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OXFORD T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M M C C U L L O U G H - H Y D E | T R I H E A LT H

WINTER 2020

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TRIHEALTH.COM

BETTER HEART HEALTH IS YOUR CHILD TOO SICK FOR SCHOOL? SCREENINGS EVERY MAN NEEDS

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SECRETS OF THE FEMALE HEART FOR WOMEN, BOTH DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF HEART DISEASE CAN POSE SPECIAL CHALLENGES. EXPERTS SAY WOMEN tend to fear breast cancer and think—even if they have heart-disease risk factors—that a heart attack will happen to someone else. In reality, heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, followed by all cancers. Many people don’t realize that the symptoms of heart disease in women can be different than those in men. While some women experience classic angina—chest pain—just as men do, others have nausea or flu-like symptoms instead. That can make it difficult to diagnose. There’s also a difference in the way male and female bodies handle plaque, which accumulates in arteries and can lead to blockages in blood flow to the heart. Doctors say that instead of a major

blockage in one spot, women sometimes develop more diffuse buildups along the artery wall. These elongated deposits can sometimes make angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft surgery less effective. Studies also show that women are more likely than men to develop dangerous conditions in the smaller byways of the arterial system, where they are more difficult to treat, rather than the major arteries leading directly to the heart. During the childbearing years, women get some protection from natural hormones, so on average they’re a little older when heart disease is diagnosed. And they’re more likely to have additional conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension. Researchers are still learning about these differences between men

4 STEPS TO BETTER HEART HEALTH Anything that gets your body moving and burning calories is good for your heart, as is being careful what you put into your body. Here are four simple ways to keep your heart healthy. • Be vigorously active for 30 minutes most days. • Don’t smoke.

• Eat fewer fatty and salty foods and more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and poultry. • See your doctor for regular physical exams—and if you experience chest pain, a rapid heartbeat or other troubling symptoms.

and women. But what’s clear is that women—especially those with known risk factors, such as excess weight, high cholesterol, high blood pressure or a history of smoking—should consult their doctors to make sure they’re doing all they can to protect themselves against heart disease.

FOR THESE SYMPTOMS, CALL 911 Studies show women are less likely than men to experience chest pain and more apt to have other symptoms, such as those listed in the last two bullet points. • Chest discomfort that lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and then returns. It may be pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. • Shortness of breath, often accompanying chest discomfort, but sometimes preceding it. • Discomfort in other upper-body areas, including the back, neck, jaw or stomach. • Nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness or breaking out in a cold sweat.

TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH A PHYSICIAN AT TRIHEALTH HEART INSTITUTE AT McCULLOUGH-HYDE, CALL 513.246.2400.

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per year. But kids who are lethargic, coughing heavily and showing other signs they need extra care aren’t going to get much out of school—and they’re probably infectious.

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BE MORE LENIENT WITH YOUNGER KIDS. You’re

probably more likely to send an older child to school, and that’s not unwise. A sick first grader in tears may trigger a midday call from the school nurse, while an older child may tough it out—and should know enough not to sneeze on his or her friends. Also, it’s harder for a high schooler to compensate for a missed day of classwork.

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HEED THE SIGNS. Depending on the circumstances, one episode of vomiting may not mandate a day at home. Neither does a cold in a child with asthma if peak flows are good. But bouts of vomiting or watery diarrhea, a heavy or frequent cough with mucus, persistent pain or a widespread rash justify an absence.

TOO SICK for School? 5 TIPS TO HELP YOU DECIDE WHETHER YOUR CHILD SHOULD BE KEPT HOME FROM SCHOOL.

IT’S DECISION TIME. Your child must get ready for the morning school bus, but he or she is feeling sick. You’re pretty sure it’s not a serious illness—and you have a busy day planned. Should you keep your child at home? These five tips can help you make the call.

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KEEP A CHILD WITH A FEVER HOME. A fever is any temperature above the normal range of 98 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. (Add a degree to readings taken orally or under the arm.) Oral temperatures can be skewed if the child just drank something hot or cold. If you use an ear device, be sure ear canals are clean. If you’re in doubt about the thermometer’s accuracy, take your own temperature, too.

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TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS. A stuffy nose, a sore throat,

sneezing or even a light cough isn’t an absolute reason to miss school; many healthy children have seven to 10 colds

SICK CHILD? GET HIM OR HER CHECKED AT OXFORD PEDIATRICS. CALL 513.523.2156.

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CALL YOUR PROVIDER. You may not be able to talk

with a healthcare professional in time for your morning decision, but if your concern lingers, be sure to seek medical advice.

PLAN AHEAD FOR YOUR YOUNGSTER’S NEXT SICK DAY Don’t wait till your child has to miss school to figure out how you’ll handle it. • KNOW YOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT’S SICK-CHILD POLICIES. Do certain contagious bugs mean mandatory absence? Will your child need a note when he or she returns? • HAVE A NETWORK. Is the babysitter or childcare provider prepared to deal with a mild illness? Have you identified friends, neighbors or relatives who can bail you out in an emergency—and agreed to do the same for them? • DECIDE WHO’S ON DUTY. If one parent has to take off work to look after a sick child, will you take turns? Will it depend on whose job duties are more critical that day? • HAVE A WORK-AT-HOME PLAN. Do you have a home computer on which you can work while you tend to a sick youngster? What is your company’s policy on time off to care for sick children?

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL GET TO KNOW THREE NEW PHYSICIANS AT McCULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

SANDRA FLAISHMAKHER, MD, PEDIATRICIAN

TATYANA HAMILTON, DPM, PODIATRIST TriHealth Orthopedic & Sports Institute 5151 Morning Sun Road, Oxford 513.863.8798 Motto: I follow the wisdom of Theodore Roosevelt: “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” Career choice: I grew up in a family of healthcare professionals, and I was impressed by how much they enriched their patients’ lives. I chose podiatry because it has a mix of everything I was looking for in medicine. I can see patients in clinical, hospital and surgical settings—all in a single day. Second choice career: astronomer Favorite pastime: Sightseeing, whether I’m doing it half a world away or in my own backyard. Little-known fact: I’m a trivia geek; I know a lot of random things. My husband and I try to play trivia games a few times a month.

Oxford Pediatrics, Oxford and Ross 513.523.2156 Why medicine: When I was 4, my family traveled to Russia to meet my grandpa. At the end of a long train ride, my mother said, “This is your grandpa. Go say hi.” I extended my hand and said, “Hello, I’m Sandra. I’m 4. I’m going to be a doctor.” Second choice career: A teacher—probably for children in kindergarten or first grade, or in special education. I’ve taught special education programs for children with Down syndrome and cerebral palsy. I’ve also tutored and worked as a daycare teaching assistant. Favorite pastime: I enjoy cooking, and I’m big on Asian food. I buy produce at a supermarket in the Sharonville area. Little-known facts: I love to sing. I was famous in the karaoke scene when I lived in Israel. Also, I don’t know how to ride a bike. Favorite film: Shawshank Redemption. It says a lot about humanity.

KAVITA DEONARINE, MD, GENERAL SURGEON TriHealth Surgical Institute 5241 Morning Sun Road, Oxford 513.523.1844 Motto: It’s from Maya Angelou: “My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor and some style.” Career choice: I initially wanted to be an obstetrician/gynecologist, but I fell in love with general surgery. I’m passionate about women’s health; I treat many women with breast cancer. Second choice career: A teacher. Both of my parents were teachers, and my husband is a teacher. When I was a resident, I enjoyed teaching medical students. I think it’s important to pass the love of our profession to the next generation. Favorite hobby: I love to paint and draw. I almost went to art school. Favorite movie: Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure. On the surface, it seems like a “dude” film, but it’s really a complex story about time travel and self-discovery. Also, it has a positive message: We should all be excellent to each other.

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HE ALTH SCREENINGS

A GUIDE FOR

MEN

HELP KEEP THE MEN IN YOUR LIFE HEALTHY BY SHARING THIS HANDY LIST WITH THEM. REGULAR MEDICAL EXAMS help detect problems early, when they’re most treatable. Yet research conducted for the American Academy of Family Physicians found that 37 percent of American men had not had a health checkup in the most recent two-year period. The researchers also discovered that 78 percent of men who have spouses or significant others said that person has influence over whether they go to the doctor. Use this guide to inform yourself and your partner. By getting the right health services and screenings, men can improve their chances of living a longer, healthier life. Physicians might modify or add to these guidelines based on an individual’s medical history and personal risk factors.

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH • Prostate cancer screening: A prostatespecific antigen (PSA) test can detect prostate cancer earlier than no screening at all. But testing is not universally recommended because there are questions about whether the benefits of testing outweigh the risks for most men. Current guidelines recommend that men ages 50 to 70 (starting at age 40

for African Americans) discuss with their physicians whether screening makes sense for them based on family history and other risk factors. • Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) tests: Before having sexual intercourse with a new partner, both partners should be tested for STIs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

HEART HEALTH • Blood pressure test: At least every two years. High blood pressure can lead to a variety of health problems, including heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease and dementia. • Cholesterol panel: At least every five years, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglycerides should be measured to assess heart-disease risk. If you have diabetes, kidney problems or certain other conditions, you may need a cholesterol test more often.

COLON HEALTH • Cancer screening: Colonoscopy every 10 years or a stool-based test (can be

done at home and requires no bowel preparation) every year. Talk to your physician about which option is best for you. For those at average risk, screening should occur between ages 50 and 75.

DIABETES • Glucose screening: Every three years for men ages 45 and older and for younger men with a BMI greater than 25 plus at least one diabetes risk factor, such as high blood pressure or a family history of the disease.

ONETIME SCREENINGS • Hepatitis C (HCV): Men born between 1945 and 1965 should talk to their doctor about this test. • Osteoporosis: Men ages 50 to 70 should be screened for osteoporosis if they have risk factors, such as long-term steroid use, low body weight, smoking, heavy alcohol use or a family history of osteoporosis.

TO SCHEDULE AN EXAM WITH A PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN IN OXFORD, COLLEGE CORNER OR BROOKVILLE, CALL OXFORD INTERNAL MEDICINE AT 513.523.4195.

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BY GETTING THE RIGHT HEALTH SERVICES AND SCREENINGS, MEN CAN IMPROVE THEIR CHANCES OF LIVING A LONGER, HEALTHIER LIFE.

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CHILDREN HELPING CHILDREN

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL PARTICIPANTS RAISED FUNDS TO HELP BABIES IN NEED.

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EVERY SUMMER, children who attend a three-day Vacation Bible School (VBS) program in Oxford raise money or perform a service project to help community members in need. In 2018, Pam Collins, Chief Patient Services Officer at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital (MHMH), told Prue Dana, one of the VBS leaders, that an infant swing would benefit certain babies at the hospital. In 2018, about 3 percent of the 430 babies delivered at MHMH had neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which occurs when a baby withdraws

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From left: Vacation Bible School students with the MamaRoo infant swing, which helps calm babies who are born to mothers who abuse substances; Maria Kreitzer, BSN, RN, CLC, Director of Obstetrics, and Lindsay Shell, RN, with the swing; obstetrics nurse Katie Maddock, RN, with an infant.

from certain substances—opioids, antidepressants or sleeping pills—he or she is exposed to during pregnancy. Babies born to mothers who abuse substances are often born addicted to the drugs themselves, since the drugs pass through the placenta. “They may be shaky and have problems with temperature control and colic,” says Sandra Flaishmakher, MD, a pediatrician at MHMH. “These symptoms can overwhelm a newborn’s nervous system and interfere with sleep.” The MamaRoo swing, which resembles the environment in the womb, can help soothe irritable babies with NAS. It’s used by more than 300 hospitals around the country. The swing fit in well with the notion of children helping children, so Prue and the other adult leaders agreed to fund it. VBS educators told the 30 to 40 children, who ranged in age from preschool to fifth grade, about the hospital’s need. “The children brought in their pennies, nickels and dimes because they understood that these babies needed their help,” says Prue. “One boy donated his entire $20

savings.” In addition, some of the children’s five churches contributed a portion of the week’s offerings to the cause, and parents donated after a VBS concert featuring a band from Colombia. In total, the children, parents and churches raised more than $600 for the swing and other nursery items.

SOOTHING IRRITABLE BABIES MHMH staff members are grateful for the swing, which has proven effective for many newborns with NAS. Case in point: John*, who was born to a mother with opioid addiction, began experiencing withdrawal symptoms within 24 hours of his birth. He was arching his back, crying until he was hoarse and sucking vigorously on a pacifier. Once the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses at MHMH placed him in the MamaRoo swing, the nurses were able to calm him almost instantly. “It was like caring for a completely different child,” says Maria Kreitzer, BSN, RN, CLC, Director of Obstetrics at MHMH. “It was the best sleep he’d had up to that point.” John spent three hours in the new swing between feedings and was able to use it several times a day

during his NICU stay. When healthy newborns cry, there are several ways to soothe them, including feeding, diapering and holding them, says Kreitzer. Not so with NAS babies. “When caring for NAS babies, you have to minimize stimulation and keep them in a dimly lit area without noise,” she says. The swing’s constant vibration and movement soothe the infant’s nervous system, allowing him or her to sleep, says Dr. Flaishmakher. The swing can be adjusted with five different motions, such as “car ride” and “rock-a-bye”, and five different speeds. It can also recline. The swing, which is reserved for NAS babies at MHMH, is used in a quiet nursery space with dimmed lights and minimal interaction with nurses. The infant is monitored at all times when he or she is in the swing. Prue and the VBS children recently visited MHMH to see how the swing was being used. “It was great for the children to see it in action,” she says. “I wanted them to know how their donation has helped babies in their own community.” *NAME HAS BEEN CHANGED

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Thanks to blood donors, Julie Joliff survived a postpartum hemorrhage.

frozen plasma units, in which plasma—a part of the blood—is given to those who are bleeding in emergency situations. Apheresis platelet units—in which the components of blood are separated— were also given to patients.

A QUICK AND SIMPLE PROCESS

THE GIFT OF LIFE

DONATING BLOOD CAN SAVE LIVES.

JULIE JOLIFF KNOWS all too well the importance of blood donation. After the birth of her daughter, McKenzie, at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital (MHMH) on June 26, 2017, Julie experienced a postpartum hemorrhage and received 15 units of blood. “Those 15 people saved my life,” she says. “I wouldn’t be here today if someone hadn’t taken the time to give blood.” Every two seconds, someone in the U.S. needs blood, according to the American Red Cross. Blood can help save the lives of many, including accident victims, patients who have had surgery,

cancer patients and those who have suffered burns. About one in seven people who are admitted to a hospital need blood, yet less than 10 percent of those who are eligible to donate do so every year, according to Community Blood Center. At MHMH, patients benefit from blood drives, which are held five times per year. In 2018, MHMH gave 209 packed red blood cell units to 120 patients. These cells have been separated from plasma, the liquid part of blood, and are often used to treat anemia (low levels of red blood cells). MHMH patients also received fresh

January is National Blood Donor Month, so it’s a good time to consider donating. A single whole blood donation can save up to three lives, says Angel Brashear, Lead Technologist, Transfusion Services. What’s more, giving blood is easier and faster than you’d imagine. “From start to finish, the entire process takes about 20 to 25 minutes,” says Brashear. She recommends drinking plenty of fluids and eating something light before donating and wearing a shirt that can be easily rolled up above your elbow. Today, Julie Joliff gives blood every time there’s a drive at her church. Her daughter recently celebrated her second birthday, and she was grateful to be part of the celebration. “These are things I would have missed had I not received a transfusion,” she says. “Knowing that motivates me to be a donor.”

COMING SOON: A NEW BLOOD DRAW STATION Getting bloodwork will soon be more convenient for McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital patients. The hospital recently began construction on a new blood draw station, which will be located just off the main lobby—an advantage for patients with mobility problems. Outpatients will be able to register and have their blood drawn in the same area. The station will be open from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m., Monday through Friday, and at other times of the day when needed. The main lab, which is located in the back of the building, remains open as usual.

TO DONATE BLOOD, VISIT WWW.DONORTIME.COM (USE SPONSOR CODE 324) AND MAKE AN APPOINTMENT OR CALL THE LABORATORY SERVICES DEPARTMENT AT 523.524.5375.

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{ POWER FOOD }

Darling Clementines THESE TANGY CITRUS CHARMERS, RIPEST IN THE DEAD OF WINTER, ARE BURSTING WITH VITAMINS AND NUTRIENTS. IF YOU’RE STILL RECOVERING from the heaviness of holiday eating, bright, cheery clementines are just the thing. Sweeter than navel oranges and less seedy than tangerines, clementines are a derivative of mandarins and are distinguished by their oval shape and glossy skins. These skins can be removed in one fell swoop to reveal small separated segments, making clementines an easy (and fun), pop-in-your-mouth snack. But it’s not just their undeniable convenience, sweet aroma or citrusy flavor that get us—these little guys happen to be nutritional powerhouses, too.

POWER UP “Christmas oranges,” nicknamed as such because they’re in season during the winter months and are traditional stocking stuffers, are packed with vitamin C, which supports the immune system and makes the skin appear more youthful, among other benefits. In fact, just one clementine boasts 36 milligrams of the stuff, which is 60 percent of the recommended Daily Value. Clementines also contain 1.3 grams of fiber, which aids digestion, as well as 130 milligrams of potassium, which can help prevent headaches, hypertension, tooth decay and a plethora of other ailments. Need more convincing? Clementines are recommended during pregnancy, since the fruit’s high folate content supposedly helps prevent neural tube defects in fetuses

(and encourages normal brain function in adults). All of these benefits are packed into just 35 calories!

BUY/STORE/SERVE Clementines are sold from December to March or April. When purchasing yours, choose fruit that are firm, and only buy as many as you’ll need because they don’t last very long. Store them in a basket or bowl on the counter, not in a fridge or in a plastic bag, and just grab and go. Clementines can be eaten on their own as a healthy snack, or you can toss them in an Asian-style salad, atop yogurt or oatmeal or mix them into a smoothie or shake. But don’t throw out those peels just yet. Zest or candy them to add a citrusy kick to baked treats or extract oil from them. Clementine oil is often used in aromatherapy, as it’s shown to be a powerful antioxidant and stress reliever that promotes clearheadedness and more restful sleep. Is it a coincidence then that clementines are at their peak in January, when we need all of that great stuff the most? Happy New Year indeed.

DID YOU KNOW? Legend has it that the natural hybrid of clementines was discovered in West Algeria in the 1900s in the garden of the orphanage of Marie-Clément, for whom the fruit was formally named in 1902.

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Tis the Sneezin’

Oxford Pediatrics and Adolescents Our doctors follow your baby from delivery to pediatric care. We provide a comprehensive range of care to help set your child on a path to reach their fullest potential by caring for their physical, mental and emotional well-being through every stage of life. Office locations: Oxford 5141 Morning Sun Road Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday appointments available for sick children, beginning at 8 a.m. 513 523 2156

Ross 2449 Ross Millville Road Suite 198 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 513 856 5953

New Patients welcome! TriHealth.com/Pediatrics

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Oxford Health & Life Winter 2020  

Oxford Health & Life Winter 2020