamaroneck • 914-381-7233

EQUUS RESTAURANT French fare served at Castle on the Hudson. • 400 Benedict Ave., Tarrytown • 914-631-3646

C R O T O N FA L L S

M I L LW O O D

THORNWOOD

PRIMAVERA Regional Italian cuisine. Try the

SPACCARELLI’S RISTORANTE

ABIS JAPANESE RESTAURANT Traditional Japanese cuisine plus steakhouse hibachi. • 14 Marble Ave., Thornwood • 914-741-5100

CORTLANDT MANOR MONTEVERDE Fine Continental menu with a view of the Hudson River. Fresh lobster, beef and lamb. • 28 Bear Mountain Bridge Rd., Cortlandt Manor • 914-739-5000

jumbo shrimp parmigiana or grilled Scottish salmon. • 595 Rt. 22, Croton Falls • 914-277-4580

Neighborhood eatery emphasizing Abruzzese cuisine. • 238 Saw Mill River Rd., Millwood • 914-941-0105

AZZURRI Mediterranean fare served in a

CROTON-ON-HUDSON

MOHEGAN LAKE

OCEAN HOUSE New England–style seashore

BELLA VITA Italian spot known for home-

fare including steamers, grilled wild salmon and fried clams. • 49 N. Riverside Ave., Croton-onHudson • 914-271-0702

DOBBS FERRY

Tuscan villa atmosphere. • 665 Commerce St., Thornwood • 914-747-6656

made pumpkin ravioli. • 1744 E. Main St., Mohegan Lake • 914-528-8233

TUCKAHOE

MOUNT KISCO

AN AMERICAN BISTRO Bright eatery featuring quesadillas, lamb and chicken. • 296 Columbus Ave., Tuckahoe • 914-793-0807

TOMATILLO Authentic Mexican fare featuring in-season local ingredients. • 13 Cedar St., Dobbs Ferry • 914-478-2300

COCO RUMBA’S Nuevo Latino menu spotlighting seafood and exotic drinks. • 443 Lexington Ave., Mount Kisco • 914-241-2299

EASTCHESTER

MOUNT VERNON

AQUARIO Brazilian and Portuguese cuisine specializing in seafood. • 141 E. Lake St., West Harrison • 914-287-0220

GINA MARIE’S TRATTORIA Regional Italian

SAMBA NA’ BRASA Authentic Brazilian

WHITE PLAINS

food including fresh seafood and homemade desserts. • 214 Main St., Eastchester • 914-793-6155

HARTSDALE GLOBAL GATHERINGS Eclectic menu, plus

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FEBRUARY 2009

buffet and meats sliced table-side. • 42 Broad St., Mount Vernon • 914-668-1112

WEST HARRISON

NEW ROCHELLE

BLUE Asian-influenced American fare featuring osso bucco. • 99 Church St., White Plains • 914-220-0000

CITY CHOW HOUSE Asian-Latin fusion

MORTON’S, THE STEAKHOUSE Chicago-

cuisine in a modern setting. • 1 Radisson

based steakhouse. • 9 Maple Ave., White


Plains • 914-683-6101

YONKERS BISTRO CHARTREUSE Modern updates of French classics. Extensive wine list. • 35 Main St., Yonkers • 914-969-1006 ZUPPA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE Innovative Italian with homemade pasta. • 59 Main St., Yonkers • 914-376-6500 ■

WHERE TO EAT BY CUISINE

AMERICAN: An American Bistro, Tuckahoe • Crabtree’s Kittle House, Chappaqua •

Division Street Grill, Peekskill • Meritage, Scarsdale • Morton’s, The Steakhouse, White Plains • Ocean House, Croton-onHudson • The Olde Stone Mill, Tuckahoe • Red Hat on the River, Irvington-on-Hudson • Tollgate Steakhouse, Mamaroneck ASIAN: Abis, Mamaroneck and Thornwood • Flirt Sushi Lounge, Irvington • Wasabi, Sleepy Hollow

CONTINENTAL: Monteverde, Cortlandt

Manor • Opus 465, Armon FRENCH: Bistro Chartreuse, Yonkers • Bistro Twenty-Two, Bedford • Equus Restaurant, Tarrytown • La Panetière, Rye • Le Château, South Salem • Vox, North Salem ITALIAN: Babbone Fine Italian Cuisine, Bronxville • Bella Vita, Mohegan Lake • Gina Marie’s Trattoria, Eastchester • Primavera, Croton Falls • Spaccarelli’s Ristorante, Millwood • Terra Rustica, Briarcliff Manor • Zuppa Restaurant & Lounge, Yonkers MEDITERRANEAN: Azzurri, Thornwood • f.i.s.h., Port Chester • Harvest-on-Hudson,

Hastings-on-Hudson MEXICAN: Don Emilio’s at Lobo’s Café,

Chappaqua • Guadalajara, Briarcliff Manor • Tomatillo, Dobbs Ferry

MULTI-ETHNIC: Aquario, West Harrison • Blue, White Plains • City Chow House, New Rochelle • Coco Rumba’s, Mount Kisco • Global Gatherings, Hartsdale • Plates, Larchmont • Samba Na' Brasa, Mount Vernon

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What’s HAPPENING SUPPORT GROUPS For more information on topics to be covered in upcoming meetings, visit www.worldclassmedicine.com. ■

Congestive Heart Failure Support Group

Meets on the first Tuesday of every month, 3:30– 4:30 p.m., at the Taylor Care Center, Conference Room O-112. Call 914-493-1730 for additional information. ■ Hepatitis

C Support Group

Meets every other Wednesday, 6–8 p.m., in the Cedarwood Hall Conference Room on the first floor. Call 914-493-7641 to learn more. ■

Living With Multiple Sclerosis

For information, call the Behavioral Health Center Outpatient Department at 914-493-2621. ■

Radiation Medicine Support Group

Meets every Wednesday, 11 a.m.–noon, in the Department of Radiation Medicine conference room. Call 914493-8561 for additional information. ■

Stroke Support Group

Meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month, 6–7:30 p.m., in the Rehab Conference Room at Taylor Care Center. Call 914-493-1573 for more information. ■

Weight-Loss Surgery Support Group

Meets twice monthly on Thursdays at 6 p.m. at the Medical Arts Atrium, 19 Bradhurst Avenue, Suite 1700, Hawthorne. LEARNING FOR LIFE Learning for Life is Westchester Medical Center’s series of free seminars held in the Conference Center at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. Parking is available in the Children’s Hospital lot; check in at the security desk. For additional information or to register, call 1-877-WMCDOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com.

at W e s t c h e s t e r M e d i c a l C e n t e r Learning About Parkinson’s Disease

Thursday, March 19, 6–7:30 p.m. This illness, which

affects more than 1.5 million Americans, knows no social, ethnic, economic or geographic boundaries. Get the facts about signs, symptoms and cutting-edge treatments from physician experts specializing in Parkinson’s. SPECIAL EVENTS ■

“When You Wish Upon a Star”

Saturday, March 7, 6 p.m. An evening of art and music

to benefit the Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department of Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, featuring a concert, art show, silent auction, wine raffle, wine tasting, light bites and more. To learn more, call 914-493-2575. ■

100.7 WHUD Kids’ Fair

Saturday, April 18. Now in its 14th year, the 100.7

WHUD Kids’ Fair unites thousands of families for a day of fun and education. Besides educational displays, games and interactive exhibits, the fair also features a live radio broadcast and more for toddlers to preteens. ■

“Go the Distance”

Sunday, April 19. Help Maria Fareri Children’s

Hospital at Westchester Medical Center celebrate its fifth birthday with a walk and family fun day to benefit the hospital’s programs and services. We thereby honor Maria Fareri’s wish “for the health and well-being of all the children of the world.” To learn more, log on to www.worldclassmedicine.com or call 914-493-2575. ■ 15th Annual Pediatric Cancer Foundation Walkathon

Sunday, April 26, 10:30 a.m.–2 p.m., Riverside Park, New York City. The Foundation is a proud supporter of

Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. To learn more about this event, visit www.pcfweb.org or call Nancy Joselson, 914-777-3127. ■

FEBRUARY ■

Weight-Loss Surgery Seminar

Thursdays, February 12 and 26, 4:30–6:30 p.m.

If you are overweight, you may be a candidate for bariatric (weight-loss) surgery. Here, bariatric surgeons explain the details of the latest minimally invasive surgical procedures. MARCH ■

Weight-Loss Surgery Seminar

Thursdays, March 12 and 26, 4:30– 6:30 p.m. If you are overweight, you may be

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SHUTTERSTOCK

a candidate for bariatric (weight-loss) surgery. Here, bariatric surgeons explain the details of the latest minimally invasive surgical procedures.


MEDICAL Q&A

S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Local healthcare experts answer your pressing questions. We all have questions about our health. Many times we can articulate a problem, but then we don’t know where to turn for help. We gathered several of your questions—from how to eliminate headaches to how to help your child with vision problems—and gave them to highly respected local healthcare professionals who offer you guidance within these pages.

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{ Medical Q&A } S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Q } I know that in the present job market, as well as socially, a youthful, attractive smile is an essential feature. How can I reverse the years and get the smile I’ve always wanted? A } I’ve been creating more youthful, natural smiles like the ones below for many years. As part of the DaVinci Dental Extreme Makeover team as seen on ABC-TV, I’ve created the beautiful smiles of celebrities as well as some of your Westchester neighbors, but they look so natural you’ll never know. During your consultation, we’ll change your smile on our cosmetic imaging computer so you can see the beautiful result before we start. You can rest assured that we can achieve this result since, as an Associate Professor of International and Honors Esthetics at NYU College of Dentistry, I’ve been teaching dentists from around the world the techniques and artistry of creating beautiful smiles. See many more of our makeovers and learn about us on our website. BEFORE

AFTER

Kenneth S. Magid, DDS | Henry Rapp III, DMD Advanced Dentistry of Westchester 163 Halstead Avenue l Harrison 914-835-0542 l adofw.com

A } A vision screening or general exam only checks for eye health and visual clarity. Visual efficiency, the effort that goes into accurate eye movement control, precise eye teaming and sustaining visual focus, is a much better indicator of whether your child has the visual “tools” necessary for academic success. Children with visual efficiency problems have difficulty sustaining attention to near-vision activities, they tend to have difficulty with reading comprehension and they may have trouble copying from the blackboard. These children are

Q } How can my child have vision problems when he passed his vision tests?

often misdiagnosed with learning disabilities or attentional deficits. Only a developmental optometrist is trained in the testing and

Ira J. Bernstein, O.D. | Paul R. Bernstein, O.D.

remediation of these problems.

Bernstein Center for Visual Performance

Treatment may include glasses,

701 Westchester Avenue l White Plains 914-682-8886 l cfvl.com

home therapy procedures and/or

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in-office treatment.

1/16/09 1:03:28 PM


S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Q } I have tried physical therapy and I am not getting any results for my chronic muscle and joint pain. What else can I do?

{ Medical Q&A }

A } Your problem is most likely caused by an overused muscle, which oftentimes does not respond well to traditional physical therapy. Overused muscles and other soft tissues often suffer from pulls, tears, collisions, microtraumas or hypoxia (which means the muscle is not getting enough oxygen). Each of these problems causes the body to produce tough, dense scar tissue in the affected area, and the scar tissue binds up and ties down the tissues that need to move freely. As the scar tissue builds up, muscles and nerves become damaged, resulting in pain and weakness. However, there is an option called Active Release Technique (ART), a patented, state-of-theart treatment that evaluates, then quickly and permanently resolves, the condition. ART gets to the root of the problem, first with an evaluation of the texture, tightness and movement of muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments and nerves. The abnormal tissue is then treated by combining precisely directed tension with specific patient movements involving stretching and massaging to free the soft tissue. There are over 500 specific moves as part of the unique ART protocol, each one designed for a very specific problem. Headaches, back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, shin splints, shoulder pain, sciatica,

Vito DiMatteo, D.C. | Nicola Vaccaro, D.C. Kinetogenics Spine & Sports Therapy 875 Mamaroneck Avenue l Mamaroneck 914-381-7575 l drxnuspine.com

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plantar fasciitis, knee pain and tennis elbow are just a few of the many conditions that are resolved using ART.

1/16/09 1:07:02 PM


{ Medical Q&A } S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

A } Headaches have many causes, and any recent experience, such as a minor car accident, fall or other stress to the body, can cause trauma to the upper cervical spine or neck. After a spinal trauma, even if it’s minor, the central nervous system’s nerve receptors (mechanoreceptors) become stressed, triggering an increase in nerve signals to the spinal cord and brain. The upper cervical spine is particularly at risk for this problem because it doesn’t have an intervertebral disc for support, protection or stability. In addition, this part of the body has the greatest concentration of mechanoreceptors that manage signals between the spinal cord and brain. When these mechanoreceptors

Q } I have frequent headaches, but my general practitioner checked me out and said stress must be causing the pain. Could there be another reason for these headaches?

are triggered after trauma, the central nervous system then becomes overly activated in the brain stem, increasing the amount of blood flow and nerve signals to the brain. This activity causes headaches. At Upper Cervical Chiropractic of New York, we use the NUCCA procedure to correct upper cervical spinal conditions. This advanced form of chiropractic, practiced by only 200 doctors worldwide, gently realigns the spine to its natural, balanced, and upright position to “de-stress” the nerve receptors. This takes pressure off the nervous system so normal blood and

George Gertner, D.C.

nerve flow can be restored. The treatment is safe and

Upper Cervical Chiropractic

painless, and many patients experience immediate

20 Old Mamaroneck Road l White Plains 914-686-6200 l ucc-ny.com

relief from even the most severe and chronic

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headaches.

1/16/09 1:03:48 PM


S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Q } Does poor oral hygiene contribute to heart disease? A } A trip to the dentist can literally save your life! I am an advocate of preventative services, especially when

{ Medical Q&A }

it comes to oral health. It’s been proven that there is a solid correlation between periodontal health and heart disease. According to the American Dental Association’s recent study results, the association between increased periodontal disease and heart attack risk is strong regardless of whether or not smoking—a known risk for gum disease—is a factor. If you keep your teeth and gums healthy, it will absolutely reduce your risk for heart disease. In addition, findings have also proved that infection of the gums, also called periodontitis, in a pregnant woman may lead to a serious increase in the likelihood of delivering a premature baby. In our offices, including our new office in northern Westchester, we have an advanced diagnostic tool called a Florida Probe that measures periodontal disease. The probe allows us to diagnose periodontal disease early enough so we can stop its progression or immediately treat the problem. I invite you to call our offices for a

Stacie Calian, DDS Westchester Smile Design 984 North Broadway l Suite 410 l Yonkers l 914-476-3838 39 Smith Avenue l Mount Kisco l 914-241-8200 westchestersmiledesign.com l mountkiscodentist.com

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complimentary consultation to discuss this extremely important part of your overall healthcare plan for 2009.

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faces of WESTCHESTER

Fashion passions L ucy Howat, Kornelya Wells and Karonlay Cueva (left to right)—

SUNY Westchester Community College—consider swatches and trim for an upcoming project.

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CHRISTOPHER BARTH

fashion merchandising students at


Minta™ faucet Dual Spray Pull-Out GROHE StarLight® Chrome

FINE DECORATIVE PLUMBING FIXTURES & HARDWARE

TO THE TRADE & HOMEOWNER COME BROWSE OUR SHOWROOMS:

212-876-0100 1254 Park Avenue New York, NY 10029

212-777-7984 19 Bond Street New York, NY 10012

914-968-9200 550 Saw Mill River Road Yonkers, NY 10701

WWW.CENTRALPLUMBINGSPEC.COM

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After 20 YEARS of award-winning obedience competitions, K9 Unit supervision, and handler training, DOG COMMANDER is here to solve your dog’s behavioral needs with the absolute finest training available.

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Profile for Wainscot Media

Westchester Health & Life's February 2009 issue  

The Good Living Magazine from Westchester Medical Center

Westchester Health & Life's February 2009 issue  

The Good Living Magazine from Westchester Medical Center