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WESTCHESTER

W E S T C H E S T E R H E A LT H

health&life THE GOOD LIVING MAGAZINE from WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

August 2009 $3.95

& LIFE ■

AUGUST 2009

Your best

Westchester

summer!

WHERE TO: dine alfresco • hike •

launch a kayak • picnic ... and more!

A BACKYARD SURVIVAL GUIDE BEDECK YOUR DECK!

Outdoor seating we love

health

watch

The dangers of acid reflux ■

Curing a child’s cancer ■

Medical mystery —solved!


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Live beautifully.

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Contents

36

38

42

WESTCHESTER

health&life

August 2009

Features 32

35

16

Your backyard survival guide From microbes to wild mammals, the great outdoors is alive with potential threats to your summertime health. Here’s what to do if injury comes your way.

The sound and the river Try these 3 ways to enjoy our twin watery wonders.

36

Nature calls

37

Outdoor eats

38

A few ways to experience all the county’s natural wonders.

summer sundresses.

18 Flash

Captured moments around the county

24 Health watch · A new surgery saves a life · Breathing restored · A victory over kids’ cancer · A hospital marks a milestone—and makes plans · 3 hospital-based doctors

Miracle growers A bountiful summer staple, zuc-

Sit this one out

Unwind in alfresco elegance with these hip outdoor seating options.

42 Escapes /

Flower power Look daisy-fresh in these cheerful

46 Glorious food

Where and how to dine alfresco in Westchester

At home /

16 Things we love

chini is a savory warm-weather treat.

48 Westchester gourmet Tender loving flair A passion for food is evident in the creative offerings served up at John-Michael’s at Purdy’s Homestead in North Salem.

Grape getaways

New York’s Finger Lakes region is an oenophile’s paradise—and fun for the rest of us too.

Departments 4 Welcome letter

50 Where to eat Your Westchester County dining guide

54 Be there! A listing of local events you won’t want to miss

55 What’s happening at Westchester Medical Center

6 Editor’s letter 13 Westchester whispers · Straight from the farm · Highway society · Toying around · ‘What I’m listening to …’ · Pony up

56 Faces of Westchester Tri, tri again COVER IMAGE : GETTY IMAGES


BEAUTIFULLY AFFORDABLE

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Welcome LETTER

Growing for a reason AS THE NEED FOR EMERGENCY AND advanced-level care for children and adults in the Hudson Valley grows, Westchester Medical Center continues to step up to the challenge. This summer we are opening 1,400 square feet of new space in our Adult Emergency Department, bringing the department’s capacity to 28, in addition to our three state-of-the-art trauma rooms. We have seen a jump in both adult and pediatric emergencyroom visits, and this expansion meets a critical need, given that our Emergency Department is the only Level I trauma center for this area’s more than 3.5 million people. Next month, our Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital celebrates its fifth anniversary (see article on page 30). Since opening it in 2004, we have treated more than 90,000 infants, children and teens. During that time it has been at or near capacity every single day, and we started an expansion program in 2008 (with an addition to our Pediatric Emergency Department) that continued into 2009, with four new inpatient beds coming on line just last month. These projects have helped to relieve some of the need for space at our Children’s Hospital, but as the needs of the region’s children continue to grow, we must be prepared to meet them. Shortly, together with Ronald McDonald House, we will break ground on a new, expanded stand-alone facility adjacent to our Children’s Hospital. This will provide better service and more capacity for parents who need to be close to their children during treatment, and will free up additional room for growth within the Children’s Hospital. These are just a few examples of how at Westchester Medical Center we are mindful that all of our projects and progress are in concert with the healthcare needs of the entire Hudson Valley region, so that we will be here and ready when our community needs us the most.

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Sincerely,

CARPET TRENDS

MICHAEL D. ISRAEL President and CEO Westchester Medical Center

5 SMITH STREET, RYE, NY 10580

info@carpetrends.com

914-967-5188 w w w.carpetrends.com

For additional information about Westchester Medical Center, visit our website at www.worldclassmedicine.com.

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A D VE RT ISE M E NT

Does Your Child Have Special Needs? Why Not Give Him Something Fun To Do? By Isa Marrs, MA CCC-SLP

P

arents of children with special needs often tell me that it is scary to enroll their children in “fun” activities because they fear that their child will not succeed. Or, that he or she will be ridiculed and possibly asked to leave the class. Unfortunately this fear often comes from experience. That’s not a worry in the innovative “Where I Can Be Me®” social skills classes with art and play. They are designed to be inclusive… and fun! The only program of this kind, every class works to improve each child’s self-confidence and self-expression while expanding their creative imagination. Who knows where their imagination will take them? What I do know is that while they are creating beautiful works of art they are also learning essential social skills to empower them in their everyday lives. (But we don’t have to tell them that, they can think they’re just here to have fun.)

Not Just Anybody

These classes are taught by board-certified experts. And by utilizing a unique blend of behavior techniques, social-communication, music, art and social skills training these experts will work to improve your child’s play skills, social interaction and behavior. And they’ll make sure your child has fun. Having fun makes it easier for us to reach our goals with your child. While the goals for each child and each class are different, one of the main goals is to teach your child how to make and keep friends.

We’re All Friends Here

These classes are provided in a safe and accepting environment where you don’t have to worry about how other people will respond. And to make certain that you believe you have made the right decision our classes have a 5-week, no strings attached, money back guarantee. There are many more things about these classes that makes them unique. I’d like to tell you about them but unfortunately I’m out of room.

Editor’s LETTER

Outside’s ‘in’ WE’RE ALL OUTDOORS ENTHUSIASTS WHEN SUMmer is in full swing in beautiful Westchester County. Even the most housebound souls step out to catch a breeze, savor the sunshine—and forget all about their “Things to Do” list and that 401K. So we at Westchester Health & Life couldn’t resist making this a special “outdoors” issue, full of our own open-air wisdom. So what’s your pleasure—biking? Hiking? Kayaking? Bird-watching? In “Nature Calls” on page 36, you’ll learn of nearby places to do all four and more. And in “The Sound and the River” on page 35, discover three kinds of fun the Hudson and Long Island Sound provide. Ready to venture a little farther? “Grape Getaways,” this issue’s Escapes piece on page 42, details an idyllic journey through the state’s Finger Lakes region. Full of rolling hills, breathtaking vistas and—best of all—a profusion of wineries, this driveable jaunt is a potently beautiful treat indeed. In this season, food just seems to taste better alfresco. So check out “Outdoor Eats” on page 37. There, we dish on the best places in Westchester to picnic under the sun and dine out beneath the moon, along with an expert’s tips on how to pack a picnic basket without that wince of “I forgot—” regret. For outdoor dining closer to home, we share our favorite outdoor seating styles. Sure, some are better for lounging than for noshing, but each lets you enjoy the season’s sunshine to best effect. See all our picks in “Sit This One Out” on page 38. And because your health is our continuing mission, we offer “Your Backyard Survival Guide” on page 32. It’s full of counsel on avoiding—or handling—outdoor dangers that range from sunburns to snakebites to the rusty nails that threaten bare feet. So enjoy the season—safely. Now, if you don’t mind, I’m heading out!

RITA GUARNA Editor in Chief

You can, however, get more information by calling me directly at (914) 488-5282, or by calling my tollfree, hassle-free, 24hr recorded message information hotline 1-866-380-8340, or by visiting www.SocialSkillsWestchester.com

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We’ve created a medical center where people are treated like their lives depend on it. Because they do.

Sharon Marino, RN, Nurse Manager Adult and Pediatric Emergency Department

At Westchester Medical Center, we set the standard in healthcare. You can see it in every room, every hallway and every department. You can see it in the eyes of a heart transplant patient or on the faces of parents whose newborn weighs just over a pound. Our advancements extend across the entire medical facility – from our innovative Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital to the latest technology, lifesaving procedures and top doctors, nurses and staff. This is how we’ve achieved national recognition for clinical excellence and have become the region’s premier destination for advanced care. So we’re ready when you need us most.

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WESTCHESTER

health&life AUGUST 2009 Westchester Health & Life Staff

editor in chief RITA GUARNA

art director SARAH LECKIE

senior editor TIMOTHY KELLEY

managing editor JENNIFER CENICOLA

assistant editor KRISTIN COLELLA

editorial intern

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DIANE SZULECKI

art interns PATRICE HORVATH , ALEXANDRIA PATE

group publisher EDWARD BURNS

executive vice president, sales & marketing JOEL EHRLICH

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publisher SUZANNE TRON

advertising account executives

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LOUISE DEMMEL , MOLLY DIMILLO , MARY MASCIALE

director, internet & new media NIGEL EDELSHAIN

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marketing director CHRISTOPHER KAEFER

marketing intern NICOLE CARCANO

production manager CHRISTINE HAMEL

advertising services manager THOMAS RAGUSA

senior art director, agency services KIJOO KIM

art intern, agency services ALICIA CAPAZZI

circulation director LAUREN MENA

editorial contributions:

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The editors invite letters, article ideas and other contributions from readers. Please write to Editor, Westchester Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201-571-7003; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Any manuscript or artwork should be accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope bearing adequate return postage. The magazine is not responsible for the return or loss of submissions.

advertising inquiries: Please contact Edward Burns at 201-782-5306 or edward.burns@wainscotmedia.com.

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“Where you make the difference”

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CARPET

WORLD Westchester Medical Center Staff

president & ceo MICHAEL ISRAEL

chairman, board of directors JOHN F. HEIMERDINGER

senior vice president, marketing and corporate communications KARA BENNORTH

director media relations/photography DAVID BILLIG

director, community relations and outreach ISABEL DICHIARA

Also featuring

The Latest in Wood Flooring One of the largest selections of exotic wood in Westchester & the most up to date laminate flooring collection available

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director editorial information management LESLIE MILLS

director of communications, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center ANDREW LAGUARDIA

photo/digital imaging BENJAMIN COTTEN , GORDON TUNISON

WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER Valhalla, N.Y. For general information, call 914-493-7000. Visit Westchester Medical Center on the Internet at www.worldclassmedicine.com.

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA

chairman CARROLL V. DOWDEN

president MARK DOWDEN

executive vice president JOEL EHRLICH

senior vice president EDWARD BURNS

vice presidents AMY DOWDEN NIGEL EDELSHAIN RITA GUARNA SHANNON STEITZ SUZANNE TRON

subscription services: To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Westchester Health & Life, Circulation Department, PO Box 1788, Land O Lakes, FL 34639; telephone 813-996-6579; e-mail lauren.mena@wainscotmedia.com.

Westchester Health & Life is published seven times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645, in association with Westchester Medical Center. This is Volume 5, Issue 4. ©2009 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14.00 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional.

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We’ve created a place with many advanced imaging technologies. Where we can see everything.

Image from the region’s only 256 Slice CT Scanner

Westchester Medical Center Advanced Imaging is where patients and staff alike have access to the very latest advanced diagnostic technology. We have pediatric ultrasound and CT capabilities and offer full field digital mammography. And with our state-of-the-art 256 Channel CT scanner, we provide coronary and peripheral angiography as well as perfusion imaging. This innovative equipment allows our doctors, nurses and staff to capture clearer, more detailed images in shorter amounts of time. For you, this not only means less exposure to radiation but faster and more accurate results and diagnoses. At Westchester Medical Center, we’ve created our Advanced Imaging services with our patients in mind, so we could provide you with a place where convenience and quality of care add to health.

We offer evening and weekend hours.

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ADVANCED IMAGING

1.5 TESLA MRI • 256 CHANNEL CT • DDR & CR DIAGNOSTIC RADIOGRAPHY HIGH-SPEED ULTRASOUND • DIGITAL MAMMOGRAPHY • BONE DENSITY

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Are you ready to lose weight? We’ll get you started with 3 easy steps: 1. Book your complimentary nutrition and weight loss evaluation 2. Schedule your weekly one-on-one weight loss coaching sessions 3. Enjoy the feeling of your new, lighter self! Introducing Healthy Fit for Women. Personalized fitness and weight loss programs. Join now and we’ll make it as easy as 1, 2, 3. Call 914.670.0600 to schedule your complimentary nutrition and weight loss evaluation now. Complimentary evaluations good through August 31.

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Westchester WHISPERS YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL TRENDS, TREASURES, PEOPLE & WELL-KEPT SECRETS

Want to be lean and green? Forget mangoes from Mexico or cherries from Chile—save the world the jet fuel and instead head to one of the county’s many bustling farmers’ markets. At the KATONAHLEWISBORO FARMERS’ MARKET (914-923-4837, w w w. c o m m u n i t y m a r kets.biz), for example, visitors can browse a host of locally grown fruits and veggies, plus handmade soaps, baked goods, herbs and more. The market runs Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., through December 19 in front of John Jay High School in Cross River. Don’t forget to stop by for the free “Tomato Tasting” event on August 15, 10 a.m. to noon at the manager’s tent. THE OSSINING FARMERS’ MARKET (914-923-4837, www.community markets.biz), meanwhile, features such farm staples as meat, pork, poultry and organic produce, plus wine from Benmarl Winery in Marlboro and cut flowers from Monkshood Nursery in Stuyvesant. You can enjoy a free ear of corn during the “Corn Roast” from 10 a.m. to noon on August 15, and sample apple cider during “An Old-Fashioned Cider Pressing Demonstration and Free Tasting,” 10 a.m. to noon on October 3. The market is held at the corner of Main and Spring streets and also runs Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., through December 19. Get a glimpse of the past at the farmers’ market at MUSCOOT FARM (914-864-7282, www.muscootfarm.org), an early-1900s interpretive farm in Somers (free admission). Highlights include Dutch apple tarts from Dutch Desserts in Kinderhook, all-natural peanut butter from Saratoga Peanut Butter Company in Saratoga Springs and garlic-soaked pickles from Pickle Licious in Teaneck, N.J. For an added treat, check out the farm’s more than 7 miles of hiking trails after your shopping is complete.

JUPITER IMAGES; SHUTTERSTOCK

Straight from the farm

Highway SOCIETY If four hours on the Bronx River Parkway sounds like your idea of hell, you’ve got it all wrong. Check out BICYCLE SUNDAYS (914-864-7275, www.westchester gov.com): On select Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., a 6.5-mile stretch of road—from the County Center in White Plains to Scarsdale Road in Yonkers—is closed off to cars for the exclusive use of walkers, joggers, bikers, in-line skaters and scooter riders. Remaining Bicycle Sundays this year include September 13, 20 and 27. “This is one of our most popular programs,” says Westchester County Parks commissioner Joseph A. Stout. “We often see up to 3,000 people of all ages coming together on any given Sunday.” While determined folks can trek the entire route, the less ambitious will find various points of entry and exit along the way. “It’s a great way to experience this beautiful parkway that winds through the heart of Westchester,” says Stout.

WESTCHESTER

H E A LT H & L I F E

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Westchester WHISPERS

Toying around

‘What I’m listening to …’

everything from tricycles to adult road and mountain

“I firmly believe there’s no such thing as a bad genre of music,” says David Neidhart, member services manager for the Tarrytown Music Hall in Tarrytown (914-631-3390, www.tarrytownmusic hall.org). “You name a genre, I can name a great performer in it.” And considering he has 5,000 LPs and 3,000 CDs in his collection, we’re inclined to believe him. Still, he managed to narrow his favorite songs to 10. “I’m more of an ‘album guy,’ but I think this playlist represents the diversity of my taste, though it’s a little light on hip-hop and contemporary country,” he says.

bikes,” says co-owner Taka Andrews, who runs the

1. “THIS DREAM OF YOU,” Bob Dylan, from Together Through Life

It began in 1908 as a baby carriage/bicycle shop. In the 101 years since, however, MILLER’S TOYS (914-698-5070, www.millers toys.com) has undergone quite a transformation. Though the Mamaroneck store maintains its oldtime charm and “friendly neighbor”–style service, today it’s a mecca for varied outdoor and indoor fun, for adults and kids alike. “We operate a full-service bike shop, with

shop with his wife, Brooke— a fourth-generation Miller. But while wheels rule the first floor, the upstairs area boasts a host of specialty toys, including redwood playsets by Woodplay, scooters by Micro and JumpSport backyard trampolines. “I’ve bought many things there over the years, from an airhockey table to a our family’s bikes to custom hats for a Wizard of Oz party,” says Larchmont resident Mary Beth Jordan, a mother of three. “The staff is amazing and gets to know your names and tastes. They’ll even demonstrate a toy or play a round with you to help you decide.”

2. “LOVE THAT GIRL,” Raphael Saadiq, from The Way I See It 3. “POTATO HOLE,” Booker T. and Drive-By Truckers, from

Potato Hole 4. “FURTHER COMPLICATIONS,” Jarvis Cocker, from Further

Complications 5. “ON THE CORNER,” Miles Davis, from On the Corner 6. “MORNING DEW,” Grateful Dead, from Europe ’72 (Live) 7. “FROM OUR TV TEENS TO THE TOMB,” Maria McKee, from

High Dive 8. “RIGHT MOVES,” Josh Ritter, from The

Historical Conquests of Josh Ritter 9. “MURDER (OR A HEART ATTACK),” Old 97’s,

from Alive & Wired 10. “YOUR HEART IS AS BLACK AS NIGHT,” Melody Gardot,

from My One and Only Thrill

Q: Where can I take horseback riding lessons in Westchester? A: Mosey on over to RIVER RIDGE EQUESTRIAN CENTER in Eastchester (914633-0303, www.riverridgestable.com), where adults and kids alike can learn both English and Western styles. Learn to walk, trot, canter and jump in a private lesson ($40 per 30 minutes; $75 per hour), or wind along nearby woodlands, marshlands and lakes during a guided group trail ride lesson ($30 per person per hour). The center also offers after-school lessons for kids ages 5 and older, teaching both riding and horse care ($450 per child for a six-week session). For English-only instruction in hunter/jumper, a classic riding form, gallop over to the 75-year-old BOULDER BROOK EQUESTRIAN CENTER (914725-3912, www.boulderbrook.org) in Scarsdale. The center’s pros teach adults and kids ages 5 and up ($55 for a half-hour private session; $75 for a one-hour group or 45-minute private/semiprivate session). On a picturesque 54 acres—complete with a heated indoor arena, two outdoor arenas and a jumping field—JT FARM in South Salem (914-763-3705, www.jtfarm.com) teaches English-style horseshow riding to equestrians of all levels. Lessons for younger children cost $50 for a 30-minute private session, while semiprivate/private sessions for older children and adults run $125 per hour.

Pony up

/

AUGUST 2009

CORBIS

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Is your child having learning problems? Is reading a struggle? Did your child’s last eye exam include an evaluation of the visual skills related to reading and learning? Do you have a bright child who is struggling or underachieving?

IT COULD BE THEIR EYES! EVEN IF THEY SEE 20/20 FOR MORE DETAILS, PLEASE CALL:

Dr. Ira J. Bernstein, OD, FAAO, FCOVD Dr. Paul R. Bernstein, OD, FCOVD

Bernstein Center for Visual Performance 701 WESTCHESTER AVE., WHITE PLAINS, NY 10604

914-682-8886

www.cfvl.com

Hand-Knotted Antique and New Oriental Rugs, Custom Tibetan Carpets. Cleaning, Appraisals and Repair Services Available. Mike and Mary Lynn McRee 14 Main Street, Bedford Hills, New York 10507 |

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(914) 666-0227

|

www.caravanconnection.com

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Things WE LOVE

Flower power 1. With a ruched bodice and full flare skirt, Kay Unger’s bold floral-print strapless dress ($300) is practically made for twirling. Line available at Neiman Marcus, White Plains, 914-428-2000; www.kayunger.com

LOOK DAISY-FRESH IN THESE CHEERFUL SUMMER SUNDRESSES 1 2

3

2. Sleek and sweet, the fitted Coming Up Rose strapless dress by Nanette Lepore ($375) features a bright bouquet of oversized blooms. Line available at Toney Toni and the Gang, Bronxville, 914-793-0737; www.nanettelepore.com 3. The breezy Coco camisole jersey dress from Catherine Malandrino ($295) boasts a sweetheart neckline and eye-catching knot detailing. Line available at Neiman Marcus, White Plains, 914-428-2000; www.catherinemalandrino.com

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4. A striking blue silk sash adds sweet flair to the cotton/spandex Inagua dress from Anthropologie ($148). Line available at Anthropologie, White Plains, 914-397-9434; www.anthropologie.com 5. A shimmering metal neckline gives this summery dress from Mint by Jodi Arnold ($473) a modern twist. Line available at Beginnings, Scarsdale, 914-472-4722; www.jodi arnoldnyc.com 5

6. A defined waist, full A-line skirt and abundant ruching make this vivid cotton/silk floral dress from AK by Anne Klein ($139) exceptionally flattering. Line available at Bloomingdale’s, White Plains, 914-684-6341; www.anneklein.com

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AUGUST 2009


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FLASH

1

AT X2O XAVIARS ON THE HUDSON IN YONKERS, THE Greyston Foundation hosted its recent annual benefit, “Celebrating Transformation,” to help support community members in need. Pier Sixty at Chelsea Piers, meanwhile, was the site of Westchester Medical Center’s 30th annual gala, “60 at Sixty.” At the Mount Kisco Country Club in Mount Kisco and the Whippoorwill Club in Armonk, New York Giants quarterback Eli 2 Manning hosted a golf classic for Guiding Eyes for the Blind. Following its season finale concert, the Westchester Philharmonic held a gala at the RitzCarlton in White Plains. Finally, the Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts hosted a gala concert and benefit at the Venetian Theater in Katonah for the 3 opening night of its International Music Festival.

1

3 2

5

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GREYSTON FOUNDATION BENEFIT 1. Anne Marie Harrison, Steve Leonard Jr., Lydia Wagner 2. Jeff and Desine Koslowsky, Janet DiFiore 3. Martin and Irene Ginsburg 4. Peter Kelly and Caryl Orlando 5. Jacob Onufrychuk and Susan Merinoff

WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER GALA 6. Beth DeFuria and Alan Gass, M.D.

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KATHY KING

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GUIDING EYES GOLF CLASSIC 8. Dan Camia, Mark Chiusano, John Gilbert and Frank Chiusano 9. Tim Williams and Kent Atherton 14

10. Eli Manning 15

11. Zach and Curt Landtroop

WESTCHESTER PHILHARMONIC CONCERT AND GALA 12. Peter and Mary Ann Liebert 13. Alisa Weilerstein, Itzhak Perlman and Molly Carr

CARAMOOR CENTER GALA 14. Barbara and Drew Cervasio

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16. Ajit and Tinku Jain, Nancy and Morris Offit

Think you belong in Flash? Send photos from your gala or charity event to Westchester Health & Life, att: Flash editor, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; or e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Include your contact information, a short event description and names of all who appear. (Submissions are not guaranteed to appear and must meet the following image specs: 4x6 color prints or 300 dpi jpg, tif or eps files. Prints must be accompanied by an SASE in order to be returned.)

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CHRISTOPHER BARTH; GABE PALACIO

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A NEW SURGERY SAVES A LIFE EARLY DIAGNOSIS AND A PROMPT OPERATION MAKE THE DIFFERENCE FOR AN ESOPHAGEAL-CANCER PATIENT

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Acid reflux occurs when stomach acids move back up the esophagus. Known medically as gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD, it causes a burning sensation behind the breastbone near the heart— heartburn. If these acids continually burn the esophagus over long periods of time, the tissues lining the esophagus change into a roughened state called Barrett’s esophagus, which now affects 700,000 Americans. Typically it does not cause symptoms itself or progress any further. But each year, in about onehalf of 1 percent of cases, cells become cancerous. Nickerson, who has been taking reflux medications for two decades, was one of those cases. He was

ISPOT

YOU’D NEVER CALL ROGER A. NICKERSON lucky. The Kingston resident developed esophageal cancer, an often deadly illness that, according to the American Cancer Society, will cause an estimated 14,530 deaths in the U.S. this year. But he was fortunate that his disease was spotted early. That enabled doctors at Westchester Medical Center to perform a surgical procedure called esophagogastrectomy to remove the cancerous parts of his esophagus and stomach, successfully treating a malignancy that, left untreated, would probably have been fatal. Nickerson, 62, is a retired carpenter who lives with his wife, Kristy, and has two grown sons and three grandchildren. This spring, he began feeling tired. He also had stomach pains. “I’d get very bloated after I ate,” he recalls. In April, his doctor performed an endoscopy, in which a camera and surgical instruments were sent down his throat to diagnose the problem. The test found lesions, and a tissue sample from them was taken for a biopsy. The results confirmed he had an adenocarcenoma, the most common type of esophageal cancer. It typically occurs at the junction of the esophagus and the stomach. The past two decades have seen a dramatic rise Rocco Lafaro, M.D. in this cancer, especially among middleaged white men. The reason for this is not clear, but doctors believe it could be related to the rise in obesity and a condition that often accompanies it, acid reflux.


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The hidden danger of acid reflux Millions of people suffer chronic acid reflux—the back-

that reason, screening is also recommended for anyone

up of stomach acids into the esophagus—and find

over 50 who has had reflux for more than six months,

treatments for it. But because many medications for

and anyone under 50 with chronic reflux symptoms.

reflux, or heartburn, are now available over the counter

Be sure to tell your primary care physician if you

(Prilosec, for example), many people don’t tell their

are taking something for acid reflux, so he or she can

doctor they have the condition. That can be a mistake.

consider screening for Barrett’s esophagus. The gold

Doctors now know that chronic acid reflux, even

standard for screening is endoscopy, sending a camera

when it’s being treated, can cause Barrett’s esophagus,

and surgical tools into the esophagus to look for and

a condition that in a few cases progresses to cancer.

remove suspect tissues for biopsy.

Current recommendations call for screening any

“Don’t ignore acid reflux,” advises Edward

patient with “red-flag” symptoms, including difficulty

Lebovics, M.D., Chief of Gastroenterology at West-

swallowing, anorexia, anemia, unexpected weight loss

chester Medical Center. “Heartburn is a very common

or blood in the stool. But Barrett’s rarely produces any

symptom, but if happens more than twice a week, tell

of these symptoms until it’s already become cancer. For

your doctor.”

camera through the openings and removed the stomreferred to Ashutosh Kaul, M.D., gastrointestinal surach’s cancerous cells, which encompassed about 1 cengeon and Director of Minimally Invasive and Robotic timeter. After closing the incisions, Dr. Kaul stepped Surgery at Westchester, who called in Tauseef Ahmed, aside as Dr. Lafaro performed essentially the same M.D., Director of Oncology. “We have a team function, only through Nickerson’s chest. He removed approach with this disease,” Dr. Kaul explains. about 2 centimeters of the esophagus that contained He and Dr. Ahmed first needed to find out how advanced Nickerson’s cancer was, how far it had penetrated into the organ tissues and In this procedure, whether it had spread into the lymph nodes surgeons need to enter and other parts of the body. It turned out that it was stage 1, the most contained and theretwo cavities: the chest fore the most treatable stage. and the abdomen. However, treatment meant surgery, and soon. And that meant calling in the services of cancer cells. He then reattached the esophagus a third team member. Rocco Lafaro, M.D., and the stomach. Chief of Thoracic Surgery, was enlisted to perAshutosh Kaul, M.D. Nickerson spent about two weeks recovform the operation on Nickerson’s esophagus, ering in the hospital, and he may still need while Dr. Kaul worked on the stomach. chemotherapy. (As of early June, his doctors weren’t “Because the surgery is so complex, you need to enter sure yet whether that would be necessary.) In any case, two different body cavities: the chest and the abdomen,” the cancer appears to be gone. “They told me it’s all says Dr. Lafaro. Only an advanced medical center such cleared up and they’re pretty sure they got it all,” as Westchester has surgeons with the experience to Nickerson says. “That’s the kind of story I like to hear.” succeed in such a combined procedure, he says. “You “His prognosis is good,” reports Dr. Lafaro. really need to do a dozen of these operations a year, as “The key is that we got it early.” ■ we do here, to know how to do it well.” Nickerson’s surgery was done laparascopically, For more information on cancer treatment at as are most esophagogastrectomies these days. First, Westchester Medical Center, please call 1-877-WMCDr. Kaul made four small incisions in Nickerson’s DOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com. belly. He introduced his surgical instruments and a

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Breathing RESTORED HER LIFE THREATENED BY PULMONARY HYPERTENSION, A YOUNG WOMAN FINALLY FINDS THE RIGHT TREATMENT

“WE USED TO HEAR YOU HUFFING AND puffing,” Carrie Leon’s coworkers tell her with a laugh. “But now you’re so quiet you can sneak up on us.” The happy change came about when Leon, a 34year-old financial analyst from New Rochelle, was treated

successfully at Westchester Medical Center this year for the illness that sneaked up on her: pulmonary hypertension. Before that, however, she endured the unfortunate medical equivalent of a wild goose chase. In pulmonary hypertension, blood pressure rises

The experts address pulmonary hypertension This past March, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at

weighing less than 1 pound.” The conference, which will

Westchester Medical Center was the site of a

be an annual event, is intended to help estab-

conference on pulmonary hypertension as part

lish a pulmonary hypertension network with

of its new Center for Pulmonary Hypertension.

nearby hospitals so they can better diagnose

More than 100 physicians, most of them from

patients and refer them for treatment to

the tristate area, attended to hear speakers

Westchester Medical Center and Maria Fareri

including Sheila Haworth, M.D., who runs a cen-

Children’s Hospital.

ter for the condition in the United Kingdom.

“This is a very uncommon but highly

Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital pediatric

fatal disease,” Dr. Krishnan says. “Many doctors

conference. “The disease spans all age groups,”

are not used to treating it. But we are. We can Usha Krishnan, M.D.

she says. “It’s often seen in premature babies born

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improve symptoms and give patients a better

quality of life.”

INDEXED VISUALS

cardiologist Usha Krishnan, M.D., hosted the


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sharply in the arteries that go from the heart to the lungs. It’s not directly related to the blood pressure doctors measure with a cuff on the arm. But it can make it hard for the lungs to oxygenate the blood so the body can function properly. The results can be shortness of breath, dizziness, fainting, impaired mobility and eventual heart failure. Few physicians know how to treat pulmonary hypertension properly. Until Leon found the right doctor—Warren Rosenblum, M.D., Westchester’s Associate Medical Director of the Heart Failure/Cardiac Transplant Programs—the treatments she was given missed the mark. For a couple of years Leon had fainting spells. “At first I’d get dizzy when I exerted myself—say, when I walked up a hill,” she recalls. “But it got to the point where I’d get that way just walking from my bedroom to my bathroom.” Her breathing also became labored. Leon’s doctor sent her to a cardiologist, who found nothing wrong with her heart. A pulmonologist, however, diagnosed an infection in her lungs and treated that with heavy doses of antibiotics, which caused liver problems. When her hand swelled from the liver medication she was given, she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and treated for that. But her breathing problems continued to worsen. Last fall, she passed out twice. Over the winter, another doctor took a lung biopsy and diagnosed lung disease. She was put on prednisone, a strong steroid, which may have contributed to the stomach pain that sent her to a local hospital this April. There, physicians thought she needed gallbladder surgery. Before they could operate, however, she showed signs of heart failure. Her lips were blue and she had massive swelling in her abdomen and legs. Finally a doctor ordered an echocardiogram, which revealed that the pressure in her pulmonary artery was 96 millimeters of mercury (mmHg), five times the normal reading of 20 mmHg. “That’s when they called me,” says Dr. Rosenblum. He has been treating pulmonary hypertension for 15 years, he says, so he knew the problem immediately. “She had all the signs and symptoms, and she’d been seen by lots of specialists, including some heart specialists,” he says. “But they didn’t have the experience to identify it.” Pulmonary hypertension is often a byproduct of other heart and lung diseases. Or it may be inherited or caused by cirrhosis of the liver or connective-tissue disor-

What is pulmonary hypertension? “The pulmonary arteries carry blood from the lower right chamber of the heart, the right ventricle, to the lungs to pick up oxygen,” says Westchester cardiologist Warren Rosenblum, M.D. Warren Rosenblum, M.D.

“This oxygen-rich blood then travels to the left ventricle, which pumps it to

the rest of the body. In a person with pulmonary hypertension, pressure rises in the pulmonary arteries and it becomes harder for the heart to push blood into the lungs. As the heart works harder, the right ventricle becomes strained and weak—so weak it can’t pump enough blood to the lungs. This can cause heart failure, the most common cause of death in people with pulmonary hypertension.”

ders such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. In still other cases—such as Leon’s—the cause is unknown. Unfortunately, there is no cure. But medications developed in recent years have improved treatment a lot. “Fifteen years ago, our only choice was one very potent intravenous medication, and it was used only for patients awaiting a lung transplant,” says Dr. Rosenblum. “There was nothing for more moderate cases. Median survival was quite poor then—less than three years.” Now, though, the five-year survival rate approaches 90 percent in some forms of pulmonary hypertension, he says. “Once we got Carrie on the right meds, she did a lot better,” he says. The pressure in her pulmonary artery was reduced, and she was given a diuretic that helped her shed 65 pounds of water weight in a month. “I feel great, like I did five years ago,” she says. She is on a restricted, low-salt and low-fluid diet, still takes medication, including an inhaler, and sees Dr. Rosenblum every month for follow-up care. But she’s back at work and feeling better—and grateful. Says Leon: “I found the right doctor, thank God!” ■ To get more information about the treatment of pulmonary hypertension at Westchester Medical Center, please call 1-877-WMC-DOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com.

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Cancer-free, young Brian Mullin is ready for anything now.

A VICTORY

over kids’ cancer TREATMENT WITH IMMUNOTHERAPY HELPS THE BODY’S OWN IMMUNE SYSTEM FINISH OFF DEADLY TUMORS

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NO MEDICAL PROBLEM IS MORE GRAVE than cancer in children. But more youngsters are now surviving a deadly malignancy called neuroblastoma, thanks to a new immunotherapy treatment that a doctor at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center helped to pioneer. Neuroblastoma is the most common cancer during the first year of life, and it’s responsible for 15 percent of all infants’ cancer deaths. About 40 percent of neuroblastoma cases aren’t discovered until they reach an advanced stage, and the cancer progresses very rapidly. “It’s a very bad disease,” says M. Fevzi Ozkaynak, M.D., a pediatric hematologist and oncologist who is Director of the Bone-Marrow Transplant Program at the children’s hospital. As vice chairman of a key clinical study of immunotherapy, Dr. Ozkaynak provided treatment that helped save the life of a neuroblastoma patient—8-year-old Brian Mullin of Stony Point. Today Brian is an active boy who loves baseball, pro wrestling and Star Wars. But when he was 18 months old, his parents noticed a bump on the right side of his head. Soon afterward, his left eye began to bulge, “like he was making goo-goo eyes at us,” says his father, Chris. An ophthalmologist found a mass growing behind his eye and suggested the Mullins see Dr. Ozkaynak. “He did a biopsy of the lump and said it was definitely malignant and most likely neuroblastoma,” recalls Mullin. “And he said it was important that we act immediately.” Brian was admitted to Westchester, underwent tests to confirm the diagnosis and started chemotherapy within two days. “It came at us out of the blue,” adds the boy’s father. “The scary part is when they tell you what might happen.” Neuroblastoma is a cancer that forms in nerve tissue. The cause is a genetic mutation in the DNA, but what produces that mutation is unclear; it’s not inherited from the parents. The cancer usually starts in the adrenal glands, which sit atop the kidneys, but may also originate in the neck, chest or spinal cord. Neuroblastoma sometimes begins before a child is born, so that by the time symptoms develop, it has usually spread to other parts of the body. That was the case with Brian, whose cancer had reached stage 4, the most advanced stage.


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How immunotherapy works

If the disease is found early, in stage 1, to fight neuroblastoma a surgeon can remove the tumor and “that can be the end of treatment,” says Dr. Ozwhite white white kaynak. Brian was not so lucky. He underblood blood blood cell cell cell went a brutal regimen that began with the removal of some of his bone-marrow stem 2. 1. 3. cells. “The bone marrow creates new red cancer cancer cancer and white blood cells, but the chemotherapy cell cell cell treatment can wipe out the bone marrow,” says the doctor. To protect them, the stem cells were frozen and held while Brian As a result, the body’s Without treatment, With immunotherapy, received three chemotherapy treatments. The own immune system the body’s immune doctors inject antibodies treatments shrank the lesions on his head can more easily find system cannot fight into the bloodstream. the cancer—and go and behind his eye, along with others on his the neuroblastoma They attach themselves on the attack! ribs and spine. He then had surgery to cancer cells. to the cancer cells. remove the main tumor on his adrenal gland. Once recovered from surgery, Brian other two were natural hormones called cytokines, received a week of extremely high-dose chemotherapy. which boost the immune system’s strength. Brian was Then Dr. Ozkaynak thawed the stem cells and transone of 226 patients in the study. After two years, 66 perfused them back into Brian’s bone marrow so new blood cent of those who underwent immunotherapy were alive cells could be grown. Brian was kept in a sterile isolation with no sign of cancer, compared with 46 percent of unit while his immune system recovered. those who didn’t have the therapy. Brian’s mother, Eileen, stayed with him throughout The combined radiation and antibody therapy the treatment while Chris was home with their daughter, was rough, Mullin says. “It was bad. Brian couldn’t eat Linda, now 12. “Eileen had to wear gloves and masks the or go to the bathroom. He lost so much weight, we whole time, and she is very claustrophobic, so it was hard couldn’t believe how tiny he was. We thought about for her,” says Mullin. “But if Brian was there, so was she.” stopping. But we decided to give it one more day, then A month after this treatment, Brian started radiaone more day, and eventually he got a little better.” tion therapy, which targeted remaining lesions in his Today, Dr. Ozkaynak even uses a term for stomach, chest and throat. During this time, Dr. OzkayBrian’s status that cancer specialists use very cautiously. nak began administering the experimental treatment, “We wait five years from the initial diagnosis,” he immunotherapy, as part of a clinical study sponsored by explains. “But Brian has passed that mark, so we can the national Children’s Oncology Group, an entity withsay he’s cured.” in the National Cancer Institute. The study investigated Brian is still checked yearly, but he’s no longer on whether introducing natural agents to help the body’s medication. The only residual effect is that, because the immune system fight the cancer chemotherapy may have affected his growth plates—the itself would benefit patients. areas of tissue near the ends of bones where growth Researchers across the country, occurs—he may not grow as tall as Chris, who is 6’3”. including Dr. Ozkaynak, injected Says the relieved dad: “That’s a price we’ll gladly pay.” ■ three substances into the subjects. The first was an antibody that To learn more about research into or treatment of attaches itself to the surface of the children’s cancer at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at neuroblastoma cell and, in Westchester Medical Center, please call 1-877-WMCessence, provokes the body’s M. Fevzi Ozkaynak, M.D. DOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com/MFCH. immune system to attack it. The

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A hospital marks a milestone— and makes plans MARIA FARERI CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, A LIVELY FIVE-YEAR-OLD, GROWS TO MEET AN INCREASING NEED

AN ANNIVERSARY IS OFTEN AN OCCASION FOR offered from the start. And it has revitalized service lines reminiscence, but there’s not much time for that these days such as pediatric neurosurgery, plastic surgery and otoat Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical laryngology (ear, nose and throat medicine). Center. As staffers mark the facility’s fifth anniver“Since we opened in 2004, we’ve also sary, they have their attention firmly on the future. enhanced our Child Life Program, which uses The hospital is expanding to meet a growplay, art and music therapy to help kids and their ing need, as the recession has caused some clinics families cope with the stress of hospitalization,” to close their doors, says Michael Gewitz, M.D., Dr. Gewitz says. More additions and expansions Physician-in-Chief. “We have been more than 100 are forthcoming. percent occupied almost since the day we opened,” This summer, ground will be broken for a he says. Accordingly, there are plans to open a new freestanding Ronald McDonald House next to “neighborhood”—the hospital’s cheery term for a the hospital, to replace an earlier in-hospital unit—adding another 10 beds to the existing 114. Michael Gewitz, M.D. facility. It will be more than twice the size of the “We are planning to get the total up to between former suite, which will be remodeled to further 130 and 150 beds in the next five years,” he adds. increase the hospital’s capacity, the doctor adds. From its inception, the hospital has consistently Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital also plans to added new programs and physicians. It has enhanced increase the number of general pediatric surgeons on staff, services in areas like cardiology and pulmonology that it boost staff and research efforts in the pediatric oncology and neurosciences programs and add new programs in palliative To find out more about Maria Fareri Children's care and pain medicine. Hospital at Westchester Medical Center or to help It’s all part of a mission to provide the finest in cliniwith support, please call 1-877-WMC-DOCS or visit cal treatment and compassionate care for seriously ill chilwww.worldclassmedicine.com/MFCH. dren and their families in the lower Hudson region. ■ 30

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3 hospital-based doctors

COURTESY OF WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

ARIF MUMTAZ, M.D. HOSPITALISTS ARE PHYSIcians who specialize in caring for patients while they are in the hospital, and the Director of the Medical Hospitalist Program at Westchester Medical Center is a doctor with an internationally varied background: Arif Mumtaz, M.D. “I was born in London and moved to Pakistan with my family when I was 10,” says Dr. Mumtaz, 46. He attended Pakistan’s oldest and most prestigious medical school, King Edward Medical College, and worked in that country for two years before starting his residency at Westchester Medical Center in 1992. “I trained here as an internist and decided to stay,” he says. Dr. Mumtaz settled his family—wife Raama and three children, ages 2 to 17—in Stormville, Dutchess County. After two years as a staff internist, he was asked to head the hospitalist program when it was established in 1998. “As the director, I try to keep things running smoothly,” he says. “If things work, I stick with them.” At home, he channels his orderly ways into landscape gardening and home improvement projects. And the family loves to travel; they plan to take a crosscountry road trip this summer.

MEDICAL HOSPITALIST

CAROLINE MOON, M.D. IT’S BEEN A BUSY YEAR, both professionally and personally, for Caroline Moon, M.D. On the professional front, she was one of four physicians named as pediatric hospitalists— hospital-based physicians—at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. “The level and complexity of the medical issues are greater here than in private practice,” says Dr. Moon, a graduate of Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston who completed her pediatrics residency at Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx. “Patients in the hospital are the best teachers, because their health needs are so great.” Dr. Moon also has a master’s degree in religion from Harvard and did bioethics research at the Harvard School of Public Health and at Wellesley College. “Everything I do in taking care of patients relies on both my technical medical training and my interest in bioethics,” she says. In June, Dr. Moon was married, and she and her new husband went on a twoweek African safari for their honeymoon. “We went to Namibia, and it was absolutely breathtaking,” she says. “One of the highlights was tracking rhinos on foot.” The pair are avid tennis players and backpackers.

DIRECTOR, MEDICAL HOSPITALISTS

PEDIATRIC HOSPITALIST

THESE UNSUNG PROFESSIONALS PROVIDE ROUND-THE-CLOCK ON-SITE CARE

TUSHAR SHAH, M.D. LIKE DR. MUMTAZ, THE physician who trained him, Tushar Shah, M.D., comes from abroad. He was born in India and attended medical school there, and in 1996 was accepted in a residency program at Westchester Medical Center. It was a difficult decision to leave his native country, he says, but opportunities here were better. Dr. Shah was originally trained as an internist, but when he was encouraged to become a hospitalist, he warmed to the possibility right away. The hospitalist concept was just gaining acceptance at that time, and he liked the idea of being part of something new. “I became a hospitalist because I like the challenge of working with sicker patients in a more dynamic work environment than an outpatient practice,” he says. “Patients tend to be frightened—they don’t know you and you have to build trust. To see them smiling as they leave is very gratifying.” Dr. Shah, 40, lives with his wife, Toral, and two children in Yorktown. When he’s not working or spending time with his family, he enjoys bicycle riding and reading nonfiction. ■

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HEALTH WATCH by Mark Dowden

Your backyard

survival guide

FROM MICROBES TO WILD MAMMALS, THE GREAT OUTDOORS IS ALIVE WITH POTENTIAL THREATS TO YOUR SUMMERTIME HEALTH. HERE’S WHAT TO DO IF INJURY COMES YOUR WAY

WITH COYOTES, BEARS AND OTHER WILD animals roaming the New York suburbs, you may be tempted to add “attack by large carnivore” to your mental list of patio perils. But let’s focus on the more likely causes of backyard injury, whose risks range from merely annoying to life-threatening. Know how to deal with these injuries, and you just might be able to relax this summer.

What happened: YOU’VE DISCOVERED A

(a chipmunk is a ground squirrel), rabbits and other rodents rarely carry rabies. The more common carriers are bats, raccoons, skunks and foxes. If the bite barely broke the skin, wash it with soap and water, apply an antibiotic cream and cover with a bandage. If the wound is deep or the skin is torn and bleeding, apply pressure with a clean cloth and see a doctor. If only you had … not tried to feed the chipmunk. Wild animals, no matter how cute, are still wild.

TICK ATTACHED TO YOUR LEG.

Why you’re worried: You may get Lyme disease.

+ What to do: The sooner you remove the tick, the less chance it has to transmit Lyme or another disease. Using fine tweezers, grasp the tick as close to your skin as possible and pull it straight up. Disinfect the bite site and tweezers. Save the tick in a plastic bag or jar to be tested in the event you get sick.

If only you had … checked yourself for ticks when you came inside. The insects take up to several hours to attach themselves, giving you time to get rid of them. If in the future you want to be utterly thorough, shower and change your clothes.

What happened:

Why you’re worried: Rabies!

+ What to do: Don’t panic— your risk of rabies is low. Squirrels

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A YELLOW JACKET.

Why you’re worried: This is your first sting, and you fear a life-threatening allergic reaction.

+ What

to do: The chances you’re allergic are remote: Hypersensitivity develops as a result of being stung, so future stings are the ones to worry about. But just to be safe, tell someone you’ve been stung, so if your airway begins to close or other serious symptoms develop, he or she will be ready to call an ambulance; you could also call the National Poison Control Center hotline at 1-800222-1222. Apply an ice pack to reduce swelling and slow the spread of venom. Acetaminophen or ibuprofen may reduce pain, as may a topical anesthetic cream.

ALAMY; SHUTTERSTOCK

YOU’VE BEEN BITTEN BY A CHIPMUNK.

What happened: YOU’VE BEEN STUNG BY


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If only you had … called an exterminator to remove the nest and laid off the perfume, which attracts wasps.

What happened: YOU STEPPED ON A RUSTY NAIL.

Why you’re worried: You can’t remember when you last had a tetanus shot.

+ What

to do: Wash the wound with soap and

water, scrubbing it to remove any dirt and debris. Apply antibiotic ointment and a Band-Aid. If the wound won’t scrub clean or begins to look infected, call your doctor. Also consider a tetanus shot. You need one every 10 years. And if it’s been more than five years, your doctor may want you to have a booster. Get the shot within 48 hours. If only you had … cleaned up that construction debris—and not decided to recapture the Huck Finn–like feeling of going barefoot.

What happened: YOU FELL ASLEEP IN THE SUN, AND NOW YOU’RE TURNING THE COLOR OF A BOILED LOBSTER.

Why you’re worried: You face the prospect of a sleepless night, fever-like chills, general ridicule and, down the road, an increased risk of skin cancer.

+ What to do: Keep the burned skin cool and moist. It’s OK to apply aloe, moisturizing lotion or hydrocortisone cream. Aspirin or other anti-inflammatory medication may help. Don’t break any blisters that form. If you develop fever or severe pain, see a doctor.

If only you had … applied sunscreen before going outdoors, not laid down in a chaise after drinking two margaritas, sworn off sunbathing forever and used the patio umbrella for its intended purpose.

What happened: YOU’VE BEEN BITTEN BY A SNAKE.

Why you’re worried: You’ve been bitten by a snake!

+ What to do: Stay calm. Most snakes are not ven-

omous. Only three poisonous species are native to New York—the copperhead, the timber rattlesnake (both of which have triangular heads and slit-like eyes) and the massasauga (with large hourglass-shaped marks on its back). But don’t worry about identifying the snake. If the bite punctured the skin, get medical attention quickly. While waiting to be treated, keep the affected limb immobile and lower than your heart. Don’t apply ice or a tourniquet, and don’t cut the wound to try to remove the venom. If only you had … steered clear. Unless you’re a herpetologist, stay away from serpents. Don’t sit on stone walls, a likely habitat for rattlers.

What happened: THOSE WEEDS YOU PULLED MUST HAVE INCLUDED SOME POISON IVY.

Why you’re worried: The itching is heinous, and the rash is spreading. How bad is this going to get? What to do: Options for relief include calamine lotion, hydrocortisone cream, an oral antihistamine such as Benadryl and an Aveeno oatmeal bath. If the itching becomes unbearable or your eyes, throat or other sensitive areas are affected, see a physician. A prescription corticosteroid can do wonders. If only you had … worn gardening gloves or used Ivy Block, an over-the-counter skin barrier. ■

+

FAST FACTS • Hawaii is the only state that has not had a single native case of rabies in animals or humans. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

• More than a third of all adult women (36.3%) and nearly half of all adult men (46.4%) experience a sunburn each year. Source: American Cancer Society

• The record for the most bee stings sustained by a surviving human is 2,443 by Johannes Relleke in Zimbabwe in 1962. Source: www.guinnessworldrecords.com

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034_WCHL_AUG09.indd 34

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Westchester’s outdoors

The sound and the river TRY THESE 3 WAYS TO ENJOY OUR TWIN WATERY WONDERS

GETTY; SHUTTERSTOCK

Row your boat On Westchester’s Hudson shore, you’ll find several places to launch canoes, kayaks and small boats. GEORGE’S ISLAND PARK in Montrose handles crafts up to 21 feet, 8 a.m. to dusk daily, April through October (914-737-7530; ramp fee $25 or $15 with a county Park Pass, which costs $50 for three years—call 914-995-4050). CROTON POINT PARK in Croton-on-Hudson (914-862-5290; parking $8, or $4 with a Park Pass) has the same schedule, but only for sailboats, canoes and boats your car can carry. Downriver there’s the YONKERS BOAT RAMP at John F. Kennedy Marina (914-377-6450, free) for up to 15-footers. On Long Island Sound, launch up to 21-foot boats at New Rochelle’s GLEN ISLAND PARK (914-813-6720; launch fee $15), 8 a.m. to dusk, if you have a Park Pass. And PLAYLAND PARK in Rye (914-813-7010; parking $4 weekdays, $5 weekends) takes car-top boats and kayaks. Don’t own a boat? Rent one at WAMPUS POND PARK in Armonk (914-237-3230; $10 an hour, $8 with a Park Pass). And HUDSON RIVER RECREATION (914-682-5135, www.kayakhud son.com) rents kayaks at Tarrytown Lakes in Tarrytown and—starting this July— also at Croton Point Park. A single kayak is $33 per hour, $50 for two hours; a double is $55 an hour, $75 for two.

WATERSIDE WALKS Want to catch breathtaking views of the Hudson River and the Palisades cliffs of New Jersey and Rockland County—and burn a few calories while you’re at it? Take a stroll on the WESTCHESTER RIVERWALK, a pedestrian-friendly route along the river that will one day extend 51.5 miles, from the Bear Mountain Bridge to the Big Apple’s northern boundary. With 31.2 miles now complete as paved and unpaved paths, promenades and sidewalks, the RiverWalk already offers many places to enjoy a long amble (or jog or bike ride). Blink hard, for example, and enjoy picture-postcard images of the Hudson at Riverfront Green Park in Peekskill, Steamboat Riverfront Park in Verplanck, Ichabod’s Landing in Sleepy Hollow, Scenic Hudson Park in Irvington or Hudson Park in Yonkers. Or ogle the ducks, geese and cormorants in a lagoon alongside a new section of the trail in Croton Landing Park, dedicated just this spring. Several spots along RiverWalk have generous parking, but why not “go green” and leave the car at home? The trail connects with 13 of the county’s 14 Metro-North Hudson Line stations. (Find out more at www.westchestergov.com/RiverWalk.)

CRUISE CONTROL

Learn about the Hudson aboard a historic

boat with Hudson Highlands Cruises (845-534-7245, www.hudsonhigh landscruises.com). The M.V. Commander, which offers three-hour narrated tours to West Point and back, is the last operating vessel that served in the U.S. Navy in World War I. Trips leave Peekskill’s riverfront at 12:30 p.m. on the last Saturday of the month (and Sundays August 9, September 6 and October 11), returning at 3:30 p.m. Fare is $30 for adults, $25 for seniors 62 and up and $20 for kids 5 to 12. In Kingston, Hudson River Cruises (845-340-

THE M.V. COMMANDER

4700, www.hudson rivercruises.com) provides narrated two-hour jaunts. Or book your own Long Island Sound wedding or party cruise with Skyline Cruises (718-446-1100, www.sky linecruises.com).

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Westchester’s outdoors

Nature calls A FEW WAYS TO EXPERIENCE ALL THE COUNTY’S NATURAL WONDERS

JOIN THE CLUB!

HAPPY TRAILS Secluded Westchester spots to make you forget all about that rush-hour traffic on Interstate 95 WARD POUND RIDGE RESERVATION (near Pound Ridge, with entrance in Cross River): This 4,700-acre preserve, the county’s largest, offers picnicking and camping, plus 35 miles of scenic hiking trails through a stunning variety of habitats. At the south end, check out the Bear Rock Petroglyph, a rock carved by Native Americans in the image of a bear. A mile and a half from the entrance, the Trailside Nature Museum is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. except Mondays and Fridays. Parking: $8 per vehicle. LASDON PARK AND ARBORETUM (Somers): In this 234-acre facility visitors will find woodlands, meadows and gardens—and plant and tree specimens from around the world. You might even meet a fox, coyote or wild turkey. In the park, see the Chinese Friendship Pavilion, a gift from the People’s Republic of China. BLUE MOUNTAIN RESERVATION (Welcher Avenue, Peekskill): A reward for the hardiest hikers? That’d be the breathtaking views from atop Blue Mountain or its neighbor, Mount Spitzenberg, in this 1,500-acre wonderland, which also tempts mountain bikers and nature-study fans.

For $50, a three-year Westchester County Park Pass gives you access to 18,000 parkland acres—and many discounts. Visit www.westchester gov.com/PARKS.

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JUPITER IMAGES

With these 7 groups, activity and camaraderie go hand in hand. BIKE: Westchester Cycle Club (914-721-6018, www.westchestercycleclub.org). Founded in 1975 as the Country Cycle Club, this 1,300-member group offers guided road and mountain biking on in-season weekends and weekday evenings for all skill levels. (Annual membership fee of $20 includes a discount at local bike shops.) Westchester Mountain Biking Association (wmba.org). This club’s annual highlights are the Fat Tire Festival in June and the Chainstretcher race in the fall. (No annual dues.) HIKE: Adirondack Mountain Club, Mohican Chapter (203-348-3993, www.adkmohican.org). Members here take to the trails in both gentle local walks and challenging highpeak climbs in the Catskills and Adirondacks. (Annual membership: $50/individual, $60/family, $40/student or senior.) Westchester Trails Association (wta.nynjtc.org). This morethan-75-year-old group hosts weekend day hikes throughout the Hudson Valley. (Annual membership: $7/person.) BOAT: Yonkers Paddling & Rowing Club (www.yprc.org). Born as the Yonkers Canoe Club back in 1886, this boat owners’ group offers both short social paddles and multiday events. (Annual memberships: $75/individual, $100/family.) BIRD: Hudson River Audubon Society of Westchester (www.hras.org). Can’t tell a sparrow from a swallow? No worries. This club is for anyone with an appreciation for birds and the natural world. Meetings are free and open to nonmembers. (Annual dues: $20 for new members.) SKI: Mogul Meister Ski Club (914-462-3400, www.mogulmeisterski club.org). This organization sponsors many Northeast ski trips, and some as far away as Europe. Meetings are held at 8 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 139 North Broadway in White Plains. (Annual membership: $45.)


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Westchester’s outdoors

Outdoor EATS WHERE AND HOW TO DINE ALFRESCO IN WESTCHESTER

3 PLACES TO PICNIC Our favorite spots for an open-air repast • FOR ROMANTICS: Croton Point Park, Croton-on-Hudson (914-862-5290). In these 508 riverside acres, you’re sure to find a secluded spot to spread your blanket. Take a dip with your sweetie at the park’s beach—open weekends and holidays—or snuggle up amid vistas of the Tappan Zee Bridge and Tarrytown Lighthouse at the

A table under the stars

park’s southern tip. (Parking: $4 with Westchester Park Pass, $8 without.)

There’s nothing like dining in a twilight breeze—or by candlelight

• FOR FAMILIES: Saxon Woods Park,

under a celestial canopy. And happily, the county offers a wealth of

Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains (914-9954480). Hot dogs taste better on 700 lush acres with a pool and an 18-hole miniaturegolf course. This park also has the county’s first playground equipped to be accessible to disabled kids. (Park Pass required; fee to use facilities: $6 adults, $4 kids.) • FOR ACTIVE FOLKS: Willson’s Woods Park, Mount Vernon (914-995-4480). Before or after your nosh, cool off on the spray deck, enjoy the fountains in the water playground, body-surf on 3-foot waves in the county’s first wave pool or plunge down the 18-foot water slide. (Park Pass required; facilities fee: $6 adults, $4 kids.) Note: Groups of 25 or more need a permit from the Group Permits Office (914-864-7075) to picnic at any county park.

options. Savor a sunset along with the tasty Mediterranean cuisine, for example, at HARVEST ON HUDSON in Hastings (914-478-2800, www.harvest2000.com/hoh), which overlooks the Hudson River. In Yonkers, try one of the 22 outdoor tables at LA LANTERNA (914-4763060, www.lalanterna.com) for Italian dishes prepared with a “Swiss twist” and live entertainment Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Or watch the trains go by against a scenic river backdrop from the charming brick patio at Irvington’s IL SORRISO—Italian for “the smile” (914-591-2525, www.ilsorriso.com). At North Salem’s VOX BAR & RESTAURANT (914-669-5450, www.voxnorthsalem.com), proprietors Jean and Sophie Lebris serve French cuisine on a patio overlooking a flower-rimmed lawn. In Pound Ridge, taste the storied Chilean sea bass at NORTH STAR (914-764-0200, www.northstarny.com). And in Armonk, dine outdoors at OPUS 465 (914-273-4676, www.opus465.com). In Port Chester, try the Loch Duart Scottish salmon at F.I.S.H. (914-939-4227, www.fishfoxisland.com) overlooking the Byram River. Or enjoy sidewalk dining at the Italian POSTO 22 in New Rochelle (914-235-2464, www.posto22.com) or ZITOUNE in Mamaroneck (914835-8350, www.zitounerestaurant.com), where owner/chef Alain Bennouna claims the belly-dancer does sometimes venture outside.

SHUTTERSTOCK; KEITH PETRI

Basket-packing 101 • BE CREATIVE. Picnic perennials such as chicken drumsticks

so it stays fresh,” adds Pellis.

are fine, says Craig Pellis, owner and executive chef at Mount

• TRY ‘DOUBLE DUTY.’ Pop a

Kisco’s Silver Spoon Catering (914-241-0955, www.silverspoon

water bottle in the freezer the

cateringny.com). “But for a special occasion—say, an outdoor

night before. Packed next to food,

classical-music concert—consider bringing it up a level with

it helps chill it; later it’s a refreshing drink.

Brie, French baguettes and an interesting berry marmalade.”

• GO EASY. “Pack simple-to-eat things—sandwiches cut into

• WRAP IT. He suggests wrapping items tightly in foil or plas-

small pieces, for example, rather than a big hero,” says Pellis.

tic, then securing them in plastic bags in the cooler, so there

• BE PLANET-FRIENDLY. Consider biodegradable, corn-based

are two layers to guard treats from leaks.

disposable utensils and dishes, advises Pellis. Available in

• COOL IT. “The main thing is to be sure the food is kept cold

many drugstores, they won’t end up eternally in a landfill.


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HOME

produced by

Rita Guarna

SIT THIS ONE OUT UNWIND IN ALFRESCO ELEGANCE WITH THESE HIP OUTDOOR SEATING OPTIONS

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THIS PAGE (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): • Retro lovers will covet the sleek Klip armchair from Koverton Classics ($1,299), made of stainless steel and vinyl tubing. • Seat yourself in soothing style with the Riviera lounge chair from Century Furniture ($2,600 to $3,900), made of powder-coated aluminum and available in six colors. • Reposition yourself to your heart’s content with the teak-and-stainless-steel Fiftyfive Chaise Lounge from Giati ($8,060). • Meditate on life’s mysteries—or just peruse a magazine—on the cushy teak-framed Moon Sofa (to designers only), designed by John Hutton for Sutherland, available in four finishes. • Don’t rely on flowers to make your yard bright. Add pop with the flame-hued Bellechase chair from Veneman’s Roger Thomas Outdoor Elegance Collection ($1,260). OPPOSITE: • Say “ooh, la la” to Outdoor Lifestyle’s stunning French-inspired Provencal table ($3,028), crafted of cast and extruded aluminum and flanked by two Ashbury arm chairs ($388 each) and six Ashbury side chairs ($318 each). continued


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THIS PAGE (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): • Choose this Coast Arc Chaise ($4,300) from Henry Hall Designs and your space will always be sunny. The lounge features underseat storage and is adjustable to six positions. • Rock out with Pier 1 Imports’ Pier Painted Wood Rocking Chair ($160). • Go modern with this Zephyr Collection resin-weave arm chair ($2,185 to $2,320, depending on fabric). • Don’t stay ahead of the curve, rest upon it with Whitecraft’s rounded All-Weather Wave Runner Lounge Rocker ($1,120). • Give your patio a comfy spot of whimsy with the colorful iron curls of the ReTrouvé 566 chair ($1,120), by Patricia Urquiola for Emu. OPPOSITE: • Relax regally in Windham Castings’ elegant Catalina chaise longue ($1,550), made of powder-coated aluminum. ■

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ESCAPES

GRAPE getaways NEW YORK’S FINGER LAKES

REGION IS AN OENOPHILE’S

PARADISE—AND FUN FOR THE REST OF US TOO

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tains some of the region’s top vineyards. A good place to start is Dr. Konstantin Frank’s Vinifera Wine Cellars—perhaps the most lauded of all the Finger Lakes wineries. Ukrainian-born Frank oversaw vineyards in the Soviet Union before moving to the U.S. in 1951. He revolutionized the New York wine industry by being the first in the region to cultivate Vitis vinifera—grapes traditionally used by European winemakers—where few believed they would grow in the region’s chilly climate. The winery wins numerous awards every year; its Salmon Run label is perhaps its most recognizable offering. Just a few minutes down the road is Heron Hill, another standout. With a sleek, modern design, the winery is notable for both its architecture and its stunning views of Keuka Lake. Its 2002 Johannisberg Riesling landed Best of Show at the 2004 San Francisco International Wine

JAMES SCHWABEL/ALAMY

FLOURISHING VINEYARDS, ROLLING HILLS, bucolic farmland—few jaunts are more romantic than a scenic drive through wine country. And fortunately, you don’t have to travel to France or California’s Napa Valley to find sublime grapes and breathtaking scenery. Much closer is a delightful region known increasingly for its award-winning wines: New York’s Finger Lakes. While there are seven commonly identified Finger Lakes, three of them—Cayuga, Seneca and Keuka, going east to west—represent the center of viticulture, with more than 80 surrounding vineyards. A driving tour is the best way to cover the area, which is primarily gentle hills and Amishand Mennonite-owned farmland, peppered with spectacular glacial gorges and waterfalls. Nestled at the base of Keuka Lake, the town of Hammondsport (about five hours from Westchester) con-


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ABOVE: The picturesque vineyards dotting Seneca Lake and the rest of the Finger Lakes region make for a bucolic—and

SHUTTERSTOCK

tasty—trip.

Competition, and visitors can stop for a libation and a bite at the Blue Heron Café after touring the grounds. You’ll find nary a wine snob at Bully Hill Vineyards, also in Hammondsport, which lures crowds with its decidedly unpretentious tour. The tasting room offers a panoramic view of Keuka Lake, and revelers can swill Bully Hill’s best, including the Sweet Walter White, Le Goat Blush and Meat Market Red. You get the idea. In terms of critical acclaim, Glenora is probably Dr. Frank’s top rival. For this you have to travel to the town of Dundee on Seneca Lake, approximately an hour’s drive. The winery earned bragging rights when President George W. Bush sampled its reserve Chardonnay at his first inaugural ball. If you’re concerned about getting tipsy behind the wheel, you can call on a number of local tour companies (Finger Lakes Winery Tours, 315-828-6289, and Grapevine Country Tours, 315-585-9599) to chauffeur

you about. Private limo, minivan and bus tours typically run six hours, hit a half dozen vineyards and cost between $30 and $100 per person—the higher prices are for smaller tour groups. There are also plenty of alternatives once the wine trails have been exhausted (or have exhausted you). Even those for whom hiking holds little appeal should check out

don’t miss this LEAVES AND LOBSTERS 2009 Those for whom a quiet drive and a few sips of Chardonnay are simply not enough should target September 19 and 20 for their getaway.

On

those

dates,

Glenora Wine Cellars hosts a weekend of full-blown bacchanalian revelry with its 10th annual “down

east

lobster

bake,”

replete with live music and—of course—plenty of wine, on the shores of Seneca Lake. Call 1800-243-5513 or visit www.glen ora.com for more information.

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Gorgeous gorges—replete with waterfalls—are among the natural wonders that highlight Watkins Glen State Park.

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COURTESY OF FINGER LAKES WINE COUNTRY TOURISM

the breathtaking scenery. Watkins Glen State Park, just south of Seneca Lake, is about 20 minutes from Glenora and features strange rock formations, steep crevasses and cascading waterfalls. The park was the site of a large-scale public works project in the 1930s, which created a stone walkway that meanders through the park. Hikers can walk behind waterfalls and marvel at the natural remains of the Ice Age. You can get the full tour in a half day. If you’re desperate to cool off from the summer heat—well, this is lake country. Drive north from Watkins Glen along the Seneca Lake coast to reach one of the three notable state parks: either Lodi Point (35 minutes), Sampson (45 minutes) or Seneca Lake (45 minutes), all of which offer swimming, boating, fishing and camping. Those traveling with kids would be remiss not to visit the Cayuga Nature Center in Ithaca—about 45 minutes east of Watkins Glen, at the base of Cayuga Lake. The highlight of the preserve is Treetops, a six-story “observational treehouse” designed and built by Ithaca High School’s class of 2000. It’s the ideal way for kids to get “up close and personal” with wildlife. Stop for homemade ice cream at the Cayuga Lake Creamery afterward. Those with more time can explore the multitude of quaint villages north of the lakes. Located at the top of Cauyga Lake (about an hour north of Watkins Glen) is Seneca Falls, home to the historic 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, where the foundation for the modern-day women’s rights movement was laid. Another 40 minutes east is Skaneateles, which boasts a charming lakeside vibe and stunning architecture—check out the Gothic Revival Reuel Smith house. On the trip back to Westchester, make a detour to the Corning Museum of Glass. With more than 45,000 objects, it is the world’s largest glass museum. Live glassblowing demonstrations occur throughout the day, and shoppers interested in returning home with art in hand can browse the works of more than 200 artists. But despite the profusion of available activities, overscheduling one’s itinerary would be a grievous mistake. The true beauty of the Finger Lakes region, after all, is its simplicity. And there are far worse fates than zipping through pastoral back roads without a care in the world. So perhaps just this once, abandon the idea of due diligence. Throw a few clothes in an overnight bag, put the top down on that old Saab and hit the road. Just don’t forget the corkscrew. ■


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Soaring vistas of Keuka Lake are among the many charms of historic

JAMES KIDD

Esperanza Mansion.

places to perch

tables to try

ESPERANZA MANSION (3456 Route 54A, Bluff Point; 1-866-927-

MOOSEWOOD RESTAURANT (215 North Cayuga Street, Ithaca;

4400; www.esperanzamansion.com). Listed on the National Register

607-273-9610; www.moosewoodrestaurant.com). Lauded by Bon

of Historic Places, this elegant Keuka Lake mansion offers both old-

Appetit as one of the 13 most influential restaurants of the 20th

world luxury and modern charm. Nine beautifully appointed rooms

century, Moosewood has been a pioneer in vegetarian cooking since

feature canopy and sleigh beds, plus flat-screen TVs and Internet

its 1973 opening. Its recipes have spawned 11 cookbooks. To put it

access. Double-occupancy stays run $160 to $275 per night.

simply, if you leave the region without dining here, you’ve erred.

WHITE SPRINGS MANOR (4069 Route 14 South, Geneva; 315-781-

SUZANNE FINE REGIONAL CUISINE (9013 Route 414, Lodi; 607-

0201;

Immerse

582-7545; www.suzannefrc.com). Before opening this acclaimed

yourself in the glory of a bygone era at this stately, 16-room

Finger Lakes eatery, Suzanne Stack worked under renowned chef

Georgian Revival farm mansion, set on Seneca Lake. Stroll through

James Laird at Restaurant Serenade in Chatham. The contempo-

the Belhurst Vineyard, located on the estate property, and return

rary American menu contains only locally grown organic produce;

for a relaxing soak in the Jacuzzi. A double-occupancy stay ranges

treat yourself to the filet mignon with garlic mashed potatoes in

from $75 to $255 per night.

a port wine sauce.

YALE MANOR BED & BREAKFAST (563 Yale Farm Road, Romulus;

DOUG’S FISH FRY (8 Jordan Street, Skaneateles; 315-685-3288;

315-585-2208; www.yalemanor.com). This cozy B&B is perfect for

www.dougsfishfry.com/dff_skaneateles). Great fish in Central New

travelers hoping to be pampered for a weekend. The manor is

York? Sure enough, Doug’s has earned its reputation by trucking in

not too far from the Seneca and Cayuga Lake wine trails, as well

fresh catches from the Boston fish auction five times a week. For

as an array of crafts fairs and farmer’s markets. The cost for two

25 years, people have been flocking here for fish-and-chips, dry sea

people is from $90 to $225 per night. There are only six rooms,

scallops and grilled shrimp kebabs. The laid-back, family-friendly

so make reservations far in advance.

landmark has a special counter where kids can nosh and mingle.

www.belhurst.com/White-Springs-Manor.html).

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Glorious Food

by Kristin Colella

Provençal-style stuffed zucchini SERVES 4–8

8 small zucchini (about 7 inches long and 11⁄4 to 11⁄2 inches wide)

peeled and seeded tomatoes

Kosher salt

1 tablespoon minced garlic

21⁄2 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil, divided

1 tablespoon freshly chopped basil leaves

6 ounces fresh sausage, such as lamb or mild pork sausage

1 teaspoon freshly chopped thyme leaves

1 cup minced onion Freshly ground black pepper 1 cup finely chopped

1

⁄4 cup fine dry bread crumbs, divided

1

⁄4 cup grated Gruyere

1

⁄4 cup finely grated Parmesan

• Lay the zucchini down on a flat work surface and, using a sharp knife, cut the top 1⁄4 of each squash off lengthwise. • Using a small melon baller or paring knife, remove the inner flesh from the zucchini to form a small boat shape, leaving a shell on the sides and bottom approximately 1⁄4-inch thick. Cut the trim-

Miracle GROWERS

mings into 1⁄4-inch dice and reserve separately. • Lightly salt the inside of each zucchini and set aside, cut sides down, on paper towels to drain. • In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. When hot, add the sausage and sauté until golden, using a spoon to break it into small pieces, about 6 minutes.

A BOUNTIFUL SUMMER STAPLE, ZUCCHINI

• Add the onion and cook until soft, 3 to 4 minutes.

IS A SAVORY WARM-WEATHER TREAT

• Add the chopped zucchini, season lightly with

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salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until squash is soft and lightly caramelized, about 5 minutes. • Add the tomatoes and garlic and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. • Add the basil, thyme and 21⁄2 tablespoons of the breadcrumbs. Season to taste, with additional salt and pepper if necessary, and set aside to cool. • Preheat oven to 350 degrees and lightly grease a baking dish with 1⁄2 tablespoon of olive oil. • Pat the insides of the zucchini with paper towels and rub the outsides of the zucchini with the remaining olive oil. • Spoon the mostly cooled filling into the zucchini. Sprinkle with the cheeses, then top with the remaining bread crumbs. • Bake for 30 minutes, or until golden brown and crispy on top.

RECIPE SOURCE: FOOD NETWORK (WWW.FOODNETWORK.COM)

CHALK IT UP TO AN EAGERNESS TO PLEASE. A member of the summer squash family, zucchini is one of the most prolific plants around. Indeed, zucchini left on the vine can grow to several feet in length, but the fruit is most tender when plucked young (about 6 to 8 inches long) Fast fact While considered a with firm, shiny skin. With a vegetable in the culinary plentiful supply in summer world, zucchini is technically months, it’s a good thing recipes a fruit—the swollen ovary for zucchini abound, from of the zucchini blossom. casseroles to quiches to pasta Source: University of Illinois Extension dishes to that beloved bread. And no need to feel guilty about overindulging—at just 20 calories per cup, the squash are an excellent source of vitamin C. Still, if your garden yields too big a bounty, don’t fret: You can refrigerate zucchini for up to five days ... or simply share with friends. ■


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Westchester GOURMET

by Maria Lissandrello

of the telltale pans emerging from the kitchen, tails of steam streaming behind them. Yet I’d prefer the foie gras served in a more traditional fashion. Here it sits in a puddle of oil, quadrupling its fat content, and the peppers and shallots don’t tease out its natural sweetness nearly enough. Missing is sufficient acid to counter the liver’s richness, and the foie gras itself is not quite the delicate, buttery wonder I’d hoped for. The smoked oyster fricassee turns out to be more soupy than creamy. In the brothy bowl: plump oysters, root vegetables and grape tomatoes but no discernible sign of the promised black truffle. The dominant flavor is smoke, which isn’t rounded out by the accompanying ingredients. Where Hamlet really shines is in the entrées. Here his execution and presentation are virtually flawless. They’d better be: With a name like “The best duck you will ever have,” the diner expects, well, the best. And the perfectly roasted duck breast delivers. Crisp-skinned, with just the right amount of fat, it’s made fragrant and flavorful with a fennel seed rub. For sweetening, dip a forkful in the thick blackberry sauce and alternate with a taste of the whipped sweet potato. The fennelkraut, julienned fennel and onions with a vinegary dressing, provides a sweet-andsour complement to this memorable dish. Also on the four-star roster: the tenderloin. The meat itself is bold and full-bodied, with a wonderful char. It’s served with a foie gras flan that puts the foiejitas to A FEW YEARS OLDER THAN THE U.S.A., PURDY’S shame—at least to this palate. Nicely eggy and velvetyHomestead—the site of John-Michael’s fine restaurant lush, with foie gras as a sophisticated undertone, the flan in North Salem—is a revolutionary backdrop (literally) is pure decadence but subtly flavored, so as not to comto some truly sumptuous entrées. The white clapboard pete with the beef. The result is an Colonial, with its stone fireplaces, entrée that wanders into luxe territory, wide dark-cedar floorboards and J o h n M i c h a e l ’s a t but—thanks to the flan’s subtle flavor beautiful timeworn beams, is itself a P u r d y ’s H o m e s t e a d —keeps its richness in perfect balfoil for chef/owner John-Michael 100 Titicus Road, North Salem; ance, so it’s never cloying. Hamlet’s decidedly modern fare. 914-277-2301 For dessert, the Granny Smith The Culinary Institute of Hours apple crisp, topped with vanilla ice America–trained Hamlet says his Wednesday and Thursday, 5:30–9 p.m.; cream, is simple and satisfying. And food is “an imaginative interpretaFriday and Saturday, 5:30–10 p.m.; the profiteroles dribbled with darktion of European cuisine that origiSunday, 4–8 p.m. chocolate sauce are just delicious. nates from the French classics.” What you should know John-Michael’s menu changes slightly Hence, a dish like his trademarked • Entrées range from $18 to $32 with the seasons, so you can expect to “foiejitas”—four oblong strips of foie • Full bar be delighted with new dishes and gras presented in a sizzling pan on a • $30 three-course prix fixe menu desserts at every visit. Further, you plate alongside marinated red pepoffered on weekdays can rest assured that, even if a dish is pers and candied shallots. They’re • Frequent diners’ club a tad off the mark, it will reflect meant to be rolled, fajita style, in the • Monthly cooking demonstrations Hamlet’s full heart and passion. accompanying nutmeg crêpes. To be offered Such zeal is hard to resist. ■ sure, the dish is popular: I lost count • Private parties accommodated

Tender loving flair

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AUGUST 2009

• All credit cards accepted

CHRISTOPHER BARTH

• Handicapped accessible

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where TO EAT

If you’ve got a craving, there’s a dining establishment in Westchester County (or nearby) that will satisfy it. Tur n to this listing next time you want a wonderful meal out.

ARMONK

• 4 W. Main St., Irvington • 866-933-5478

PEEKSKILL

OPUS 465 Contemporary cuisine in an unpretentious environment. • 465 Main St., Armonk • 914-273-4676

IRVINGTON-ON-HUDSON

DIVISION STREET GRILL Food with a contemporary American flair. • 26 N. Division St., Peekskill • 914-739-6380

RED HAT ON THE RIVER Upscale eatery

featuring contemporary American cuisine. • 1 Bridge St., Irvington-on-Hudson • 914-591-5888

ZEPHS’ Global soul food. • 638 Central

French bistro fare. • 391 Old Post Rd. (Rt. 22), Bedford • 914-234-7333

LARCHMONT

PORT CHESTER

PLATES New American menu with Italian,

F.I.S.H. Mediterranean take on seafood. • 102

BRIARCLIFF MANOR

French and Asian accents. • 121 Myrtle Blvd., Larchmont • 914-834-1244

Fox Island Rd., Port Chester • 914-939-4227

BEDFORD

Avenue, Peekskill • 914-736-2159

BISTRO TWENTY-TWO Romantic setting for

GUADALAJARA Festive Mexican including

RYE

favorites like fajitas. • 2 Union St., Briarcliff Manor • 914-944-4380

MAMARONECK TOLLGATE STEAKHOUSE Known for prime

LA PANETIÈRE Contemporary French cuisine. • 530 Milton Rd., Rye • 914-967-8140

TERRA RUSTICA Classic Italian with salads,

porterhouse steak. • 974 E. Boston Post Rd., Mamaroneck • 914-381-7233

SCARSDALE

pastas and seafood. • 550 N. State Rd., Briarcliff Manor • 914-923-8300

MERITAGE New American cuisine in a chic

Manhattan-style setting. • 1505 Weaver St., Scarsdale • 914-472-8484

C H A P PA Q U A CRABTREE’S KITTLE HOUSE An award-

SLEEPY HOLLOW

winning wine cellar complements American fare. • 11 Kittle Rd. (off Rt. 117), Chappaqua • 914-666-8044

WASABI Relaxed atmosphere serving sushi,

sashimi and hot dishes. • 279 N. Broadway, Sleepy Hollow • 914-332-7788

DON EMILIO’S AT LOBO’S CAFÉ Vibrant,

upscale Mexican eatery. • 57-59 King St., Chappaqua • 914-238-2368

SOUTH SALEM

CORTLANDT MANOR

LE CHÂTEAU Classic French dishes in a Tudor mansion built by J.P. Morgan. • Rts. 35 and 123, South Salem • 914-533-6631

M I L LW O O D

MONTEVERDE Fine Continental menu with a

view of the Hudson River. Fresh lobster, beef and lamb. • 28 Bear Mountain Bridge Rd., Cortlandt Manor • 914-739-5000

C R O T O N FA L L S PRIMAVERA Regional Italian cuisine. Try the

jumbo shrimp parmigiana or grilled Scottish salmon. • 595 Rt. 22, Croton Falls • 914-277-4580

CROTON-ON-HUDSON OCEAN HOUSE New England–style seashore

fare including steamers, grilled wild salmon and fried clams. • 49 N. Riverside Ave., Croton-onHudson • 914-271-0702

DOBBS FERRY TOMATILLO Authentic Mexican fare featuring

in-season local ingredients. • 13 Cedar St., Dobbs Ferry • 914-478-2300

HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON HARVEST-ON-HUDSON Mediterranean cuisine, with river views. • 1 River St., Hastings-on-Hudson • 914-478-2800

IRVINGTON FLIRT SUSHI LOUNGE Japanese eatery

known for provocatively named sushi rolls.

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SPACCARELLI’S RISTORANTE

Neighborhood eatery emphasizing Abruzzese cuisine. • 238 Saw Mill River Rd., Millwood • 914-941-0105

MOHEGAN LAKE BELLA VITA Italian spot known for home-

made pumpkin ravioli. • 1744 E. Main St., Mohegan Lake • 914-528-8233

TA R R Y T O W N EQUUS RESTAURANT French fare served at Castle on the Hudson. • 400 Benedict Ave., Tarrytown • 914-631-3646

THORNWOOD

MOUNT KISCO

ABIS JAPANESE RESTAURANT Traditional Japanese cuisine plus steakhouse hibachi. • 14 Marble Ave., Thornwood • 914-741-5100

COCO RUMBA’S Nuevo Latino menu

AZZURRI Mediterranean fare served in a

spotlighting seafood and exotic drinks. • 443 Lexington Ave., Mount Kisco • 914-241-2299

Tuscan villa atmosphere. • 665 Commerce St., Thornwood • 914-747-6656

TUCKAHOE NEW ROCHELLE CITY CHOW HOUSE Asian-Latin fusion

cuisine in a modern setting. • 1 Radisson Plaza, New Rochelle • 914-576-4141

AN AMERICAN BISTRO Bright eatery featuring quesadillas, lamb and chicken. • 296 Columbus Ave., Tuckahoe • 914-793-0807

WEST HARRISON NORTH SALEM JOHN-MICHAEL’S AT PURDY’S HOMESTEAD

Inspired modern fare set in a Colonial home. • 100 Titicus Rd., North Salem • 914-277-2301 VOX French bistro serving eclectic fare from foie gras to burgers. • 721 Titicus Rd., North Salem • 914-669-5450

AQUARIO Brazilian and Portuguese cuisine specializing in seafood. • 141 E. Lake St., West Harrison • 914-287-0220

WHITE PLAINS BLUE Asian-influenced American fare featuring osso bucco. • 99 Church St., White Plains • 914-220-0000


The Center for Cosmetic Dentistry MORTON’S, THE STEAKHOUSE

Chicago-based steakhouse. • 9 Maple Ave., White Plains • 914-683-6101

YONKERS BISTRO CHARTREUSE Modern updates of French classics. Extensive wine list. • 35 Main St., Yonkers • 914-969-1006 ZUPPA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE Innovative Italian with homemade pasta. • 59 Main St., Yonkers • 914-376-6500 ■

Visit our brand new state-of-the-art facility for a complimentary cosmetic consultation We know your time is valuable. That’s

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WHERE TO EAT BY CUISINE

George L Rioseco, DDS,PC Robert L Rioseco, DMD, LLP 914•761•8229

147 Underhill Avenue•East White Plains, NY 10604

WWW.ZENDENTIST.COM

AMERICAN: An American Bistro, Tuckahoe • Crabtree’s Kittle House, Chappaqua •

Division Street Grill, Peekskill • JohnMichael’s at Purdy’s Homestead, North Salem • Meritage, Scarsdale • Morton’s, The Steakhouse, White Plains • Ocean House, Croton-on-Hudson • The Olde Stone Mill, Tuckahoe • Red Hat on the River, Irvington-on-Hudson • Tollgate Steakhouse, Mamaroneck ASIAN: Abis, Mamaroneck and Thornwood • Flirt Sushi Lounge, Irvington • Wasabi, Sleepy Hollow

CONTINENTAL: Monteverde, Cortlandt

Manor • Opus 465, Armon FRENCH: Bistro Chartreuse, Yonkers • Bistro

Twenty-Two, Bedford • Equus Restaurant, Tarrytown • La Panetière, Rye • Le Château, South Salem • Vox, North Salem ITALIAN: Bella Vita, Mohegan Lake •

Primavera, Croton Falls • Spaccarelli’s Ristorante, Millwood • Terra Rustica, Briarcliff Manor • Zuppa Restaurant & Lounge, Yonkers MEDITERRANEAN: Azzurri, Thornwood • f.i.s.h., Port Chester • Harvest-on-Hudson,

Hastings-on-Hudson MEXICAN: Don Emilio’s at Lobo’s Café,

Chappaqua • Guadalajara, Briarcliff Manor • Tomatillo, Dobbs Ferry

MULTI-ETHNIC: Aquario, West Harrison • Blue, White Plains • City Chow House, New Rochelle • Coco Rumba’s, Mount Kisco • Plates, Larchmont • Zephs’, Peekskill

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SPECIAL promotion

Westchester Medical C enter

in the news WMC Honors Three Leaders at Gala

Pictured L-R , Jeff Zink, Board Member, maria fareri Children’s Hospital Foundation; Janelle Hraiki, Executive Director, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital Foundation; students and LEO members Maggie Cole, Van Vourliotis, Theresa Marriott; Michael Gewitz, M.D., Physician-in-Chief, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital; and LEOS Advisor Debbie Costello.

A Roar of Gratitude to the LEOS Students from the Hendrick Hudson LEOS Club, a schoolaffiliated community service youth organization sponsored by the Hendrick Hudson Lions Club, presented a $30,000 check to Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. The club raised the money during the past year through fundraising events including a Stay-Awake-A-Thon which was held in May at Hendrick Hudson High School in Montrose.

Biathlon Benefits Trauma Center at WMC More than 400 athletes gathered on June 28 for the 8th Annual Westchester Medical Center Biathlon. This year’s event, which took place on the beautiful Medical Center campus and included a two mile run, a 15-mile bike and another two mile run, raised just over $50,000 for the Regional Trauma Center at Westchester Medical Center. Top awards for Overall Male and Overall Female went to Artour Samsonov and Amy Bevilacqua.

WMCintheNews_0809final.indd 1

On June 6, Westchester Medical Center recognized three outstanding individuals at our 30th Annual Gala: Patricia Sheiner, Former Westchester Medical Center patients M.D., FRCS(C), and their families joined more than 700 guests at the 30th Annual Gala. FACS, Director of Liver Transplant and Hapatobiliary Surgery at WMC; Paul Woolf, M.D., Associate Director of Pediatric Cardiology at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital and Director of Graduate Medical Education at WMC; and Lawrence S. Schwartz, Secretary to New York State Governor David Paterson. The event benefits a Transplant Resource Center and an Education Resource Center at Westchester Medical Center, as well as the Westchester Medical Center Foundation. Assisting with the presentation of the awards to the honorees were former patients of Westchester Medical Center or Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital whose lives were forever changed by the treatment they received.

WMC Nurses Take Learning to a Higher Level Nurses from every specialty throughout Westchester Medical Center regularly take on the role of educator to their colleagues and nurses throughout the Eileen Farrington, RN, NP; Joan Madalone, RN, NP; WMC Chief Nursing Officer Hudson Valley region. Laura Caramanica, RN, Ph.D.; and Mary Recently, two Nurse McKiernan, RN, Vice President for Nursing Practitioners took the role of educator a step further and offered their expertise and clinical research on a national stage. Joan Madalone, R.N., N.P., and Eileen Farrington, R.N., N.P., presented posters on evidence-based clinical research projects that originated at Westchester Medical Center out of needs they saw within the hospital. Joan researched and developed positive training practices to significantly decrease central venous catheter infections. Eileen’s work revolved around improving the early identification and treatment of sepsis. These two talented nurse educators, as well as nearly 50 other projects, were featured during continuing education poster sessions during Westchester Medical Center’s National Nurse Recognition Week in early May.

7/15/09 3:23:07 PM


experts in health

S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Would you like to live a healthy life? It takes courage—and the right resources— to commit to living healthy. Finding the right expert eases the anxieties that come along with starting and maintaining a health regime, or, in dealing with a potential health issue. Take heart by knowing that Westchester’s plethora of renowned health experts are just a phone call away. – M A R I LY N Z E L I N S K Y- S YA R T O

The Center for Cosmetic Dentistry Dr. Robert Rioseco, best known for porcelain veneers, implants, whitening, and all phases of general dentistry, has doubled the size of his state-of-the-art office and teaching facility. Dr. Rioseco offers the newest, and most comfortable, dental technology, including Invisalign clear braces for adults and teens. In addition, the center’s Cerec machine digitally designs a perfect-fitting crown in one day, eliminating the need for temporary crowns and multiple visits. ROBERT RIOSECO, D.D.S. | 147 UNDERHILL AVENUE | WEST HARRISON 914-761-8229 | WWW.ZENDENTIST.COM

Bernstein Center for Visual Performance Does your bright child struggle with reading or schoolwork? One out of four children struggle with reading and learning because of hidden vision problems; even kids with 20/20 vision are at risk. Many of these children are misdiagnosed with ADD/ADHD, LD, and dyslexia. With school starting soon, it is essential that parents recognize the signs of vision problems that interfere with learning. For more information about the critical link between vision and learning, please visit the center’s website or call. DR. IRA J. BERNSTEIN | DR. PAUL R. BERNSTEIN 701 WESTCHESTER AVENUE | WHITE PLAINS 914-682-8886 | WWW.BERNSTEINCENTERFORVISUALPERFORMANCE.COM

Healthy Fit for Women Healthy Fit for Women, formerly Simply Fit, voted #1 Readers Choice Awards 2007-2009 for Best Health Club and Weight Loss Center, offers an innovative fitness and proprietary weight loss program based on healthy eating. Healthy Fit, a local women-only health club, offers a friendly, nurturing environment. Call for a complimentary 45-minute weight loss consultation with Greg Vasami, who specializes in helping clients reach individual goals by incorporating healthy lifestyle choices. Massage and babysitting services available. 1000 EAST BOSTON POST ROAD | MAMARONECK 914-670-0600 | WWW.SIMPLYFITFORWOMEN.COM

Visiting Nurse Service in Westchester What if you could use simple technology at home for better healthcare? The Visiting Nurse Service in Westchester expands its popular remote monitoring TeleHealth program to patients with diabetes. TeleHealth monitors many conditions, including hypertension, weight control, asthma, anemia, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The TeleHealth nurse monitors the patient’s readings from a computer, then helps patients understand the information for optimal health results. Call VNSW for more information on TeleHealth. 360 MAMARONECK AVENUE | WHITE PLAINS 914-682-1480 | WWW.VNS.ORG

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Be THERE AUGUST August 11—Take the kids to an outdoor screening of THE TALE OF DESPERAUX, 7 p.m. at the Saxon Woods Park Pool in White Plains. Swim and enjoy a barbecue before the movie begins at sundown. Tickets: $10, FREE for children under 3. Call 914-9954480 or visit www.westchester gov.com for more information. August 12—Relax in the Sculpture Garden, sip complimentary beer and wine and listen to acclaimed singer-pianist Dena DeRose at SHADES OF JAZZ, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Katonah Museum of Art in Katonah. Tickets: $20. Call 914-232-9555 or visit www.katonahmuseum.org for more information. August 20—Add a colorful touch to your porch by designing and painting a windsock at the QUAD CARP WINDSOCK workshop, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Children’s Room at the Warner Library in Tarrytown, for adults or families with children ages 3 and up. FREE. Call 914-631-7734 to register or visit www.warnerlibrary.org for more information. August 30—Bring binocu-

lars and see how many

OYSTER FESTIVAL AT FIVE ISLANDS PARK September 26 and 27—Slurp up some fun at this first annual event in

New Rochelle, featuring eating and shucking contests, rides, games and more. FREE. Call 914-703-0149 or visit ww.westchesteroysterfestival.com for more information. feathered friends you can spot at the FALL MIGRATION BIRD WALK, 8 a.m. at the Marshlands Conservancy in Rye. FREE. Call 914835-4466 or visit www.westchester gov.com for more information.

SEPTEMBER September 12—Go back to the days when rock reigned with the LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE as performed by Hammer of the Gods, 8 p.m. at the Tarrytown Music Hall in Tarrytown. Tickets: $30 to $50. Call 914-631-3390 or visit www.tarrytownmusichall.org for more information.

September 13—See snakes, igua-

nas, turtles and other cold-blooded creatures at THE NEW YORK METRO REPTILE EXPO, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Westchester County Center in White Plains. Tickets: $4 to $12, FREE for kids under 7. Call 845-526-4845 or visit www.reptile expo.com for more information. September 24 through November 29—See 42ND STREET at the Westchester

Broadway Theatre in Elmsford. Tickets: $60 to $73. Call 914592-2222 or visit www.broadway theatre.com for more information.

SEND EVENT LISTINGS TO:

COUNTRY FALL CRAFTS AT LYNDHURST September 11 to 13—Spend an autumn day outdoors at one of the

54

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AUGUST 2009

Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received four months in advance of the event and must include a phone number that will be published.

SHUTTERSTOCK

top-rated arts shows in the country, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday on the scenic grounds of the Lyndhurst Estate in Tarrytown. Over 300 booths featuring handmade items such as jewelry, pottery, clothing and furniture will be featured. Tickets: $3 to $10. Call 845-331-7484 or visit www.artrider.com for more information.

Westchester Health & Life, 110


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What’s HAPPENING

at W e s t c h e s t e r M e d i c a l C e n t e r

SUPPORT GROUPS

ting for Westchester Medical Center’s 10th Annual Golf

For more information, visit www.worldclassmedicine. com.

Tournament, co-chaired by Harold Moskowitz, partner,

Congestive Heart Failure Support Group

Meets on the first Tuesday of every month, 3:30– 4:30 p.m. Call 914-493-1730 for additional information. ■

Hepatitis C Support Group

Meets every other Wednesday, 6–8 p.m., in the Cedarwood Hall Conference Room on the first floor. Call 914-493-7641 to learn more. ■

Living With Multiple Sclerosis

For information, call the Behavioral Health Center Outpatient Department at 914-493-2621. ■

Radiation Medicine Support Group

Meets every Wednesday, 11 a.m.–noon, in the Department of Radiation Medicine conference room. Call 914493-8561 for additional information. ■

Stroke Support Group

Meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month, 6–7:30 p.m. Call 914-493-1573 for more information. ■

Weight-Loss Surgery Support Group

Meets twice monthly at 6 p.m. at the Medical Arts Atrium, 19 Bradhurst Avenue, Suite 1700, Hawthorne.

Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP, and David Asprinio, M.D., Chairman and Director, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Westchester Medical Center. Reservations for this annual event will go quickly. For information on sponsorship opportunities, please call 914-493-8029. ■

Westchester Running Festival

Sunday, October 11. Westchester Medical Center is

proud to present the Westchester Running Festival, featuring a half marathon and 10K. The festival also includes a free half-mile Fun Run for Kids. For additional information, visit www.worldclassmedicine.com. ■

Fifth Annual 100.7 WHUD Children’s Miracle

Network Radiothon Wednesday,

November

11

through Friday, November 13. Broadcasting live and on

location from the lobby of Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. The

LEARNING FOR LIFE Learning for Life is Westchester Medical Center’s series of free seminars held in the Conference Center at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. Parking is available in the Children’s Hospital lot; check in at the security desk. For additional information or to register, call 1-877-WMCDOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com. ■

Weight-Loss Surgery Seminars

fifth

Annual

Children’s

WHUD

Miracle

100.7

Network

Radiothon will benefit the worldclass advanced pediatric care at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. ■

Thursdays, August 13 and 27, September 10 and 24, 4:30–6:30 p.m. If you are overweight, you may be a candidate for bariatric (weight-loss) surgery. Here, bariatric surgeons explain the details of the latest minimally invasive surgical procedures.

SPECIAL EVENTS ■

10th Annual Westchester Medical Center

SHUTTERSTOCK

Golf Tournament Monday, October 5. The prestigious Trump

National Golf Club in Briarcliff Manor is the set-

WESTCHESTER

H E A LT H & L I F E

/

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faces of WESTCHESTER

Tr i , t r i a g a i n At Kingsland Point Park, racers in the first annual Sleepy Hollow Sprint Triathlon walk to the starting line. Following the half-mile

then tackled a 10-mile bike ride 56

/

AUGUST

2009

and 3-mile run.

CHRISTOPHER GORE

swim, the 200-plus participants


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914.739.2244

Don’t let these bad economic times hold you back. Come talk to us — we’ve adjusted our fee schedules to meet your needs. Call to schedule a complimentary lunch and tour.

914.737.2255

6KRUWWHUP5HVSLWH&DUH$YDLODEOH CATHERINE STRET, CORTLANDT MANOR, NY 10567

www.ďŹ eldhome.com C4_WCHL_AUG09.indd 2

7/15/09 4:45:47 PM


Westchester Health & Life August 2009