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W E S T C H E S T E R H E A LT H

WESTCHESTER

health&life T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E from W E S T C H E S T E R M E D I C A L C E N T E R

April 2009 $3.95

& LIFE ■

APRIL 2009

THE HOME ISSUE P lu s

Sleepaway camps for grownups

RUGS: Style underfoot Inside a hip hilltop haven FIND YOUR DESIGN ‘TIME’

health

watch

A burn victim’s amazing comeback ■

Too thin no more: One woman’s story ■

A baby saved by a high-tech procedure ■


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Contents

32

44

40

WESTCHESTER

health&life April 2009 Features 28

QUIZ: What’s your design era? We’ll tell you which time period suits you best and how to create that look in your own beloved abode.

32 At home /

Mad about views

Breathtaking vistas steal the show in this simply designed weekend retreat.

36

Well-dressed floors Never mind neutrals—these eye-catching area rugs give your rooms instant panache and personality.

36

40 Escapes /

Happy campers

Who said sleepaway camp was just for kids? These 3 specialty-themed adult getaways prove you’re never too old to learn something new.

Departments 4 Welcome letter 6 13

Editor’s letter Westchester whispers

· The lights fantastic · Stuck on Q · “What I’m listening to ...” · Garden variety · Knit wits

16 Flash

Captured moments around the county

20 Health watch · A burn victim’s comeback · The newest—and coolest—in medical technology · Too thin no more · Saved by a scope · Spotlight on residents

44 Westchester gourmet World’s fare Fresh and hearty global cuisine awaits at the inspired Zephs’ in Peekskill.

46 Where to eat Your Westchester County dining guide

48 Be there! A listing of local events you won’t want to miss

50 What’s happening

at Westchester Medical Center

52 Shopping guide 56 Faces of Westchester Stretching the point

COVER IMAGE : DAVID PAPAZIAN PHOTOGRAPHY I NC


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Welcome LETTER

Staying on the cutting edge

Quality floor care solutions by Miele: in every shape, size and brilliant color.

FOR ALL OF US, TECHNOLOGY MAKES MANY things that we do in our daily lives better, safer and faster. So you can imagine the key role that technology plays at Westchester Medical Center, where each year we provide care to tens of thousands of the most severely ill and injured patients from the region. As the advanced-care resource in the Hudson Valley, Westchester Medical Center has made a commitment to providing our highly trained and talented medical professionals with access to the newest cutting-edge technology across every field of medicine. As you will read in this issue of Westchester Health & Life, at Westchester Medical Center today we manage more than 12,000 devices on our campus from the most basic to the most advanced. And we continue to invest in the latest technology, from wireless patient bedside monitoring systems using telemetry, to high-definition video systems in our operating rooms, to our recently installed 256-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner that can complete a full-body scan in about 10 seconds. One of only 25 in the United States and the first of its kind in the Hudson Valley, the 256-slice CT will alter the way we diagnose many diseases, particularly heart disease, and I am proud that we are able to offer this to the people of our region. Without technology, the field of medicine would not be where it is today. People would not be as healthy, many diseases would remain incurable and many injuries untreatable. That’s why Westchester Medical Center remains dedicated to investing in the latest and greatest equipment and the finest staff—so that we can continue to be the area’s leader in advanced care, here when patients and their families need us the most.

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MICHAEL D. ISRAEL President and CEO Westchester Medical Center

For additional information about Westchester Medical Center, visit our website at www.worldclassmedicine.com.

3/24/09 4:35:47 PM


Lace up and line up! Sunday, April 19, 2009 for the Annual “Go The Distanceâ€? Walk and Family Fun Day to raise funds for Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. s2EGISTRATIONSTARTSATAM s7ALKSTARTSATAM RAINORSHINE s&REEPARKING

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BUSINESS JOURNAL

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3/24/09 10:19:56 AM


A D VE RT ISE M E NT

Does Your Child Have Special Needs? Why Not Give Him Something Fun To Do? By Isa Marrs, MA CCC-SLP

P

arents of children with special needs often tell me that it is scary to enroll their children in “fun” activities because they fear that their child will not succeed. Or, that he or she will be ridiculed and possibly asked to leave the class. Unfortunately this fear often comes from experience. That’s not a worry in the innovative “Where I Can Be Me®” social skills classes with art and play. They are designed to be inclusive… and fun! The only program of this kind, every class works to improve each child’s self-confidence and self-expression while expanding their creative imagination. Who knows where their imagination will take them? What I do know is that while they are creating beautiful works of art they are also learning essential social skills to empower them in their everyday lives. (But we don’t have to tell them that, they can think they’re just here to have fun.)

Not Just Anybody

These classes are taught by board-certified experts. And by utilizing a unique blend of behavior techniques, social-communication, music, art and social skills training these experts will work to improve your child’s play skills, social interaction and behavior. And they’ll make sure your child has fun. Having fun makes it easier for us to reach our goals with your child. While the goals for each child and each class are different, one of the main goals is to teach your child how to make and keep friends.

We’re All Friends Here

These classes are provided in a safe and accepting environment where you don’t have to worry about how other people will respond. And to make certain that you believe you have made the right decision our classes have a 5-week, no strings attached, money back guarantee.

Editor’s LETTER

Interior delights IT’S NO EASY THING, CHOOSING A STYLE FOR your home. Just as many of us shudder looking back on outdated hairstyles and outfits, so do we often cringe recalling a particular floral sofa or way-too-metallic wallpaper we now regret. Having recently survived a modest home makeover myself, I know that the fear of choosing poorly while pondering fabric swatches and paint samples can drive you crazy—if you don’t have a proper vision. And that’s where we come in. In this, our home issue, we seek to provide guidance and inspiration in equal measure. For the former, turn to page 28, where you’ll find a visual quiz to help you pinpoint your design era of choice—plus tips on how to achieve that look for maximum impact throughout your house. As for inspiration, we offer a dose in “Well-dressed Floors,” page 36, where we spotlight eight eye-catching area rugs sure to give your room instant pop. And in “Mad About Views,” page 32, you’ll read the design success story behind an ultramodern weekend retreat, adorned simply so as to keep all eyes on the staggering vistas out the windows. More home ideas can be found in two of the locales featured in Westchester Whispers, page 13: At Fleur in Mount Kisco you’ll discover a bevy of unique garden accessories, handpicked in Europe by the discerning owners. And Designer’s Corner in Larchmont offers vintage lighting galore, along with professional expertise to help you choose your illuminations wisely. When you’re ready to step out of your home, consider a meal at the truly eclectic Zephs’ in Peekskill, which features international dishes representing locales far and wide—from Greece to China to Hungary and more. Read the delectable details in our review on page 44. Finally, now that spring is here, we’ve been dreaming of fun, warm-weather excursions. In that spirit we present “Happy Campers,” page 40, in which we explore three jaunts that give travelers a chance to learn something new. If you’ve ever longed to revisit those sleepaway-camp days of yore—with, perhaps, a more upscale twist—these trips are sure to please. May you and everyone in your home enjoy the blossoming season before us.

There are many more things about these classes that makes them unique. I’d like to tell you about them but unfortunately I’m out of room. You can, however, get more information by calling me directly at (914) 488-5282, or by calling my tollfree, hassle-free, 24hr recorded message information hotline 1-866-380-8340, or by visiting www.SocialSkillsWestchester.com

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RITA GUARNA Editor in Chief

3/24/09 11:36:39 AM


Photo: John Tom McWilliam Photo: Bessler

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WESTCHESTER

health&life APRIL 2009

Westchester Health & Life Staff

editor in chief RITA GUARNA

art director SARAH LECKIE

senior editor TIMOTHY KELLEY

managing editor JENNIFER CENICOLA

assistant editor KRISTIN COLELLA

art intern ALEXANDRIA PATE

group publisher EDWARD BURNS

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executive vice president, sales & marketing JOEL EHRLICH

publisher SUZANNE TRON

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advertising account executives LOUISE DEMMEL , ELIZABETH LAUCKS , MARY MASCIALE

director, internet and new media NIGEL EDELSHAIN

marketing director CHRISTOPHER KAEFER

production manager CHRISTINE HAMEL

advertising services manager THOMAS RAGUSA

senior art director, agency services KIJOO KIM

circulation director LAUREN MENA

editorial contributions:

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The editors invite letters, article ideas and other contributions from readers. Please write to Editor, Westchester Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201-571-7003; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Any manuscript or artwork should be accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope bearing adequate return postage. The magazine is not responsible for the return or loss of submissions.

advertising inquiries: Please contact Edward Burns at 201-782-5306 or edward.burns@wainscotmedia.com.

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3/24/09 3:09:34 PM


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s Co-Founder and Creative Director of Static Hair Salon in White Plains, I have been approached throughout the years with questions about coloring fine and thinning hair. Fortunately our Fine Hair Specialist Ashley has all the answers: Is it safe? When professionally applied, yes. There are many types of color products at my disposal and the art is in knowing not only what to use but how to apply it for the desired results. Can you highlight? Yes, when properly done, the highlighting process itself actually adds the often-needed bulk and thickness that is missing. I also have a signature process that doesn’t give a ‘highlight’ look; it just changes the texture of the hair.

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WESTCHESTER

health&life THE GOOD LIVING MAGAZINE from WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

Westchester Medical Center Staff

president & ceo MICHAEL ISRAEL

chairman, board of directors JOHN F. HEIMERDINGER

senior vice president, marketing and corporate communications KARA BENNORTH

director media relations/photography DAVID BILLIG

director, community relations and outreach ISABEL DICHIARA

director editorial information management LESLIE MILLS

director of communications, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center ANDREW LAGUARDIA

photo/digital imaging BENJAMIN COTTEN , GORDON TUNISON

WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER Valhalla, N.Y. For general information, call 914-493-7000. Visit Westchester Medical Center on the Internet at www.worldclassmedicine.com.

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA

chairman CARROLL V. DOWDEN

president MARK DOWDEN

executive vice president JOEL EHRLICH

senior vice president EDWARD BURNS

vice presidents AMY DOWDEN NIGEL EDELSHAIN RITA GUARNA SHANNON STEITZ SUZANNE TRON

subscription services: To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Westchester Health & Life, Circulation Department, PO Box 1788, Land O Lakes, FL 34639; telephone 813-996-6579; e-mail lauren.mena@wainscotmedia.com.

Westchester Health & Life is published seven times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645, in association with Westchester Medical Center. This is Volume 5, Issue 2. ©2009 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14.00 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional.

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Westchester WHISPERS YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL TRENDS, TREASURES, PEOPLE & WELL-KEPT SECRETS

Stuck on Q “We’re not your cliché peanutson-the-floor, pig-heads-on-the-wall barbecue place,” declares Jeffrey Kohn, co-owner with wife Jennifer of the sleek Q AUTHENTIC BARBECUE RESTAURANT & BAR in Mount Kisco (914-241-7427) and Port Chester (914-933-7427, www.qrestaurantbar.com).

The lights fantastic Vintage lighting abounds at Designer’s Corner in Larchmont.

From sconces to pendants to candelabras to lamps, it’s a festival of lights at DESIGNER’S CORNER (914-834-9170, www.designerscorneronline.com) in Larchmont, which boasts the tristate area’s largest collection of vintage lighting. The venture is the passion of owner Judy Levine, who comes to the business with a best-of-both-worlds pedigree: “I choose things with both a designer’s eye and an antique dealer’s eye,” says Levine, who has 35 years’ experience in the former profession, 15 years in the latter. All of the luminous finds in the quaint shop—most of European origin—are fully restored before being offered for sale. But not everything is illuminated at Designer’s Corner; Levine and her team also sell vintage purses, jewelry and furniture, and offer home staging and interior design services. Pelham resident Patricia Ryan has taken advantage of the staff’s

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design expertise for many items in her Colonial home. “When I was choosing my dining room chandelier, the staff came in a van with four options, brought them into the house, held them up over the table and then explained why they did or did not work in the room,” Ryan says. “It’s that per-

Indeed, Kohn is a Culinary Institute of America grad who goes to great lengths to serve only topquality finger-lickin’ cuisine. The barbecue wings, for instance, come from free-range, hormone-free chickens ($14.50). Freshly cut St. Louis-style ribs ($18 per half-slab) are “never frozen—and I can tell you that nine out of 10 barbecue restaurants are getting frozen ribs,” he asserts. French fries (hand-cut), coleslaw, cornbread and biscuits are made from scratch in-house, while fresh-baked rolls and layer cake come courtesy of the couple’s Port Chester bakery, The Kneaded Bread. Just place your order up front, take a number and Q’s staff will bring your food to your table. And don’t forget to grab a drink from the vibrant bar area, where you’ll find a host of bourbons, microbrews on tap and reds and whites by the glass. Need more incentive? On Wednesdays a child eats for free for every paying adult.

sonal service and the variety of merchandise that keeps me coming back.”

WESTCHESTER

H E A LT H & L I F E

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Westchester WHISPERS

‘What I’m listening to ...’ “I love all music—there’s no one genre that categorizes my taste,” says Jan Sillery, artistic administrator for The Performing Arts Center at Purchase College. “This list represents what’s been in my player recently.” And putting them back into her CD holder shouldn’t be a problem: “I keep all my recordings alphabetized, from Dvorák before Dylan to Elvis after Ellington.”

Garden variety

1. “CONTEMPLATION,” McCoy Tyner, from

Land of Giants

Gnarls Barkley

2. “SET OUT RUNNING,” Neko Case, from

Furnace Room Lullaby 3. “CHICAGO,” Sufjan Stevens, from Illinois 4. “RUN (I’M A NATURAL DISASTER),”

Gnarls Barkley, from The Odd Couple 5. “CHASING PAVEMENTS,” Adele, from 19 6. “PORTRAIT OF MAHALIA JACKSON,”

Duke Ellington, from New Orleans Suite

Duke Ellington

7. “TILLIBOYO (‘SUNSET’),” Kronos Quartet,

from Pieces of Africa 8. “HOUSE OF CARDS,” Radiohead, from

In Rainbows 9. “TWELVE VARIATIONS ON A CHORALE BY J.S. BACH,” Simone Dinnerstein,

from The Berlin Concert 10. “BLUES FOR LIFETIME,” Liam Sillery,

Adele

from Outskirts

How does your garden grow? Stop by the inspiring FLEUR in Mount Kisco (914-241-3400, www.fleurnewyork.com), and it’ll resemble a sweet French-country plot, aburst with distinctive outdoor accessories handpicked on trips abroad by husband-and-wife co-owners John Schumacher and Barbara Cirkva-Schumacher. “I love the European aesthetic in garden design— it’s a constant inspiration for me,” says CirkvaSchumacher, who also works as an executive for Chanel. Though 95 percent of the items in the whimsical two-floor showroom are purchased from France, the inventory includes antique, mid-century and contemporary garden accessories from across Europe for both indoors and out, as well as some decorative objects for the home. Among the highlights of the current collection are a pair of mid-century French gilt metal sconces featuring a tulip and leaf motif ($3,500 per pair); a pair of mid-century realist oak glass-top tables from Prague ($7,500 per pair); and 19th-century French carved-stone pineapple-shaped finials ($5,900 per pair).

KNIT WITS

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APRIL 2009

EVERETT DIGITAL; WIREIMAGE IMAGES; ISTOCK

Step aside, Weinermobile—the Yarn Bus is coming to town. “People can’t believe it when they see it,” says Elise Goldschlag, owner of FLYING FINGERS YARN SHOP in Tarrytown (914-631-4113, www.flyingfingers.com), of her trademarked 15-passenger van topped with gigantic plastic spheres of yarn, which gives Manhattanites a free ride to her shop on weekends. But a pilgrimage for yarn? The shop’s offerings say it all: floor-to-ceiling shelves stocked with 10,000 varieties of all-natural yarn from sources such as soy, milk fiber, corn and bamboo, plus a host of needles, buttons and other notions. You can take lessons ($100 for seven) or simply drop by to knit or ask questions. “If you buy yarn from us, we’ll help you forever,” says Goldschlag. “I go there all the time, to get help or just be in the atmosphere,” says Tarrytown resident Diane Pratt, who takes weekly knitting classes. “They have such a great selection of yarn and the staff is so friendly and helpful. It inspires you to do more.”


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FLASH

1

IN CELEBRATION OF 60 YEARS OF COMMUNITY SERVICE the Junior League of Bronxville held “A Sparkling Affair,” a gala event featuring cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, auctions and raffles. The new, state-of-the-art Apogee Pilates & Wellness Center, meanwhile, hosted a grand opening event in White Plains. Also in White Plains, at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, the Westchester/Hudson Valley chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society held the Leukemia Indoor Golf Classic, an 18-hole minigolf tournament that preceded dinner, prizes and more. And at a luncheon event, Westchester Medical Center announced the honorees for its 2009 ball, to be held at Manhattan’s Pier Sixty on June 6. 3 2

JUNIOR LEAGUE OF BRONXVILLE GALA 1. Nicole Salimbene, Elisa Rizzo and Heidi von Maru 2. Michael Korengold, Bohn and Christine Vergari, Jonalie Korengold

5

APOGEE PILATES & WELLNESS CENTER OPENING 3. Myong Feiner and Stacy Ciaravella

LEUKEMIA INDOOR GOLF CLASSIC 4. Matthew Campbell, Mimi Vilord and Andrew Giuliani

4

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WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER FOUNDATION GALA KICKOFF 6

6. Vincent Gallo and Robert Gibson 7. Zubeen Shroff; Austa Devlin; John Heimerdinger; Patricia Sheiner, M.D.; and Paul Woolf, M.D.

7

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APRIL 2009

BRONXVILLE GALA IMAGES BY KATHY KING

Think you belong in Flash? Send photos from your gala or charity event to Westchester Health & Life, att: Flash editor, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; or e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Include your contact information, a short event description and names of all who appear. (Submissions are not guaranteed to appear and must meet the following image specs: 4x6 color prints or 300 dpi jpg, tif or eps files. Prints must be accompanied by an SASE in order to be returned.)


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Health_WST_209_v16.jcREV

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Health

Watch

12:30 PM

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W H AT ’ S N E W I N M E D I C I N E A N D H O W Y O U C A N S TAY W E L L

A burn victim’s comeback LOVE, SUPPORT AND ‘HEROIC EFFORTS’ SAVE A TEENAGE BOY FROM NEAR DEATH

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BOB COMMANDER

“THERE WAS A BIG FLASH AND A LOUD POPPING noise,” recalls John Gurga of the 2004 explosion that would alter the then 14-year-old’s life. “I didn’t feel anything, but I knew I was on fire everywhere.” The accident occurred when John, who lives in the small town of Perth, N.Y., was camping with friends in the woods near his home. When their campfire started to go out, John tried pouring gasoline on it. The can caught fire and exploded. “It all happened really fast,” he remembers. His friends ran home and called paramedics, who saw how badly John was injured and called a helicopter to take him to Westchester Medical Center’s burn unit. “I remember one of the paramedics asking if I had ever been in a chopper before,” he says. “Then I blacked out.” He didn’t fully awaken for more than two months. John had third-degree burns (the severest kind) over 75 percent of his body. “He suffered fullthickness burns, which meant there Roger E. was essentially no skin left,” says Salisbury, M.D. Roger E. Salisbury, M.D., Chief Emeritus of Plastic Surgery and Emeritus Director of the Burn Center. “His odds of survival were minimal. It took heroic efforts to give him any chance of making it.” Back in Perth, state troopers told John’s parents, John and Andrea, of the accident. The couple raced to Westchester. “When we saw how bad it was, we knew there was no way we could leave,” says the boy’s father. He and his wife took paid leave from their jobs and found various places to stay in the area, spending six months in the Ronald McDonald Family


OLGA ZAICHENKO; “FAST FACT” SOURCE: WWW.STJOEHOSPITAL.COM

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Room at Westchester’s Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. From the outset, Dr. Salisbury’s team had to prevent John from going into shock and help him fight off Fast fact infection, the most common complication of deep burns. Ordinary tap water heated They also took cells of his unburned skin and sent them to to 130 degrees can cause a lab in Boston, where they could be cultured and “grown” severe burns in seconds. into sheets containing cells to stimulate new skin. Over the next several weeks or so, they removed “I love and respect this family more than any other John’s dead skin, about 20 percent of it at a time, which patient I have had in 42 years,” says Dr. Salisbury, who is all the body can withstand. Then they started grafting has since moved on to administrative duties. “That boy new skin in place. By five or six weeks after the accident, never complained once about what was happening or the John’s open wounds were covered by grafts containing pain he had to undergo in order to live. I have taken care maturing skin cells. But his ordeal wasn’t over. of Marines and paratroopers who weren’t as brave.” “He had every complication you expect in these After about 11 months at Westchester, John was devastating cases,” says Dr. Salisbury. They included finally stabilized, but still had months of surgeries and pneumonia, blood clots in his lungs and infections rehabilitation ahead of him. For this stage of his care, the throughout his body. Gurgas transferred him to Shriner’s Hospital in Boston. “Just when you thought he’d turned a corner, the “The feeling the staff had when we saw John leave was bottom fell out again,” says the elder John. “At first it was like winning the Super Bowl or taking a victory lap at the a minute-to-minute thing. Then it was hour to hour, Olympics,” says the doctor. “It was very exhilarating.” and it stayed like that for months.” John spent four months in Boston and came home For the first several months, young John was heavin a wheelchair, which he still uses. His ankles were badly ily medicated—he remembers little from this time. He deformed by the fire, and future surgeries will be needed to does recall his father sitting by his bed, talking to him. get him on his feet. But John says he doesn’t care about That’s not surprising. “The father never left his side except that, or about the scar tissue across body. “My mom tells to change clothes,” says Dr. Salisbury. “As a father myself, me I look great every day,” he says. I respect him a great deal. He was my “And some girls tell me I’m pretty cute, partner. He was always there, supportBurns, by degree so that’s cool.” ing us but not intrusive. He saw how He cares more about college. hard this was and the energy we were FIRST-DEGREE BURNS: The least John will graduate from Broadalbinexpending, and wanted to help.” Help serious, these affect only the skin’s Perth High School with honors this he did, changing his son’s dressings, top layer (epidermis), causing spring, and intends to attend a local swelling and redness. A sunburn, feeding him, doing whatever he could. community college while continuing in fact, may be classified as a firstThe staff helped the Gurgas celhis treatments and surgeries—unless, degree burn. ebrate John’s birthday, Thanksgiving that is, he’s accepted at Harvard. He SECOND-DEGREE BURNS: These and Christmas in his hospital room. applied there after learning the school affect both the epidermis and the Indeed, during the many months of offers scholarships to students who dermis below it, and are often John’s treatment at Westchester, the have been through ordeals like his. characterized by blistering and a family developed a kinship with the Wherever he goes, he’ll take with him blotchy appearance. hospital surgeons, nurses and staffers. the laptop computer that Westchester’s THIRD-DEGREE BURNS: The “At an absolutely insane time, it’s staff bought him as a Christmas presmost grave, these reach the amazing how bearable they made it,” ent while he was recovering—a deeper tissue of the skin and says Gurga. “Everyone in the hospital, reminder of how far he has come, and cause permanent tissue damage. even the folks running the coffee carts, Skin may appear charred white or of the extended “family” there that knew how bad John was, and they tried black and may be numb. will always wish him well. ■ to make us as comfortable as possible.”

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THE NEWEST— AND COOLEST— in medical technology AN EXCITING PARTNERSHIP BRINGS A HOSPITAL SOME DAZZLING NEW EQUIPMENT

Zvi Lefkovitz, M.D.

THIS WINTER, WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENter installed the most advanced imaging system that is available for clinical care. It’s called a 256-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner, and it’s one of only 25 in the United States and the first of its kind in the Hudson Valley. This scanner brings with it dramatic advances in diagnosing diseases, particularly heart disease. With four times the capacity of the previous generation of scanners, it can take 256 images, or slices, of a 3-inch–wide body part, creating a three-dimensional picture in less than a third of a second. A full-body scan— images of everything, from head to toe—can be acquired

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in about 10 seconds. “The new scanner represents a profound change in healthcare, allowing us to do imaging that five years ago was absolutely impossible,” says Zvi Lefkovitz, M.D., the medical Arthur R. Bartosch center’s new Chair of Radiology. “Historically, you couldn’t freeze-frame the heart. Now, because the 256-slice scanner allows us to image a moving target, we can get a clear view of coronary anatomy in a noninvasive way.”


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Besides imaging the on the campus, from bedside monitors and nurse-call sysheart, adds the doctor, the tems to robotic surgical devices and neonatal incubators. new tool can detect a clot in “It’s challenging, but exciting,” he says. “Westa pulmonary artery or an chester Medical Center is assuring that it is a leader. We aneurysm in the aorta. And it handle the most complex cases in the region, and we does “exquisite imaging of the require the technology and support to make that happen.” brain for stroke diagnoses,” he Agreements between manufacturers and medical says. The scanner also cuts the centers are becoming more common around the country, radiation dose required by up to says Wrinkle. Bartosch explains why. “This arrangement 80 percent compared with a helps to create synergy among the different departments standard 64-slice CT scanner, so so that their systems can communicate well. It brings the it makes the scanning process medical center’s whole electronic world together.” safer as well as dramatically Bartosch describes the new electrocardiogram improving its effectiveness. (EKG) system as an example. The current system assures “This tool puts Westthat an EKG taken, say, in the emergency room need not chester at the absolute forefront of be uploaded through a phone line to be sent to machines imaging in the country,” says Dr. in other parts of the hospital so it can be downloaded and Lefkovitz. read. Instead, all the EKGs are integrated wirelessly. The The scanner is just one of results can be seen and read simultaneously in any area of many new, exciting medical devices the hospital. In addition, the doctor can upload past EKG installed at Westresults to review a patient’s history. “You chester in the past have one EKG system that follows you “This tool puts two years through a special partnerthroughout your hospital stay, from ER ship with Philips Medical Systems, Westchester at the to recovery to discharge,” Bartosch says. which specializes in products on the Wireless patient monitors are absolute forefront cutting edge of healthcare technology. another example. “We used to have beds of imaging in the that were hard-wired,” Bartosch exWestchester and Philips (which has research and development offices in plains. “If the patient needed a monitor, country.” Briarcliff) signed a Strategic Business he had to go to a monitored bed. Now Alliance, a five-year agreement, in 2007. we can bring the monitor to the patient For the medical center and its patients, the rather than the patient to the monitor—thus reducing arrangement puts the most advanced technology onsite, the burden on housekeeping and support services and all of it customized to meet Westchester’s specific goals cutting paperwork. It makes everything simpler for and needs. For Philips, it creates a working environment everyone. And the beauty of this equipment is that the to introduce newly developed technologies and to showsoftware is upgradable, so in the future we won’t be case the company’s newest and coolest equipment to behind the technology curve.” other potential clients. Other hospitals have even taken note of “It’s exactly what we want a partnership to be,” says Westchester’s technological improvements. “We have had Donna Wrinkle, Strategic Business Manager, Philips at least two other facilities come onsite to see what value Medical Systems. “It helps both partners meet their goals.” Philips has brought the institution,” he says. Arthur R. Bartosch, Westchester’s Director of “We look to Philips to help us stay state-of-the-art,” Biomedical Engineering Services, and his staff of 14 are in Bartosch adds, noting that the relationship may extend charge of purchasing, installing and maintaining all of the beyond medical systems to include flat-panel televisions, equipment the medical center uses to provide healthcare. lighting systems and radiofrequency tracking programs. “The past 24 months have been pretty intense,” he “Both partners have the same vision—to bring admits. Under the initiative, the Biomed team, as it’s the best technology to the medical center to care for our known, has been upgrading nearly every medical device patients,” he says. ■ WESTCHESTER

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TOO THIN NO MORE A WOMAN’S LIFE IS TRANSFORMED, THANKS TO A BREAKTHROUGH DEVICE

FOR YEARS, DOCTORS TOLD SHERRY GAFFIN she was starving herself. “Because I was young, female and under stress—I was in graduate school, and my father was very sick—they insisted I had an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia,” she recalls. “I kept telling them, ‘You don’t understand. I know I’m too thin! I don’t want to look like this!’” What really ailed Gaffin, a Warwick resident who is now 45, was gastroparesis—a disorder in which the stomach fails to empty completely or quickly enough, and that in her case triggered persistent vomiting. Her quest for relief led through several doctors, many failed medications and six years with feeding tubes because she couldn’t keep food down. Then, in 2000, Gaffin’s life changed when doctors at Westchester Medical Center implanted a gastric electrical stimulator, a battery-operated device that does for the stomach what a pacemaker does for the heart. “At one point I was down to 89 pounds,” recalls the 5-foot 9-inch Gaffin. “I had frequent nausea, vomiting and severe stomach pain. I was very scared.” The turning point came when a pediatric specialist who was caring for her son referred her to Brad Dworkin, M.D., Associate Director of Westchester’s Division of Gastroenterology. “He listened to every word I said, trying to put the pieces together,” says Gaffin. Dr. Dworkin ordered an endoscopy—a visual examination of her esophagus and stomach by means of a tube with a lighted scope—and also a gastric emptying study in Brad Dworkin, M.D. which Gaffin was fed scrambled eggs with radioactive dye material that would show up in an imaging study. The study determined what her problem really was, and Gaffin became the first patient at the hospital to receive the stimulator, which is still approved only for limited use by the Food and Drug Administration. Many primary care physicians still don’t know about the gastric electrical stimulator, says Dr. Dworkin. 24

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Sore throat? It could be GERD—and a ‘startling’ tool can help Do you have persistent unexplained coughing, asthmatic

Director of Westchester’s Division of Gastroenterology. It’s

wheezing, hoarseness, a sore throat or chest pain?

a 2-millimeter catheter that is inserted through the nose

If the most likely culprits have been ruled out—

and down through the esophagus. On that catheter is a

cardiac problems for chest pain and respiratory difficulties

series of electrodes, 1 centimeter apart, that measure the

or flu-like conditions for the other four—you should know

electrical activity of the liquids in the esophagus. The

that your symptoms could be caused by acid reflux, or

catheter attaches to a recording device worn around the

GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). And a technology

shoulder. The next day, that device is plugged into a com-

called impedance monitoring may help to diagnose the

puter so that the data can be read.

problem. Like the gastric electrical stimulator described in

“The technology is pretty startling,” adds Dr.

the accompanying story, it’s offered only at Westchester

Dworkin. “Gastric juice has got a lot of ions in it, and it con-

Medical Center among hospitals in the lower Hudson Valley.

ducts electricity very well—much better than the air does.

In GERD, the liquid contents of the stomach back up

With this tool we can tell what’s liquid and what’s air, what’s

into the esophagus, causing heartburn. Over time, left

acidic and what’s not, and what direction the material is

untreated, it can lead to inflammation, bleeding, ulcers and

moving. Normally that would be downward, but with reflux

a condition called Barrett’s esophagus, in which cells lining

it’s upward.”

the esophagus, roughened by contact with the stomach

The patient goes home with the tube in place, and

contents, become precancerous and, sometimes, cancerous.

it’s kept there for 24 hours while he or she continues habit-

Patients thought to have GERD are usually given

ual activities—eating, sleeping, exercising. “Most people

medications such as proton pump inhibitors, which cut the

don’t go to work with it because of the prominent tube in

production of acid by blocking acid-producing enzymes in

the nose,” says the doctor. “But some do.”

the wall of the stomach. For most people, those drugs identify the problem as GERD by bringing relief. In a few cases, however, diagnosis remains uncertain

burp.” He adds that if impedance monitoring determines

even after medications are given. Now, many of those

that medication-resistant GERD is indeed the cause of

people can be helped by impedance monitoring.

symptoms, surgery is often the answer. If GERD is

“It’s for people for whom we just can’t figure out what’s going on,” says Brad Dworkin, M.D., Associate

JOSÉ ORTEGA

“Impedance monitoring lets us measure everything in the esophagus,” says Dr. Dworkin. “We can tell if you

absolved, a pulmonary (lung) or otolaryngology (ear, nose and throat) specialist is often the next stop.

But it may be the best treatment for people with persistent intractable nausea and vomiting because “people just nausea and vomiting when medications don’t bring relief. don’t feel they have to throw up.” “I see this problem every week,” says the doctor. Gaffin still takes medications to help control her “It’s most common in those with diagastroparesis. She eats small meals and betes, probably because that condition must avoid certain foods—such as rich “At one point I damages nerves in the stomach. It can fried items and spicy dishes—or else she also accompany vascular disease and knows she’ll pay a price. But the gastric was down to 89 endocrine disorders. But frankly, it also stimulator has freed her from feeding pounds. I was occurs in many people without these tubes and allowed her to enjoy movies very scared.” conditions—three-fourths of them and dinners out without fearing she’ll women—and we don’t know why.” have to rush to the restroom to be sick. Also unknown, adds Dr. “It’s the most wonderful thing in the world,” she Dworkin, is exactly how the gastric electrical stimulator says. “It gave me my life back.” ■ works. And he cautions that it does not always bring relief for gastroparesis. In some cases it aids the stomTo learn more about the treatment of gastrointestinal ach’s emptying and in others it does not, he explains. illnesses at Westchester Medical Center, please call 1But the signal it sends the brain seems to reliably quiet 877-WMC-DOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com.

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SAVED by a scope A SURGICAL TECHNIQUE CALLED NEUROENDOSCOPY CAN GIVE A BABY SOMETHING PRECIOUS: HIS FUTURE

WHEN HE WAS 6 WEEKS OLD, OLIVER RODriguez of Monroe woke up in the middle of the night with a roaring fever of 106.7. His mother, Polish-born Iwona, was so distraught that when the 911 operator asked if he was unconscious, she’d forgotten what that English word meant. “I forgot everything!” she recalls. For unknown reasons, a dangerous infection called Group B streptococcus meningitis had attacked Oliver’s brain, causing severe hydrocephalus, a buildup of cerebrospinal fluid. It could have left him severely incapacitated for life, and he will face developmental delays and limitations. But this spring, as he turns 1, Oliver is a responsive baby with a future—thanks to the pediatric neurosurgeons at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center and a technique called neuroendoscopy. Neuroendoscopy uses an endoscope, a tube with a camera and light that’s inserted into the body through a small opening. “With the scope, we could get to areas of infection that had been walled off and open blockages so that fluid could be drained,” explains Michael Tobias, M.D., Co-Chief of Pediatric Neurosurgery. “If we had not, the infection would have destroyed his brain.” Neuroendoscopy isn’t new, says Dr. Tobias’ Co-Chief, Avinash Mohan, M.D. “But the cameras’ resolution has improved dramatMichael Tobias, M.D. ically, so we can see much better with them.” As he explains, neuroendoscopy can be used to treat various neurological conditions affecting pediatric patients; one of the most common of these is hydrocephalus, which can be lifethreatening if left untreated. Traditionally, hydrocephalus was treated only with implanted shunts. But now, in some patients, the endoscope can open pathways in Avinash the brain’s fluid spaces. For Oliver, the Mohan, M.D. surgery made it possible to implant two 26

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shunts that drained fluid. For many children, neuroendoscopy can mean a shunt isn’t needed at all. Another application of the endoscope has been brain tumors. “Certain tumors can be removed with a scope rather than in surgery that requires a larger opening,” says Dr. Mohan. Using the scope lessens the danger of injury to the brain and shortens recovery time. For example, following endoscopic removal of pituitary tumors, the patient does not look as if he or she has had surgery at all. The endoscope is also now being used to treat craniosynostosis. In this congenital condition, the flat bones in the skull are abnormally fused together, restricting growth and potentially causing too much pressure on the brain. “The traditional way to fix this is through open surgery,” says Dr. Mohan. But that has to wait until the child is at least six months old. “The endoscope, which requires a much smaller skin incision, allows us to do these operations earlier, and operating earlier makes possible a lessinvasive procedure with potentially less risk to the patient.” With only about 200 pediatric neurosurgeons in the country, having two at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital who are trained in neuroendoscopy is a significant boon to the area. In coming years, the doctors predict, the endoscope may be appropriate for more patients and more conditions. As for little Oliver? “Now he sits very well, holds his up head strongly and pays attention to his toys,” reports his grateful mom. “He’s a different baby, believe me.” ■ To find out more about pediatric neurosurgery at Westchester Medical Center’s Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, please call 1-866-WMC-PEDS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com/MFCH.


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Spotlight on residents

COURTESY OF WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

KRISTEN SAHLER, M.D. A SPECIAL FAMILY CHALlenge first gave Kristen Sahler, M.D., 27, an interest in brain science. Her brother, Mickey, three years younger, grew up with Tourette’s syndrome, a disorder marked by involuntary physical and vocal tics. Classmates accepted him, she recalls, but teachers wanted to put him on Ritalin, which would have made things worse. A protective older sibling, Dr. Sahler would visit Mickey’s school to educate the educators. “There I was,” she recalls, “a 14-yearold handing out pamphlets to middle-aged teachers!” Dr. Sahler came across the country from her native Portland, Oregon, to attend college at New York University because of its renowned neuroscience program. She earned her M.D. at New York Medical College and is now a medical resident. She plans to begin a neurology fellowship at NYU this summer—then possibly return to Westchester Medical Center, which she loves. She and her husband, Christopher, a fourth-year medical student, live in Pleasantville and enjoy taking in movies in their rare free time. And Mickey? He’s now in law school, thriving. Says the doctor: “He takes credit for inspiring my career.”

SURGICAL RESIDENT

DORIS RIVERA-ARAUJO, M.D. A HOSPITAL RESIDENCY doesn’t leave quite as much time for personal drama as it appears to on TV, says Westchester Medical Center pediatric resident Doris Rivera-Araujo, M.D.: “We work a lot harder than that.” She dreamed of a medical career while still a child, “making a Band-Aid from toilet paper and a piece of tape,” she says. And after a forensic biology elective in high school, it seemed autopsy pathology would claim her. But when she finished college at New York University and entered the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, “I realized I wanted to care for live patients,” she says. “I’m a social person, and I connect with people.” And it was in her pediatrics rotation, she says, that “I clicked the most. There’s a child in me that interacts well with kids.” Now a third-year resident, Dr. Rivera-Araujo will stay an extra year to be chief resident starting in July. She hopes eventually to divide her time between private practice and a neighborhood clinic. “I grew up in an underserved community,” says the Bronx native. “That’s the kind of community I most enjoy.” Dr. Rivera-Araujo, 30, lives in Valhalla with her 3-year-old son, Emmanuel, and her husband, Joel Araujo, a lawyer.

MEDICAL RESIDENT

PEDIATRIC RESIDENT

STELLAR IN SCIENCE, THESE UP-AND-COMING DOCTORS ALSO EXCEL IN HUMAN INTERACTIONS

MICHAEL PARKER, M.D. ALWAYS DRAWN TOWARD science, this talented surgeon started out as a biology teacher. Michael Parker, M.D., 34, grew up in Oswego. He graduated from Hamilton College in Clinton in 1995, taught high school for four years, and then interrupted work on a master’s degree in education to enter medical school at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, where he earned his M.D. in 2004. Now, as chief surgical resident at Westchester Medical Center, he calls upon his old teaching skills to guide medical students and interns. He anticipates a future in academic medicine, not only performing surgery, but also training tomorrow’s surgeons. “One learns by teaching,” says Dr. Parker. “The proof that I know something is that I can explain it to somebody else.” He lives in Stamford, Conn., with his wife, Heather, and his 1-year-old daughter, Charlotte. This summer, he’ll begin a fellowship in minimally invasive gastrointestinal surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla. Dr. Parker notes that surgery is changing, with operations becoming less and less invasive. But he adds: “We’ll always need an appreciation for the hands-on anatomy of open surgery.” ■ WESTCHESTER

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HOME

QUIZ: What’s your design era? T H E PA S T I S A L I V E — I N Y O U R L I V I N G R O O M . C O N S C I O U S LY O R N O T, W E A L L D R AW O N T H E S T Y L E S O F D I F F E R E N T E R A S T O D E C I D E W H AT L O O K S W E L I K E I N I N T E R I O R DESIGN. BUT SOMETIMES WE NEED HELP IDENTIFYING, UNIFYING AND MAKING THE M O S T O F O U R P R E F E R E N C E S . T H AT ’ S W H AT T H I S Q U I Z I S F O R . S I M P LY P I C K Y O U R FAV O R I T E I M A G E I N E A C H O F T H E S E E I G H T S E C T I O N S — W E ’ L L T E L L Y O U W H I C H E R A S U I T S Y O U B E S T A N D H O W T O C R E AT E T H AT L O O K I N Y O U R O W N B E L O V E D A B O D E .

A. B.

D.

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A: KAREN MELVIN, B: LUCINDA SYMONS/REDCOVER.COM; C: SCOTT VAN DYKE, D: ERIC ROTH PHOTOGRAPHY

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C.

B.

D.

Lamps

B.

A.

D.

C.

A.

Couches

A.

B.

C.

D. continued

Side tables WESTCHESTER

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A: PETER RYMWID PHOTOGRAPHY, B: ARCHITECT DALE LUMPKIN, C: LOOK PHOTOGRAPHY/BEATEWORKS/CORBIS, D: ERIC ROTH PHOTOGRAPHY

Kitchens

D. C. B. A.

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Chairs

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B.

C.

D.

Pendant lights

RESULTS MOSTLY “A”s: 19th-CENTURY TRADITIONAL You like a comfortable-but-formal setting, but that doesn’t mean you’re stuffy. After all, a number of lively styles—Regency, Victorian, American Empire— commingled during this era. Today’s interpretation allows for a refreshing, eclectic look that maintains a classic aesthetic. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: • Grand furniture with soft, smooth lines, modest curves and classical symmetry • A profusion of patterns, often florals and plaids • Materials such as marble, polished mahogany and rosewood and luxurious fabrics • Embellishments such as carvings, decorative accents and gilding • Rich, dark colors • An abundance of furniture and other decorative objects—lamps, figurines, elaborate draperies, urns, large patterned rugs, ornamental globes

A.

MOSTLY “B”s: ART DECO Elegance and industry converged in the ’20s and ’30s, creating spaces both exotic and opulent, grand and graceful. Those in search of a dash of glam need look no further than the splendid, look-at-me showpieces from this chic era. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: • Beveled mirrored surfaces • Motifs such as rays, “stepped” forms and curves • Bold, saturated colors • Light and dark woods together, wood inlays • Exotic pieces with Asian and African influences • Strong geometric patterns, plus stylized florals and figures • Materials such as ebony, lacquer, mother-of-pearl, metal and glass

B.

MOSTLY “C”s: 1950s AND ’60s Plastic and color don’t scare you. You are a risk-taker and love all things that pop! Clothing fashions of the time greatly influenced this design style, and it evokes the era: uninhibited, playful and just plain cool. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: • Fun colors such as aqua, yellow, red, blue and mint green • Futuristic-looking forms • Rounded, asymmetrical, parabolic shapes • Simple, Scandinavian-influenced shapes • Oversized florals • Bold pop art touches, with dashes of kitsch and humor • Materials such as plastic, acrylic, teak, plywood and chrome

C.

Mostly “D”s: TODAY You enjoy minimalist-inspired pieces thoughtfully enhanced with a few “wow” accents. You follow the style trends heralded in the latest design blogs and appreciate simple forms made with exquisite craftsmanship, as well as rooms that deftly balance shape, color and texture. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: • Crisp, clean lines with little embellishment • Items in basic geometric forms, often offset by one or two whimsically shaped decorative accents • Industrial finishes • Materials such as stainless steel, glass, slate, durable woods and reclaimed or sustainable materials • Natural textures and colors, accented with spots of bright color ■

D. Mirrors For product and photo information for the items shown, see page 52.


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by Kristin Colella

Mad about

VIEWS BREATHTAKING VISTAS STEAL THE SHOW IN THIS SIMPLY DESIGNED WEEKEND RETREAT

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PHOTOS BY GEORGE ERML

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THE INSPIRATION BEHIND THIS STAGGERING, ultramodern Clinton Corners manse is surprisingly simple: “It’s all about the views,” asserts architect Martin Holub, principal of Martin Holub Architects & Planners in Manhattan and Clinton Corners, who designed the abode from the ground up as a weekend retreat for a professional couple from Manhattan, then set about decorating it. “We built the house atop a hill on 15 acres of secluded land in the woods, which the homeowners purchased for the picturesque vistas of rolling hills, dense trees and the Catskills in the distance. The home is designed to take advantage of those views.” The sheer height of the house helps make the vistas grand. “The higher you are, the better views you get, so we built the house as tall as the building restrictions would allow,” says Holub. Careful not to overwhelm the homeowners with lofty flights of stairs, though, Holub fashioned a clever floor plan: “We actually built 11 total levels—from the mechanical basement to the roof terrace—each separated by just a few stairs,”

he says. “The flow from one level to another is so easy you hardly notice it.” But from the outside, this unconventional structure—crafted of wood and steel framing—appears a geometric marvel. Three distinct finishes cover the multifaceted exterior: exposed concrete foundation; natural cedar siding, which reflects the home’s wooded surroundings; and stucco siding, which offsets the sculptural forms of the house. A unique pyramid-shaped bluestone stairway leads to the porch and front doors. Inside, “the homeowners wanted maximum light and openness,” says Holub, who achieved this through high ceilings, unenclosed spaces (except in the bathrooms and guest bedrooms), white plaster walls and an abundance of windows. “With the exception of shades placed on windows facing west to block the afternoon LEFT, with sharp angles and levels galore, this modern house offers spectacular views of the secluded surroundings. ABOVE, “light and airy” was the directive for the home’s interior, which this minimalist-style living room achieves to grand effect. WESTCHESTER

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HOME

Two expansive 1950s leather sofas add softness and comfort to the crisp, clean space.

sun, most windows have no treatments,” adds Holub. “There are no neighbors nearby, so nobody can look in.” Holub’s next task, therefore, was to add warmth to this airy abode while keeping the simple style the homeowners desired. Take the expansive minimaliststyle living room: Maple hardwood floors add a touch of rustic elegance, and a wall of glass windows provides a pastoral backdrop. A corner fireplace, set in a customdesigned enclosure, creates coziness while maintaining the modern aesthetic. “The enclosure is finished in the same stucco as the exterior, so we brought the outdoors in,” says Holub. A honed bluestone shelf stores extra fire logs to help keep flames burning. A dash of fun comes from two comfy, super-cushy leather sofas—“a design classic from the 1950s,” says 34

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Holub. For additional seating there’s a wire-framed chair by Harry Bertoia for Knoll and a long bench crafted of honed bluestone and strewn with a profusion of pillows. In the center, a low marble-top coffee table on a maple pedestal makes an ideal spot to rest a book or beverage, while thin, flexible floor lamps provide both reading and up lighting. Just a three-step ascent from the living room, the kitchen is discreetly hidden with a low wall at the homeowners’ request. “If you walk into the living room you have no idea there’s a kitchen right there,” says Holub. But the location has other perks: “The owners wanted the kitchen to be at the heart of the house, and from here you can see the living room below, the adjacent dining room and the views outside,” he adds. Maple custom cab-


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Though nestled in the hub of the house, the home’s kitchen is largely hidden from view.

inetry and a maple refrigerator face match the hardwood floors, while a backsplash made of slabs of Broughton Moor, a volcanic stone, provides a dark contrast. Simplicity reigns again in the small informal dining room, which is anchored by a maple dining table that seats 10. Wicker “handkerchief chairs” by Massimo Vignelli for Knoll provide comfortable seating atop black rubber tile flooring. Looking up, the 20-foot–high ceiling provides a fairly striking view of its own. Cedar panels add a touch of warmth amid exposed, sun-dappled flying

beams, which keep the home structurally sound. “When you have this kind of complex, multivolume structure you have to consider the winds,” explains Holub. To give the beams further practicality, Holub notched them with low-voltage lights that illuminate the kitchen and dining room below. When the two-year design process was over, the homeowners were the ones beaming. “They visit the home every weekend, all year round,” Holub says. “If you buy a property for the views, you want to make the most of it.” ■

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HOME

Well-dressed floors NEVER MIND NEUTRALS—THESE EYE-CATCHING AREA RUGS GIVE YOUR ROOMS INSTANT PANACHE AND PERSONALITY

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FROM LEFT Who says stained glass is for lamps and windows alone? Get the look underfoot with the 100-knot Glass rug by Tibetano, $100 per square foot, made of wool with silk accents. It comes in custom colors and sizes up to 25 feet wide. From Odegard’s Artist collection, this striking black-and-white rug—modeled after a work by Belgian artist Narcisse Tordoir—is made of hand-spun, -knotted and -carded Himalayan wool, $11,200 for an 8-foot by 10-foot version. Nature and abstract art collide in the colorful Pokeweed Encounter rug by Amy Helfand, $11,200 for 7 feet by 10 feet, crafted of hand-knotted Tibetan wool and Chinese silk. Get a dose of the outdoors with Grass by Graviti Zone Rugs, $3,400 for an 8-foot 5-inch by 5-foot 6-inch rug, featuring darkgreen blades on a light-green background, made of hand-tufted New Zealand wool. continued


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FROM LEFT Inspired by the famed quilts of Gee’s Bend, Ala., this limited edition 8-foot 5-inch by 11-foot 8-inch rug from ABC Carpet & Home, $6,999, is handmade in Turkey with 100-percent wool textile fragments. The whimsical spirals of the Calabasas rug from Rug Art’s Botanic collection, $6,800 for 9 feet in diameter, were inspired by the blooms of the Mexican Hat wildflower. Sold to the trade only. Add a burst of color with the bright-orange Parqué rug by Alicia D. Keshishian, $106 per square foot, made of hand-carded and hand-spun Tibetan wool with silk accents. Custom colors and sizes available. Everything’s coming up Mums and Asters in this playful Tibetan wool offering from Kim Parker for The Rug Company, $6,125 for a 10-foot by 7-foot rug. ■ For stores that carry the product lines shown, see our shopping guide on page 52.

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ESCAPES

UNDERWATER EXPLORATION: L a S o u rc e i n G re n a d a

Happy campers WHO SAID SLEEPAWAY CAMP WAS JUST FOR KIDS? THESE 3 SPECIALTY-THEMED ADULT GETAWAYS PROVE YOU’RE NEVER TOO OLD TO LEARN SOMETHING NEW

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A SILENT, ETHEREAL BEAUTY AWAITS UNDER the sea—one revealed only to those skilled in scuba, as you’ll discover at the renowned scuba diving program at LaSource (1-888-527-0044, www.theamazingholiday.com), an all-inclusive luxury resort situated on Grenada’s Pink Gin Beach. Surrounded on three sides by the sparkling blue Caribbean, the resort offers scuba instruction for all experience levels, plus top-notch accommodations and a host of other land and sea activities. Before getting in on the action, you’ll first want to perch in your luxe guest room or suite, each equipped with a four-poster king-sized bed or two double beds (rates start at $335 per night). Hand-carved mahogany furniture and Italian marble bathrooms add a touch of elegance, while a private balcony or terrace offers breathtaking water views. A stroll outside will reveal 40 acres of lush tropical gardens, a pool area with a Jacuzzi and an expanded deck for lounging in the tropical sun. Of course, you don’t want to miss out on the


COURTESY OF L A SOURCE RESORT

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hotel’s signature sport, and even inexperienced divers can give it a whirl with the one-day “Discover Scuba Diving” introductory program, which culminates with a 40-foot open water dive. Got the diving skills but no certification to prove it? Not to worry: You can become fully certified through LaSource’s Professional Association of Diving Instructors fast-track option. Just start your course work at home with a CD-ROM, then complete your training at the resort in a mere three days. Once certified, you can enjoy a complimentary dive each day of your stay. Nearby dive sites include Bianca C, a spectacular cruise ship lying 90 to 120 feet below the surface that sank in 1961, and the Lower Boss Reef, a home to green moray, barracuda and sheet coral. This sumptuous sanctuary also offers adults the chance to enjoy a host of land activities reminiscent of those fun-filled summers at camp. Professional instructors can teach you to shoot a bow and arrow, spike a vol-

leyball on the beach, achieve that perfect swing on the tennis courts—even joust during fencing lessons (equipment included). Golfers can also hit the greens on the resort’s nine-hole course, and all can unwind from this flurry of activity each day with a complimentary spa treatment at the Oasis Spa. Among our favorites are the Arawak, an intensive head, neck and shoulders massage, and the Point Salines Wrap, where you’re cocooned in seaweed to draw out toxins. continued

A TABLE TO TRY The Great House (1-888-5270044) Enjoy a romantic dinner of fine globally inspired cuisine at this premier LaSource restaurant. Featuring hardwood vaulted ceilings and an outdoor verandah providing breathtaking views of the capital city, St. George’s, the restaurant serves à la carte specialties such as prime sirloin steak and Marrakech Scottish salmon.

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ASTRONAUT PREP: Space Camp in Huntsville, Alabama YOU COULD SHELL OUT $30 MILLION TO BE an actual space tourist—or get the next best thing, minus that pesky reentry, as a trainee at Space Camp (1-800-63-SPACE, www.spacecamp.com), held at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala. Programs for kids are offered throughout the year, but wannabe

rocket men and women can take three-day ($449) and six-day ($899) adult-only programs in late August and September. Trainees stay in either the Space Habitat, a futuristic space station mock-up containing both individual rooms and bays of 20 to 40 beds, or the Aviation Challenge Hangar, which houses up to 300 trainees in military-style bays. Three daily meals at the center’s cafeteria are also included. The three-day beginner offering, Space Academy for Adults, lets you experience some of the actual training astronauts go through prior to a space mission. You’ll prepare for a walk on the moon—where you only weigh one-sixth of what you do on earth—in a special gravity trainer, and practice mission control and shuttle crew positions in two simulated space shuttle missions. On the exhilarating Space Shot ride, which blasts campers 140 feet straight up in 2.5 seconds, you’ll experience how a rocket launch really feels—including two to three seconds of weightlessness and all four Gs of force. Looking for an even bigger challenge? The six-day Advanced Space Academy provides more daring activities, such as scuba diving in an on-site underwater astronaut trainer, rotating through orbiters and riding in high-performance jet simulators. For shuttle mission simulations, advanced trainees can choose their field of interest and pursue it as either a pilot or mission specialist. Whichever program you choose, you can bet your experience will be out of this world.

DON’T MISS THIS The Space Museum at the

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U.S. Space & Rocket Center contains America’s largest collection of space artifacts, and campers are granted full access. Highlights include a mighty Saturn V—the largest (more than 360 feet tall) and most powerful rocket ever launched, used by NASA in the late ’60s and early ’70s; and a life-size World War II German V-2 rocket, the first man-made object capable of leaving the earth’s atmosphere.


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EPICUREAN ENCHANTMENT:

COURTESY OF THE INTERNATIONAL KITCHEN

T h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l K i t c h e n i n Tu s c a n y WHAT BETTER PLACE TO LEARN THE SEcrets of classic Tuscan cooking than within the enchanting region itself? “A Classic Tuscan Table With Chef Claudio” is a four- or six-night culinary program and tour offered by The International Kitchen (312-4670560, www.theinternationalkitchen.com). Students stay in the charming medieval village of Figline Valdarno and receive four hands-on cooking lessons, taught by the passionate Chef Claudio Piantini, owner of the famous Torre Guelfa Restaurant located in the town square. You can choose to lodge in the Hotel Villa Casagrande, a magnificent 14th-century palazzo featuring a Renaissance garden and a host of precious paintings, frescoes, sculptures and antiques (from $2,275/person for four nights and $2,995/person for six nights), or a cottage at Chef Claudio’s quaint bed and breakfast, located just five minutes outside of town amid vineyards and olive groves (from $2,125/person for four nights and $2,625/person for six nights). Conducted at either Torre Guelfa or Chef Claudio’s own teaching kitchen at his bed and breakfast (transportation provided to both locales), classes show you how to whip up such tantalizing Tuscan dishes as ribollita, a hearty bean soup; crostini, thin slices of lightly toasted bread with various toppings; and castagnaccio, a chestnut flour cake. Because practicing recipes is just one part of the Tuscan culinary experience, the program also lets students soak up the culture of Tuscany through daily excur-

sions. For instance, you’ll sample Italy’s famous red wine during a half-day tour of the renowned Chianti region; meander through an authentic outdoor food market in Figline and enjoy a two-hour guided tour of the historic town of Arezzo, the birthplace of Renaissance master Giorgio Vasari. But rest assured, while you learn about this lush region, you’ll be eating well too! No matter which accommodation you choose, you’ll enjoy a daily breakfast buffet, nightly dinners at various Tuscan restaurants and four very special lunches: your own enticing creations after each cooking class. Buon appetito! ■

DON’T MISS THIS During your excursion to the charming village of Greve in the Chianti region, discover tantalizing prosciutto, salami, guanciale and capocollo made with centuries-old techniques at Antica Macelleria Falorni (+39 055 854363, www.falorni.it), a famous family-owned butcher shop dating back to 1729. Mere sight of these prime cuts mixed with the smells of fresh fennel, parsley, garlic and sage are sure to delight the senses.


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Westchester GOURMET

WORLD’S FARE

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ZEPHS’ 638 Central Avenue, Peekskill; 914736-2159; www.zephsrestaurant.com

Hours DINNER: Wednesday through Sunday, from 5:30 p.m. What you should know • Entrées range from $23 to $31 • Full bar • $14 corkage fee if you BYO • Visa, MasterCard and personal checks accepted

MATTHEW WILLIAMMS

LOCATED IN THE CENTURY-OLD BRICK MacKellar Mill, Zephs’ in Peekskill has, at first glance, all the earmarks of a charming one-room country eatery—from an entrance flanked by two blue wooden benches to hardwood floors, a dozen or so rustic wooden tables and a welcoming waitstaff. But a closer look at both the décor (Africaninspired oil paintings, exotic potted plants) and the menu (which changes frequently) hint that this is a restaurant with a few tricks up its sleeves: Touting its dishes as “global soul food,” the eclectic fare features inspirations from around the world, bypassing “hip” recipes for homey-yet-creative international cuisine—classic preparations such as roasts, stews, casseroles and fish filets— whipped up from scratch with fresh seasonal ingredients. First up? The artichoke soup, a creamy blend of roasted artichokes pureed with leeks and celeriac in a soothing chicken broth. Placed atop was a rolled crisp made of crunchy Parmesan, adding a burst of salty flavor. Next came the prassopitta, or Greek leek pie, a rich mix of sharp sheep’s-milk feta, leeks and fresh dill housed in a heart-shaped phyllo crust. We devoured the dainty creation, served with a flavorful kalamata olive, fennel and lemon salad. But if you dislike pickles we suggest steering clear of this item—the smell and taste of dill dominated. The siu mai—four Chinese-style steamed dumplings— was artistically folded and generously packed with fresh scallops, crabmeat and shrimp, seasoned with

scallions and ginger. A side of spiced soy sauce was ideal for dipping. After we enjoyed two salads of fresh red leaf lettuce with creamy dressing (included with each meal), our showstopping entrées arrived. The Mediterraneaninspired half-roasted chicken tapenade featured a hidden layer of flavor: Between its succulent meat and lightly browned skin was a rich blend of chopped Saracene black olives, capers, lemons and extra-virgin olive oil. Though the menu promised a side of semolina gnocchi alla romano, we were perfectly content with what came instead: two mashed-potato pancakes (fluffy and cheesy on the inside, golden on the outside) and a delicate side of steamed Brussels sprouts and cubed potatoes. Also heavenly was the sautéed rib-eye steak, a tender, juicy cut topped with a tangy, flavorful Dijon sauce. A crispy horseradish baked stuffed potato was a hearty complement. We ended the meal with two delectable Continental desserts. The coconut crème brûlée was a nice twist on a French favorite, served with a buttery Brazil-nut cookie on the side. A chocoholic’s dream, the oh-so-sweet Hungarian chocolate squares arrived as two 2-inch-high towers of dense chocolate mousse sandwiched between a thin fudge top and a chocolate cake bottom. This indulgent finish aside, all dishes felt hearty and healthy, with lots of vegetables, little grease and a decidedly home-cooked feel. By the end of the evening, we were both satisfied and comforted, as if we were leaving a cosmopolitan friend’s house after an abundant holiday meal. “Our most appreciated compliment is when a customer recognizes this is not restaurant food,” Zephs’ website declares. Technically, it is, of course, but we know just what they mean. ■


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where TO EAT

If you’ve got a craving, there’s a dining establishment in Westchester County (or nearby) that will satisfy it. Tur n to this listing next time you want a wonderful meal out.

ARMONK

• 4 W. Main St., Irvington • 866-933-5478

Division St., Peekskill • 914-739-6380

OPUS 465 Contemporary cuisine in an unpretentious environment. • 465 Main St., Armonk • 914-273-4676

IRVINGTON-ON-HUDSON

ZEPHS’ Global soul food. • 638 Central

BEDFORD

Avenue, Peekskill • 914-736-2159 RED HAT ON THE RIVER Upscale eatery

featuring contemporary American cuisine. • 1 Bridge St., Irvington-on-Hudson • 914-591-5888

BISTRO TWENTY-TWO Romantic setting for

PORT CHESTER F.I.S.H. Mediterranean take on seafood. • 102

Fox Island Rd., Port Chester • 914-939-4227

French bistro fare. • 391 Old Post Rd. (Rt. 22), Bedford • 914-234-7333

LARCHMONT

BRIARCLIFF MANOR

French and Asian accents. • 121 Myrtle Blvd., Larchmont • 914-834-1244

LA PANETIÈRE Contemporary French cuisine. • 530 Milton Rd., Rye • 914-967-8140

favorites like fajitas. • 2 Union St., Briarcliff Manor • 914-944-4380

MAMARONECK

SCARSDALE

TOLLGATE STEAKHOUSE Known for prime

MERITAGE New American cuisine in a chic

TERRA RUSTICA Classic Italian with salads,

porterhouse steak. • 974 E. Boston Post Rd., Mamaroneck • 914-381-7233

Manhattan-style setting. • 1505 Weaver St., Scarsdale • 914-472-8484

RYE

PLATES New American menu with Italian,

GUADALAJARA Festive Mexican including

pastas and seafood. • 550 N. State Rd., Briarcliff Manor • 914-923-8300

SLEEPY HOLLOW

C H A P PA Q U A

WASABI Relaxed atmosphere serving sushi,

sashimi and hot dishes. • 279 N. Broadway, Sleepy Hollow • 914-332-7788

CRABTREE’S KITTLE HOUSE An award-

winning wine cellar complements American fare. • 11 Kittle Rd. (off Rt. 117), Chappaqua • 914-666-8044

SOUTH SALEM LE CHÂTEAU Classic French dishes in a Tudor mansion built by J.P. Morgan. • Rts. 35 and 123, South Salem • 914-533-6631

DON EMILIO’S AT LOBO’S CAFÉ Vibrant, upscale Mexican eatery. • 57-59 King St., Chappaqua • 914-238-2368

TA R R Y T O W N

CORTLANDT MANOR MONTEVERDE Fine Continental menu with a

view of the Hudson River. Fresh lobster, beef and lamb. • 28 Bear Mountain Bridge Rd., Cortlandt Manor • 914-739-5000

M I L LW O O D SPACCARELLI’S RISTORANTE

Neighborhood eatery emphasizing Abruzzese cuisine. • 238 Saw Mill River Rd., Millwood • 914-941-0105

C R O T O N FA L L S PRIMAVERA Regional Italian cuisine. Try the jumbo shrimp parmigiana or grilled Scottish salmon. • 595 Rt. 22, Croton Falls • 914-277-4580

MOHEGAN LAKE BELLA VITA Italian spot known for home-

made pumpkin ravioli. • 1744 E. Main St., Mohegan Lake • 914-528-8233

CROTON-ON-HUDSON

MOUNT KISCO

OCEAN HOUSE New England–style seashore

fare including steamers, grilled wild salmon and fried clams. • 49 N. Riverside Ave., Croton-onHudson • 914-271-0702

COCO RUMBA’S Nuevo Latino menu spotlighting seafood and exotic drinks. • 443 Lexington Ave., Mount Kisco • 914-241-2299

DOBBS FERRY

NEW ROCHELLE

TOMATILLO Authentic Mexican fare featuring

CITY CHOW HOUSE Asian-Latin fusion

in-season local ingredients. • 13 Cedar St., Dobbs Ferry • 914-478-2300

cuisine in a modern setting. • 1 Radisson Plaza, New Rochelle • 914-576-4141

HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON

NORTH SALEM

HARVEST-ON-HUDSON Mediterranean

VOX French bistro serving eclectic fare from

cuisine, with river views. • 1 River St., Hastings-on-Hudson • 914-478-2800

foie gras to burgers. • 721 Titicus Rd., North Salem • 914-669-5450

IRVINGTON

PEEKSKILL

FLIRT SUSHI LOUNGE Japanese eatery

DIVISION STREET GRILL Food with

known for provocatively named sushi rolls.

a contemporary American flair. • 26 N.

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EQUUS RESTAURANT French fare served at Castle on the Hudson. • 400 Benedict Ave., Tarrytown • 914-631-3646

THORNWOOD ABIS JAPANESE RESTAURANT Traditional Japanese cuisine plus steakhouse hibachi. • 14 Marble Ave., Thornwood • 914-741-5100 AZZURRI Mediterranean fare served in a

Tuscan villa atmosphere. • 665 Commerce St., Thornwood • 914-747-6656

TUCKAHOE AN AMERICAN BISTRO Bright eatery featuring quesadillas, lamb and chicken. • 296 Columbus Ave., Tuckahoe • 914-793-0807

WEST HARRISON AQUARIO Brazilian and Portuguese cuisine specializing in seafood. • 141 E. Lake St., West Harrison • 914-287-0220

WHITE PLAINS BLUE Asian-influenced American fare featuring osso bucco. • 99 Church St., White Plains • 914-220-0000 MORTON’S, THE STEAKHOUSE

Chicago-based steakhouse. • 9 Maple Ave., White Plains • 914-683-6101


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YONKERS BISTRO CHARTREUSE Modern updates of

French classics. Extensive wine list. • 35 Main St., Yonkers • 914-969-1006 ZUPPA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE Innovative Italian with homemade pasta. • 59 Main St., Yonkers • 914-376-6500 ■

WHERE TO EAT BY CUISINE

smart center Englewood AMERICAN: An American Bistro, Tuckahoe • Crabtree’s Kittle House, Chappaqua •

Division Street Grill, Peekskill • Meritage, Scarsdale • Morton’s, The Steakhouse, White Plains • Ocean House, Croton-onHudson • The Olde Stone Mill, Tuckahoe • Red Hat on the River, Irvington-on-Hudson • Tollgate Steakhouse, Mamaroneck ASIAN: Abis, Mamaroneck and Thornwood • Flirt Sushi Lounge, Irvington • Wasabi,

Sleepy Hollow CONTINENTAL: Monteverde, Cortlandt

Manor • Opus 465, Armon FRENCH: Bistro Chartreuse, Yonkers • Bistro Twenty-Two, Bedford • Equus Restaurant, Tarrytown • La Panetière, Rye • Le Château, South Salem • Vox, North Salem ITALIAN: Bella Vita, Mohegan Lake •

Primavera, Croton Falls • Spaccarelli’s Ristorante, Millwood • Terra Rustica, Briarcliff Manor • Zuppa Restaurant & Lounge, Yonkers

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Be THERE APRIL April 11—Get up close and personal with some slippery friends at AMPHIBIANS FOR KIDS, where children ages 5 and up will learn how to imitate amphibians’ calls and search for the creatures in their natural environment, 1 p.m. at the Trailside Nature Museum of Ward Pound Ridge Reservation in Cross River. Cost: $4 parking fee with Westchester County Park Pass; $8 without. Call 914-864-7322 or visit www.westchestergov.com/parks for more information. April 19—Enjoy eco-conscious

CHRIS BOTTI

fun at EARTH DAY WESTCHESTER 2009, featuring live music, demonstrations, children’s activities and more, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Kensico Dam Plaza in Valhalla. FREE. Call 914-864-7275 or visit www.westchestergov.com/parks for more information.

May 7—Listen to the contemporary jazz sounds of this famed trumpeter,

April 28 to May 31—Tour the STATELY HOMES BY-THE-SEA

presented by Jazz Forum Arts, 8 p.m. at Tarrytown Music Hall. Tickets: $45 to $85. Call 877-840-0457 or visit www.tarrytownmusichall.org for more information. the door; $30 for tickets purchased before April 28; $25 per person for groups; $20 for seniors. Call 732224-6791 or visit www.statelyhomes bythesea.com for more information.

May 1 to 3—Browse jewelry,

Sheep’s Run (99 Rumson Road, Rumson, N.J.), an H.T. Lindeberg–designed country house restored to its former glory by more than 50 leading interior designers and 12 landscape designers, benefiting Visiting Nurse Association of Central Jersey. Hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $35 at

furniture, ceramics, photography and more at SPRING CRAFTS AT LYNDHURST, held at the breathtaking Lyndhurst Estate in Tarrytown. The event also features food, music and children’s activities, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $4 for children 6 to 16, FREE for children under 6. Call 914-631-4481 or visit

WAGS & WHISPERS WALK-A-THON AND PET FAIR lowed by a festival of food, music, games, crafts and more—10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at FDR State Park in Yorktown Heights. Sponsored by the SPCA of Westchester. Admission: $20. Call 914-941-2896 or visit www.spca914.org for more information.

APRIL 2009

days of tastings, music and more at the Doubletree-Tarrytown Hotel. A Saturday evening casino party hosted and catered by chef Peter X. Kelly benefits the Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. Tickets: $60 per tasting in advance, $90 at the door; $150 for the casino party. Visit www.greaternywine.com for more information. ■ SEND EVENT LISTINGS TO:

Westchester Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received four months in advance of the event and must include a phone number that will be published.

FABRIZIO FERRI; ERIC ISSELÉE

April 25—Bring your furry friends to this event—a 3-mile walk fol-

/

May 15 to 17—Head to the 5TH ANNUAL GREATER NEW YORK WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL, three

M AY

DESIGNER SHOW HOUSE at

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What’s HAPPENING SUPPORT GROUPS For more information, visit www.worldclassmedicine. com. ■

Congestive Heart Failure Support Group

Meets on the first Tuesday of every month, 3:30– 4:30 p.m. Call 914-493-1730 for additional information. ■ Hepatitis

C Support Group

Meets every other Wednesday, 6–8 p.m., in the Cedarwood Hall Conference Room on the first floor. Call 914-493-7641 to learn more. ■

Living With Multiple Sclerosis

For information, call the Behavioral Health Center Outpatient Department at 914-493-2621. ■

Pulmonary Hypertension Support Group

Meeting Saturday, April 4, from 10 a.m. to noon. Conference Center, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. Call Yusetty Ovalle, CA Accredo Therapeutics, 1-800-5265113, ext. 5519, for additional information. ■

Radiation Medicine Support Group

Meets every Wednesday, 11 a.m.–noon, in the Department of Radiation Medicine conference room. Call 914493-8561 for additional information. ■

Stroke Support Group

Meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month, 6–7:30 p.m. Call 914-493-1573 for more information. ■

Weight-Loss Surgery Support Group

Meets twice monthly on Thursdays at 6 p.m. at the Medical Arts Atrium, 19 Bradhurst Avenue, Suite 1700, Hawthorne. LEARNING FOR LIFE Learning for Life is Westchester Medical Center’s series of free seminars held in the Conference Center at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital. Parking is available in the Children’s Hospital lot; check in at the security desk. For additional information or to register, call 1-877-WMCDOCS or visit www.worldclassmedicine.com. ■

Weight-Loss Surgery Seminars

Thursdays, April 2 and 23, May 21 and 28, 4:30– 6:30 p.m. If you are overweight, you may be a candidate

for bariatric (weight-loss) surgery. Here, bariatric surgeons explain the details of the latest minimally invasive surgical procedures. ■

Living Donor Liver Transplant Seminars

at W e s t c h e s t e r M e d i c a l C e n t e r SPECIAL EVENTS

100.7 WHUD Kids’ Fair

Saturday, April 18. Now in its 14th year, the 100.7

WHUD Kids’ Fair unites thousands of families for a day of fun and education. Besides educational displays, games and interactive exhibits, the fair also features a live radio broadcast and more for toddlers to preteens. ■

“Go the Distance”

Sunday, April 19. Help Maria Fareri Children’s

Hospital at Westchester Medical Center celebrate its fifth birthday with a walk and family fun day to benefit the hospital’s programs and services. We thereby honor Maria Fareri’s wish “for the health and well-being of all the children of the world.” To learn more, log on to www.worldclassmedicine.com or call 914-493-2575. ■

Pediatric Cancer Foundation Walkathon

Sunday, April 26, 10:30 a.m.–2 p.m., Riverside Park, New York. The Foundation is a proud supporter of

Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. For more information about this event, visit www.pcfweb.org or call Nancy Joselson, 914-777-3127. ■

Mayfair Fundraiser at Rye Playland

Saturday, May 2, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. (Rain date: Sunday, May 3, noon–6 p.m.), Playland Amusement Park, Rye.

Sound Shore Medical Center, Westchester Medical Center and White Plains Hospital Center team up for a fifth year of fundraising to benefit all three hospitals. At this year’s Mayfair celebration The public will get a sneak preview of Rye Playland, with many amusement rides and Kiddyland open for business. To learn more or to purchase advance Fun Cards, call Sound Shore Medical Center, 914-637-1155; Westchester Medical Center, 914-493-8029; or White Plains Hospital, 914-681-1040. ■ 9th Annual Pediatric Cancer Foundation Bikeathon

Sunday, May 17, 10 a.m.–1 p.m., County Center, White Plains. The Foundation is a proud supporter of Maria

Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. For more information about this event, visit www.pcfbike.org or call Nancy Joselson, 914-777-3127. ■

30th Annual Westchester Medical Center Ball

Saturday, June 6, Pier 60 at Chelsea Piers, New York City. For more information, please call the Westchester

Medical Center Foundation at 914-493-6180. ■

8th Annual Westchester Medical Center Biathlon

Wednesdays, April 29 (Spanish language seminar) and May 6 (English language seminar), 6–7:30 p.m. Learn

Sunday, June 28, Macy Oval, Westchester Medical Center Campus. Are you ready to run 2 miles, bike

about liver disease and living donor liver transplant. Hear from our expert transplant team on what makes a good candidate for a liver donor and recipient. Educate yourself about the safety issues surrounding living donor liver transplant.

15 miles and run 2 more miles? You can compete alone or as a team in this New York Triathlon Club–sanctioned event. To register, go to www.NYTRI.org. To learn about sponsorship or volunteer opportunities, call 914-493-8029. ■

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SPECIAL PROMOTION

WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER

in the news

Westchester Medical Center Nurses Honored by Hudson Valley Magazine Two Westchester Medical Center nurses have captured regional acclaim as top 20 finalists for Hudson Valley Magazine’s Excellence in Nursing Awards. Kathy Longo, RN, BSN, and KATHY LONGO Kathy Rogan, RN, BSN, MS, will both be considered for the top award this May. Kathy Longo is the Nurse Manager of Westchester Medical Center’s newly renovated Medical Intensive Care Unit. When the call for nominees came out, Kathy had just completed the physical and operational establishment of a new and expanded Medical Intensive Care Unit that is now KATHY ROGAN able to provide care for 11 patients, a 57% increase, in a state of the art facility. Kathy Rogan is the Clinical Nurse Specialist for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Her career began close to 30 years ago at Westchester Medical Center. Kathy worked as a Staff Nurse when the original Neonatal Intensive Care Unit first opened in 1982. Throughout her career at WMC she has advanced her education and training to better care for the smallest patients our medical center treats. Both nurses will be honored at a celebratory dinner during National Nurses Week. Congratulations to them both for this well-deserved honor!

at Westchester Medical Center. John was discharged on February 9, 2009, just in time to spend Valentine’s Day at home with his wife and his new heart!

Caitlin and Eric Hauser There is positive news to report in the story of Caitlin and Eric Hauser, young siblings that were featured in the Holiday edition of Westchester Health & Life. As the issue went to press, Eric, then five, was in need of a life-saving bone marrow transplant that would cure him of two rare immune deficiency disorders: hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a condition that affects one in one million children under the age of 15; and X-linked lymphoproliferative disorder2 (XLP2), which made Eric extremely susceptible to infection via the Epstein-Barr virus. The bone marrow donor was to be his seven-year-old sister Caitlin, who proclaimed herself a “soldier” in her brother’s “army” fighting the conditions. January’s transplant procedure was successful and after being in protective isolation for a month, Eric left Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center in midFebruary for his home in Harriman, NY. Since his release, Eric has been visiting Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital’s outpatient program regularly for post-operative transplant and his health is improving. In fact, if his current progress continues, parents Eric and Christina say little Eric may be back in school by May. Caitlin made it through the procedure with mere soreness and was back to her normal routine soon after the transplant.

STORY UPDATES John Newton In the February 2009 issue of Westchester Health & Life we introduced you to 53-year old John Newton of Wantage, NJ. In desperate need of a transplant, John’s heart was so severely damaged as a result of several heart attacks he was being kept alive by a left Ventricular Assist Device while he waited for a suitable donor. On January 25, 11 days after the magazine went to print, 220 days after being placed on the waiting list for a heart, John Newton received his transplant

WMCintheNews_0409final.indd 1

ERIC HAUSER POSES WITH THE STANLEY CUP DURING A FOLLOW-UP VISIT AT MARIA FARERI CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL.

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Photo credits, QUIZ: What’s your design era? pages 28–31 Lamps: A, Akemi table lamp from Uttermost; B, Walnut and Nickel Deco Dome table lamp from Lamps Plus; C, Countess Retro Medley Giclee table lamp from Lamps Plus; D, Eclipse table lamp from Stonegate Designs Couches: A, Cromwell sofa from Edward Ferrell; B, Robert Scott CA, from Inside Art Deco: A Pictorial Tour of Deco Interiors From Their Origins to Today by Lucy D. Rosenfield, Schiffer Publishing (October 30, 2005); C, Retro Marshmellow sofa from Vintage Looks; D, CH103 sofa by Hans J. Wegner from Suite New York Side tables: A, Impero table from Lewis Mittman; B, Cosmo table from Lewis Mittman; C, Carrello Trolley by Azucena from Suite New York; D, Formstelle waitress table from Suite New York Chairs: A, Arosa dining arm chair from Lewis Mittman; B, Art Deco dining chair from Inside Art Deco: A Pictorial Tour of Deco Interiors From Their Origins to Today by Lucy D. Rosenfield, Schiffer Publishing (October 30, 2005); C, Arne Jacobsen Egg chair from Suite New York; D, Edit side chair by Philippe Cramer for Bernhardt Design Pendant lights: A, Sterling crystal chandelier from Schonbek; B, Deco inverted pendant from Meyda Tiffany; C, Classique pendant from Stonegate Designs; D, Caboche Collection suspension lamp by Patricia Urquiola and Eliana Gerotto from Suite New York Mirrors: A, antique gold-crackle traditional mirror from Bellacor; B, black and white mirror from Midnight Mirrors; C, Sunburst mirror from Baker Furniture; D, Cut-Twig wall mirror from West Elm ■

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{ Home Design } S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

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Absolute Flooring Absolute Flooring offers its customers the ultimate look of luxury with Milliken Carpet’s new Easy Change™ program. With Easy Change, you can work with Milliken’s color palette of 49 hues and 160 patterns to design an affordable, customized broadloom carpet to match your own distinctive décor. The short turnaround time it takes to create your personalized, custom look allows Absolute to install your carpet in a matter of only weeks. 1735 FRONT STREET | YORKTOWN HEIGHTS 914-245-0225 | WWW.ABSOLUTEFLOORING.COM

Amendola Marble & Stone Known as “The Stone Source Since 1989,” this familyowned retailer and fabricator tops recommendation lists of East Coast architects, contractors, commercial developers, and homeowners. Certified fabricators for Silestone, CaesarStone and Eco-Stone, Amendola also manufactures Bianco Specchio, a solid pure white glass for counters and flooring. Avanti, their exclusive glass mosaics, are manufactured for precise color matching, available in custom architectural patterns. There’s a piece of stone, glass, or ceramic to take your breath away at Amendola’s showroom. 560 TARRYTOWN ROAD | WHITE PLAINS

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The Caravan Connection Homeowners intent on living in healthy, yet luxurious interiors should be interested in The Caravan Connection’s new collection of vegetable-dyed carpets from Nepal woven from aloe. Mike McRee, co-owner, says Nepal’s innovations include weaving with other natural fibers, but that aloe offers a soft hand with subtle colorations. “Combining aloe and wool creates fantastic textures,” says McRee, adding that you can see over 40 samples of aloe carpets at their showroom.

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Carpet Trends Great design begins with great choices. As their name infers, Carpet Trends is on the leading edge of floor fashions for 2009. Area rugs custom-fabricated from leather textiles bring exciting and bold new patterns to the home and faux animal prints invoke memories from a long ago safari trip. For naturalists, Carpet

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{ Home Design }

The new definition of luxury is green, and new carpet technology is one major key to cleaning up the environment. Carpet World’s introduces Bliss by Beaulieu, highly durable and soft carpeting produced from a synthetic fiber made from recycled plastics that resists bacteria, mold, and mildew. In addition, Carpet World offers Mohawk’s Smart Strand carpeting made from corn fiber. Both have exceptional warranties. Carpet World also announces that it’s holding prices at 2008 levels.

Also featuring

The Latest in Wood Flooring One of the largest selections of exotic wood in Westchester & the most up to date laminate flooring collection available

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Consolidated Plumbing Known as Westchester’s oldest Kohler distributor, Consolidated Plumbing’s loyal customers love Kohler’s WaterTile Ambient Rain overhead showering panels for luxurious water delivery at a great value. The 54-nozzle sprayheads offer hydrotherapy and chromatherapy—moodenhancing colored light sequences that create effects from sunsets and passing clouds. The coordinating steam unit also has a well in which scented oils can be poured to create aromatherapy. You’ll find working displays at Consolidated Plumbing’s showroom.

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Grande Central Showroom “Now is the best time to take the bathroom and turn it into a spa vacation to enjoy everyday to sooth your nerves,” says Howard Frankel of Grande Central Showroom. Frankel suggests turning a regular shower into a luxurious space by adding body sprays, an overhead showerhead, a steam unit with aromatherapy and chromatherapy options, and seat. Frankel says you can even hook up your iPod and turn your wall tiles into speakers.

CC

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faces of WESTCHESTER

S t re t c h i n g the point C ounty Executive Andy Spano gets a Pilates primer from Melanie Danza at the opening of Apogee Pilates & Wellness Center in White Plains. Spano was on hand to announce the Apogee Fit Kids Challenge, a

children to adopt healthy habits.

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2009

KEVIN TUREK

program encouraging school


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Profile for Wainscot Media

Westchester Health & Life April 2009 issue  

The Good Living Magazine from Westchester Medical Center

Westchester Health & Life April 2009 issue  

The Good Living Magazine from Westchester Medical Center