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summer 2012

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i n e v ery i s s ue

6 WElcoME lE T TEr 8 E d i To r’S N oT E 5 1 W H E r E To E AT 54 T H i N g S To d o

20

26

Three high-tech additions to Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s surgical units allow for less invasive procedures and faster recover y.

Find out how faith and Mother Nature keep two doctors balanced outside the hospital.

INSIDE LOOK

23

TECH SAVVY For children undergoing surger y, a team of pediatric anesthesiologists provides specialized care.

24

SEASONAL HEALTH Allergies are on the rise—learn how you can keep the sniffles and sneezes at bay.

25

UP CLOSE

24 2

summer 2012

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The mother of an autistic boy helps other parents deal with the challenges she knows well.

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FACES OF SAINT PETER’S

34

WATER GARDENS Enjoy tranquility in your own backyard by adding a water feature.

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9 FUN FAMILY TRIPS We’ve gathered a list of nearby road-trip destinations that will delight your whole tribe this summer.

40

COLOR THERAPY Move over, Malibu! This Strathmere beach house brings a color ful and sur fer-chic vibe to the Jersey Shore.

on the cover: masterfile. this page: shutterstock

FEATURES

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SUMMER

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31

48 46

LOCAL BUZZ

Judging from the lychee fruit’s long history, those old Chinese emperors really knew their antioxidants.

13

Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in Middlesex County

28

GATHERINGS Photos from recent charity and social events

30

LOCAL FASHION This season, blue jeans get a color ful makeover.

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LOCAL JEWELRY Garden-inspired pieces to evoke the flower child in you

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AT HOME Update your bathroom with these light- and eye-catching items.

4

SUMMER 2012

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POWER FOOD

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TASTES The locavores have taken over! These restaurants support local farmers and sustainable cooking.

52

FINANCIAL BALANCE Don’t buy long-term care insurance without considering these important factors.

53

MIDDLESEX LIVING In these retirement homes, the senior years can be a time of fulfillment and fun.

56

ESCAPES Enjoy a rustic-but-refined getaway at Hidden Pond in Kennebunkport, Maine, which lets you experience the great outdoors—no tents required.

ALL BUT RING: SHUTTERSTOCK. RING: COURTESY OF YVES SAINT LAURENT

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DEPARTMENTS

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WELCOME LETTER

SPECIAL EVENTS z Saint Peter’s Healthcare System’s

Annual Golf Classic

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 9:00 AM - Breakfast, Registration and Practice Range 11:00 AM - Shotgun Start 4:30 PM - Cocktails, Awards and Dinner The Ridge at Back Brook, Ringoes, NJ Play a round at one of New Jersey’s top-rated golf courses to benefit Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. $750 per golfer. Numerous sponsorships available. For more information, call Michael Loch at the Saint Peter’s Foundation at 732-745-8542.

HEALTH & WELLNESS z

Free Community Lecture Series THIRD THURSDAY OF THE MONTH 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM Saint Peter’s Urgent Care Center, located in the Village Shopper III Shopping Center, 1378 Route 206, Skillman Free lecture series every third Thursday of the month features physicians and healthcare professionals discussing a variety of healthcare issues affecting children and adults. For upcoming lectures, call Saint Peter’s Urgent Care Center at 609-497-4597.

z

Community Mobile Health Services Saint Peter’s Community Mobile Health Services provides health education and screenings, including blood pressure, blood sugar, breast health, cholesterol, stroke, skin safety, osteoporosis, body mass index and more. Community groups and businesses interested in scheduling on-site screenings can contact Community Mobile Health Services at 732-745-8600, ext. 8903.

CHANGE HAPPENS

HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGY IS A RAPIDLY CHANGING LANDscape, and Saint Peter’s Healthcare System is changing along with it, always striving to provide our patients with the latest in medicine. This edition of Middlesex Health & Life offers a window into some of the advances that have taken hold at Saint Peter’s—devices and techniques that are propelling safer care, improved postoperative outcomes, faster recovery times and hope for our patients, who are eager to return to their normal lives as quickly as is possible. Please take a glance at this edition’s Inside Look feature on page 20, which details several of those surgical leaps forward, each a promising weapon in the technological arsenal at Saint Peter’s. Just last month, Saint Peter’s became only the third hospital in New Jersey—and the first in this part of the state—to pioneer a new robotic technique known as “single-port” roboticassisted surgery, offered by the latest, most advanced version of the da Vinci Surgical System, which lowers even further the risk of scarring, reduces complications and speeds recovery time. The single-port procedure—which enables the surgeon to operate through only a single small opening in or near the navel—involved the removal of a gallbladder. The patient was operated on and returned home the same day. Saint Peter’s is also taking the battle against brain and spine cancers to a new level with the use of our CyberKnife radiosurgery system—again, the only one of its kind in the region. CyberKnife works by aiming its beams directly into a targeted tumor, while completely avoiding (and protecting) surrounding healthy tissue. John Lipani, M.D., one of a handful of neurosurgeons in the world to have trained with the inventor of CyberKnife, is a new addition to the Saint Peter’s surgical team, and is performing brain and spine surgeries using CyberKnife. There is much more to this edition of Middlesex Health & Life. The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital manages one of the few 24/7 pediatric anesthesiology programs in the state, a crucial service if your child is ever in need of surgery, no matter what time of day or night. See the Tech Savvy article on page 23. And please take the time to read about two of our Saint Peter’s physicians—A. Liam Ness, M.D., a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, and Archana Singh, M.D., a pediatric pulmonologist— who are featured in Faces of Saint Peter’s on pages 26–27. I hope you will enjoy the magazine and the chance to learn more about Saint Peter’s.

RONALD C. R AK , J.D. PRE S IDE N T A ND CHIE F E X E C U T I V E OFFI CE R S A IN T PE T E R’S HE A LT H CA RE SYST E M

254 EASTON AVENUE

|

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600 | www.saintpetershcs.com

B06+/B6800(5LQGG

30


Saint Peter’s University Hospital welcomes Dr. John D. Lipani to our CyberKnife team.

THE ONLY FELLOWSHIP-TRAINED CYBERKNIFE NEUROSURGEON IN NJ. Recognized internationally as a CyberKnife® expert, Dr. John D. Lipani strengthens Saint Peter’s position as the most advanced CyberKnife program in the state. In addition to his extensive CyberKnife training, he is one of the few neurosurgeons in the world to have completed a prestigious fellowship in Neurosurgical Oncology and Radiosurgery. Trained at Stanford University Medical Center by the inventor of CyberKnife, he has treated over 3,500 cases in patients with brain or spine tumors. Dr. Lipani is board certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgeons and belongs to numerous medical societies.

John D. Lipani MD, PhD, FAANS, FACS

CyberKnife is the ultimate weapon in the battle against cancer. It’s called knifeless surgery because it removes tumors with no cutting, stitching or pain. Using pinpoint radiation beams, it targets hard-to-reach tumors in just one to five treatments — instead of the conventional 30 to 45! For details about CyberKnife, call toll-free 866-702-2737 or visit saintpetershcs.com/CyberKnife.

Treating you better...for life. 254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901 

732-745-8600 

www.saintpetershcs.com/CyberKnife

 Accredited by the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen  State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center CyberKnife is a registered trademark of Accuray Incorporated and is used with permission.

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GRAND OPENING

EDITOR’S NOTE

My father watches my husband and kids from the bridge at the reflection pool in the Azalea Garden at Skylands.

CI R O PI Z

ZA

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FORMERLY OF JOE & PAT’S PIZZERIA

secret garden

EVERY YEAR MY PARENTS AND MY LITTLE SISTER AND

Come and experience our Gourmet Pizza and our extensive menu featuring appetizers, chicken, veal, eggplant & steak entrees, seafood, pasta, selections from our grill, paninis, wraps, hot & cold heroes and delicious desserts.

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JENNIFER VREELAND

“Home of the Thin Crust Pizza”

her family come to visit us from North Dakota. (I am not originally a Jersey girl, but after 16 years, I think I qualify.) One highlight from their trip last spring was our excursion to the New Jersey State Botanical Garden at Skylands in Ringwood. Have you visited? What a New Jersey treasure—96 acres of beauty! One glorious afternoon last May we packed a picnic basket full of pastries from Balthazar Bakery in Englewood and headed to the garden. The estate was founded by Francis Lynde Stetson in 1891, and in 1922 it was purchased by Clarence McKenzie Lewis, an investment banker and trustee of the New York Botanical Garden. Lewis built the magnificent 45-room, Tudor-style mansion and transformed Skylands into a botanical showplace. It is now New Jersey’s only state botanical garden and is listed on both the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places. We spent the day meandering through the grand, colorful landscaped gardens, taking lots of pictures and catching up with each other. I was so happy to have found an outing that was fun for three generations—not an easy task. My favorite spot was the Azalea Garden, which features a reflection pool. I really experienced the peaceful, calming effects of a water garden. Read our article on page 34 to learn about the different styles and how to create your own water garden. I’m going to give it a try myself this summer by starting a container version. It will bring back fond memories of our time with my family last year. Enjoy!

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30


JENNIFER VREELAND ED ITOR IN CHIEF

SHAE MARCUS PUB LI S HER

S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER RONALD C. RAK, J.D.

ART DIRECTOR

MEREDITH M C BRIDE KIPP

EXECUTIVE EDITOR MARI S A S ANDOR A ED I T O R I A L

SENIOR EDITOR

TIMOTHY KELLE Y

ASSOCIATE EDITOR/SOCIAL MEDIA LIZ DONOVAN

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

REBECCA K . ABMA MEGHAN BA S HAW REBECCA THIENES CHERNY LEE LUS ARDI CONNOR KELLE Y GR ANGER DAVID LE VINE FR ANCESCA MOIS IN L AN N. NGUYEN LESLIE GARISTO PFAFF PAT TANNER

INTERNS

LINDSE Y BANK S MAUREEN SCULLY

EDITOR, CUSTOM PROGRAMS RITA GUARNA ART

DESIGN CONTRIBUTOR AMANI SEMADI

ART INTERNS

CA SE Y O’CONNOR CHRISTINE PORTER WEB

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL MEDIA NIGEL EDELS HAIN

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR NAOMI IMATOME-Y UN PRODUCTION

ADVERTISING

SALES MANAGER JODI BRUKER

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE MONICA DELLIS ANTI

DIRECTOR, SPECIAL PROGRAMS L AUR A A . DOWDEN

M A R K E T I N G & O P E R AT I O N S

CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER PETER CONNOLLY

CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER MAT THEW WIECZKOWS KI

CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER PHIL HARTMAN

DIRECTOR, MARKETING AND MEDIA RELATIONS MICHELLE L A Z Z AROT TI

MARKETING MANAGER AMANDA THOROGOOD

ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER JACQUELYNN FISCHER

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR, AGENCY SERVICES

SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

PRESIDENT, MEDICAL AND DENTAL STAFF DINES H S INGAL, M.D.

KIJOO KIM

CONTROLLER AGNES ALVES

SAINT PETER’S HEALTH AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES CORPORATION

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE REPRESENTATIVE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

AMANDA ALBANO

STE VEN S. RADIN, ESQ.

MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CATHERINE VALENTINE

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA

S A I N T P E T E R ’ S F O U N D AT I O N

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EMILY LYS S IK ATOS

CHAIRMAN CARROLL V. DOWDEN PRESIDENT MARK DOWDEN VICE PRESIDENTS AMY DOWDEN, REED FOSTER, RITA GUARNA, CHRISTINE HAMEL, SHAE MARCUS, ANDREW S HANE

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION CHRISTINE HAMEL

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Middlesex Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Middlesex Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. MIDDLESEX HEALTH & LIFE is published 4 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 6, Issue 2. © 2012 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Middlesex County: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Shae Marcus at 856.797.2227 or shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Middlesex Health & Life, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; e-mail christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

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Hope is born here every day. Many couples struggle with the pain and feelings of emptiness from infertility and don’t know that there are alternatives to in vitro fertilization. At The National Gianna Center for Women’s Health and Fertility,TM we offer two options in women’s health care – The Creighton Model FertilityCareTM System and NaProTechnology.TM Both options allow our physicians to offer women natural, restorative approaches to monitoring their health and managing their fertility. Through these techniques, our physicians diagnose and treat the underlying causes of infertility to help couples conceive naturally. The Gianna Center. Committed to honoring the sanctity of human life. To learn more about The National Gianna Center for Women’s Health and Fertility, visit www.saintpetershcs.com/giannacenter

THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH AND FERTILITY

TM

222 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901  732-565-5490 15 EAST 40th STREET, SUITE 101, NEW YORK, NY 10016  212-481-1219 Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen Regional medical campus of Drexel University College of Medicine

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State-designated children s hospital and regional perinatal center Affiliate of The Children s Hospital of Philadelphia

6/4/12 3:57 PM


LOCALBUZZ MIDDLESEX NEWS

REVIEWS

TIPS

When to buy

ORGANIC PROPONENTS OF ORGANIC FOODS CLAIM THEY’RE SAFER AND HEALTHIER THAN THE CONVENTIONAL ALTERNATIVE, BUT HUNTING DOWN THESE SPECIALLY LABELED PRODUCTS CAN BE A HASSLE—AND CAN ADD TO YOUR FOOD BILL. SO WHEN TO BE CHOOSY? HERE ARE FOUR ITEMS FOR WHICH IT MAY BE WORTHWHILE TO “GO ORGANIC” AND WHY:

BEEF Cattle are fed estrogen-like hormones and antibiotics, which end up in the meat we consume.

MILK About 17 percent of dairy cows are given the hormone rBGH, which some people believe may cause cancer in humans.

CELERY This food, which packs beneficial low-calorie fiber, topped the list of vegetables high in pesticide residue in a 2011 study by the Environmental Working Group. (Spinach, too, ranked high.)

TOP LEFT (4): SHUTTERSTOCK. BOTTOM RIGHT: COURTESY OF RUGGED MANIAC

APPLES Eve’s biblical offering led the fruit pack in terms of pesticide residue. (Runners-up include strawberries and peaches.)

TRENDS

GOOD SCENTS During the grimy summer months, having hand sanitizer in your purse or pocket is more than handy; it’s a must. What’s not so convenient is the strong alcohol smell that may linger after you use it. That can be the effect of the 60 percent alcohol content that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says hand sanitizers must have in order to be effective. Fortunately, some brands are trying hard to improve hand sanitizers’ scents appeal while adhering to CDC standards. Middlesex Health & Life performed a staff survey and found that our favorite was EO Hand Sanitizer Spray in organic peppermint, which uses essential oils. The peppermint was invigorating, and the spray left hands feeling soft. Find it at Whole Foods stores and at eoproducts.com.

DOWN AND DIRTY

Running is a great sport to burn calories, build endurance and strengthen your heart. But people who are becoming tired of the same old 5-kilometer street race can expand their horizons with a mud run. Ranging in distance from three to 12 miles, these events allow you to fulfill every childhood fantasy you’ve ever had of jumping into puddles and rolling around in wet dirt—without getting in trouble with Mom. Add to that an obstacle course to navigate containing fire, water tunnels and mazes. “A mud run isn’t really a race—it’s a challenge,” says Peter Wishnie, D.P.M., founder of Family Foot & Ankle Specialists in Piscataway. For those interested in taking on a mud run, especially those who plan to do a UPCOMING MUD RUNS: JULY 14: Rugged Maniac, 5K, Englishtown, ruggedmaniac.com Tough Mudder (the longest and most difficult mud run), Dr. Wishnie JULY 14: Warrior Dash, 5K, Morristown, warriordash.com recommends a 12-week training program that includes distance AUGUST 18: MuckRuckus MS, 5 miles, West Orange, muckruckusms.com running (6 to 8 miles) and strength-building exercises like squats, SEPTEMBER 15: Bill Bottino Mud Run for Cancer, 4 miles, Millville, njmudrun.com OCTOBER 20, 21: Tough Mudder, 12 miles, Englishtown, toughmudder.com push-ups and rope climbing. Also, improving balance is important for both the climbing obstacles and the slippery course. MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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SUMMER 2012

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LOCAL BUZZ

1

5

2

4 3

Fine dining comes to Old Bridge with the new Just Restaurant (732.707.4800, justrestaurantnj.com), which opened last winter. Its unassuming location (tucked behind a gas station off Route 9) gives the contemporary American restaurant a “best-kept secret” vibe, but it’s likely that the word will get out about this place soon enough—we recommend you make a reservation while you still can. Chef Ira Siegel, who trained under Wolfgang Puck, serves up the highest-quality ingredients including wild-caught seafood and free-range organic meat in his refined seasonal menu. (Foie gras sliders, anyone?) After hours, the restaurant transforms into a lounge-like scene with a dance floor.

NEED A PRESENT TO MARK A CAP-AND-GOWN MOMENT? GRAB ONE OF THESE GREAT GRAD GIFTS: 1 Stylish Laptop Bag Send her off into the working world with the Havana bag from Knomo. Scotch-guarded linen is perfect for summer, and on the inside, a dedicated quilted pouch with foam protects a laptop up to 13ʺ. $169 at knomobags.com. 2 Sleek iPhone Case Inspire him or her to keep in touch with this dark walnut striped iPhone4 case from Würkin Stiffs. Each case is precision-machined from one piece of wood. $85 at wurkinstiffs.com. 3 A Pen ‘In His Own Write’ With a surface reminiscent of a vinyl record and a clip inspired by John Lennon’s guitar (with his portrait in the guitar’s sound hole), Montblanc’s John Lennon Special Edition Ballpoint Pen will make the hippest music lover look polished and presentable for job interviews. $750 at montblanc.com. 4 Stone Bookends Artisans in Brazil make these agate bookends, which are available in brown, grey, black, white-and-tan and red-and-orange, in addition to the green-and-blue shown. They’d liven up drab dorm-room décor or make a unique addition to a first apartment. $95 at Jafajems, Upper Montclair, 973.746.5885. 5 Nostalgic Necklace She’s leaving for college — in another state! Wipe your tears and buy her this Kris Nations State Necklace to remind her she’ll always be a Jersey Girl. $48 in sterling silver or 14K gold over recycled brass at krisnations.com.

SKIN-LOVING SOAPS This one had us in a real lather: While browsing in a local farmer’s market one day, we discovered a line of all-natural, organic, chemical- and preservative-free soaps and body moisturizers by Bodhi, the company started by Cresskill native Tom Bodhi. After years of suffering from eczema as an adolescent, Bodhi began making his own soaps in 2008 using fragrances derived from pure essential oils and sustainable palm oils. The company also has an eco-friendly edge: The soap is wrapped in paper that will grow wildflowers when you plant it. Look for Bodhi soaps, butters, oils, lip balms and soy wax candles at Whole Foods stores or bodhibars.com.

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TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF JUST RESTAURANT. BOTTOM LEFT: COURTESY OF BODHI

FOODIE FIND

KNOWLEDGEABLE INVESTMENTS

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5/30/12 11:13 AM


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local buzz

3

1 2

5 4

During allergy season, many people use a neti pot (a small ceramic vessel that looks like a tea pot) to flush out clogged nasal passages in order to

get some relief. But last December, two Louisiana residents died after using neti pots from infections of Naegleria fowleri, a rare “brain-eating amoeba” that had infected their tap water, although it is more typically found in warm freshwater. However, there’s no need to panic, says Jonathan Yoder, epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch. As long as you use a neti pot the right way, there’s no danger, says Yoder. He offers answers: HoW CAn nETi PoT uSERS PRoTECT THEmSELvES? “If you are irrigating, flushing or rinsing your sinuses (with a neti pot, for example), use water that has been distilled, sterilized, boiled for one minute (three minutes at elevations above 6,500 feet) and left to cool, or filtered with an absolute pore size of 1 micron or smaller. Rinse the irrigation device after each use with water that has been distilled, sterilized, filtered or previously boiled, and leave the device open to air-dry completely.” HoW WouLd WE KnoW iF WE’RE inFECTEd AFTER nETi PoT uSE? “Infection with Naegleria fowleri is very rare. The early symptoms of this infection are more likely to be caused by more common illnesses such as meningitis. People should seek medical care immediately whenever they develop a sudden onset of fever, headache, stiff neck and vomiting, particularly if they have been in warm freshwater recently.”

save that skin

The average sunblock can protect you from the sun’s unforgiving UV rays, but what protects you from the harsh chemicals in that sunscreen? Ingredients in some sunscreens (oxybenzone, padimate O and sometimes avobenzone, for example) can be irritating to your skin. For people with sensitive skin, experts recommend using sunblocks that stay on the surface of your skin—ones than include titanium dioxide or zinc oxide—because these are less likely to cause a skin reaction than the ones that are absorbed into the skin. To stay sun-smart and skin-safe this summer, check out some of our editor’s picks for SPF products: 1 For a summer glow sans the sun, pick up The Perfect Tanning Kit by Lavera. $30 at duanereade. com. 2 To soothe skin and retain your tan, try the J.R. Watkins After Sun Gel. $9 at jrwatkins.com. 3 For a little concealing and a lot of UV coverage, try Vitamin C-enriched EmerginC Tinted Sunscreen with SPF 30. $37 at emerginc.com 4 Nourish, protect and plump your lips with Sugar Lip Treatment by Fresh with SPF 15. $23 at Sephora, Edison, 732.635.0023. 5 Yes to Carrots Hydrating Body Lotion has SPF 30 protection and is made with vitamin-rich carrots. $15 at yestocarrots.com.

LefT (2): sHuTTeRsToCk

are neti pots safe?

THinK ouTSidE THE Box

Moving is hard enough without having to wrangle cardboard boxes and find a place to dispose of them after you’ve unpacked, not to mention the effect all that wasted material has on the planet. Instead, call Bin There Store That (888.309.2243, bintherestorethat.com), a Hoboken-based company that serves all of northern New Jersey and the five New York City boroughs. Give the company a day and time, and Bin There will drop off storage bins—then haul the empty ones away when you are done moving. Pricing ranges from $59 to $139 and allows the renter to keep the bins for one week. For an added cost, customers can rent additional bins or keep them longer.

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correction

In our Spring issue, we incorrectly listed the name of The Ronald McDonald House of Long Branch & New Brunswick (rmh-cnj. org). We apologize for the error.

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e t i l u l l ! e e C gon ore m o n

litt

s… t e r c le se

Make your appointment today with Dr. Lombardi to learn more about Cellulaze—the new, one-time FDA appoved Cellulite treatment.

32 CORBETT WAY • EATONTOWN, NJ

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ANTHONY LOMBARDI, MD, FACS . 732-460-9555 . www.doctorsofcosmeticsurgery.com

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Same-day surgery backed by a name you can trust.

CARES Surgicenter— located next to Saint Peter’s University Hospital. Before you choose a same-day surgery center, ask your doctor a few questions first. Most surgery centers are free-standing units and are not connected to a hospital. So what happens in an emergency if you need a higher level of care? Is the facility accredited by The Joint Commission, which shows a strong commitment to the highest level of care and patient safety? Only one surgery center in the area provides all these important benefits and more; the CARES Surgicenter, part of the Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. At CARES, our highly skilled medical teams perform over 10,000 same-day procedures a year, all backed by individualized, personal care. Our specialty surgeries and procedures include:       

Colonoscopy Endoscopy Breast surgery Cosmetic and reconstructive surgery Ear, nose and throat surgery Eye surgery General surgery    

 

Gynecologic surgery Orthopedic surgery Pain management Pediatric surgery (with dedicated pediatric anesthesiologists) Podiatric surgery Urological surgery

For details, call 732-565-5400 or visit saintpetershcs.com/CARESsurgicenter.

Treating you better...for life. 240 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

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732-565-5400 

saintpetershcs.com/CARESsurgicenter

6/4/12 4:40 PM


ingoodhealth Medicine

t e c h n o lo g y

pat i e n t c a r e at sa i n t p e t e r ’ s h e a lt h c a r e s y s t e m

Ge t tinG there EdIson   FArmErs’ mArkET sundays, 925 amboy ave., edison HIgHLAnd PArk   FArmErs’ mArkET Fridays, Raritan avenue between 2nd and 3rd avenues, Highland Park JAmEsburg   FArmErs’ mArkET saturdays, Veterans’ Park on east Railroad avenue between lincoln and sedgewick, Jamesburg mETucHEn   FArmErs’ mArkET saturdays, Pearl street parking lot, metuchen mIddLEsEx   FArmErs’ mArkET Fridays, Route 28 in front of middlesex High school, middlesex Borough nEw brunswIck   communITy   FArmErs’ mArkET Thursdays and saturdays, 178 Jones ave., new Brunswick ruTgErs gArdEn   FArm mArkET Fridays, 112 Ryders ln., new Brunswick woodbrIdgE   FArmErs’ mArkET Wednesdays, Parker Press Park, Rahway avenue, Woodbridge

shutterstock

to market, to market Farmers’ market season is finally here, when the fresh fruits and veggies are

ripe for the picking and the organic treats are at arm’s reach. But these markets do more than offer healthy food options — they also build a sense of community, benefit the earth by promoting organic farming and support local businesses and agriculturists. Pick up your bounty at one of the nearby farmers’ markets listed above.

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inside look

The Da Vinci surgical sysTem

These innovaTions improve paTienTs’ Tre aTmenT and speed Their recovery

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shutterstock

Three Surgical advanceS

robotic surgery has been around for some time now, and the da Vinci surgical system is the brand of choice for most hospitals. last year, the manufacturer released its newest, most advanced version yet, and saint Peter’s university hospital had one up and running in December of 2011. “it’s the cadillac of robotic surgery, and this is the brand’s top-of-the-line product,” says James e. gervasoni Jr., chairman of the Department of surgery. With the da Vinci robot, the surgeon sits at a console in the operating room instead of standing at the operating table. he or she looks into a special eyepiece that receives magnified, threedimensional images of the surgical site. The surgical instruments are manipulated through fingertip controls and are computer-assisted to allow for the most careful and precise maneuvering by the surgeon. The result, in many cases, is less scarring, a reduced risk of complications and a faster recovery. “The main improvement is in the visualization of the anatomic structures during surgery,” Dr. gervasoni says. “you can see very small vessels and dissect them with much more ease than you can with either traditional laparoscopic surgery or open surgery.” This new da Vinci model also has a second console for surgeons to assist in certain procedures. and it comes with a simulator for doctors new to the system to train on. Dr. gervasoni says he spent about 50 hours on the simulator before his first procedure. “it was pretty easy to learn,” he says. surgeons are now using the da Vinci for gynecological, urological and general surgical procedures. and it has already won over some doubters—including Dr. gervasoni himself. “i was a complete skeptic at first—for me, going to a robot was a big leap of faith,” he says. “But once i started doing it, i saw its advantages. it makes my job easier, and it’s a satisfying tool for a surgeon to use. it’s really phenomenal, and if i were a patient, i would want a robotic-assisted surgeon performing my operation.”

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inside look

James e. gervasoni Jr., m.D., chair of surgery, operates the new da Vinci robotic surgical system.

bohm-marrazzo photography

single-port surgery traditional surgery requires doctors to cut a large opening to gain access to the appropriate area of the body. For the past decade or so, more and more operations have been performed with a minimally invasive approach, in which surgeons have used several much smaller openings to insert thin surgical tools, called laparoscopes, to perform the procedure. the next step is operating through just one small opening, called a single port, cut in or around the belly button. and that step has been taken. saint peter’s is just the third hospital in new Jersey and first in the central portion of the state to use a single-port operative procedure to perform gallbladder surgery. it’s done with the da Vinci robot, and is made possible by newer,

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more flexible tools. For gallbladder procedures, the new method requires just one incision less than an inch long instead of the four to six incisions used in most minimally invasive surgery. the incisions were previously required because tools needed to be introduced at the surgical site from different angles. But today’s improved devices can enter the body through one opening and still allow the doctor to position them for precise and accurate surgery. “the maneuverability and precision of these instruments is better than the human hand,” says dr. gervasoni, who performed the hospital’s first such operation in may. and gallbladder surgery is just the beginning. Within the coming year, he says, new instruments will allow surgeons to perform colon and gyne-

cological procedures as well, with more operations to be added to the single-port roster in the coming years. the advantages are the same as those of other laparoscopic techniques, only more so—less bleeding and fluid loss, lower risk of infection and, by going through or near the belly button, little or no visible scarring. and it’s quick —in some cases, patients can have a gallbladder removed in about an hour in the morning and be home in time for dinner, with little or no pain or discomfort. “single-port surgery will supersede everything else over the next 25 years,” dr. gervasoni says. “most operations will be done robotically through one port. all surgeons will have to get on board and learn how to do this, because this is the future.”

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CYBERKNIFE It sounds like a weapon in a sciencefiction movie. Instead, the CyberKnife is a weapon in the war against brain and spine cancers. And Saint Peter’s recently became affiliated with John D. Lipani, M.D., Ph.D., one of a select few neurosurgeons in the world to have received extensive training in CyberKnife radiosurgery under Stanford University School of Medicine neurosurgery professor John R. Adler, M.D., CyberKnife’s inventor.

John D. Lipani, M.D., Ph.D., says the CyberKnife radiosurgery system is bringing a revolution in the treatment of brain and spine cancers.

Dr. Lipani joins an already select group of CyberKnife-trained physicians who work at Saint Peter’s, including Arno Fried, M.D., chief of Adult and Pediatric Neurosurgery. Dr. Lipani, founding director of Princeton Neurological Surgery P.C. and the Brain and Spine Radiosurgery Institute, explains that CyberKnife radiosurgery has changed the way doctors manage brain and spine tumors. “Traditional open brain and spine surgery can be quite traumatic for the patient and often requires a pro-

longed recovery period,” he says. “This new knifeless technology allows patients to get better faster.” The CyberKnife delivers about 100 beams of relatively low-level radiation from all different angles, computed to converge right at the tumor site. The rays pass through healthy tissue without damage and then combine to reach cancer-killing levels of radiation. “Each beam is innocuous on its own, but together they are very potent,” says the doctor. “The technology allows surgeons to destroy deep-seated tumors without creating a destructive pathway through precious neural tissue, as is often the case with traditional open brain and spine surgery.” A distinct advantage of CyberKnife is that, while other radiosurgical devices require a rigid head frame fixed to the skull for targeting purposes, its advanced imaging system is able to precisely locate the tumor without a head frame. In addition, a process called hypofractionation can be used in which smaller amounts of radiation are delivered over two to five days to further protect critically important neural tissue from radiation damage. Frameless technology also greatly improves patient comfort and allows for easy outpatient treatments—some patients have their radiation delivered on their lunch hour and then head back to work. Dr. Lipani currently uses the CyberKnife to destroy tumors in critical locations of the brain and spine, but he says the beauty of the machine is that it can be used anywhere in the body. And now, after about a dozen years of clinical research, “its effectiveness cannot be denied,” he says, “and this technology will undoubtedly continue to become increasingly more common.” For now, it’s enough to know that brain and spine cancers are up against this formidable foe. “I have a 99 percent success rate for treating brain and spine cancers while preserving cognitive ability, mental function and spinal stability with this tool,” Dr. Lipani says. “We are revolutionizing the way we manage cancer in the brain and spine.” —DAVID LEVINE

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SURGICAL SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY AT 732.745.8571 OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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INSIDE LOOK

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TECH SAVVY

Warren Land, D.O., (right) one of Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s pediatric anesthesiologists, is assisted by Rosevida Adona, R.N.

SPECIAL CARE FOR KIDS IN SURGERY PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGISTS ARE TRAINED TO HANDLE SMALLER, MORE VULNERABLE PATIENTS

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

ONE QUESTION PARENTS OFTEN ask doctors is: “Who would you send your kids to if they needed medical care?” When surgery is involved, James Sperrazza, M.D., of Anesthesia Consultants of New Jersey and director of Pediatric Anesthesiology at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, has a quick answer: “As a parent myself, I would want a person who is able to deal with any unexpected event,” he says. “If my child needed surgery, I’d be most comfortable knowing that a pediatric anesthesiologist was in the room the whole time.” Pediatric anesthesiologists receive an extra year of training to learn the special techniques needed to care for younger and smaller patients. The pediatric anesthesiology program at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s has the largest number of board-certified and fellowship-

trained pediatric anesthesiologists in central New Jersey and is one of the few hospitals to offer 24/7 coverage of this kind. “There are a lot of different considerations when caring for children,” says Howard Lakritz, M.D., also of Anesthesia Consultants of New Jersey and chairman of Anesthesiology at Saint Peter’s. Positioning breathing tubes in an airway is challenging in any patient, but the tiny trachea of a 2-pound premature newborn, or even a 30-pound toddler, makes it exponentially more so. “If the tube is too high or too low, it may displace or you may ventilate only one lung,” says Dr. Sperrazza. Maintaining proper oxygen levels during surgery is the most important thing anesthesiologists do, he says. “Oxygen levels can drop fast in kids— faster than in adults—and you need to know how to deal with that.” Medication management is also trickier

in small patients. “Dosages need to be much more specific and calculated, because any small variation can have a big impact,” says Dr. Lakritz. And complications such as minor blood loss that would be inconsequential in adults can be devastating in a child. “Adults have more reserve—if something happens, they can compensate for it,” he says. “Children lack that ability. For them, things can take a turn for the worse much more quickly.” Bedside manner is also important. Children are, of course, often afraid of hospitals, needles and doctors. “We are trained to comfort kids as well as care for them,” says Dr. Sperrazza. There are seven physicians in the pediatric anesthesiology program. “When we perform a procedure on a child, there is an experienced pediatric anesthesiologist in the room at all times,” says Dr. Sperrazza. “That’s what sets us apart.” —D.L.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY SERVICES AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL THE DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIOLOGY AT 732.745.8530, EXT. 7059, OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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SEASONAL HEALTH

ALLERGIES ON THE RISE THE PROBLEM IS NOTHING TO SNEEZE AT, BUT TREATMENTS ARE AVAIL ABLE WHETHER IT’S FROM TREE pollen, dust mites, food or some other substance, roughly 50 million Americans suffer from some form of allergy. And that number is increasing. In fact, not only are allergy specialists seeing more patients, but they are also seeing more severe reactions to common allergens and changing patterns of reactions to less common triggers. And no one quite knows why. “There are a lot of hypotheses, but nothing has been borne out yet,” says Gary Zuckerman, M.D., an allergy and asthma specialist with Central NJ Allergy & Asthma Associates LLC, and a staff

member at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, part of the Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. One culprit could be earlier and longer growing seasons caused by global warming. Another could be increases in environmental toxins. Whatever the cause, Dr. Zuckerman says, “the number of people with allergies is going up, and the rate of that increase is rising.” The most common allergens are plant materials such as pollen and mold, which trigger allergic rhinitis in an estimated 10 percent to 20 percent of the population. Allergies are at their worst in spring and fall, but summer, of course, is a peak time for being outdoors, and dust, animal dander and insect allergies still abound. While allergies are no more than annoying to most, they can be downright dangerous to people with asthma. “It’s estimated that up to 90 percent of children with asthma also have allergic rhinitis,” says Dr. Zuckerman. “These allergens commonly trigger an asthma attack.” If you suspect a new or worsening allergy, Dr. Zuckerman advises seeing an allergy specialist. He or she will take a history, conduct a physical exam and, if warranted, start allergy testing to determine exactly what you’re allergic to. “Once we know the causes of your allergies, we can direct specific medical therapies,” he says. That can include oral medications, a program of injecting allergens to prompt the system to develop tolerance and/or lifestyle changes that will limit your exposure to whatever is making you sneeze. —D.L.

IS IT A COLD OR AN ALLERGY? Symptoms of these two conditions can be similar—both, for example, commonly cause runny or stuffy nose, usually produce sneezing and are sometimes also characterized by weakness or fatigue. But other symptoms differ in frequency—check the chart below. And if your symptoms last more than a week or so, an allergic reaction may well be the cause. That should trigger a visit to the doctor for further testing. SYMPTOMS itchy eyes sore throat fever duration

COLD rare or never common rare 3 to 14 days

AIRBORNE ALLERGY common sometimes never weeks (for example, 6 weeks for ragweed or grass pollen seasons)

Source: National Institutes of Health

TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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SHUTTERSTOCK

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE TO TREAT ALLERGIES AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.565.5490 OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM.

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UP CLOSE

The Kumapleys, from left: Nicholas, Robert, Delali, Genevieve and Sena

FACING AUTISM A GHANA-BORN PHARMACIST PUTS HER EXPERIENCE TO WORK HELPING OTHERS

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

GENEVIEVE KUMAPLEY DIDN’T know what to think when her 15-monthold, Nicholas, started acting strangely. “He seemed not as alert,” she says. “He stopped responding to his name, and he lost language.” That was a decade ago, before many of the media reports that have made developmental problems at least vaguely familiar to most of us. Though Kumapley was a doctor of pharmacy and an immigrant who had crossed the ocean from her native Ghana at age 14, she wasn’t ready for the new world she entered when Nicholas was diagnosed with autism. “I had never heard of autism,” admits Kumapley, now 39 and a Saint Peter’s University Hospital pharmacist. Autism is a developmental disorder—often called a “spectrum” of disorders—characterized by varying

degrees of self-absorption, inability to communicate and repetitive behaviors. In those days, besides dealing with an often unresponsive and difficult son, Kumapley faced painful misunderstanding, ignorance and rejection in others. “There was a lot of denial in our community and a lot of myths, and people were not quick to talk about it,” she recalls. Some people believed that a child with autism was demonically possessed. Others thought autism had something to do with race or gender or religion, and still others held the mother responsible. For almost all, autism was a source of shame, something to be hidden. Kumapley and her husband, Robert, an engineer, found that their extended family avoided Nicholas and did not want to acknowledge his disability. “They thought it was something that

we’d done wrong or that Nicholas had done wrong,” she says. Like many autistic kids, Nicholas (now 11) had accompanying physical problems—chronic colds and gastrointestinal ailments—and the couple also had two typically developing kids to care for: daughters Sena, now 13, and Delali, now 7. It was a struggle to find the information they needed about insurance, education and medical treatment and to adapt the family’s routines to Nicholas’s care. Their marriage began to suffer. But experts say one way to help yourself is to help others, and doing just that has changed Kumapley’s life. Five years ago she started a nonprofit foundation called MyGOAL Inc., which offers support to parents of children with autism, especially those who have to overcome misunderstanding, as she did, to help their children get proper and respectful care. The name is an acronym: My Gateway to Overcoming Autism in Life. Today, MyGOAL raises money through various fundraising events—bowl-athons, 5K races and music and dance concerts—which it gives out in small grants to families to ensure that they have the resources they need to learn about autism and to care for an autistic child. “We help break the disorder down to the level that people can understand, and ensure that language and financial issues don’t stop them from getting what they need,” Kumapley explains. The group holds meetings, conferences and support-group sessions. Through it the Kumapleys have worked with autism families both here and overseas—and found new direction themselves. Genevieve Kumapley has come a long way from the day Nicholas was diagnosed. “It occurred to us that if, as a pharmacist and an engineer, we couldn’t deal with all this, how would someone in a more difficult situation handle it?” she says, explaining the group she founded and now leads. “There are many organizations that focus on the kids,” she says. “We focus on parents and families.” —D.L.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT AUTISM SERVICES AT THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL BARBIE ZIMMERMAN-BIER, M.D., 732.339.7045, OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM/SPCHILDRENSHOSPITAL. TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MYGOAL, VISIT MYGOAL AUTISM.ORG. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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faces of saint peter’s

A. Liam Ness, M.D.

The love of learning propels

A. Liam Ness, M.D., finds intellectual satisfaction in both his career and his religion.

both the professional and personal interests of a. liam ness, M.D., a maternal-fetal medicine specialist who recently came to saint peter’s University hospital from stanford University in California. originally from the tri-state area, Dr. ness studied at Yeshiva University and albert einstein College of Medicine in new York. after his internship at the University of California at los angeles and residency at new York’s Cornell University, he practiced as a general obstetrician/ gynecologist for 20 years before deciding to study maternal-fetal medicine through a fellowship at Thomas Jefferson Medical Center in philadelphia. he and his wife, Jocelyn, a social worker, have two grown daughters and a college-age son. Why make the late sWitch from ob-gyn to maternal-fetal medicine? i had a feeling i needed to do something new. i have always loved learning, and i needed new challenges. Maternal-fetal medicine gave me an opportunity to provide services i couldn’t offer as a general ob-gyn. There is a big demand for maternal-fetal medicine, and it’s really an extension of obstetrics, which i did, plus more advanced imaging techniques, which i love. i am very happy with the choice i made. Where does your love of learning come from?

partly it’s because i’m Jewish, and learning is part of practicing Judaism. i always knew i wanted to be a doctor, but along with my pre-med studies i also went to Yeshiva to get a formal education in Judaism. have you continued With your Judaic studies?

“maternal-fetal medicine gave me an opportunit y to provide services i couldn’t offer as a general ob-gyn.” —a. liaM ness, M.D.

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Yes. Wherever i’ve lived i have continued to learn at some level. in California i had a study group. There are more opportunities here in new Jersey, and i am really excited about that. What else interests you? i love to travel. i enjoy skiing, which we can do more of here in the east, and photography. Mostly, i like learning new things. —D.L.

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FACES OF SAINT PETER’S

Archana Singh, M.D.

WHEN SHE’S NOT WORKING

as a pediatric pulmonologist, Archana Singh, M.D., can be found in her garden. Dr. Singh and her husband, Anoop Singh, M.D., also a pediatrician, live in Brooklyn. They have two sons, one grown and one still in college. Dr. Singh went to medical school in her native India, and then came to the U.S. in 1996 when her husband was offered work here. She completed her residency at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn and a fellowship at Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola on Long Island. She joined the staff of The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital in 2009. WHEN DID YOU DECIDE TO BECOME A DOCTOR?

I have always had a passion for medicine. I knew how I felt about it even as a child. I still recall the image of my pediatrician in a white coat, and I could picture myself as that. WHAT DREW YOU TO YOUR SPECIALTY?

I chose pediatrics because kids are playful and happy. That side of medicine is totally to my liking. And I became fascinated with the lungs when I saw my first bronchoscopy, which showed the inner workings of the lung. WHAT DO YOU GROW IN YOUR GARDEN?

Pumpkins, chilies, peppers and other vegetables. AND GARDENING IS A PASSION OF YOURS?

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

When I take care of plants it gives me a feeling of joy akin—in a small way— to that of raising a child. As a child I watched my parents enjoy the same hobby in India. The weather and plant choices are different here, so I’ve had to get used to different kinds of flowers and vegetables. My kids always help with the garden. They like to eat the things I grow. —D.L.

Shown here among her flowers, pediatric pulmonologist and avid gardener Archana Singh, M.D., is equally adept at growing vegetables.

“I’VE ALWAYS HAD A PASSION FOR MEDICINE. I STILL RECALL THE IMAGE OF MY PEDIATRICIAN IN A WHITE COAT, AND I COULD PICTURE MYSELF AS THAT.” —ARCHANA SINGH, M.D. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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gatherings at saint peter’s

A HIGH GRADE FOR GIVING The Most Rev. Paul G. Bootkoski, Bishop of Metuchen, shares a light moment with Joseph DeMarco, owner of High Grade Beverage Co. in South Brunswick, during Saint Peter’s Healthcare System’s Spring 2012 Gala held in April at The Heldrich in New Brunswick. DeMarco and his wife, Elizabeth, were the guests of honor for their many years of philanthropic giving to the Saint Peter’s Foundation and the numerous hospital programs that it supports. “Their commitment to their faith has been exemplified by their longtime support of both Saint Peter’s and the Diocese of Metuchen,” said Emily Lyssikatos, executive director of the Saint Peter’s Foundation. The DeMarcos are residents of Monroe Township.

NOTABLE NURSE Elizabeth Wykpisz, chief nursing officer at Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, left, and Sarah Maute, advance practice nurse in the Adult Intensive Care Unit, right, present Jennifer Butwill, an R.N. in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, with an award for her community volunteer work during a celebration of National Nurse Day held on May 9. Saint Peter’s Healthcare System celebrated the entirety of National Nurse Week—May 6 through May 12—with educational seminars, guest speakers and awards presentations. FoR INFoRMATIoN oN UPCoMING EVENTS SPoNSoRED By THE SAINT PETER’S FoUNDATIoN, Go To saintpetershcs.com/Foundation.

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photos courtesy of saint peter’s healthcare system: Bennie Williams/aWB photo (top); Bashir BasKinGer (others)

HONORING VOLUNTEER SERVICE Anna Trautwein, practice administrator for Women’s Ambulatory Care Services at Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, says hello to volunteer Jessie Kukor at an April 23 luncheon held in honor of the hundreds of Saint Peter’s volunteers. Kukor has volunteered at Saint Peter’s for nearly 40 years, most recently delivering free newspapers to patients. “The volunteers that we have at Saint Peter’s are all extremely valuable and we couldn’t survive without them,” said Stacy Siegelaub, manager, Volunteer Services. “They are the backbone of this organization, and they go above and beyond the call of duty.”

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twilight in triana celebration alborada spanish dance theatre ria Mar restaurant in south river, March 18, alboradadance.org Attendees at this annual gala and fundraiser came clad in creative “gypsy” outfits to compete in a costume contest while enjoying Spanish-inspired food and drinks and participating in a silent auction. The event benefited the local flamencoand Spanish-dance company.

1 Claudia Morena 2 The Alborada Tango Ensemble 3 Teresa Rodriguez with Dominico Caro 4 Ana Castro, Ethel Maryak and Claire Spring 5 Eva Lucena, Ethel Maryak and Claire Spring 6

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courtesy of the alBorada spanish dance theatre (1–5), douGlas davies (6–8)

scholarship gala Middlesex county college Middlesex county college in edison, March 3, middlesexcc.edu Magic was in the air at this soiree, which raised funds for the college’s scholarship program.

6 It took Alex “Cardman” Perricone 44 hours and more than 600 decks of cards to build this display. 7 Joanne Fillweber, Patrick Madama, Joann La Perla-Morales, William Egbert, Rose Cofone, Brian Daugherty, Karen Hays, Xenia Balabkins and Genette Falk 8 Illusionist David Garrity performs a magic trick for Sabrina Elson and her husband, Lascelles.

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LOCAL FASHION

GOOD JEANS DENIM GETS DRESSED UP FOR SUMMERTIME WITH COLORFUL NEW STYLES AND CHIC CUTS

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1 Invoke your inner prairie girl with this versatile Washed-Denim Button-Down Top, $88, which can be worn neatly tied (as shown) or long and loose for a relaxed vibe. Anthropologie, North Brunswick, 732.565.9870. 2 The “Pink Lady” jacket gets a chic urban overhaul with Elizabeth & James’ Sid Denim Jacket, $365. madewell.com. 3. 3 If anyone can elevate denim to high class, it’s the always-elegant Burberry. This lightweight Shirt Dress, $495, is both comfortable and classic. us.burberry.com. 4 Colored Jeans made a strong style statement this spring, but the trend truly took off when Duchess Kate Middleton showed off coral skinny jeans on the field hockey court. We love the bright tones of these models by J. Brand (left to right: Lipstick, Tangerine and Coral), $169–$224, and 7 For All Mankind (Neon Yellow) $169. bloomingdales. com. 5 Show that you’re both fashion-forward and philanthropic-minded. For every purchase of these denim Serena Wedges, $69, Toms Shoes will donate a pair of shoes to a child in need. toms.com. —LIZ DONOVAN

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MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

5/30/12 11:15 AM


LOCAL JEWELRY

PETAL PUSHER FLOR AL ACCESSORIES ARE I N F U L L B LO O M T H IS S PR I N G

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9 1 The Flower Stud Earrings, $275, by Tory Burch are pretty and simple with semi-precious cabochon and smokey poured glass petals trimmed in gold. toryburch.com. 2 Steal the show in Tiffany’s platinum Flower Ring, $875,000. A brilliant 5.25-carat center diamond is surrounded by 3.25 carats of pavé diamond petals. tiffany.com. 3 The Floral Necklace, $995, by Oscar de la Renta is a surprising mix of color and form. Navy and white enamel adorns floral stations and petal details. Citrine- and black diamondhued glass crystals are on 24K Russian yellow gold–plated chains. neimanmarcus.com. 4 Don these enamel Flower Earrings, $28, for a unique vintage flair. The 14K gold-plated studs are hand-painted. cwonder.com. 5 Give your downtown look its finishing touch with this chicly abstract Arty Flower Ring, $250, by Yves Saint Laurent. net-a-porter.com. 6 Bring the outdoors in with Kate Spade’s Gerbera Garden Statement Necklace, $298. The bouquet of resin and crystal blooms tied with a grosgrain ribbon is everfresh. Lord & Taylor, Woodbridge, 732.750.3232. 7 The Ebony Cuff by Mattioli, $4,770, is adorned with an 18K rose gold Lotus flower. The petals contain ruby, amethyst and prasiolite. landsbergjewelers.com. 8 Add just the right amount of quirky to your polished look with the vintage-inspired Carnation Ring, $35. The two-tone enamel flower has petals tipped with tiny beads. J. Crew, Edison, 732.452.1500. 9 These 18K yellow gold Freesia Earrings, $4,000, with .48 diamond carats are hand-formed and fabricated for a timeless look. ayeshastudio.com. 10 Lanvin’s Petal Necklace, $685, with silk petals, glass pearls and Swarovski crystals is delicately romantic. lanvin.com. —MEGHAN BASHAW

CHECK OUT THE WORK OF STYLE CONSULTANT MEGHAN BASHAW AT MEGHANBASHAW.COM.

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5/31/12 6:35 PM


AT HOME

MIRROR, MIRROR GLIMMERING GLASS ADDS A TOUCH OF HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR TO YOUR BATH

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1 Visage Antiqued Glass Wall Tile from Ann Sacks enchants visitors with its romantic charm. 4ʺ x 8ʺ field tile, $82.76 per square foot. annsacks.com. 2 With angled side mirrors outlined in snazzy silver beading, this Looking Glass (30.25ʺ x 40.75ʺ ) , $299, makes reflection fun. zgallerie.com. 3 A Hammered Copper Sink with a hand-dipped brushed nickel finish, the raised profile Hana sink from Native Trails, $1,225, reflects light while stealing the show. South Amboy Plumbing Supply, South Amboy, 732.721.4242. 4 A traditional Melon Knob, $8, in surprising silver mercury glass adds a flash of sparkle to your bath cabinet. Anthropologie, Nor th Brunswick, 732.565.9870. 5 Barbara Barry’s lustrous Sink Vanity for Kallista ($4,161, base only) gives diamonds a run for their money as a girl’s best friend as it provides ample storage and a raised back to keep splashes at bay. kallista.com. 6 The exposed filaments of Edison light bulbs are lovely to look at but a bit dim for tasks like shaving or makeup application. Multiply their glow with the reflective mirror shade of Rejuvenation’s Menlo Fixture, $350. rejuvenation.com. 7 Antiqued mirror sides and metal trim bring a flash of unexpected glitz to the once lowly Wastebasket, $169. decorativethings.com. —REBECCA THIENES CHERNY

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water garden

create a Whether it’s a dramatic Waterfall cascading into a king-sized koi pond or a decorative fountain contained in a corner of your patio, there is something very relaxing about a backyard water feature. In fact, research shows spending time in a water garden can lower blood pressure and reduce stress. Plus, the sound of rushing water can help filter out neighborhood noise. And creating a water garden is not hard to do. Experts say you can amp up the tranquility at home in the span of a long weekend. Here’s how: Plot your placement. “When planning a water feature, focus on the patio or area where people gather for the greatest visual and auditory impact,” says Lorenzo Fernandez, owner of Outdoor Living & Watergardens in Old Bridge. You should also avoid large overhanging trees, which will shed leaves and other debris. Keep in mind that most water plants need at least six hours of sun a day.

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Consider the upkeep. Thanks to recent advances in pumps and filtration systems, you won’t have to spend Saturdays slaving over your water garden. Install a bottom drain to keep water circulating through the filter. The right-sized pump and filter will keep maintenance to a minimum. “There are also new high-efficiency ‘green’ pumps that run on low amperage,” says Fernandez. “These cost slightly more, but they deliver high water-flow rates with minimal electricity, paying for themselves in electricity savings and longevity.” Get started. If it is not a large project, you can probably do it yourself in about three days. All it takes is a little planning, some sweat equity and the right equipment: a pump and filtration system, decorative rocks and plants, and a shovel. Call in the pros. For grander projects, like floating patios, deep ponds or multi-tiered cascading waterfalls, professional installation may be required to ensure safety and sustainability.

getty images

adding a soothing aquatic feature can take your backyard from ordinary to ‘oasis’ By reBecca K. aBma

5/30/12 11:18 AM


2 waterfall

A dramatic waterfall is a beauty to behold, and its babble can drown out the sounds of modern living. Add deep-water, sun-loving waterlilies, which come in both hardy and tropical varieties. The perennial hardy blooms from May until October, while the showier tropicals are annuals and bloom for a shorter period.

1 reflecting pool

A traditional Dutch garden—a style characterized by a rectangular shape often enclosed by hedges—provides classic elegance fit for a castle. A rectangular reflecting pool offset by well-manicured greenery is reminiscent of the gardens at Antrim Castle in Northern Ireland and Westbury Court in Gloucestershire, England.

3 stepping stones

Rough hewn stones create a scenic pathway that’s both functional and feng shui. For larger ponds stocked with koi and goldfish, stepping stones can allow you to keep closer watch on your fish and to test water samples from different locations to ensure the pond’s ecosystem is healthy.

4 rill retreat

Add ambiance by winding narrow canals called rills through a garden of waterloving plants. For elegant simplicity, stick with single varieties of grassy foliage with small blooms. Good choices: dwarf iris, Himalayan windflower, cardinal flower or daylilies. Rill gardens are an ideal option for smaller backyards.

5 container water garden

An urn brimming with lilypads and submerged ornamental grasses is a great option for patios or balconies. To make, use a 15- to 25-gallon container; plants potted in heavy clay garden soil topped with pea gravel; bricks or rocks to set submerged plants on; and a small fountain kit (found at home improvement stores).

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state of pl ay

If you’re looking for more information on any of these nine destinations or additional vacation spots in the Garden State, the New Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism is a great resource. Check out all the options at visitnj.org/summer and visitnj.org/find-interest.

9 Fun Family Trips if you’re looking to do something different this summer but can’t bear the thought of airport lines or long-distance drives, we’ve got the perfect getaway spots for you. They’re right in your own backyard—that big backyard known as the Garden state. from an undiscovered victorian gem on the delaware to a high-end resort with an emphasis on luxury, new Jersey offers an extraordinary variety of family-friendly vacation destinations. we’ve gathered some of our favorites to help you plan a trip that’s sure to please both adults and kids of all ages. 36

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CourTesy of Capemay.Com

These Garden sTaTe GeTaways will have The whole family askinG, “are we There yeT?” By LesLie Garisto Pfaff

5/31/12 3:23 PM


Top lefT: CourTesy of Corson’s InleT sTaTe park. BoTTom lefT: CourTesy of GIllIan’s Wonderland pIer. CenTer (BoTTom 2) BIll BrokaW/BrokaW phoToGraphy. rIGhT (2): shuTTersToCk

Ocean city FrenchtOwn Best. Boardwalk. ever. (Plus one awesome elePhant)

stepping onto the boardwalk in ocean City confers a pleasant sense of dislocation: Can this really be 2012, or have you and your family traveled back to a safer, gentler time, when fun meant pedaling a surrey along the boards, sharing a box of caramel corn and taking in the ocean views from the top of a giant Ferris wheel? (with nary a drink in sight—oC is a dry town.) this is a shore spot that’s happy to show off its vintage good looks and share its old-fashioned good times—including concerts overlooking the ocean and an amusement park that caters to families (Gillian’s wonderland) and the best homemade donuts on the Jersey shore (Brown’s). a visit to lucy the elephant—the famous turn-of-the-20th-century building in close-by margate that looks like, yes, an elephant—is the perfect way to supersize your trip. oceancityvacation.com; lucytheelephant.org

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Canal-side Charm meets outdoor adventure

it may not be as famous as nearby lambertville (or new hope across the river in Pennsylvania), but this strollable town known for its victorian ambience is every bit as charming and also offers a wealth of outdoor adventures for families, from walking or biking along the canal to tubing on the delaware (don’t forget to grab lunch from the justifiably Famous river hot dog man) to sightseeing from on high courtesy of alexandria Balloon Flights in close-by milford. and if a day in the great outdoors (or the great Frenchtown shops) has you searching for a comfortable place to spend the night, check in at the national hotel new Jersey, where comfort (along with high style) is always in good supply. frenchtownnj.org; delawarerivertubing.com; njballoon ing.com; thenationalhotelnj.com

tuckertOn SeapOrt waterside history Comes to liFe

if you and your family have a nautical bent or a passion for history, tuckerton seaport is sure to float your boat. at this 40-acre re-creation of a working maritime village on the shores of tuckerton Creek in ocean County, you can tour a fully operational boatworks, learn about shellfishing at Parson’s Clam and oyster house, marvel at decoy-carving by master craftsmen, check out the historic hotel deCrab, hang ten at the new Jersey surf museum, visit a circa-1835 sea captain’s house, peek into the 303-year-old andrew Bartlett homestead (the oldest house in ocean County) and admire extraordinary examples of folk art (such as glassblowing, basket weaving and painting) at the Jersey shore Folklife Center. still haven’t satisfied your inner seafarer? Consider getting your sea legs back on a voyage aboard the seaport’s classic charter boat, Wasting Time. tuckertonseaport.org

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5/31/12 3:23 PM


Paradise in the Valley if you’re looking for variety, activity and relaxation all in one spectacular setting, you don’t have to go any farther than Crystal springs. this top-flight resort, nestled in the rolling hills of Vernon Valley, comprises four hotels; two spas; a sports club offering tennis, yoga, Zumba, Pilates, spinning and more; seven premier golf courses (call ahead for in-room babysitting if your kids aren’t ready for the links); more than a dozen restaurants serving up everything from pizza and burgers to tuscan-inspired dishes and organic, locally sourced artisanal cuisine; and did we mention the Biosphere, a tropically planted pool complex, with an underground aquarium, a 40-foot water slide, a jacuzzi in a grotto and a retractable roof? Just in case you’re still in search of things to do, there are great hiking trails, tours of the Kuser Bog natural area and horseback riding along ancient limestone cliffs. crystalgolfresort.com

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stokes state Forest

adVenture along the aPPalaChian trail this 15,000-acre gem in northwestern new Jersey combines stunning scenery—the view at the summit of sunrise Mountain, for example, and the waterfalls feeding tillman Brook— with outdoor fun such as swimming and canoeing on stony lake (or sunning on its sandy beach), fishing on lake ocquittunk or Big Flat Brook, picnics along stony Brook and hiking the world-famous appalachian trail. a visit to stokes makes for a great day trip, but for a longer stay you can set up a tent or rent one of 10 furnished cabins (they’re rustic but include electricity, hot and cold running water and a wood stove for cooking). Check out the calendar at newjerseystatefair.org to see if your trip coincides with one of the many summertime events at the new Jersey state Fairgrounds in neighboring augusta, including horse, dog and car shows; a crawfish festival; and, during august’s first two weeks, the new Jersey state Fair itself. state.nj.us/dep/parksand forests/parks/stokes.html

Camden WaterFront Wonder

Camden? a vacation destination? absolutely! Camden’s spruced-up waterfront is the perfect spot for an unexpected family adventure. start your trip with a tour of the Battleship new Jersey, america’s most decorated battleship and now a fascinating museum, then spend the night on board (or, if you’d prefer something a bit more luxurious, there’s the hyatt regency just across the water in Penn’s landing). the next day, choose from a spectrum of urban delights: a trip to the brilliantly renovated state aquarium (where you can book a swim with the sharks), a boat ride to Philadelphia on the river link Ferry, a concert at Wiggins Park or the susquehanna Bank Center, a minor-league baseball game at Camden riversharks stadium or a stroll through the Children’s garden, where you’ll find a carousel, a butterfly tent, a tree house, a train ride through a miniature landscape and all manner of theme gardens, including dinosaur, irish Faerie, Picnic, storybook and Fitness. camdenwaterfront.com

Courtesy of Crystal sPrings, Jonathan CarluCCi/nJDeP Division of Parks anD forestry, Courtesy of the CaMDen aDventure aquariuM

Crystal springs resort

5/31/12 3:24 PM


Grounds for sculpture

Christine Porter, Courtesy of Morris County tourisM Bureau, Courtesy of CaPeMay.CoM

An Awesome ArrAy of outdoor Art

you don’t have to be an art lover to find something to love at this magical al fresco museum in Hamilton. the gorgeously landscaped grounds are laid out to create a surprise around every corner. there’s a pettable bronze panther, a massive head rising from a shaded lily pond and sculptor seward Johnson’s 3-d re-creations of classic paintings like monet’s “Japanese Bridge” and seurat’s “sunday in the Park,” which invite onlookers to jump into the picture. you’ll also find an excellent cafeteria, an outdoor café overlooking a pond filled with enormous lotus plants, special exhibits in the domestic Arts and museum buildings and 35 acres in which to roam, ramble and be amazed. Grounds for sculpture is a perfect day-trip destination, but if you’re looking for a longer getaway, you could spend the night in Princeton, 20 minutes to the north, which offers first-rate accommodations, dining and family-friendly attractions, such as the governor’s mansion and the Princeton university natural History museum. groundsforsculpture. org; visitprinceton.org

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Morristown smALL CIty, BIG fun

new Jersey has its own mo’ town, and while it can’t bill itself as the birthplace of r&B, it has lots of other great things to strut about, including wonderful shops and restaurants lining the town green; the morris museum, which houses an extraordinary array of fine art, costumes, dolls and toys, scientific materials and the amazing Guinness collection of musical instruments and automata (mechanical figures); and a wealth of performances for young people at the morris museum’s Bickford theatre and the mayo Performing Arts Center. there are pastoral pleasures as well, among them beautiful Jockey Hollow, a great hiking spot and part of morristown national Historic Park (don’t miss the restored cabins that housed George washington’s men during the winter of 1779); ford mansion, where washington himself spent the winter (guided tours are available) and fosterfields, a working turn-of-the-century farm. morristourism.org

cape May tHe CAPe to esCAPe to

Cape may takes everything new Jersey has to offer to vacationers—the history, the great outdoors, the family fun, the shore—and wraps it all up in one glorious Victorian package. from the town’s famous open-air trolleys and jaw-dropping architectural gingerbread to broad, beautiful beaches, whale watches and kayak nature tours to the zoo, the Aviation museum and historic Cold spring Village, there’s something here to excite and delight everyone in the family. If you’re looking for a hotel with the feel of a resort, try Congress Hall, where you’ll find a pool, spa, fitness room, shops, three restaurants, a nightclub and Club Congress Hall, an evening program just for kids. feel like venturing farther afield? Hop the Cape may–Lewes ferry for a day trip to one of the country’s oldest towns, Lewes, delaware, famous for its fun shops and restaurants and its historic homes (including one whose stone foundation still bears a cannonball lodged there during the war of 1812). Bring along your suits and enjoy the surf at Cape Henlopen state Park, home to breathtaking beaches lined with submarine-spotting towers left over from world war II—one of them open to the public. capemaychamber.com; lewes.com

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Color

Therapy

A bright, sunny Jersey shore house uplifts with A pAlette thAt pops

written By marisa sandora 路 interiors By mona ross Berman 路 PhotograPhy By Jonny Valiant

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this image and opposite:

Family photos are hung against grasscloth above the wet bar in a corner of the living room. The white furniture and woven vinyl rug provide a neutral base for brightly colored pillow and curtain fabrics. Benjamin Moore’s Fresno enlivens the mudroom.

a

s the owner of two high-end women’s clothing stores, Maureen Doron is surrounded by color. Her stores, called Skirt, carry lines like Milly, Trina Turk, Diane von Furstenberg and Tory Burch—classics with a modern twist that deliver vibrant hues and interesting patterns. When one of Doron’s best customers “who always purchased my own personal favorites” mentioned one day that she was an interior designer, Doron knew they were drawn to the same colors and styles. That customer was Philadelphia-based designer Mona Ross Berman. “I had never used an interior designer before,” says Doron, “but I knew that we had the same taste and that I liked her.” Berman eased Doron into decorating, helping her with her home in Bryn Mawr, Pa., and some remodeling of one of her stores. When Doron and her husband decided to build a beach house on the Jersey Shore in Strathmere, Doron comissioned Berman to decorate it “soup to nuts,” Doron explains. “Mona says it was fun because I let her run with it.” And run she did, with a high-energy palette of orange, yellow and turquoise against a white background, a design based on a 1960s table

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The custom-made dining table is fashioned after a vintage one that Berman spotted in Miami, providing the color inspiration for the entire house.

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“i love color. i’m not afraid of it. but mona was smart in that if you really look at the house, the base pieces are all white or neutral. we layered on the color with fabrics and accessories.” —homeowner maureen Doron

this page: “A beach house is fun to do because people

tend to take themselves less seriously,” says Berman. The zigzag, Missoni-esque pattern on the floor of the master bedroom was painted with Salmon Berry and White Dove, both by Benjamin Moore. opposite, clockwise from top left: The vintage dresser in the foyer is mid-20th-century Danish modern; the master bedroom headboard is upholstered in Henry in Rose by Raoul Textiles; geometric wallpaper (Recessed from Studio Printworks) adds zing to the powder room; the homeowner’s love of fashion inspired the Yves Saint Laurent posters in the master bedroom.

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clockwise from left: The guest room beckons in sunny yellow; dashes of pink were added to the yellow, orange and turquoise color scheme; Fermob’s Costa extension table adds a pop of turquoise to the deck.

that Berman found on a trip to Miami. “When she showed me a picture of the table, she had me hook, line and sinker,” says Doron. Berman’s plan was to give the home a “1960sCalifornia-surfer-chic vibe,” she explains. “I wanted to do something fresh and different and show that there was more than one way to do a beach house. Even though this home is at the Jersey Shore, it feels like it could be in Malibu or somewhere else.” And thankfully, Berman’s client was the sort who is willing to take risks. “I love color,” says Doron. “I own a women’s clothing store. I’m not afraid of it. But Mona was smart in that if you really look at the house, the base pieces are all white or neutral. We layered on the color with fabrics and accessories so in case I get sick of it, I’m not locked into it for 30 years.” But for now, Berman’s dynamic design is perfect for this active young family. “I have three kids who get up at the crack of dawn, and I’m always tired,” says Doron. “But when I walk up the stairs to the kitchen and living room in the morning all bleary-eyed and I see the light streaming in and all the color, I instantly feel uplifted, and a smile breaks out on my face. It’s a fun house to be in.”

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Fruit

The lychee is a Touch of royalTy for your Table

did you know?

PowEr

This exotic fruit may be best known for its modern-day cameo appearance in martinis and cocktails at five-star restaurants, but the lychee (or litchi) has an even more resplendent past. it has logged more than 2,000 years of recorded cultivation since it originated in China. There the fruit was prized by emperors, who would send express horsemen on missions to retrieve it from the south and quickly deliver it to their imperial courts. Growth first spread to neighboring Southeast Asian countries with favorable tropical or subtropical climates, and over the centuries lychee found its way into Burma, india and the west indies. By the 19th century it was being grown in the greenhouses of England and France before it was introduced to the united States, where it flourished in Hawaii, Florida and California. with a spiny red exterior and sweet, fragrant white fruit inside, lychee still holds court with health benefits that span traditional and modern medicine.

The Chinese believe the seeds have analgesic properties, and the lychee has traditionally been used to treat coughing, swollen glands and neuralgic pain. it has a concentration of antioxidant polyphenols—specifically, cancer-fighting flavonoids—that help protect blood vessels and cells from damage and prevent inflammation. These same antioxidants are also extracted from the lychee for commercial purposes, packaged and sold as anti-aging nutritional supplements said to enhance the skin, boost circulation and reduce fatigue. The lychee also contains a variety of beneficial vitamins and minerals, including copper and vitamin C.

Buy · STorE · Grow

rECiPE lyCHEE & CoriAndEr SnAPPEr Courtesy of the Australian lychee Growers Association inGrEdiEnTS: 2 Tbs. olive oil 3 Tbs. roughly chopped coriander 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. ground pepper 1 tsp. chopped small red chili pepper, finely chopped with seeds removed Juice of 1 lime 8 lychees, peeled, deseeded and roughly chopped Half of a Spanish onion, chopped 4 snapper fillets PrEPArATion: Place lychees, olive oil, coriander, salt, ground pepper, onion, chili pepper and lime juice in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Set aside. Spray hot pan with canola spray or olive oil. Cook fish for 3–4 minutes, turning once or until cooked. Place fish onto plates and spoon over with the lychee mixture. Serve.

shutterstock

The majority of lychee are consumed fresh, but the fruits can be dried and sold as “lychee nuts,” which are raisin-like. They’re also available peeled and canned. For optimal health benefits, it’s best to eat lychee fresh, but due to its propensity for quick deterioration, fresh lychee should be eaten within a few days—it’ll usually keep for about three days at room temperature. Choose fruit that has

a vibrant pinkish-red color and avoid rinds that appear greenish or brown—meaning they’re not ripe or overripe, respectively. A good lychee will feel tender under a pressed finger, but not overly soft. Purchasing from markets is the best option for new Jersey residents—even the greenest of thumbs will likely have trouble growing lychee, as it doesn’t do well with heat, frost or high winds. —kEllEy GrAnGEr

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5/31/12 3:20 PM


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TASTES

E

arning the label ‘farm-to-table’

WITH A FOCUS ON LOCAL INGREDIENTS, RESTAURANTS BRING CULINARY DISTINCTION TO THE WELL-NAMED GARDEN STATE

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SHUTTERSTOCK

THERE WAS A TIME WHEN the phrase “fine dining” implied that a restaurant imported the costliest, most exclusive ingredients from France. That began to change with the teachings of celebrated chef and food writer James Beard, one of the first to advocate the use of regional American ingredients. But it wasn’t until the early 1970s, when New Jersey–born Alice Waters opened her Berkeley, California, restaurant Chez Panisse, that what we now call the locavore movement was born. Her revolutionary idea was to base her menu almost entirely on the freshest sustainably grown, raised and foraged ingredients from nearby farms, forests and waterways. Waters knew then what leading chefs everywhere have come to understand: that starting with pristine, just-picked produce creates meals that simply taste better. Plus, using produce, meat, eggs and dairy products conscientiously grown or raised on local farms often reaps additional benefits in terms of nutrition, the lessening of impact on the environment, the maintenance of open space and the humane treatment of farm animals. And these chefs and their restaurants draw upon not just local sources but also local food artisans, such as cheese makers

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and bread bakers, who transform the bounty. For all involved, it means that dollars are pumped back into the surrounding communities. In the decades that followed Chez Panisse’s debut, northern California cuisine became widely copied across the country—sometimes, ironically, by chefs who sourced ingredients from that region rather than following the local-sourcing example. But here in New Jersey, one groundbreaking restaurant broke that mold as early as 1974, when brothers John and Dennis Foy established the Tarragon Tree in Meyersville. They reached out to local farmers for the besttasting, most natural ingredients, which they incorporated into their acclaimed modern American fare. Then, in 1991, a 30-year-old chef who had trained under the Foys took over the Ryland Inn in Whitehouse Station. Craig Shelton remains to this day New Jersey’s most lauded chef. Among the innovations he brought to that late lamented restaurant was an organic garden right on the restaurant’s grounds—a novelty back then. Today, Garden State restaurants of all stripes—from world-class gourmet meccas to neighborhood cafés—cook with ingredients sourced from their very own gardens and, increasingly, their

own multi-acre farms. Failing that, they use just-harvested ingredients from local farmers’ markets, or from Zone 7, an innovative service based in central New Jersey that delivers products direct from regional farms to restaurants around the state. These restaurants rightly term their fare “farm-to-table.” They’re finally taking proper advantage of the fact that our geographically diminutive state ranks among the top 10 producers nationally of blueberries, cranberries, peaches, spinach, cucumbers, bell peppers, snap beans, squash and, of course, tomatoes. Few farm-to-table options existed even a decade ago. It was in 1999 that Jim Weaver, chef/owner of Tre Piani restaurant in Princeton, founded the first New Jersey chapter of Slow Food. In his new book Locavore Adventures (Rivergate Books), Weaver writes: “I had long been frustrated that I couldn’t directly purchase all the wonderful fresh foods that were being produced virtually next door to my restaurant.” At the time, the only option for chefs was to use large out-of-state distributors. This meant, he writes, that “a locally farmed tomato would be trucked back to my door days later at three times the price and half the quality.” Thankfully, better days have arrived. —PAT TANNER

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TASTES TOP FARM-TO-TABLE RESTAURANTS IN NJ A TOUTE HEURE 232 Centennial Ave. Cranford 908.276.6600 atouteheure.com BERNARDS INN 27 Mine Brook Rd. Bernardsville 908.766.0002 bernardsinn.com

B LUE ROOST ER BA K ERY & CA FÉ, CR A N BURY You might say that Karen Finigan—who with her husband, Bob, established this café in a pretty Victorian house on Cranbury’s historic Main Street in 2008—has come home to roost. She grew up just down the street, but was away for 30 years, including five living in Dublin, where Bob trained to be a professional bread baker. The ring of farmland that surrounded the village back when she was young is still intact, although reduced, and the Finigans make a point of sourcing as many ingredients as they can from them for their eatery, which Karen says was “inspired by European bakeries, gourmet shops and cafes.” Their offerings include madeto-order breakfasts, weekend brunches, lunches and dinners. (Afternoon tea is another possibility, if reserved in advance.) Spinach has long been a specialty crop of Cranbury farms, and Karen obtains hers via wholesalers Barnes Bros. Even though spinach is a cool-weather crop typically available in spring and early fall, she reports delightedly that “in 2011, we had a fresh spinach delivery in December!” Honey for Blue Rooster’s renowned sweet treats comes from Rejay’s Farm just down the road, where Sally Tuscano is the second-generation beekeeper. “Pop’s Farm Market is another family-run, multigenerational farm market that I knew as a kid,” Finigan continues. Chief among the berries, broccoli and other summer fruit and vegetables she purchases is that market’s “absolutely beautiful” asparagus. A variety of heirloom tomatoes are part of a range of summer produce she procures from Susanne and John Specca’s Corner-Copia in neighboring East Windsor. In the off-season, the Blue Rooster is one of many farm-to-table eateries around New Jersey that rely on deliveries from Zone 7. “Mikey Azzara and his team are a great resource,” says Finigan. “They do the work of finding, consolidating and delivering really fabulous product from a wide range of area farms.” The artisan cheeses of Long Valley’s Valley Shepherd Creamery are featured in a breakfast omelet, and an assortment of three fills the farmhouse cheese boards that are popular at lunch and dinner.

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PROVENÇAL VEGETABLE TIAN BLUE ROOSTER BAKERY & CAFÉ, CRANBURY

“This is served as a luncheon meal,” says Karen Finigan. INGREDIENTS 1 large onion or 2 medium leeks 2 large cloves garlic 1 or 2 small zucchini 1 or 2 small eggplants 1 or 2 small potatoes 2 or 3 medium plum tomatoes 2 or 3 sprigs fresh thyme ¼ cup dry white wine Extra virgin olive oil Butter Sea salt Freshly ground black pepper

PREPARATION

Cut a piece of parchment paper to the size of a two-quart glass or ceramic baking dish. Butter the inside of the dish and set aside. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Slice the onions crosswise into pieces ¹∕8 -inch thick. Peel and mince the garlic. Slice tomatoes crosswise into ¹∕8 -inch-thick rounds. Slice potatoes into ¹∕8 -inch-thick slices. Coat a small pan with a good dose of olive oil and heat on stove until shimmering. Add the garlic and swirl to coat. Gently add the onions (or leeks). Cook, stirring frequently, until the onions (or leeks) have begun to soften and the garlic has released its fragrance, approximately 2 to 5 minutes. Carefully spread the onion/leek-garlic mixture across the bottom of the baking dish. Sprinkle with salt and a few grindings of fresh black pepper; strip the leaves from one of the sprigs of thyme and sprinkle over the mixture. Layer the zucchini, eggplant, potato and tomato on top of the onion/leek-garlic mixture, alternating each and overlapping slightly. Make sure to put the juicier things (squash and tomato) between the drier veggies (eggplant and potato) to keep the whole dish consistently moist. Drizzle with a two-count of olive oil and splash with the wine. Sprinkle with salt and a few grindings of fresh black pepper; strip the leaves from the remaining thyme and sprinkle over the casserole. Butter the cut parchment and carefully place, buttered side down, on top of the vegetables. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes, until the vegetables are soft but not mushy while the edges are nicely crisp and brown. Serves 4.

BLUE MOREL 2 Whippany Rd. Morristown 973.451.2619 bluemorel.com THE BLUE ROOSTER BAKERY & CAFÉ 17 N. Main St. Cranbury 609.235.7539 blueroosterbakery.com BROTHERS MOON 7 W. Broad St. Hopewell 609.333.1330 brothersmoon.com DUE MARI 78 Albany St. New Brunswick 732.296.1600 duemarinj.com ELEMENTS 163 Bayard Ln. Princeton Township 609.924.0078 elementsprinceton.com ENO TERRA 4484 Route 27 (Old Lincoln Hwy.) Kingston 609.497.1777 enoterra.com JBJ SOUL KITCHEN 207 Monmouth St. Red Bank 732.842.0900 jbjsoulkitchen.org MEDITERRA 29 Hulfish St. Princeton 609.252.9680 mediterrarestaurant.com NINETY ACRES 2 Main St. Peapack and Gladstone 908.901.9500 x 1 natirar.com PICNIC THE RESTAURANT 14-25 Plaza Rd. Fair Lawn 201.796.2700 picnictherestaurant.com RAT’S 16 Fairgrounds Rd. Hamilton 609.584.7800 groundsforsculpture.org/ratsrestaurant TRE PIANI 120 Rockingham Row Princeton 609.452.1515 trepiani.com URSINO 1075 Morris Ave. Union 908.249.4099 ursinorestaurant.com VINCENTOWN DINER 2357 Route 206 Vincentown 609.267.3033 vincentowndiner.com

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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where toeat f i n e

c a s ua l

fa m i ly

AVENEL

JAMESBURG

D’ITalIa ReSTaURanT Italian fare, specializing in pizza, 1500 Saint Georges Ave., 732.574.1120

MaRIa’S Family-friendly traditional Mexican fare and diner, 194 Buckelew Ave., 732.656.9722

CARTERET

KENDALL PARK

JUlIan’S American steak house with seafood options, 1000 Roosevelt Ave., 732.541.9500

SHOgUn 27 Hibachi steak house with a sushi bar, 3376 Route 27, 732.422.1117

COLONIA

KINGSTON

BUD’S HUT Casual dining featuring seafood and steak, 906 Route 1 North, 732.634.5530

CHaTeaU MaDRID Spanish and Portuguese fare, 8 Holly St., 732.969.0692

lUSO BaRBeCUe American and Portuguese barbecue, 330 Inman Ave., 732.499.0455 Maxwell’S 35 New American bistro fare with extensive wine list, 1159 St. Georges Ave., 732.527.0293

CRANBURY

CRanBURY Inn Traditional American dining, 21 S. Main St., 609.655.5595 ZInna’S BISTRO Casual Italian fare, BYO, 1275 S. River Rd., 609.860.9600

DAY TON

FUJI Japanese hibachi and sushi, 485 Georges Rd., 732.274.8830 la TaVeRna Cozy traditional Italian dining, 375 Georges Rd., 732.274.2200

EAST BRUNSWICK

CaSa nOVa 68 Traditional Italian fare, 68 Ryders Ln., 732.246.1888 gUSTO gRIll Traditional American food, 1050 Route 18, 732.651.2737

EDISON

CaFÉ gallO Family-style Italian dining, 1153 Inman Ave., 908.756.5752 lOUCÁS Upscale American and Italian fare, 9 Lincoln Hwy., 732.549.8580 MIng Fusion Asian cuisine with vegetarian options, 1655 Oak Tree Rd. #185, 732.549.5051 Penang Malaysian and Thai eater y, 505 Old Post Rd., 732.287.3038

FORDS

lITTle SPaIn ReSTaURanT Authentic Spanish cuisine in a charming atmosphere, 582 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.7300

FIDDleHeaDS American fine dining, Sunday brunch ser ved, 27 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.0878

DUSal’S Casual Italian seafood and pizza eater y, 3300 Route 27, 732.821.9711

enO TeRRa Italian cuisine featuring seafood, homemade pasta and an extensive wine list, 4484 Kings Hwy., 609.497.1777 OSTeRIa PROCaCCInI Quaint Italian restaurant serving pizza, sandwiches and salads with organic and local produce, 4428 Route 27 North, 609.688.0007

ME TUCHEN

anTOnIO’S BRICK OVen PIZZa Traditional Italian pizzeria, 435 Main St., 732.603.0008 MaIn STReeT TRaTTORIa Upscale Italian cuisine, 413 Main St., 732.589.7141 THe ORCHID Glatt kosher dining, 455 Main St., 732.321.9829

MIDDLESE X

CaRPaCCIO Southern Italian fare, 651 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.3242 VInCenZO’S RISTORanTe Italian cuisine, 665 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.7777

MILLTOWN

FReSCO Seafood and steak grill, prix fixe menu, 210 Ryders Ln., 732.246.7616 TOMaTO FaCTORY Family-friendly Italian fare, BYO, 264 Ryders Ln., 732.249.1199

MONMOUTH JUNCTION

PIeRRe’S Fine international dining with awardwinning wine list, 582 Georges Rd., 732.329.3219 SenS aSIan Far East fusion cuisine, 4095 Route 1 South, 732.355.1919

MONROE

gaRVeY’S Family-friendly American eater y, 405 Gravel Hill Rd., 732.521.3311 la VIlla Casual Italian dining, 335 Applegarth Rd., 609.655.3338

ReSTaURanT 2FIFT Y4 Saint Peter’s University Hospital restaurant, offering healthy dishes and vegetarian options for breakfast, lunch and dinner, 254 Easton Ave., 732.745.8600, ext. 7773 TUMUlT Y’S Upscale pub food, featuring steaks and seafood, 361 George St., 732.545.6205

NORTH BRUNSWICK

aRTHUR’S TaVeRn Traditional American steak house, 644 Georges Rd., 732.828.1117 ISTanBUl ReSTaURanT & PaTISSeRIe Turkish and Mediterranean fare, 1000 Aaron Rd., 732.940.1122

OLD BRIDGE

BIg eD’S BaRBeCUe American barbecue, 304 Route 34, 732.583.2626 JUST Contemporar y American and French fare, 2280 Route 9 South, 732.707.4800 THe PIne TaVeRn Imaginative American cuisine with Continental flavors, Route 34 and Cottrell Rd., 732.727.5060 POnTe VeCCHIO Classic Italian and American Continental fare with seafood options, 3863 Route 516 East, 732.607.1650

PERTH AMBOY

THe BaRge Water front restaurant featuring steak and seafood dishes, 201 Front St., 732.442.3000 PORTUgUeSe ManOR Traditional Portuguese featuring sangria, 310 Elm St., 732.826.2233

PISCATAWAY

al DenTe Traditional Italian eater y, 1665 Stelton Rd., 732.985.8220 MIDORI Authentic Japanese and hibachi dining, 1392 Centennial Ave., 732.981.9300

PL AINSBORO

CaSa ROSaRIa’S ITalIan RISTORanTe Classic Italian food, 607 Plainsboro Rd., 609.799.9009 eaST Asian fusion fare with a bubble tea bar, 5 Market St., 609.750.3278

SOUTH AMBOY

BlUe MOOD Contemporar y American and pub fare, 114 S. Broadway, 732.525.0014 COSTa VeRDe Portuguese and Spanish cuisine featuring fresh seafood, 6039 Route 35 South, 732.727.7070

MClOOne’S wOODBRIDge gRIlle Upscale interpretations of American classics, 3 Lafayette Rd., 732.512.5025

NEW BRUNSWICK

CHRISTOPHeR’S American seafood and steak fare, 10 Livingston Ave., 866.609.4700

aDelIneS RISTORanTe Casual northern Italian dining, 2243 Hamilton Blvd., 908.755.8520

VIlla BORgHeSe Traditional Italian fare, 432 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.0666

DelTa’S ReSTaURanT Southern cuisine with live music and specialty drinks, 19 Dennis St., 732.249.1551

Flanagan’S American and Irish pub fare, 2501 Plainfield Ave., 908.757.1818

HIGHL AND PARK

MIDORI SUSHI Japanese fusion with a sushi bar, 237 Raritan Ave., 732.246.4511

DUe MaRI PeSCe e VInOTeCa Modern Italian food featuring fresh local and seasonal ingredients, 78 Albany St., 732.296.1600

KRaKOwIaK Casual Polish restaurant, BYO, 42 Main St., 732.238.0433

PaD THaI Vegetarian-friendly Thai eater y, 217 Raritan Ave., 732.247.9636

eVelYn’S Lebanese food with vegetarian options, 45 Easton Ave., 732.246.8792

RIa-MaR Traditional Portuguese, Spanish and American fare, 25 Whitehead Ave., 732.257.1100

PITHaRI TaVeRna Greek cuisine with seafood fare, 28 Woodridge Ave., 732.572.0616

glO UlTRa lOUnge anD TeQUIla BaR Upscale pub food and a bar with more than 200 tequilas, 367 George St., 732.246.8330

WOODBRIDGE

CaSa gUISePPe Italian fine dining, 487 Route 27, 732.283.9111

KaIRO CaFÉ Casual eastern Mediterranean dining, 49 Bayard St., 732.545.2476

J.J. BITTIng BRewIng CO. Traditional American fare, 33 Main St., 732.634.2929

URBan SPICe Authentic Indian fine dining, 42 Marconi Ave., 732.283.1043

OlD Man RaFFeRT Y’S Casual American eater y, 106 Albany St., 732.846.6153

MUlBeRRY STReeT ReSTaURanT Italian seafood eater y, 739 Rahway Ave., 732.634.4699

ISELIN

FOR OUR COMPLETE LIST OF DINING OPTIONS, VISIT THE “WHERE TO EAT” SECTION OF MIDDleSexHealTHanDlIFe.COM.

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SOUTH PL AINFIELD

SOUTH RIVER

CHRIS MICHael’S STeaKHOUSe Steak and seafood restaurant, 40 Oakwood Ave., 732.634.5355

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financial balance

investing in Future care here’s what to consider before you buy long-term care insurance

facilities charge before you choose your benefit amount so you don’t unnecessarily buy more coverage than you need.

3 benefit length

How long should your benefit last? Choices range from two years to forever. Three-, four- or five-year-coverage policies are growing in popularity because they’re cheaper than lifetime options and generally encompass most long-term claims. “of course those with a family history of chronic illness like Alzheimer’s disease may want to choose a policy with a longer benefit period,” says Kubit.

4 elimination periods

With many policies, you won’t start receiving your benefits on the same day you enter a facility or begin using home care. This time between the moment you claim your policy and the moment the insurance company begins reimbursing you is called the elimination period, and it’s one of the plans’ often misunderstood provisions. Most elimination periods are 30, 60 or 90 days. “policies with shorter elimination periods are more expensive,” says Kubit. “But if you pick a policy with a longer elimination period, you may have weeks of out-of-pocket expenses.”

than ever. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that the fastest-growing segment of our population is adults 85 or older. But longevity can bring illness, cognitive impairment or the loss of functionality, and help in the form of professional elder care may be required. While Medicare provides automatic health insurance for Americans 65 or older, it mainly covers doctor visits and episodes requiring hospitalization. For help in paying for costly day-to-day support, consider long-term care insurance. “It pays for assistance with basic daily living tasks, such as bathing, dressing, eating, transferring and toileting,” says Linda Kubit, a long-term care insurance specialist with the national agency LTC resources. It also pays for care if you have dementia. Wary of burdening loved ones with such expenses, more people are choosing to purchase this coverage. Introduced in the 1970s as nursinghome insurance, long-term care insurance now covers assisted-living facilities and adult day care centers. Be sure to work with a licensed insurance special-

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ist to review a policy’s provisions when shopping, especially if you have a particular facility in mind. Some places that care for the elderly may not be covered. Today, long-term care policies also cover full-time care at home, which is typically provided by a home healthcare aide or a geriatric care manager. Some policies also reimburse informal caregivers, such as friends or neighbors, but policies vary in terms of the type of home healthcare worker they’ll pay for. Long-term care insurance is complicated, so before you buy, consider:

1 age

Get coverage before major health problems arise. “Insurers look closely at your medical history and may reject applicants with chronic ailments such as diabetes,” says Kubit. “As with other insurance, you don’t know if and when you’ll need it.”

2 benefit amount

You typically purchase a daily or monthly benefit policy, and coverage amounts can vary from $50 to $500 per day or $1,500 to $15,000 a month. Learn how much

5 inflation

premiums are lower if you forgo inflation protection, but Kubit advises customers not to do so. “If you’re in your 50s when you purchase your policy, you may not need it for another 15 years or more, and you want your benefit amount to keep pace with inflation,” she says.

6 rate hikes

Insurance companies can raise their premiums after you’ve purchased—but only if they increase premiums on all similar policies in that state. “no individual can be singled out for a rate hike,” says Kubit. one tip: Ask to review a company’s personal rate–increase history before you buy.

7 extra features

Ask to eliminate all policy features that aren’t worthwhile. return of premium, for example, seems attractive at first. It states that if you never need your policy, all premiums paid over the years will be refunded to your estate or spouse. “But this is a very expensive add-on, and most people find it doesn’t make sense financially,” says Kubit. —Francesca Moisin

shutterstock

TodAY, peopLe Are LIvInG LonGer

For More InForMATIon on LonG-TerM CAre opTIonS, See middlesexhealthandlife.com/eldercare.

5/30/12 11:15 AM


middlesex living PLAY TIME Villagio

55+ $479,500+ 42 Stouts ln., Monmouth Junction 732.329.4200, villagio55.com

This “Siena” villa is one of four styles of homes offered at Villagio.

This Tuscan-inspired estate offers a variety of outdoor activities. Residents can take advantage of an on-site putting green, tennis courts, a swimming pool and an amphitheater, as well as jogging and biking paths surrounding the community. Those seeking more space to unwind indoors can opt for a finished basement, a third bedroom or even a third floor.

Retirement Roosts FORgE T THE ROCkINg CHAIR. THEsE LUxURY CO M M U N I T I Es FO R ACT I V E sEN IO Rs r e al ly ROCk JOIN THE CLUB StoneBridge

55+ $292,950+ 3 Mandrake rd., Monroe 888.979.9989, greenbriarnj.com/stonebridge.htm

The largest of Middlesex’s retirement communities, Stonebridge comprises two- and three-bedroom homes, which come with attached garages. But there’s no need to drive off the complex for entertainment—the clubhouse contains indoor and outdoor pools, a movie theater, a media room and card tables. The clubhouse holds pool tables, a fitness center and a grand ballroom.

The pond and clubhouse at the entrance of Madison Crossing

HAVE IT YOUR WAY MadiSon CroSSing at BirCh hill

One of two pools at the Stonebridge clubhouse

55+ $229,900+ 1 Schneider Ct., old Bridge, 732.536.8900, liveatmc.com

Customize your two- or three-bedroom condo or townhouse (or, for those who want to retire in high style, your two-to-fourbedroom villa), with hardwood and tile floors, high-end kitchen appliances or designer lighting. A heated pool, tennis courts and bocce courts are just some of the amenities at residents’ disposal.

MiddleSe xhealthAndliFe.CoM

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thingstodo J u n e

J u ly

Au g u s t

festival of Ballooning at solberg airport in readington, July 27–29

JuNE 25 Join the Freehold

Municipal Alliance to Prevent Substance Abuse at the annual Ray KeRshaw MeMORial GOlf OutinG at Knob Hill Golf Club in Manalapan, 8:30 a.m. Along with a round on the beautiful greens, the event will include prizes for winners and a five-star meal. Call 732.294.5103 or visit twp.freehold.nj.us for more information.

JuNE 26 Canadian jazz musi-

cian diana KRall comes to the State

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Summer 2012

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Theatre in New Brunswick, 8 p.m. The singer and pianist has performed with Ray Charles and Tony Bennett and collaborated with her husband, Elvis Costello. Tickets: $39–$129 . “Date Night” packages, which include two seats, wine and chocolate, are $184 . Visit statetheatrenj.org to learn more.

JuLY 3 Celebrate Independence

Day at fReehOld fiRewORKs and cOnceRt at Freehold Raceway, 5:30 p.m. Enjoy live music from the RockNRoll Chorus and cover band Turnstyles, which will entertain until dusk when the sky becomes the show! Free admission. Visit downtown freehold.com for more information.

JuLY 12–14 Former Come-

dy Central host and comedian caRlOs Mencia will be performing at Stress Factory in New Brunswick, 8 p.m. Thursday–Saturday and 10:30 p.m.

Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $37 . Call 732.545.4242 or visit stressfactory.com for more information.

JuLY 14–28

Experience the food of the area’s local chefs during new BRunswicK RestauRant weeK. Discounted lunch and dinner menu options will be available. For participating restaurants, go to new brunswick.com.

JuLY 19

Get ready for a show that’ll take the words right out of your mouth. MeatlOaf will be promoting his new album, Hell in a Handbasket, at the State Theatre in New Brunswick, 8 p.m. The Grammy-winning artist is famous for his hits “Bat Out of Hell” and “Paradise By the Dashboard Light,” as well as his film appearances in Fight Club and Rocky Horror Picture Show. Tickets: $55–$155 . Go to statetheatrenj.org.

Courtesy of anna hauptmann

Through JuNE 24

A poor girl tries to win the affection of a rich man whose life she saves but meddling island gods get in the way in the musical Once On this island at the Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn. This show features original musical numbers and high-energy dancing. Tickets: $32–$103 . Go to papermill.org for tickets.

MIDDLESE xHeALTHANDLIFe.COM

5/31/12 3:26 PM


things to do

JULY 24

Dogs get a free ticket to the ball game during Bark in the Park at TD Bank Ballpark in Bridgewater, 7 p.m. You and your puppy can watch the Somerset Patriots take on the Sugar Land Skeeters and receive a Doggie Goodie Bag! Tickets: $14–$40 . To find out more, call 908.252.0700 or visit somersetpatriots.com.

JULY 27–29

Watch the sky fill with color at the annual Quik Chek Festival oF Ballooning, held at Solberg Airport in Readington. The festival includes a 5K run, amusement rides, fireworks and live performances by singer Smokey Robinson and other artists. Tickets: $30 adults, $15 children. Visit balloonfestival.com for more information.

JULY 28 Sample from New

Jersey vineyards during Wine tasting at rutgers gardens at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, 10 a.m. Take a tour of the gardens

and even bring the kids—there will be activities planned for children. Tickets: $10 ( free admission for children and nondrinkers). To learn more, call 732.932.8451 or visit rutgersgardens.rutgers.edu.

AUGUST 1–11

Spend a summer night with Sandy, Danny and the rest of the Pink Ladies and T-Birds during grease, performed by Edison’s outdoor theater company Plays in the Park, 8:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Attendees are encouraged to bring a nonperishable donation for the local food bank. Tickets: $7 (adults), $5 (seniors), free (children under 12). Go to playsinthepark.com for details.

AUGUST 6–12 Bring

the family to the annual Middlesex County Fair at Middlesex County Fairgrounds in East Brunswick, 5–11 p.m. (Mon.–Fri.), 11 a.m.–11 p.m. (Sat.), 11 a.m.–7 p.m. (Sun.). The fair will feature rides, food, agricultural

shows geared toward children and live entertainment, including a unicycling juggler, a trampoline show and racing pigs. There will be a fireworks display on Monday night at dusk. Go to middlesexcountyfair.org for details, including admission prices.

SepTember 1–2

Sample New Jersey wines and food from local restaurants during the Jazz it uP Wine & Food Festival at the Allaire State Park in Farmingdale, 12 p.m. The festival will also include live music and activities for kids. Tickets: $25 . For more information, visit allairevillage.org. Send event listings to: Middlesex Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; or e-mail us at thingstodo@wainscot media.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Community Calendar at middlesexhealthandlife.com.

shutterstoCk

Wine tasting at rutgers Gardens on July 28

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Ge t tinG there

hidden pond 354 Goose Rocks Rd. Kennebunkport, Maine 207.967.9050 hiddenpondmaine.com driving time: about 6.5 hours

clockwise from left:

the family pool, a bungalow bedroom, a bungalow bathroom, morning yoga, a two-bedroom cottage

Rustic chic

nestled in the Maine woods lies a cottaGe-style retreat that is at once siMple and sophisticated LoVE THE woods BuT HATE To camp? Find the perfect solution at Hidden Pond, an upscale resort featuring luxurious cottages and bungalows tucked away in the woods about 10 minutes from downtown Kennebunkport, Maine. stepping into one of the 16 two-bedroom cottages is both a surprise and a delight, as each of the 1,100-square-foot buildings is uniquely decorated. The Periwinkle cottage, for example, mixes bright colors like red, yellow and, of course, periwinkle with natural materials to achieve an upbeat, whimsical feel. A cottage is a perfect choice for a family getaway, with two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a kitchen, plus a screened-in porch and outdoor shower. But last year, Hidden Pond added 20 two-person bungalows to the 60-acre property to attract couples, placing these bungalows in another section of the resort along with an adults-only pool. The 700-square-foot bungalows, decorated

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in soft earth tones with rustic touches of wood and stone, offer a quiet retreat for those looking to get away sans kids. Also new last year was Earth, a gardeninspired restaurant helmed by star Boston chef Ken oringer. The restaurant, which overlooks the pond that inspired the resort’s name, features homegrown organic vegetables and herbs with fresh local seafood and meat. Another welcome addition is the Tree spa. The spa’s treatment rooms are individual wooden “sheds” built 10 feet off the ground and accessed by wooden footbridges. You are perched among the birch and balsam fir trees as you enjoy your treatment, which features organic Farmaesthetics products. The main gathering place at the resort is the Arts and Crafts–inspired Lodge, which houses the check-in desk, a lounge area with a large stone fireplace and the Back Porch Bar. outside the Lodge is a fire pit

surrounded by wooden benches, tables and chairs. Grab a seat by the nightly bonfire and enjoy a cocktail or complimentary s’mores. The staff will happily provide you with a stick perfect for roasting your marshmallows under the stars. In the morning, a basket of freshly baked muffins and bread appears in a bag hanging outside your door along with hot coffee and a newspaper. Enjoy breakfast on your screened-in porch or snuggled on the couch in front of your stone fireplace, then try a 9 a.m. yoga or tai chi class on the lawn by the organic garden, or grab a bike from Pete’s bike shed on the property and take a one-mile ride over to the beach at Goose Rocks. Hidden Pond guests have access to the beach at The Tides Beach Club, a recently renovated 113-year-old Victorian inn, which is a sister property. Both hotels are a short drive from the picturesque coastal village of Kennebunkport with its myriad shops, restaurants and whale-watching excursions. After a day spent as a tourist in town, it’s a treat to retire to the quiet of the woods at Hidden Pond. —Marisa sandora

TrenT Bell

escapes

To sEE MoRE PHoTos oF HIddEn Pond And To PLAn YouR TRIP, Go To middlesexhealthandlife.com/hiddenpond.

5/31/12 3:22 PM


Valley National Bank, the perfect f it to ref inance your home.

Gerald H. Lipkin Ge CHA CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD, PRE PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

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Freehold 3495 Route 9 (732) 303-1927

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Highlands 301 Shore Drive (732) 872-1249

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Holmdel 2124 Route 35 South (732) 796-3988

Manalapan 801 Tennent Road (732) 536-3520

Sea Bright 1173 Ocean Avenue (732) 224-5127

Middletown 760 Highway 35 & Twinbrooks Ave. (732) 796-3980 Oakhurst 777 West Park Avenue (732) 493-1274

Shrewsbury 465 Broad Street (732) 224-5100

Red Bank 74 Broad Street (732) 224-5125 362 Broad Street (Foodtown) (732) 224-5121

The Perfect Fit 800-522-4100, option 3 valleynationalbank.com

As of 5/15/12, a sample $100,000 30 year fixed-rate mortgage APR is 4.043% with a monthly payment of $4.77 per thousand. APR’s subject to change. Program is available for minimum loan amount of $100,000 and maximum of $1,000,000, single or two family owner occupied homes in NJ and a single family, owner occupied home in PA. Other programs are available for other loan amounts. Approved applicants will be responsible at closing for funding interim interest, an escrow account for property taxes and insurances and any lien subordination fees from other lenders. Cannot be combined with other offers. Subject to credit approval. Additional terms and conditions apply. © 2012 Valley National Bank. Member FDIC. VCS-4681

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Middlesex Health & Life: Summer 2012