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OXFORD T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M M c C U L L O U G H - H Y D E | T R I H E A LT H

SPRING 2019

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TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

HONORING CAREGIVERS BETTER MRIs EXCEPTIONAL MATERNITY CARE

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TAKING CARE OF OUR OWN MATERNITY CARE AT McCULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL OFFERS THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS: TOP MEDICAL EXPERTISE AND COMMUNITY-STYLE CARING.

TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT AT OXFORD OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY, CALL 513.523.2158. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.OXFORDOBGYNINC.COM.

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Katie Woodruff of College Corner has given birth to all three of her children at McCullough-Hyde, including Gracelynn, born January 15.

her husband, David, for quite a while, and they’re like many young parents in our community. They’re warm and compassionate people working hard to build a strong, healthy family.”

VANESSA MITCHELL, REIBOLDT PHOTOGRAPHY

KNOWN FOR QUALITY AND CARING

CLINICAL EXCELLENCE combined with compassionate care is something patients naturally seek—never more so than when they’re preparing to deliver a baby. That powerful combination is what first drew Katie Woodruff, 31, of College Corner to McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth. She has given birth to all three of her children there, including Gracelynn, who was born on January 15. Katie ended up delivering during one of the busiest weeks the hospital has ever experienced—seven babies born in a 24-hour period. Yet even this high patient volume didn’t affect the high quality of care or service. Katie knows one of the McCulloughHyde maternity nurses personally. “She was with me when both my boys, Nathan and Clayton, now 7 and 3, were born,” says Katie. “As I was walking the halls, trying to help my labor progress, I overheard the staff calling her in because of the John Harlan, MD OB/GYN extra patients.”

Katie hoped that she might have her friend with her again when she delivered, and she did. “She was so great,” remembers Katie. “She didn’t show any sign of stress that she was working extra hours. She’s someone who’s been at the hospital for 14 years, which tells you something about working at McCullough-Hyde. Many of the other staff have been there a long time, too.”

HAPPY TO DO THEIR PART Katie’s OB/GYN, John Harlan, MD, also arrived to lend a hand, even though he wasn’t on call. “Dr. Harlan delivered all my kids,” says Katie. “Even though he wasn’t scheduled that night, he came in anyway, along with the other physician in his practice, Dr. Daniel Stein, and the midwife, Donna Bostick. They all stayed because there were so many women delivering.” For his part, Dr. Harlan says that this long delivery day was definitely a group effort, with everyone in his office assisting. “The day of Katie’s delivery was just after a cold snap—people had been snowed in, and as weather warmed up, it seemed everyone went into labor at once.” He adds, “I’ve known Katie and

McCullough-Hyde’s maternity facilities include Labor-DeliveryRecovery rooms that provide a home-like atmosphere and private postpartum rooms. But it’s the hospital’s reputation for caring that draws many maternity patients. “I’ve always felt there’s something special about the obstetrics department at McCullough-Hyde—the way they treat you with such care and kindness,” says Katie. “I don’t know if the nurses go through some kind of special training, but each time, they made me feel as if it were my first baby. I know friends who drive miles out of their way to come to McCulloughHyde and have their babies because they know of their great reputation and services.” Dr. Harlan says: “People from our community know that they’ll receive warmth and a face-to-face encounter from caregivers whenever they go to McCullough-Hyde. Members of the nursing staff in particular work so well together. The day of Katie’s delivery, they were helping each other and trading off so all the moms were covered.”

MAKING A DIFFERENCE McCullough-Hyde medical staff members are highly skilled, experienced and, most importantly, want to make a difference in their patients’ lives. Dr. Harlan sees this firsthand. “Whenever I’m there, I feel as if we’re taking care of our friends and neighbors and cousins,” he says. “And if it’s not my family members, it’s the mother-in-law or cousin of someone I know. We’re taking care of our own, and each other. It feels good.”

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NEW MRI BRINGS MANY BENEFITS A STATE-OF-THE-ART MRI SYSTEM PROVIDES MORE DETAILED IMAGES IN LESS TIME AND A MORE COMFORTABLE PATIENT EXPERIENCE.

IF YOU HAVE A PHYSICIAN REFERRAL FOR AN MRI, YOU CAN SCHEDULE YOUR MRI AT M c CULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL BY CALLING 513.524.5555.

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“I ANTICIPATE THAT WE’LL REDUCE PATIENT TIME IN THE RADIOLOGY SUITE BY 25 TO 50 PERCENT. AND THE COMFORT FACTORS WILL REALLY HELP WITH IMAGE QUALITY.” —HILLARY EVANS, MD

WHAT IS AN MRI? McCULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL Hospital | TriHealth recently upgraded its radiology suite, adding a new MRI system with state-of-the-art technology to help doctors diagnose conditions more efficiently and precisely, while offering a much more comfortable exam experience for patients. “The upgrade of the hardware and software will increase image quality, reduce scan times, increase patient comfort and enhance their overall experience,” says Hillary Evans, MD, a radiologist at McCullough-Hyde.

MORE SPACE FOR PATIENTS One appealing change is noticeable as soon as you see the new MRI unit: The hole in the center is wider, and the machine itself has less depth to it. “With the shorter bore and larger core, it won’t feel as claustrophobic,” says Dr. Evans. “It’s going to be a more comfortable experience.” Even for patients who don’t have issues related to claustrophobia, the shape of an MRI unit is important. “The prior magnet had a small donut hole,” says Dr. Evans. “The new magnet has a larger opening, so we’ll be able to accommodate larger patients. And it helps with comfort: Patients don’t have the wall of the magnet immediately against their shoulders or their face.”

A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study produces detailed crosssectional pictures of the body’s organs, soft tissues and bone. Images are created using a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer. Because of the strong magnetic field used, people with certain conditions may not be able to have an MRI. Prior to scheduling an exam, the radiology team will ask you a series of questions to ensure an MRI is safe for you. Jewelry and watches are best left at home as they cannot be worn or brought into the exam room.

A QUIETER SCAN The new machine also is quieter than the previous unit. The clicks and knocks indicating that pulses of electromagnetic current are running through the machine will seem muffled in comparison to the noises emitted by the previous machine. “There’s 70 percent noise reduction— it’s quiet technology,” says Dr. Evans. “But we’ll still offer earplugs to patients.” The new unit—a Siemens Magnetom Aera 1.5T—contains a 1.5 Tesla magnet, which is the same strength as the magnet used in the unit that it replaced. However, the new MRI has improved coil technology, allowing more detailed,

higher-resolution images to be taken. “It will give us superior visualization of anatomy for musculoskeletal exams and improved cartilage visualization,” says Dr. Evans. “Higher anatomic details contribute to better diagnoses.”

FASTER AND MORE DETAILED Additionally, the MRI unit’s new software allows for higher-quality images to be taken in less time, leading to shorter scan times for patients. During a typical MRI appointment, several images are taken of each patient. With the new machine, each image should take less time to capture, shaving time from appointments. “We can acquire the same images in about half the time,” explains Dr. Evans. “MR pulse sequences can be 30 seconds apiece or up to six minutes. Instead of hearing, ‘Mr. Smith, please try to stay still. This scan will take four minutes,’ now we have scans that will take just two minutes.” In the past, if patients didn’t lie perfectly still in the MRI machine, there was a chance that a scan sequence would need to be repeated because their movements could compromise the images. But technology that’s part of the new MRI machine reduces the need for repeat images, which means that patients should spend less time in the machine overall. “We would build wiggle room into our exam times to allow for these repeats,” says Dr. Evans, “But we won’t have to allow time for little motion artifacts or discomfort that contributes to people moving anymore.” If patients do make small movements, often they can be managed. “There’s new software technology that allows us to correct for little twitches and little motions that previously made us repeat entire pulse sequences,” says Dr. Evans. “Now if you twitch a little bit, we have some fancy tricks that allow us to still use that image.” Together, all of these changes and improvements should make MRI appointments shorter and sweeter for patients. “I anticipate that we’ll reduce patient time in the radiology suite by 25 to 50 percent,” says Dr. Evans. “And the comfort factors will really help with image quality.”

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RAISING ACTIVE KIDS HELPING CHILDREN TO BE FIT DOESN’T HAVE TO COST A LOT, BUT THE PAYOFF IS HUGE.

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TODAY’S KIDS weigh more and move less than ever before. According to data from the State of Obesity, a report from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Ohio has the nation’s sixth highest obesity rate for youth ages 10 to 17. Lack of exercise is no doubt a contributing factor. The most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that only 26 percent of Ohio’s school-aged children and adolescents achieve the minimum recommended amount of physical activity (60 minutes) each day, and 13 percent report no physical activity at all. What’s changed? For one thing, the simple suggestion to “go outside and play” now works only for those lucky enough to have both neighborhood friends who are home and adults around to keep an eye out. For another, the proliferation of screenbased entertainments means kids don’t actually have to leave the house—or even the couch—to be social. Moreover, many schools, under pressure to raise standardized test scores, have cut back on recess. And kids’ sports leagues are becoming increasingly competitive, leaving the child of average skills on the sidelines—if he or she makes the team at all.

FITNESS BY EXAMPLE The good news is that many of the negative trends can be countered by parental effort. Moms and dads who model active behavior and a healthy diet can make a big difference. That means doing things like walking or biking together in the evening, hiking on weekends and being active when you take kids to the playground. Try to schedule at least 30 minutes three times a week to be active with your kids. Parents also can help by setting ground rules and expectations. When you’re preparing dinner, tell the kids not to watch TV while they’re waiting—they can help you or do Wii Fit (an active play system used with the Nintendo Wii console) for 30 minutes. See the sidebar “Make Activity Part of Life” for more ideas. Experts acknowledge that, given the demands on parents’ time, making family fitness a priority is easier said than done. It may help to know that these activities are among the most important things you can do for your child. The American Heart Association reports that physical activity influences weight, reduces blood pressure, raises HDL (“good”) cholesterol, reduces the risk of diabetes and some kinds of cancer—and leads to greater self-confidence and higher self-esteem. Happy exercising!

Type 2 diabetes

Osteoporosis

BENEFITS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Heart disease

PART OF LIFE The best way to create healthy exercise habits is to incorporate physical activity into daily life. Here are some ideas for getting your kids up and moving. • Find an exercise or sport your child enjoys. In addition to team sports that schools and communities offer, dance, tennis and martial arts are good options for youngsters and teens not interested in team sports. • Check your local YMCA or recreation program for low-cost classes. • Check cable and online listings for free fitness or yoga classes you can do at home with your child. • Allow kids to walk to and from school, if possible. • Put your child in charge of walking the dog. • Crank up the music and sing and dance as you clean together. • Encourage biking or walking with friends instead of texting and gaming. • Use the time during TV commercials to do quick workouts, such as abdominal or stretching exercises or a series of planks. As a bonus, if you do this, kids won’t be using commercial time to get snacks. • Encourage an exercise journal—kids respond to being held accountable.

HOW MUCH EXERCISE? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that schoolaged children and adolescents (ages 6 to 17) participate in a variety of physical activities they enjoy that are appropriate for their age. They should be physically active for 60 minutes or more each day and include these elements: • Aerobic activity: either moderate- or vigorousintensity aerobic physical activity (this should make up most of the 60 or more minutes a day).

High blood pressure

Cancer

MAKE ACTIVITY

Regular exercise helps children and adolescents control weight, build strong bones and muscles, improve heart health and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. Physical activity reduces the risk of all the conditions listed above.

Obesity

• Muscle-strengthening: activities that involve moving muscles against resistance, such as using free weights, elastic bands or workout machines, or walking/running up stairs or hills (at least three days a week). • Bone-strengthening: activities that produce an impact on the bones, such as hopping, skipping, jumping rope, running, weight lifting or playing sports like volleyball, tennis and basketball (at least three days a week).

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HONORING THE

CAREGIVERS MANY PATIENTS AND FAMILIES APPRECIATE A McCULLOUGH-HYDE PROGRAM THAT HELPS THEM SAY “THANK YOU FOR CARING” WHILE ALSO HONORING A LOVED ONE.

ENTERING A HOSPITAL as a patient—or even as a visitor—means encountering many of life’s most powerful emotions: Fear, hope, dread and joy all arise in the waiting rooms, hallways and surgical suites of hospitals. The experiences we have with nurses, physicians and team members color our feelings about these lifealtering occasions. Nothing can erase the pain and sorrow that accompany being injured or losing a loved one. But having a sympathetic, encouraging encounter with a member of the healthcare team can provide solace and comfort. And for many, it’s helpful to have an opportunity to share some of those feelings and experiences, and to thank anyone who helped us through a challenging time. That’s why the McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital Foundation rolled out the Grateful Patients and Families program. This program allows patients and their families to honor team members who’ve made a difference in their care by writing an account of their experiences and, if they choose, including a note of thanks. In addition, the program allows patients and families to make a donation in the name of a loved one or to honor particular caregivers or departments.

THE HEALING POWER OF EXPRESSION That’s exactly what Clare Iniewicz did for her husband, Stanley A. Iniewicz, who suffered from diabetes and heart disease. When he died at age 90, Stanley had been a frequent patient at McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth. During the 40 years he and Clare lived in the Oxford area, the couple had watched the hospital grow and expand. In the note accompanying her gift, Clare wrote: “Stanley received many hours of solicitous excellent care by the nurses, doctors and staff.” She adds: “The nurses were so good to him; they never acted as if it was a chore to help him. The staff were like neighbors. They always showed us kindness and shared a smile.” Clare earmarked her donation for diabetes education. She wrote: “I know that Stanley would be honored to be part of the growth and innovation of a facility that so benefits our community.” “We’ve always had grateful patients and provided excellent care at our hospital,” says Mary Bennett, Chief Development Officer. “But now we have a better way to capture and celebrate it. The gifts are an extra piece. The main thing is honoring what our team members are doing, and giving patients and their families a chance to share their feelings about their experiences.”

IF YOU’RE A GRATEFUL PATIENT AND WOULD LIKE TO HONOR THE HOSPITAL OR SOMEONE WHO CARED FOR YOU OR A LOVED ONE WHILE AT THE HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL THE Mc CULLOUGH-HYDE FOUNDATION AT 513.664.3850.

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ALMIGHTY ASPARAGUS

LOADED WITH NUTRIENTS, THESE SPIRITED SPEARS ARE PACKED WITH POWERFUL HEALTH BENEFITS. THIS SPRINGTIME GREEN vegetable is tender, tasty, easy to prepare and packed with nutritional benefits. So maybe it’s time to make these succulent stalks a menu regular.

POWER UP Asparagus helps the heart in several ways. It’s rich in fiber, which can reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, and full of inflammation-fighting antioxidants. It also packs plenty of B vitamins, which help regulate the amino acid homocysteine, high levels of which can be a danger to your arteries. What’s more, one ½-cup serving of this powerhouse vegetable provides 57 percent of your daily requirement of vitamin K (which helps blood clotting and strengthens bones)

10”

growth rate: up to 10 inches in 24 hours

and 34 percent of the daily requirement for folate (needed to produce DNA and to help the body’s cells divide properly). Asparagus also contains a type of soluble fiber that helps us absorb nutrients by supporting the colon’s probiotic bacteria. You get all that— and distinctive taste, too—for only 20 calories!

BUY/STORE/SERVE Choose stalks that are round and neither fat nor twisted. The stems should be firm and thin with deep green or purplish closed tips. To store your spears, wrap a damp paper towel or cloth around the ends and place in your fridge. Try to consume asparagus within 48 hours of purchase, when it’s

3

years from seed to first harvest

at its best both in taste and nutritional value. Pre-cooking prep is minimal. Use a vegetable peeler to remove the outer skin of the stem’s thicker bottom portion, which tends to be tough and stringy. Don’t cut the tips off! Wash asparagus under cold water to remove any grit and then cook stalks whole to maintain nutrients. Serve asparagus as a side dish by sautéing in your choice of vegetable broth, chicken broth or olive oil, or by roasting in the oven, lightly sprinkled with Parmesan cheese. In the mood for a breakfast with a difference? Asparagus makes a flavorful addition to any omelet. Or liven up that lunchtime salad by chopping up asparagus spears—raw or cooked— and tossing them into the mix.

15–20

number of years an asparagus plant typically produces

20

edible varieties (of 300 total)

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Marti Kyger has been a volunteer in the Emergency Department for 14 years.

THE VALUE OF VOLUNTEERING

WHETHER GREETING PATIENTS, SUPPORTING THE CARE TEAM OR HELPING ADMINISTRATORS, HOSPITAL VOLUNTEERS PLAY A CRUCIAL ROLE.

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WHEN PATIENTS ENTER the surgical waiting room at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth, the first face they see is likely to belong to Carolyn Stearns, an energetic and welcoming 89-year-old volunteer who has been a constant presence at the hospital for more than 20 years. “We’re there to greet them, take their name and folder and just try to help them feel comfortable,” she says.

Stearns first began volunteering at McCullough-Hyde in February 1998, after her husband had passed away the previous year. “I always wanted to volunteer, to commit myself to helping people,” Stearns says. “I worked as a secretary after the youngest of my six kids went to school, so I was the first volunteer to start in medical records. After a while they needed surgical hostesses, so I went there and

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eventually became chairman of the Surgical Hostesses Committee.”

10,000 HOURS AND COUNTING Stearns has made a positive impact in every corner of the hospital: When the courtesy desk needed a hand because the regular volunteers were on vacation, she pitched in five days a week, and when the hospital began digitizing records, she started with oncology, scanning and uploading all the charts into the computer. In her two decades of volunteering, Stearns has logged more than 10,000 total hours of volunteer time at the hospital. “We couldn’t do our work without our volunteers,” says Sharon Klein, Director of Volunteer Services at McCullough-Hyde. “They help out everywhere, from the courtesy desk and administrative work to supporting our medical staff and patients by delivering specimens, getting blankets, cleaning rooms—anything to help.” For a small community hospital, McCullough-Hyde has a dedicated and active group of nearly 200 volunteers who donated 13,645 hours of their time last year alone. About half of the volunteers are college students from Miami University who make a twosemester commitment. The rest are adults and teens from the Oxford community. “I can’t express how important our volunteers are,” Klein says. “No one in this hospital could do their jobs without them.”

A LIFELONG VOLUNTEER Another longtime adult volunteer is Marti Kyger, who works by day as an assistant dean and director of advising at Miami University. Marti has donated one night a week in the Emergency Department for the last 14 years. “I first started volunteering as a candy striper when I was in high school and I really enjoyed working with the nurses,” she says. “I think I’ll continue volunteering indefinitely.” For Kyger, volunteering her time in the Emergency Department provides her

Carolyn Stearns, a volunteer for 20-plus years, works in many areas of the hospital.

with experiences and perspectives she just doesn’t get at her day job. “I spend every day working with young college students,” she says. “At the hospital, I’m interacting with people who are elderly or sick, and I’m able to give back in my own small way.” Kyger says it’s the community hospital environment that keeps her coming back year after year. “It’s very convenient for me to stop in after I leave work, and it really feels like I’m helping my community,” she explains. “I never know what I’m going to do that day. I could be changing beds, delivering samples or just providing an extra pair of hands to open a door or bring someone a drink.” McCullough-Hyde is always open to new volunteers who want to give back to their community or learn new skills. “Anyone interested in volunteering can fill out an application that includes their areas of interest, so they can find a time and a role that work best for them,” Klein says. “Even if you feel uncomfortable in a hospital or interacting with patients, there are many other things volunteers can do, from working in the gift shop to scanning records,” Kyger says. “The hospital is right here in town— it’s convenient, flexible—try one assignment, and if it doesn’t fit, you can always try something else.”

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT VOLUNTEERING AT Mc CULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, VISIT WWW.TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMHVOLUNTEER.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF VOLUNTEERING Volunteers often donate their time because they enjoy helping others, but volunteering can actually have a powerful impact on your own health. Studies into the effects of volunteering have found a number of important physical and mental health benefits, especially among older adults: • Avoid Depression: Volunteering regularly can reduce feelings of isolation and lower the risk of depression. • Stay Active: Increased physical activity can help you remain healthy and active later in life. • Stimulate the Mind: Working with others stimulates the brain to keep your mind sharp, slowing down memory loss and dementia. • Stay Social: Interacting with coworkers and making friends through volunteering can reduce stress, boost selfesteem and give a sense of purpose. • Live Longer: All of these benefits are known to be key factors for living a longer, healthier life.

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Personalized birth experiences are

BABY BOUND delivers an individualized plan perfect for you The next chapter of your story is about to begin, and the TriHealth team is by your side. McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital delivers more than state-of-the-art facilities, allprivate Labor-Delivery-Recovery rooms and a home-like atmosphere, we also deliver a personalized, hands-on experience through our BABY BOUND maternity services. Registered nurses provide individualized plans for each expectant mom that includes pregnancy assessment and birth planning, prenatal education, nutrition counseling, breastfeeding support, follow up visits and more. BABY BOUND, one more reason why no one else delivers an exceptional maternity experience quite like we do.

Learn more at TriHealth.com/maternity or call 513 524 5689

All private rooms | 60+ years in Oxford, OH

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Profile for Wainscot Media

Oxford Health & Life: Spring 2019  

The Good Living Magazine from McCULLOUGH-HYDE | TRIHEALTH

Oxford Health & Life: Spring 2019  

The Good Living Magazine from McCULLOUGH-HYDE | TRIHEALTH