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T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M M c C U L L O U G H - H Y D E | T R I H E A LT H

OXFORD FALL 2018

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TRIHEALTH.COM

MEET OUR SPECIALISTS PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE: WHAT TO KNOW EXERCISE & PREGNANCY

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YOUR HEALTHCARE NEWS NO FLU FOR YOU!

Perry Funk, DO

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

Influenza is a potentially serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every year, millions of people get the flu, hundreds of thousands of people are hospitalized and tens of thousands of people die from flu-related causes. An annual seasonal flu vaccine is the best way to help protect against flu. Vaccination has been shown to have many benefits, including reducing the risk of flu illnesses, hospitalizations and even the risk of flu-related death in children. The single best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated each year! Flu shots are offered at Oxford Priority Care and Ross Urgent Care on a walk-in basis or by contacting your primary care physician.

For 44 years, Oxford Internal Medicine has provided the very best in primary care in Oxford and the surrounding region. As part of McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth, the practice is expanding on that tradition. Last year, Perry Funk, DO, moved to Oxford to join the practice. A graduate of The Ohio State University and Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Dr. Funk is accepting new patients, as are other physicians in the practice. TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT, CALL 513 523 4195.

NEXT-LEVEL MRIs

To better serve patients, McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth has invested in the latest MRI technology from Siemens. The new system delivers exceptional quality while producing scans in less time than older technology. It also features a wider opening, increasing comfort for all patients, in particular those who may be claustrophobic. If you have a physician referral for an MRI, you can make an appointment by calling 513 524 5555.

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EXPANDED PRIORITY CARE HOURS

When you have an urgent medical need, such as a minor injury or illness that cannot wait for a visit with your primary care physician, Oxford Priority Care offers walk-in care (no appointment necessary). Located at 5151 Morning Sun Road in Suite B, Oxford Priority Care is now open Monday–Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday– Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Staffed by physicians, nurse practitioners and certified medical assistants, services include on-site lab testing and X-rays; broken bone/fracture evaluation; splinting of injuries; minor burn care; wound care and stitches; infections; and cough, cold, asthma and flu care. As part of McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth’s full spectrum of care, Oxford Priority Care offers: • Walk-in care for urgent, but less-thanemergent issues • Medical care for adults and children (ages 2 months and older) • Minimal wait times • Copay similar to that of a physician office visit for most insurance plans • Communication about your care throughout the TriHealth system and with your physician • The TriHealth Labs’ high-quality process • The expertise of radiologists from McCullough-Hyde Memorial, Bethesda Butler and Good Samaritan hospitals

FALL 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

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Maria Kreitzer, her husband, Kyle, and daughter, Morgan Lynn, donated a CuddleCot to MHMH.

HELPING PARENTS GRIEVE

A CUDDLECOT DONATED TO McCULLOUGH-HYDE WILL HELP PARENTS OF STILLBORN BABIES MOURN THEIR LOSS. NEARLY THREE YEARS AGO, Maria Kreitzer of Eaton, Ohio, delivered a stillborn baby at an Indiana hospital after her placenta unexpectedly detached from her womb. Instead of celebrating the birth as they had expected, the family grieved. Because the hospital had a CuddleCot, the Kreitzers were able to spend 26 hours with their daughter, Alayna Lynn, before parting ways. The CuddleCot’s special cooling system helps to extend the period of time that parents of a stillborn can interact with their child. “Our immediate family were able to come to the hospital and hold her,” Maria says. “We were able to take pictures. She was able to wear a few of her outfits that

were really special to us. That experience gave us the passion and mission to do this for other families.” In January, the Kreitzers donated a CuddleCot to McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth, where Maria, a nurse, did her nursing school externship and took training courses, including grief counseling for perinatal loss. Plaques on the unit and its case say that the CuddleCot was donated in Alayna’s memory. The family brought it to McCullough-Hyde on a significant day. “That’s how we celebrated Alayna’s second birthday,” Maria says. “Our second daughter, Morgan Lynn, who was named after her sister in heaven, was with us the day we placed it.”

Nationwide, about 1 in 160 babies are stillborn, sometimes for unknown reasons, to healthy moms. “The most painful thing is when your goodbye comes before you even had the chance to say hello to your child; there’s not much of a chance to make memories,” says Janet Feazell, RN, McCullough-Hyde’s grief coordinator for perinatal loss. “We want to do everything that we can to support our families at this painful time. The idea is that the CuddleCot would allow couples to spend more time with their babies.” McCullough-Hyde’s CuddleCot hasn’t been used yet. “Our hope is that no patient would experience this kind of loss,” Feazell says, “but if they do, they can use this gift from the Kreitzers.”

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PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE: ARE YOU AT RISK? SYMPTOMS

TO WATCH FOR Some people with peripheral artery disease may not experience any symptoms. For those who do, symptoms may include: • Claudication—heaviness, tiredness or cramping in the leg that occurs during activity and resolves after the activity is stopped • Sores on toes, feet or legs that heal slowly or not at all • Pain in the legs or feet that wakes you up or prevents sleep • Color changes in the feet, particularly blueness • Poor nail growth or decreased hair growth on the legs • A lower temperature in one leg than the other If you have questions or concerns about PAD, contact your primary care physician.

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THIS SERIOUS, SOMETIMES SYMPTOMLESS CONDITION INCREASES AN INDIVIDUAL’S RISK OF HEART ATTACK AND STROKE. PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE (PAD) affects 1 in 20 Americans over the age of 50. It occurs when plaque, a fatty deposit, builds up in the arteries, restricting blood flow to the legs. These fatty deposits put the individual at a greater risk of heart attack and stroke. The problem is that buildup of plaque may not result in any detectable symptoms. That’s why it’s important to know not only the potential symptoms, but also the risk factors so you can talk with your doctor. When assessing your risk for PAD, your doctor will take a personal and family medical history. He or she also will perform a physical exam to check pulses, color and temperature

of the legs and feet, and may perform an ankle-brachial index. This test compares the blood pressure in your ankles with that in your arms. If PAD is suspected, your doctor also may order an ultrasound to try to identify the blocked artery. Treatment options for PAD include lifestyle changes, medication and surgery. Lifestyle changes that improve PAD include quitting smoking, improving cholesterol and blood glucose levels, eating a healthy diet, exercising and achieving or maintaining a healthy weight. Medical treatment may include prescriptions to reduce blood pressure and cholesterol, manage diabetes, or

prevent the formation of blood clots. In addition, surgery or other medical procedures may be used to unclog arteries. The best thing you can do to decrease your risk for PAD is to make those lifestyle changes now, if necessary, or to maintain your healthy lifestyle into the future. PAD is one of hundreds of conditions that develop in patients who have high cholesterol, are overweight, don’t exercise, have developed diabetes or smoke. Remedying these health issues will help reduce your risk of PAD and countless other conditions as you age. Why not start now? Your future self will thank you for it.

You have high blood pressure

You have diabetes

You are a smoker or former smoker

You have a history of vascular disease

RISK You are over the age of 50

FACTORS 50+

You may be at increased risk for PAD if any of the above are true.

You are AfricanAmerican

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FALL 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

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{ TASTES }

SWEET

SENSATIONS

CAP YOUR MEAL WITH THIS DELICIOUS MIDDLE EASTERN DESSERT—BECAUSE THE ENTRÉE SHOULDN’T BE THE ONLY COURSE WITH FLAVORS TO SAVOR.

Triple Almond Cake YIELDS: 12 SERVINGS

DIRECTIONS

INGREDIENTS

TO MAKE THE ALMOND PASTE:

n butter and all-purpose flour, for the pan n 20 oz. almond paste, homemade (see below) or store-bought n 2½ sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature n6 large eggs n3 Tbs. rosewater n2 cups almond flour n2½ Tbs. baking powder n1 cup granulated sugar n pinch of sea salt nzest of 1 lemon n sliced almonds and confectioners’ sugar, for serving FOR THE ALMOND PASTE n 20 oz. blanched slivered or whole raw almonds n6 Tbs. honey n2 Tbs. vanilla extract n 1 Tbs. Amaretto liqueur (optional) n 1 Tbs. Frangelico liqueur (optional)

In a food processor, process the almonds until ground and clumpy. Add the honey and vanilla as well as the Amaretto and Frangelico, if using. Process until the mixture is the consistency of dough. You can make the almond paste in advance; it will keep, covered in the refrigerator, for up to one week. TO MAKE THE ALMOND CAKE:

Preheat the oven to 300°F. Grease a Bundt pan and dust lightly with flour, shaking out any excess. Place half of the almond paste in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Add the butter and mix for 3 minutes or until it becomes foamy. Carefully add the eggs one at a time as you mix. Add the rosewater and beat until fluffy, about 3 to 5 minutes. In another bowl, whisk together the almond flour, baking powder, granulated sugar, salt and lemon zest. Gradually add these dry ingredients to the butter mixture and mix for 5 minutes. Pour half of the batter into the prepared pan. Evenly top with the remaining half of the almond paste by breaking off bits and scattering them over the batter (they will sink into the batter). Top with the rest of the batter. Bake for about 1 hour, until the cake springs back when pressed. Remove the cake from the oven and let it cool in the pan for a few minutes. Run a thin knife around the edge of the cake to make sure it has released from the pan, then flip it onto a plate. Let the cake cool completely. Serve at room temperature, sprinkled with sliced almonds and dusted with confectioners’ sugar.

Recipe and photo are reprinted with permission from Levant by Rawia Bishara. Photos by Con Poulos. © Kyle Books.

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TAKING CONTROL OF

DIABETES

FOR ANYONE WITH PREDIABETES OR TYPE 2 DIABETES, STAYING HEALTHY DEPENDS ON UNDERSTANDING HOW TO MANAGE BLOOD-SUGAR LEVELS. OUR CLASS PROVIDES THE KNOW-HOW NEEDED.

30.3 84.1 MILLION PEOPLE HAVE DIABETES

MILLION PEOPLE HAVE PREDIABETES

ACCORDING TO THE LATEST statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 30.3 million Americans have diabetes. But a more alarming figure is that 84.1 million adults in the United States have prediabetes, and more than 90 percent of them don’t even know it. With prediabetes, blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as full-blown diabetes. Still, prediabetes increases a person’s risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. To help people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes stay healthy, McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital is offering a Diabetes Self-Management class for adults 18 and older. The class, which has an initial individualized assessment, usually lasts between five and six hours and is geared toward anyone with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who wants to learn more about how to balance healthy eating, medications and physical activity to control blood-sugar levels. The diabeteseducation team consists of a registered nurse and a registered dietitian who both have received special education from the American Diabetes Association to prepare them to teach the class. One of the instructors, Rebecka

Sayne-Meyer, RN, is excited about reaching new students. “I enjoy teaching the class because I love to see the ‘Ah ha’ moments from the attendees when we talk about diabetes,” she says. “Whether we’re discussing someone’s specific concerns about diet, exercise or medications, it’s so rewarding to see them have the confidence to leave our class with the tools they need to take control of their diabetes.” Sharon Klein, Director of Community and Employee Wellness at McCulloughHyde, encourages participants to bring a support person to the class. “Having someone who is a second set of ears is always a good idea,” she says. “Many people bring the person from home who is in charge of shopping and cooking the meals.” Previous attendees have high praise for the class. One wrote, “Thank you! The class was very informative, and I would recommend this to others.” And said, “Both of the instructors were awesome! They answered all of our questions, and were very personable and knowledgeable on every subject. I learned many ways to take care of myself and my health.” To attend the class, you must have an order from your medical provider. Contact their office and ask for a referral if you feel the class will help you.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CLASS OR TO SIGN UP, PLEASE CALL 513 524 5555.

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TriHealth specialists in the Oxford area These specialists see patients in the Oxford area, either at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital, Bethesda Butler Hospital or individual offices. For office addresses, please visit TriHealth.com. Breast Cancer Surgery

Cardiology

Cardiology

Cardiology

Cardiology

Cardiology

Ear, Nose, Throat

Anne Kurtizky, MD

Steve Lewis, MD

Kamal Shemisa, MD

Chris Thoresen, MD

David Reed, MD

Marshall Winner, MD

Raymond Rock, MD

Hamilton

Oxford

Oxford

Oxford

Oxford

Oxford

Oxford

513 853 1300

513 524 5555

513 524 5555

513 524 5555

513 524 5555

513 524 5555

513 246 7000

Gastroenterology

Medical Oncology

Medical Oncology

Medical Oncology

Orthopedic Surgery

Pain Management

Pain Management

Robert Cucinotta, MD

Faisal Adhami, MD

Ed Crane, MD

Seerin Shatavi, MD

Bryan James McCullough, DO Bruns, MD

James Fortman, MD

Hamilton, Oxford

Hamilton, Oxford

Oxford

Hamilton, Oxford

Ross

513 853 1300

513 853 1300

513 853 1300

Brookville, Hamilton, Oxford

Ross

513 853 2120

513 856 5971

513 856 5971

513 856 5971

Podiatry

Rheumatology

Sports Medicine

Surgery

Lawrence Hufford, DPM

Maricor Docena, MD

Matthew Daggy, MD

Rolf Travis Brunckhorst, MD Dugger, MD

Douglas Hingsbergen, MD

Hamilton, Oxford

Oxford, West Chester

Oxford, Ross

Butler, Oxford

Butler, Oxford

Butler, Oxford

513 856 5971

513 844 1000

513 844 1000

513 844 1000

513 856 5971

Surgery

Surgery

513 246 7000

© 2018 TriHealth | 1018 | TRI

© 2018 TriHealth | 1018 | TRI

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TriHealth primary care physicians in the Oxford area Oxford Internal Medicine 12 W. Church Street Oxford, OH 45056 513 523 4195

Internal Medicine

Brent Bader, MD

Molly Emmert, MD

Perry Funk, DO

Brookville, Oxford, W. College Corner

Oxford, W. College Corner

Brookville, Oxford, W. College Corner

Kami Park, MD

Deborah Perkins, CNP

Amy Spivey, MD

Brookville

Brookville, Oxford, W. College Corner

Brookville, Oxford, W. College Corner

James Davis, MD

Sofia Gofman, MD

William Logeman, MD

Oxford, Ross

Oxford

Oxford, Ross

Jill Mock, CPNP

Sandy Simpson, CPNP

Oxford, Ross

Oxford

Oxford Internal Medicine 10130 Oxford Pike Brookville, IN 47012 765 647 3557 Oxford Internal Medicine 121 W. Liberty Avenue W. College Corner, IN 47033 765 732 3114 Oxford Pediatrics 5141 Morning Sun Road Oxford, OH 45056 513 523 2156

Pediatrics

Ross Pediatrics 2449 Ross Millville Road Suite 198 Hamilton, OH 45013 513 856 5953

Looking for a TriHealth physician? Get the guidance you need at 513 524 5500 or toll-free 888 433 5678.

© 2018 TriHealth | 1018 | TRI

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EXERCISE FOR A HEALTHY PREGNANCY STAYING ACTIVE WHILE YOU’RE PREGNANT WILL HELP KEEP YOU AND YOUR BABY HEALTHY AND PREPARE YOUR BODY FOR THE DEMANDS OF LABOR.

CONGRATULATIONS! You’re pregnant! This is a time for you to pamper and take good care of yourself. While you need plenty of rest and time to put your feet up, you also need to stay fit. Studies show that exercise during pregnancy benefits both you and your baby. Before starting any exercise regimen, even if you were very active before your pregnancy, consult your doctor. There are conditions during pregnancy that can make exercise unsafe even for the biggest fitness guru. Once your doctor gives the okay, you can stay active in almost any way you like. Aerobics, light weight lifting, walking, non-contact sports (think tennis and golf), yoga, swimming and stretching are all potential activities. Swimming is particularly beneficial as it relieves the growing pressure on your

back and feet while allowing you to get a great cardiovascular workout. While almost any activity is safe during pregnancy, a few precautions should be taken. Be sure to avoid overheating, particularly if you work out in hot weather. Drink lots of water and take frequent breaks. Also, be careful of anything that requires balance because your center of gravity will be shifting. Avoid becoming too out of breath. A good test is whether you can carry on a light conversation while working out. If you’re breathless, slow down. Be sure to slow down or stop if something doesn’t feel right, and contact your doctor if necessary. Staying active will help relieve some common pregnancy aches and pains and prepare you for the hard work of labor. It also will help you bounce back to a healthy lifestyle after your baby is born.

5 WARNING SIGNS If you experience any of these symptoms while exercising, stop immediately and contact your doctor: 1. Abdominal pain or contractions that don’t go away when you stop and drink water 2. Bleeding or having fluid leak from your vagina 3. Sudden swelling in your legs or ankles 4. Muscle weakness or difficulty walking 5. Chest pain

NEED AN OB/GYN? JOHN T. HARLAN, MD, AND DANIEL J. STEIN, MD, BOTH BOARD-CERTIFIED IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, OFFER APPOINTMENTS IN OXFORD AND BROOKVILLE. OXFORD OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY 5225 MORNING SUN ROAD, SUITE A, OXFORD, OH | 513 523 2158 10058 COOLEY ROAD, SUITE A, BROOKVILLE, IN | 765 647 2677

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Accepting new patients Oxford Internal Medicine Perry Funk, DO

TriHealth.com/mhmh 513 523 4195 | 12 W Church Street, Oxford, OH 45056

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Profile for Wainscot Media

Oxford Health & Life: Fall 2018  

The Good Living Magazine from McCULLOUGH-HYDE | TRIHEALTH

Oxford Health & Life: Fall 2018  

The Good Living Magazine from McCULLOUGH-HYDE | TRIHEALTH