Issuu on Google+

m i d d l e s e x H e a l t h & Li f e

t h e g o o d l i v i n g m a g a z i n e f r o m s a i n t p e t e r ’ s h e a lt h c a r e s y s t e m

july 2011 the good living magazine from saint peter’s healthcare system

an Inspirational interior and ideas from top designers cheese: What to try, buy and serve

4ways

the hospital helps the poor

p.18

healthy summer sips

inspirational interior design sports medicine

‘sports medicine’ for nonathletes j u ly 2 011 | $ 3 . 9 5 | m i d d l e s e x h e a lt h a n d l i f e . c o m

_MID0711_Cover_08REV2.indd 2

6/10/11 10:14 AM


C2-1_MSHL_JULY11.indd 2 NJ Cranbury Health & Life 18.5x11.125 1

Š2011 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Franchises independently owned and operated.

BE

6/9/11 10:34 AM


For more than 30 years, California Closets has been the leader in custom home storage solutions. Call us today for a free consultation, and see all the possibilities that California Closets offers, all affordably priced and beautifully customized for your home.

BEDROOM

GARAGE

ENTRYWAY

LAUNDRY

KIDS

MEDIA CENTER

OFFICE

STORAGE

CRAFT

PANTRY

800.229.2567 | CaliforniaClosets.com/cranbury

C2-1_MSHL_JULY11.indd 3

6/9/11 10:34 AM 2/9/11 9:53 AM


Contents on the cover: shutterstock. top: SRS Photography srsphotographer.com. bottom: Peter Margonelli

july 2011

36 30

FEATURES

17

I N G O O D H E A LT H Saint Peter’s University Hospital pros weigh in on a variety of health topics.

i n e v ery i s s ue

6 w e lc o m e l e tt e r 8 Ed i to r’s N ot e 4 3 Wh e r e to E at 4 6 th i n g s to d o

30

T H E N AT U R A L Designer Frank DelleDonne brought the sunny spirit of California into a couple’s new home here in New Jersey.

36

A S B U R Y PA R K The stor y of a shore town that went from drab to fab

_MID0711_TOC_10.indd 1

6/7/11 3:36 PM


SPH-1121 Magnet MHL:SPH-1121 Magnet MHL

3/1/11

4:13 PM

Page 1

Saint Peter’s

is 1 of only 6 hospitals in the world to achieve Nursing’s highest honor 4 times in a row!

THE BEST OF THE BEST. THAT’S WHAT A MAGNET DESIGNATION SAYS ABOUT SAINT PETER’S NURSING EXCELLENCE. But this isn’t the first time the compassion, professional dedication and commitment of our nurses have been recognized. This latest Magnet® recognition not only marks our fourth consecutive time we have received this honor for nursing excellence, it makes Saint Peter’s one of only six hospitals internationally to do so! Saint Peter’s University Hospital. When you want the best in patient care, trust the best nursing team.

Treating you better...for life. 254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901



732.745.8600



www.saintpetershcs.com

Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen  State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center Regional medical campus of Drexel University College of Medicine  Affiliate of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

003_MSHL_JULY11.indd 9

6/9/11 10:48 AM


Contents JULY

44

DEPARTMENTS

12

LOCAL BUZZ Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in Middlesex County

14

LOCAL FASHION

14

On the tennis court, this trendy, comfortable apparel will more than ser ve.

26

GATHERINGS Photos from recent charity and social events at Saint Peter’s University Hospital

28

SHOP LOCAL LEADER Entrepreneur Marlon Pando of White Lotus Home brings “green” values to the marketplace.

29

AT HOME

40

TASTES A guide to the many varieties of cheese, where to find them and how to ser ve them

42

48

POWER FOOD

I N G O O D H E A LT H INSIDE LOOK TECH SAVVY FACES OF SAINT PETER’S SEASONAL HEALTH UP CLOSE

18 21 22 24 25

24

Discover the histor y and health benefits of figs.

44

WINE + SPIRITS Tasty—and healthy—drinks for a hot summer day

48

ESCAPES Take a peek at Cr ystal Springs Resort, a golfer’s dream getaway. FO LLO W U S Friend us on Facebook by visiting facebook.com/middlesexhealthandlife Follow u s on Twitter: @MiddlesexHandL Sign up for our e-newsletter at middlesexhealthandlife.com/newsletter

TOP LEFT: © LOUPE IMAGES/DEBI TRELOAR. CENTER: JOE CHURCH. BOTTOM: BULL’S EYE/IMAGEZOO/GETTY IMAGES

Interior designer Jennifer McGee shares her favorite home décor items for this season.

Visit middlesexhealthandlife.com to subscribe!

4

JULY 2011

|

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

_MID0711_TOC_10REV1.indd 2

ou it’s F RE E if y s e x ! li ve in M id d le

6/8/11 2:29 PM


EXPAND your living space… Expand your living space with a finished basement.

Up to 800 square feet for only $9,999.* The Basic Basement Co. will give you the basement you’ve always wanted by transforming your previously unfinished basement into a usable and comfortable living area. Increase the value of your home, cut your energy use, and expand your usable living space. Our professionals will provide you with a completely remodeled basement. OUR BASEMENT REMODELING PACKAGE INCLUDES: Framing | Insulation | Electric | Sheetrock | Doors | Trim | Painting *FLOORING SUPPLIED AND INSTALLED AT A ADDITIONAL COST. PLUMBING NOT INCLUDED

SCHEDULE YOUR FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION! 1-877-777-0204 | www.DoneFor9999.com

005_MSHL_JULY11.indd 9

All electrical work to be performed by a licensed electrician. LICENSE # 13VH05389400

6/10/11 9:36 AM


welcome letter

SPECIAL EVENTS 

Serving the poor

Saint Peter’s Healthcare System’s Annual Golf Classic MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 9:00 AM REGISTRATION AND BRUNCH 11:00 AM SHOTGUN START 5:00 PM RECEPTION AND DINNER The Ridge at Back Brook, Ringoes, NJ Play a round at one of New Jersey’s top-rated golf courses to benefit Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. $750 per golfer. Sponsorships available. Call Saint Peter’s Foundation at 732-745-8542.

HEALTH & WELLNESS 

Diabetes Education TUESDAY, JULY 12 • 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM Sister Marie de Pazzi Conference Center @ Saint Peter’s University Hospital Sponsored by Saint Peter’s Thyroid and Diabetes Center. Light dinner served to registered participants. Call 732-745-8600, ext. 5795 to register or for details.

Taking Control of Epilepsy SATURDAY, JULY 23 • 8:30 AM REGISTRATION 9:00 AM – 11:30 AM PHYSICIAN PRESENTATIONS Sister Marie de Pazzi Conference Center @ Saint Peter’s University Hospital Call Beth Wiederspiel at 800-336-5843 for more information.

MyGOAL: My Gateway to Overcoming Autism in Life Support Group SUNDAY, JULY 24, AUGUST 28 AND SEPTEMBER 25 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM Saint Peter’s University Hospital Join us for a discussion group for men who have families or have been affected by the journey of Autism. Monthly group sessions facilitated by Robert Kumapley, co-founder of MyGOAL, and Brian Cavill, fathers of children with Autism. For details, contact Robert Kumapley at 877-886-9462 or robert.kumapley@gmail.com.

PerhaPs no service of saint Peter’s healthcare System is more emblematic of our faith-based, Catholic Churchdriven mission than The Family Health Center in New Brunswick, also known to many as the How Lane clinic. Why? All of the services offered by The Family Health Center are provided without regard to one’s ability to pay—and very often its patrons cannot pay. That is because they quite typically are the poorest of the poor, the sickest of the sick—those folks without a regular paycheck from week to week or a stable roof over their heads, let alone health insurance of any kind. For those unfamiliar with The Family Health Center, it offers programs for both children and adults—services that run the gamut of what is ultramodern in today’s health care. For example, The Family Health Center houses services for adults in general internal medicine and clinics in the following subspecialties: endocrinology, gastroenterology, infectious disease, nephrology and rheumatology. The center serves adult outpatients from 18 years old through the senior years. This site serves about 8,000 patients annually. The professional staff includes attending physicians, resident physicians, advance-practice nurses, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, registered dieticians and social workers. The support staff includes patient care technicians, registration representatives and billing representatives. Meanwhile, comprehensive primary and preventive health care is provided to children at The Pediatric Faculty Group at the Louis S. Damiano Pediatric Health Center, part of The Family Health Center. The center is staffed by an interdisciplinar y team of pediatricians and nurses, as well as social workers, nutritionists and professionals from numerous other disciplines. The Family Health Center is located at 123 How Lane. Key services include the Dorothy B. Hersh Regional Child Protection Center, a state-designated child protection center (CPC) that serves seven counties in central New Jersey. The CPC provides crisis intervention, child-abuse assessments and referrals to community resources. A multidisciplinary team of doctors, nurses, psychologists and clinical social workers works with children and their families to try to prevent future abuse. Any mention of The Family Health Center must also include the For KEEPS program (Kids Embraced and Empowered through Psychological Services), an acute partial-hospitalization shortterm-stay unit for children ages 5 through 17. What all of this means is that anyone—regardless of income, faith or personal beliefs—can depend upon The Family Health Center for their healthcare needs, be it an annual checkup by a physician or, if required, more complex treatment. Please read this edition of Middlesex Health & Life to learn more about The Family Health Center.

RONALD C. R AK , J.D. PRE S IDE N T A ND CHIE F E X E C U T IV E OFFICE R S A IN T PE T E R’S HE A LT H CA RE SYST E M

254 EASTON AVENUE

|

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600 | www.saintpetershcs.com

006_MSHL_JULY11.indd 2 _MID0711_Welcome_REV1.indd 1

6/9/11 AM 6/8/11 10:31 2:28 PM


SPH-1164 CYBERKNIFE MHL:SPH-1164 CYBERKNIFE MHL

6/3/11

5:14 PM

Page 1

YOU’LL FIND THE ULTIMATE WEAPON IN THE FIGHT AGAINST PROSTATE CANCER AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. CyberKnife® is a remarkable non-surgical alternative to traditional prostate cancer treatments. It’s pain-free, requires no incisions, anesthesia, and hospital stays, so there’s virtually no recovery time! CyberKnife’s revolutionary robotic technology uses pinpoint radiation beams to target hard-to-reach-prostate tumors—eradicating the tumor while sparing the healthy tissue around it. CyberKnife takes just five visits—instead of months for other treatments—allowing men to quickly return to their normal lifestyles. CyberKnife at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. Treating you better…for life. For details, call toll-free 866-702-2737

or visit saintpetershcs.com

Treating you better...for life. 254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901 Accredited by the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer



Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen

732.745.8600

 

State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center

CyberKnife is a registered trademark of Accuray Incorporated and is used with permission.

007_MSHL_JULY11.indd 9

6/9/11 10:48 AM


BRING OUT YOUR

INNER BEAUTY

VOI SALON & SPA

offers a complete array of hair, nail, spa and makeup services. We also feature the latest hair straightening techniques including

PLANNING YOUR SPECIAL DAY? We specialize

in bridal updos and makeup.

VOI SALON CARRIES WINNERS OF BEHINDTHECHAIR.COM’S STYLISTS CHOICE AWARDS INCLUDING THEIR FAVORITE:

Voi SALON & SPA

SHAMPOO Redken Color Extend Shampoo CHEMICAL SMOOTHING SYSTEM Keratin Complex Smoothing Therapy by Coppola

gearing up for summer

If you’re like me, you can’t wait until the weekend, when you can finally don your garden boots and get outdoors to spend the day planting and pruning. Or maybe you pull on your running shoes to sweat out the stress of the work week. Whatever outdoor activity you choose, know that its benefits will go beyond the fun factor: Numerous studies confirm you’ll also be boosting your psychological and emotional well-being. In fact, visiting places with lots of trees like local parks and forests has been proven to increase immune-fighting white blood cells, so get out and visit the many parks, rivers and lakes in Middlesex—or hit the beach. If you haven’t already experienced Asbury Park’s comeback, you must visit. The boardwalk has been resurrected, funky shops and new restaurants are flourishing, hotels are restored, and the beach is divine. Read more about AP in our article on page 36. I love to entertain, and in the summer we all do more of it than ever. You’ll find our food section quite helpful when planning your next get-together, from tips on selecting the perfect cheeses (page 40) to summer cocktail recipes with a healthy twist (page 44).

PHOTO: ROBERT DESANTOS/VENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY OF RIDGEWOOD; HAIR: MARYANN ESMAILI; MAKEUP: BARBI DIAZ/PANICO SALON & SPA OF RIDGEWOOD

EDITOR’S NOTE

Enjoy!

PERMANENT COLOR LINE Redken Color Fusion DEMI-PERMANENT COLOR LINE Redken Shades EQ

253 RT. 18 SOUTH EAST BRUNSWICK, NJ

732-390-9390 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE

SMALL COMPANY Unite

JENNIFER VREEL AND, EDITOR IN CHIEF EDITOR@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

collapsible cooler

WHAT I’M LOVING...

Trek lightly (say goodbye to those heavy plastic coolers). Instead, picnic in style with this completely collapsible, insulated canvas cooler with lightweight aluminum handles. It comes in three colors and is available at REI in East Hanover (973.581.1938) or online at rei.com.

WWW.VOISALONANDSPA.COM

008_MSHL_JULY11.indd 2 _MID0711_EdLetter_REV2.indd 1

6/10/11 8:55PM AM 6/8/11 2:36


FIsCAL FITNEss CERTIFIED DIVORCE FINANCIAL ANALYsTTM

straight talk... real issues in divorce

W

elcome to the latest edition of Fiscal Fitness! As a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst, I meet with many individuals and couples who are seeking guidance from a professional specifically trained in all aspects of divorce financial planning. Unfortunately, many come to me after the divorce or at the tail-end of the negotiations, when it is too late to make changes. The focus of this article is to address common mistakes and how to avoid the many pitfalls of divorce. Preparation is the key to success.

different retirement plans from her ex-husband. Without her knowledge, the husband had taken a loan from one of the plans. The plan will not make any distribution from the plan until the loan is paid back. The husband claims he does not have the money to pay it back. Now what? Back to the attorney’s office. Did anyone request a current statement for the plan or ask about any outstanding loans?

InsurIng the settlement Premature death or disability of your ex-spouse can result in loss of maintenance, child support, a property settlement or college tuition. Life and disability insurance can guarantee your payments as well as your family’s security. Typically, a term insurance policy can be issued. If insurance coverage is part of the settlement, make sure the process is started during the negations. It is inexpensive compared to whole life insurance and covers a specific term. Also, don’t ignore the high cost of purchasing individual health insurance.

estate plannIng One of the most overlooked areas. The divorce is over. You can finally breathe. Have you updated your will, power of attorney and health care directive? If not mandated by the divorce decree to list your ex-spouse as a beneficiary, immediately request a change of beneficiary form. Update all retirement plans, insurance policies and annuities. Don’t forget to list a contingent beneficiary should something happen to the primary. Naming children as beneficiaries may cause unforeseen problems. For example, insurance companies, pension plans and retirement accounts may not pay death benefits to minors. The benefits would likely be held until they could be made to a court-approved guardian and/or a trustee of a children’s trust. Consider establishing a trust for your minor children to insure competent management of the proceeds. I did….

hIghly apprecIated assets Remember, not all assets are created equal. While it might make sense to split a joint brokerage account invested in a portfolio of stocks, bonds and mutual funds, be aware of hidden tax liabilities. In one instance, a couple decided to split their stock portfolio in half. Unfortunately for the husband, the shares he kept had the lowest cost basis. When he came to me for postdivorce financial planning, we found the mistake and he was now on the hook for the entire capital gains tax if he sells the investments. Qdro When one spouse is to receive part of the ex-spouses qualified retirement plan, a Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO) is needed to transfer the asset. A QDRO is a court order which instructs a pension plan to pay an Alternate Payee (or former spouse) a portion of retirement benefits due to an equitable distribution agreement in a divorce. Each type of plan has its own guidelines and methods for distributing benefits. I recently met with a client who was waiting to receive a portion of two

Don’t become a financial victim of your divorce. Misinformation and misconception about the divorce process can be detrimental. By working with an experienced CDFA™ who is also Certified Financial Planner Practioner™,you can reduce the amount of apprehension and feel confident in your decision making. I can help … n

Debra Fournier Certified Financial Planner® Certified Divorce Financial Analyst™

This information should not be construed as specific tax, legal or investment advice. Debra Fournier is not an attorney and does not provide legal advice. Securities offered through LPL Financial Member FINRA/SIPC

009_MSHL_JULY11.indd 9

Debra Fournier, CFP®, CDFATM AbouT The AuThor: Debra Fournier is a Principal of Harbor Lights Financial Group, a full service wealth advisory firm located in Manasquan, N.J. She has been providing comprehensive financial planning and fee-only asset management to affluent families in Monmouth and Ocean counties for over a decade. She is a Certified Financial Planner™ and a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst®, a professional designation that certifies her to examine the financial ramifications of a proposed divorce settlement. These services are especially productive in divorce cases where there are complicated financial issues, significant assets or an imbalance of financial knowledge between the divorcing couple. Debra has been a frequent guest on Good Day New York and quoted in Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine. She is a member of the Association of Divorce Financial Planners, Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts and serves as an executive board member of the Jersey Shore Collaborative Law Group. To schedule a private, no-obligation phone consultation, please call 800-995-4534 or email debra.fournier@hlfg.com

800-995-HLFG www.hlfg.com http://divorce.hlfg.com debra.fournier@hlfg.com

6/10/11 10:02 AM


Fast, Convenient Way To Get To Manhattan, for Commuting and Leisure Travel.

We offer an array of Special Events throughout the year. Ask about our special discounts.

Martha’s Vineyard

Check web for

Departs NJ/NYC every weekend during the summer beginning May 27th

SPECIALS

Yankees/Mets Games

• 7 Days Per Week • NJ - Highlands & Atlantic Highlands • NY - Pier 11 & East 35th St. • Private Parties & Charters • Indoor & Outdoor Seating

Take the SeaStreak ferry to New York to see the Yankees or the Mets.

Broadway Theatre Packages available

jennifer vreeland ed itor i n c h i ef

art director meredith m c bride kipp executive editor marisa s andor a ed i t o r i a l

senior editor timothy kelle y assistant editor eliz abeth l arner contributing editors alli son ander son, s allie br ady, kelle y granger, christopher hann, david le vine, maureen c. petrovsky intern maureen scully editorial director, custom media rita guarna art

art & Production contributor meghan ba s haW Web

director, digital media l arry vollmer

Full Calendar of Special Events

contributing editor naomi imatome-y un production

director of Production and circulation christine hamel

Production assistant julia nied z Wiecki

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR CURRENT OFFERS!

shae marcus pub li s her advertising

senior account executive jodi bruker account executives

jes sica salerno, stephanie staiano

director, sPecial Programs l aur a a . doWden

Turning your storage into a thing of beauty!

m a r k e t i n g & o p e r at i o n s

director of marketing and advertising services thoma s r agus a sales and marketing associate amanda thorogood senior art director, agency services ki joo kim assistant controller agnes alves accounts receivable rePresentative amanda albano manager, office services and information technology mario orti z

Published by wainscot media c h a i r m a n carroll v. doWden

WE SPECIALIZE IN ALL TYPES OF ROOMS AND SPACES INCLUDING: Bedrooms

|

Kids

|

Home Office

|

Garage/Hobby Room

|

Laundry/Utility

|

Pantry/Linen

CALL TODAY FOR A FREE CONSULTATION!

p r e s i d e n t mark doWden s e n i o r v i c e p r e s i d e n t shannon steitz v i c e p r e s i d e n t s amy doWden, rita guarna

732-413-8722

SPRING LAKE, NJ

010_MSHL_JULY11.indd 2 _MID0711_MASTHEAD_04.indd 1

|

WWW.BELLA-SYSTEMS.COM

6/10/11 3:38 8:54PM AM 6/7/11


brady, ,

Pauline Poyner is the #1 realtor in Monmouth County for 2010 Let My Experience Work For You! saint Peter’s healthcare system President and chief executive officer ronald c. r ak , j. d.

chief oPerating officer, senior vice President patricia carroll

chief marketing officer peter connolly director, marketing and media relations michelle l a z z arot ti

now more than ever, it’s important to have the right real estate agent working for you. I believe that the service I provide can help you attain the success you’re looking for.

Pauline Poyner

SALES ASSOCIATE PREVIEWS PROPERTY SPECIALIST CERTIfIED RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST

Coldwell Banker RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

director, Public relations phil hartman

saint peter’s university hospital

President, medical and dental staff dines h s ingal, m. d.

17 west river road, rumson Direct Office Line: 732-933-5527 Email: rightdec@aol.com Visit my Website: www.PaulinePoyner.com

saint peter’s health and management services corporation

executive director ste ven s. radin, esq.

In THe ToP 1% Of COLDWELL BANKER REALTORS NATIONWIDE

THe #1 SaleS aSSoCIaTe

saint peter’s HealtHcare system 254 Easton Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. For more information about Saint Peter’s facilities and services, please visit saintpetershcs.com or call 732.745.8600.

IN ThE COLDWELL BANKER RumSON OffICE fOR ThE 11Th CONSECuTIVE YEAR! 2011 Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corporation. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corporation. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT Incorporated.

we want to hear from you! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Middlesex Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Middlesex Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials.

Fast, Convenient Way To Get To Manhattan, for Commuting and Leisure Travel.

• 7 Days Per Week • NJ - Highlands & Atlantic Highlands • NY - Pier 11 & East 35th St. • Private Parties & Charters • Indoor & Outdoor Seating

od

ano

We offer an array of Special Events throughout the year. Ask about our special discounts.

Martha’s Vineyard Departs NJ/NYC every weekend during the summer beginning May 27th

Yankees/Mets Games Take the SeaStreak ferry to New York to see the Yankees or the Mets.

middlesex HealtH & life is published 4 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 5, Issue 2. © 2011 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Middlesex County: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. advertising inquiries Please contact Shae Marcus at 856.797.2227 or shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com. subscription services To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Middlesex Health & Life, C i r c u l a t i o n D e p a r t m e n t , 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; e - m a i l c h r i s t i n e . h a m e l @wainscotmedia.com.

Full Service Bar

011_MSHL_JULY11.indd 1 _MID0711_MASTHEAD_04.indd 2

6/10/11 6/7/1112:58 3:38PM PM


LOCALBUZZ REVIEWS

TIPS

TRENDS

Pick the Perfect Shades

We wanted to know how to choose the healthiest sunglasses, so we asked Stephen Gordon, M.D., an ophthalmologist affiliated with Saint Peter’s University Hospital (732.745.8600, saintpetershcs.com) for expert advice. WHAT SHOULD ONE KEEP IN MIND WHEN CHOOSING SUNGLASSES?

WHAT SHOULD READERS KNOW ABOUT CHOOSING LENSES BY DARKNESS OR COLOR? For most people, color is not as important as gradient—the percentage of light blocked. In general, choose the darkest gradient that is consistent with how you most often use your sunglasses—for example, the darkest ones may not be best for driving at dusk. Photochromatic lenses—the “transitional” kind that grow darker when exposed to UV rays—are good for people who go in and out a lot, but there’s a caveat. Most car windshields contain UV blockers to protect the cars’ upholstery, so transitional lenses won’t darken inside an automobile. WHAT ABOUT THE FRAMES? In general, large frames provide better coverage than smaller ones, and a wraparound design protects your eyes when you use peripheral vision. Impact-resistant sunglasses (or glasses) are important for kids who are active in sports.

FOOD’S NIFTY AT ‘FIFTY’ A hospital as a culinar y destination? No way, you say—until you enjoy a meal at 2FIFTY4 (732.745.8600, ext. 7773; saintpetershcs. com/restaurant2fifty4), a brightly decorated, modern restaurant that opened last September at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, 254 Easton Avenue (thus the name), offering eclectic cuisine with vegetarian options and all-day breakfast. “These days people want it all—great food, excellent ser vice and a delightful ambiance,” says project manager John Serra, a restaurantbusiness veteran (creator of New Brunswick’s La Fontana and Piscataway’s Al Dente) who developed the color ful eater y. “We tr y to provide all three—but not at a $100-a-person price tag.” Indeed, despite a steep rise in food prices in recent months, you can still get entrees in the $6 to $8 range at 2FIF TY4. There’s outdoor seating for alfresco dining when it’s nice, and “anything we can make homemade, we try to,” says Serra. The staff, led by manager Eileen Lombardi, often uses fresh rosemary, basil, oregano and tomatoes grown in pots right outside the building. For super-healthy-but-tasty options, Serra recommends the artichoke française, salads with portobello mushrooms, and a homemade hummus dip. Or indulge yourself with scrumptious pastries produced by the renowned Mendoker’s Quality Bakery in Jamesburg. 2FIFTY4 is open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends. And though most customers are Saint Peter’s staffers, outpatients and visitors, there are also discriminating diners who come 2 the hospital just 4 the food.

SHOES WITH SOUL Love to garden, but hate your clunky clogs or boots? Native Shoes has a revolutionary alternative

for fashionistas with a green thumb. Available in bold colors like Kermit Green and Hollywood Pink, these kicks are made from a supercomfy foam material that is waterproof, odor-resistant and completely washable—perfect for withstanding garden mud. Manufactured in a low-energy and zero-waste process, Native Shoes are a great choice for any gardener who sees the “green” beyond his or her own backyard. They’re available at Nordstrom (732.603.5000, nordstrom.com) in Edison and at zappos.com just in time to sow your seeds in style.

12

JULY 2011

|

TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF RAY BAN. TOP RIGHT: COURTESY OF SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF NATIVE SHOES

Look for a pair that blocks at least 99 percent of ultraviolet (UV) rays, both UVA and UVB. These rays—especially UVB—can damage the retina, cornea and other parts of the eye. Also, studies now show what we long suspected—that over time, these ultraviolet rays in sunlight can contribute to the development of cataracts, though they’re not the only cause.

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

_MID0711_Buzz_REV3.indd 1

6/10/11 10:14 AM

TOP AND TWO BOTTOM LEFT: SHUTTERSTOCK. BOTTOM RIGHT: COURTESY OF THE CUTTING GARDEN

MIDDLESEX NEWS


TOP AND TWO BOTTOM LEFT: SHUTTERSTOCK. BOTTOM RIGHT: COURTESY OF THE CUTTING GARDEN

TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF RAY BAN. TOP RIGHT: COURTESY OF SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF NATIVE SHOES

TENNIS TIME

What better way to lose the winter weight than tennis? “Tennis is the only fast-paced game that’s good for any generation,” says Catarina Lindqvist-Ryan, owner of the East Brunswick Racquet Club (732.247.1700, ebrctennis.com). “You can learn it young and play it your whole life.” On the court, you’ll burn as many as 500–800 calories per hour (depending on your weight), work every major muscle group and even lower your blood pressure. You’ll also give your brain a workout—strategy helps you win and keeps you sharp. And it’s not just for grownups. “Tennis is a great way for kids to build character—there’s no clock to kill. You have to play until that last point and really put it all on the court in every match.” To avoid straining muscles, Ryan suggests doing a few sets of jumping jacks and taking a couple of minutes to jog in place before you stretch. “Many people don’t stretch or warm up before they play. If you start cold, you can pull a muscle or even injure yourself more seriously,” says Ryan. And if you’re looking to improve your game, lift weights. “Simple weight training can build muscles, which will make your swing stronger and improve your speed on the court,” Ryan adds. DID YOU KNOW? Tennis history enthusiasts should check out two New Jersey clubs that feature grass courts—a rare find these days. Orange Lawn Tennis Club (orangelawn.com) in South Orange was founded in 1880 as one of the first tennis clubs in the United States and features 10 grass courts. It’s a private club but regularly hosts United States Tennis Association (USTA) grass events. The Seabright Lawn Tennis & Cricket Club (sltcc.org) in Rumson was also one of the nation’s first tennis clubs and has been named a National Historic Landmark. Membership is by invitation only, but this club also hosts USTA events.

EAT LOCAL

To keep up a healthier summer diet, try shopping at a farmer’s market or joining a farm share, which provides members with a box of fresh produce each week of the farming season. Locally grown produce uses fewer chemicals to maintain freshness and has a lower risk of carrying bacteria like E. coli. It also helps combat global warming—trucks, planes, trains and boats don’t burn fuel transporting your food. And buying local produce helps preserve open spaces by keeping nearby farms in business. During July you can look forward to fresh fruits and vegetables such as raspberries, sweet peppers, peaches, green beans, cherries, zucchini and blueberries. Check out farmersmarketonline.com/fm/NewJersey.htm for a farmer’s market near you, or visit slowfoodnnj.org for fees and other information on joining a farm share.

NOT YOUR EVERYDAY BOUQUET

GOT THE COUNTY’S CUTEST PET? Prove it! Submit your best photo of your furry friend for a chance to make him or her famous in our October issue! To enter, visit middlesexhealth andlife.com/pets or e-mail your photo to amanda. thorogood@wainscotmedia.com along with your pet’s name, your name and a few words about the “personality” of your winsome creature. You may also mail your photo to Amanda Thorogood, Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. Sorry, photos can’t be returned. Entries must be received by July 31. Good luck!

If you’d like to brighten up your home this season with some eye-catching flowers, you’ll want to stop by The Cutting Garden (609.235.9242, thecuttinggarden.biz) at 70 N. Main Street in Cranbury. In spring and summer, owner Kathy Burke can be found Fridays and Saturdays on the front porch, smiling while she chats with neighbors, offering up glasses of her homemade lavender lemonade and preparing gorgeous bouquets of fresh-cut flowers. “People come up and talk to me every morning when I’m getting ready,” says Burke. “It’s so homey.” And no wonder—for her it is home. The Cutting Garden’s entire stock of flowers, obtained from national, international and local growers, is outside on display, so passers-by can literally stop and smell the roses.

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

_MID0711_Buzz_REV2.indd 2

|

JULY 2011

13

6/8/11 3:59 PM


LOCAL FASHION 2

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

14

JULY 2011

|

_MID0711_Fashion_04.indd 1

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

game set match SERVING UP THIS SEASON’S BEST TENNIS CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES

1 For men, an old-school Fila Retro Jacket, $80, in a classic color combination is the perfect layer for chilly mornings on the court or for kicking around town on cool evenings. fila.com. 2 Finally, a chic and sturdy tennis carry-all for women! Cortiglia’s Sonoma bag, $425, is made from patent leather and nylon and stylishly holds two racquets plus your gear. cortiglia.com. 3 The lightweight nylon Wind Tunnel Pullover from Lija, $110, is wind-resistant and water-repellent. Available in light blue or white, it will look great with both tennis clothes and your everyday attire. Lamington Farm Club, Bedminster, 908.470.4400. 4 Oakley’s Commit SQ in white, $150, is the ideal pair of sport sunglasses for women. They are unbelievably lightweight and have interchangeable lenses that allow you to adapt to changing light conditions. Kim’s Bike Shop, New Brunswick, 732.846.3880. 5 Stella McCartney for Adidas is an unbeatable melding of fashion and athletic wear. We love the Tennis Ballerina Per formance Dress, $120, featuring a pleated skirt and ClimaLite fabric to keep you dry. Famous Footwear, South Plainfi eld, 908.668.9901. 6 Not only is Babolat’s AeroPro Drive GT, $189, highly rated, it is also Rafael Nadal’s racquet of choice. It filters and dampens racquet vibrations for maximum comfort during play and is available in lightweight, extended and junior versions. East Brunswick Racquet Club, East Brunswick, 732.247.1700. 7 Need a gift for a tennis enthusiast? Tiffany & Co.’s beautiful 18K gold tennis charm (notice the diamond) on an 18K chain is both classic and stylish. Your loved one will be the envy of her tennis group. Tiffany & Co., Red Bank, 732.345.8150. 8 The Polar RS300X heart-rate monitor watch will track your heart rate, calories burned, speed/pace and distance traveled when combined with the heart-rate monitor and S1 foot pod (which is worn on your shoe). It’s $250 for the set. Foot Locker, Somerset, 732.246.7679. —ALLISON ANDERSON CHECK OUT ALLISON ANDERSON’S FASHION BLOG AT ST YLEDIRECTIONBYALLISON.COM.

6/7/11 2:24 PM


SPH-1126 CCG AD MHL:SPH-1126 CCG AD MHL

6/3/11

2:28 PM

Page 1

Where can you find great doctors and specialists close to home?

287

SAINT PETER’S COMPREHENSIVE CARE GROUP

Our primary care physicians provide general services for adults 18 years and older, including internal medicine, prevention and wellness, and disease and medication management. And we provide access to specialists in such areas as geriatrics, diabetes care, cardiac care, gastroenterology, pulmonology, rheumatology, and wound care. Should you have a serious illness or injury that requires extensive treatment or a hospital stay, it’s comforting to know that your primary care physician is a member of the medical staff at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. You can be assured of receiving the highest quality health care—the type of care Saint Peter’s is known for—close to home.

18

Easto

n Ave

nue

Garden State Parkway

Finding a good doctor is not always easy. But now you can find great medical care at one of Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Comprehensive Care Group locations in Monroe, New Brunswick and Piscataway.

PISCATAWAY

95

NEW BRUNSWICK

Sayreville 1

East Brunswick

Kendall Park

18

Heathcote

Old Bridge 9

Helmetta

Dayton

1

Princeton

95

Jamesburg Rossmoor

615

Dutch Neck

Marlboro

MONROE 130

619

625

Twin Rivers

Freehold Manalapan

33

SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL COMPREHENSIVE CARE GROUP LOCATIONS

Treating you better...for life. New Brunswick: 240 Easton Avenue (Center for Ambulatory Resources next to Saint Peter’s)  732.937.6008 Monroe: 300 Overlook Drive, Pondview Plaza  609.409.1363 Piscataway: 30 Wills Way (located in the Central Jersey Medical and Professional Park)  732.565.5432

015_MSHL_JULY11.indd 9

6/9/11 10:49 AM


BEFORE, THERE WAS HAIRCOLOR. NOW, THERE IS

NO AMMONIA. NO ODOR. OPTIMIZED SCALP COMFORT. SUPREME RESPECT FOR THE HAIR. INFINITE HAIRCOLOR POWER. COVERS UP TO 100% WHITE.

10 %

OFF

A FIRST TIME INOA COLOR SERVICE WITH IS AD

THE HAIR COLOR OF THE FUTURE IS NOW AT

www.AVANTIDAYRESORT.com 732-780-0222

345 ROUTE 9 SOUTH | MANALAPAN, NJ 07726

016_MSHL_JULY11.indd 2

6/10/11 10:03 AM


ingoodhealth Medicine

t e c h n o lo g y

pat i e n t car e at sa i n t p e t e r ’ s u n i v e r s i t y h o s p i ta l

michael hitoshi/photodisc/getty images

the mission of serving a community’s healthcare needs knows no boundaries of income, ethnicity or insurance status. turn the page to read about this mission and meet individuals who help fulfill it.

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_12.indd 1

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

|

july 2011

17

6/8/11 2:31 PM


inside look

Caring for the poor and uninsured

the saint peter’s family Health Center provides medical and social services to those in need System likes to say it is a Catholic institution “with a capital C and a small c.” The first, of course, describes its religious affiliation; the second, its mission of caring for people of all faiths and walks of life. There is no better example of the latter than Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Family Health Center in New Brunswick. The center offers numerous medical and psychosocial services to uninsured residents of New Brunswick and the Middlesex County region. It serves, among others, juvenile victims of sexual abuse, economically disadvantaged families and mentally disabled and/or violenceprone youth, often at little or no cost. It has also recently applied for status as a federally designated health center, which will enable it to procure federal funding for these much-needed services. The Family Health Center comprises four separate programs, each serving a specific population of adult or pediatric patients:

The Adult Family Health Center This program provides primary care in internal medicine and specialty services that include endocrinology, gastroenterology, infectious disease, nephrology and rheumatology. The center serves about 8,000 adults annually, says Marygrace Zetkulic, M.D., chief of general internal medicine and acting

18

july 2011

|

medical director. “We serve not just the Medicaid population but also the working poor, those who make too much money to qualify for Medicaid but are still uninsured,” she says. The professional staff includes attending physicians, resident physicians, advance-practice nurses, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, registered dieticians and social workers. Patient care technicians, registration representatives and billing representatives are among the center’s support staffers. Patients are commonly referred to the center for treatment after discharge from Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “Our goal is to start appropriate care to prevent a health issue that might send them back to the hospital,” says Dr. Zetkulic. Others learn about the facility through outreach programs at community health fairs and free health screenings. “We are especially on the lookout for those with chronic disease, particularly diabetes and high blood pressure,” the doctor adds. All patients are taught to “Take Control of Your Health”—using a program of instruction bearing that name, created by Stanford University, that is designed to improve health literacy. “We teach patients how to take better care of themselves, how to get the most out of a doctor visit and how to understand and meet their health goals,” she says. The center is different from similar

facilities, she says, in that physicians work both there and at the hospital. “I can see my patients in both places, which provides better continuity of care,” says Dr. Zetkulic. The uninsured may apply for free or partial charity care, depending on income. Social workers help patients obtain charitable donations of medications from pharmaceutical companies to further control costs. And important preventive services such as colonoscopy, mammography and Pap screens are also provided at little or no cost.

The Dorothy B. Hersh Regional Child Protection Center In the 1990s, the New Jersey Legislature established four regional centers for the diagnosis and treatment of child abuse and neglect. One of them is this center located on How Lane, which covers seven counties in central New Jersey. “Last year we provided services to about 1,200 kids—and a few people older than 18,” says Ray Wolfinger, program manager. “We help not just children, but also their parents.” Patients and their families are referred to the center by the state Division of Youth and Family Services (DYFS) or by county prosecutors. “We also have a few independent referrals from doctors or family members, but they must be referred to DYFS before they come here,” he says.

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_REV2.indd 2

6/8/11 4:34 PM

Charlie schuck/uppercut imageg/getty images

The Saint Peter’s HealthCare


inside look

Charlie schuck/uppercut imageg/getty images

with four key programs, the family health center helps patients who cannot pay. Those in the program receive physical, emotional and sexual medical assessments from the pediatricians, psychologists and social workers on staff. Children who need placement in foster homes or inpatient care facilities are given a baseline medical evaluation under a Medicaid program called Comprehensive Health Evaluations for Children (CHEC). This one-time screening, which takes several hours, identifies medical, developmental and mental health difficulties, coordinates follow-up care and makes treatment recommendations. The center specializes in sexual abuse cases, which account for 70 percent of the patients it handles, Wolfinger says. “Not many pediatricians or emergency room staff really have that specialty,” he says. Providers here are also mandated

to testify in court in civil and criminal cases if necessary. “That’s one of the reasons these centers were created because it’s hard to find professionals willing to testify in these cases,” he says.

The For KEEPS Program

For KEEPS is an acronym of For Kids Embraced and Empowered through Psychological Services. “It’s designed for any child having difficulty managing behaviors in social environments,” says Loretta Jantos, Psy.D., director. That includes children diagnosed with depression, attention disorders, behavioral problems, anger, sadness and other psychosocial issues. The program provides group, individual and family therapy sessions for kids ages 5 to 17 and their families. They

participate for six to eight weeks on average, Dr. Jantos says, and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday they’re at the center, where they receive therapy and medication management as well as academic instruction. Since 2002, the For KEEPS program has offered services designed to maximize each child’s potential for learning and growth and emotional/behavioral stability. With the support of the hospital administration and the tenacity of a committed staff the focus is always quality of care, says Dr. Jantos. Clear proof of success, she notes, is the fact that “90 percent of our children return to school with support services in place.” For KEEPS has been so successful that the Division of Medical Assistance and Health Services has recommended

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_12.indd 3

|

july 2011

19

6/8/11 2:32 PM


INSIDE LOOK

GE T TING THERE Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Family Health Center at 123 How Lane, New Brunswick, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. For more information, call Saint Peter’s University Hospital at 732.745.8600.

William Bernstein, M.D., medical director of the Louis S. Damiano Pediatric Health Center, chats with the mother of a young patient.

LOUIS S. DAMIANO PEDIATRIC HEALTH CENTER The Pediatric Faculty Group at this facility provides comprehensive primary and preventive health care to needy patients from birth to age 21. The center, part of the Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, is staffed by a team of pediatricians, nurses, social workers and nutritionists. “We treat about 18,000 patients per year, more than half of whom are Hispanic,” says William Bernstein, M.D., medical director. Like any pediatric practice, it provides both well-child and acute care for childhood illnesses and development, as well as counseling on behavior, nutrition and injury prevention. A bilingual telephone triage operator is available 24/7 to answer questions and direct appropriate care. The eight pediatricians on staff can also refer kids to specialty care if needed. “We also train pediatric residents and medical students here, giving us

the opportunity to showcase this care model to tomorrow’s physicians,” he says. That model strives to show patients the “medical home” concept, in which the primary care practice, not a hospital emergency room, becomes patients’ and families’ first choice for care. The center fosters a child-friendly approach, Dr. Bernstein says. “All the doctors and nurses are trained in pediatrics, the facility is bright and decorated for kids and we give books and stickers to youngsters to help comfort them during exams and immunizations.” In fact, the center is a designated site for the Reach Out and Read program, a national program to promote literacy and cognitive skills. Dr. Bernstein welcomed this assignment, he says, because “I was attracted to Saint Peter’s and its mission of community service and care to medically underserved populations. It’s so very important to kids, who have their whole lives ahead of them, to get the care they need early on. That is the most rewarding part of our job.” —D.L.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

20

JULY 2011

|

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_REV2.indd 4

6/8/11 4:34 PM

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

themselves and their success, they will carry that good feeling with them.”

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

a model for statewide programs, says the doctor. It’s effective partly because of the special services it offers, including pet therapy, humor therapy, an antibullying program, a garden for the kids to work to gain knowledge about good nutrition and physical exercise, and a reading project to encourage kids to use reading to diffuse anger. At various times during the year, patients in the program take part in holiday programs such as an annual Thanksgiving project, in which they make and donate items to a nursing home, the Margaret McLaughlin McCarrick Care Center, also part of the Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. “It teaches them to be grateful and give back,” she says. “There are also Olympic-style competitions that help show youngsters how to be a good loser or a gracious winner, and an International Day to celebrate all the region’s cultures and have a grand time.” Along with the hard work of therapy, there are parties for birthdays and holidays and at discharge. “Kids need to be kids—they need to celebrate,” Dr. Jantos says. “Once they feel good about


TECH SAVVY

Seated in the CyberKnife control room, urologist David H. Koota, M.D., views a digital image of the treatment area. BELOW: the CyberKnife unit

Fighting prostate cancer with the CyberKnife A NEW DEVICE DELIVERS RADIATION MORE QUICKLY, ACCURATELY AND SAFELY THAN EVER BEFORE EACH YEAR, MORE THAN 186,000

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

American men learn they have prostate cancer. In early 2010, Saint Peter’s University Hospital became the only hospital in central New Jersey to install the most advanced radiation delivery system available for treating that dangerous illness. The device, the CyberKnife, uses advanced computer guidance software “like you’d find in a jet fighter plane,” says urologist Anthony J. Catanese, M.D., allowing radiation oncologists to target and lock into the cancerous lesion more precisely than before. In addition, the guidance system follows the pros-

tate as it naturally moves, ever so slightly, while the treatments are under way. Because the radiation is so precisely delivered, minimizing the chance of its hitting surrounding tissue, patients can safely receive about three times as high a dosage per session as they can with traditional radiation treatments. The process takes longer per session—roughly 30 minutes, as opposed to about 10—but requires far fewer sessions overall. “With other radiation systems, patients typically need 40 to 42 treatments over eight weeks, but the CyberKnife can deliver the same amount of radiation in fi ve

treatments,” says Gopal Desai, M.D., of University Radiology Group, chair of the department of radiation oncology. “Patients receive treatment on alternate days, so they’re done within a week and a half.” Most patients with cancer confined to the prostate and no other serious health problems are candidates for CyberKnife therapy, he says. Treatment begins with creating “a plan to optimize killing the cancer and avoiding side effects,” adds Dr. Catanese. “I spend hours with the radiation oncologist, physicist and technician to design a custom plan for each individual.” The patient’s urologist implants gold markers just 2 millimeters in diameter into the prostate. “It’s done the way one would take a prostate biopsy, in the office as an outpatient procedure,” Dr. Desai says. Four to five days later, a computerized tomography (CT) scan confirms that the markers are in the right place. A couple of days after that, treatments can begin. “My patients have tolerated the CyberKnife well,” says urologist Ramon E. Rodriguez, M.D. “I have had at least 20 patients use it, and complications—some discomfort in urination in some cases, for example—are minimal and temporary.” The CyberKnife can also be used to treat brain tumors, vascular malformations, lung and pancreatic cancers and other disorders, says Dr. Desai. “It’s more convenient and less disruptive than the tools we had before and produces strong results with minimal side effects,” says David H. Koota, M.D., chief of the section of urology. Agrees Dr. Desai: “It’s a great tool that helps in many ways.” —D.L.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT CYBERKNIFE SERVICES AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 866.702.2737. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_REV2.indd 5

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

|

JULY 2011

21

6/8/11 4:34 PM


faces of saint peter’s

Archna Parmar, D.O.

Preventive medicine is a spe-

cial passion for Archna Parmar, D.O., 30, an internal medicine physician at Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s new Comprehensive Care Group office in Piscataway, a facility whose staff is focused on caring for the region’s diverse population. Born in northern India, Dr. Parmar came to the United States with her family at age 10 and grew up in Edison, where she still lives with her husband, Sandeep, 33, an IT engineer, and their daughter, Suhani, 17 months. She went to Rutgers University in New Brunswick, earned her medical degree at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and did her residency at Saint Peter’s. Why has the hospital opened this new facil-

Saint Peter’s had no office in this area, and there is a growing need among different ethnic groups here, especially the South Asians. There are many health issues in this community—particularly high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. How do you plan to address them? We need to educate people about prevention. Often people don’t go to the doctor for wellness checkups, but only when they are sick. I want to promote preventive health by going to health fairs, senior centers and other community centers. ity?

Does being an immigrant yourself motivate

It’s always been my goal to help my community because it helped my family when we came here. My parents came to America to give us a better education. They spoke no English and worked odd jobs at restaurants and factories to make ends meet. I am the first college graduate in my family. This is my first job, and it’s like a dream job. I will give it my best and do whatever it takes to make this work. What do you do in your spare time? I used to perform traditional northern Indian dances in school, and I also love Bollywood-style dancing. I still perform, but mainly at family get-togethers. —D.L.

“i am the first college graduate in my family. this is my first job, and it’s like a dream job. I will do whatever it takes to make it work.” ­— Archna Parmar, D.O.

22

july 2011

|

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_12.indd 6

6/8/11 2:32 PM

bohm-marrazzo photography

Archna Parmar, D.O.

bohm-marrazzo photography

you for this task?


FACES OF SAINT PETER’S

Steven Palder, M.D.

WHILE STUDYING TO BE A PHYSICAL

therapist, pediatric surgeon Steven Palder, M.D., found he was more interested in medical treatments than in rehabilitation. So he started medical school in Belgium and then graduated from the University of Maryland Medical School. He interned at the University of California Davis Medical Center, then completed research fellowships at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and Children’s Hospital of Michigan in Detroit, followed by a pediatric surgery fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. A native of Washington, D.C., Dr. Palder, 59, lives in Hopewell. He is a single father with four sons, ages 19 to 26, and has been with Saint Peter’s since 2003. WHY DID YOU SWITCH FROM PHYSICAL THERAPY TO SURGERY? I wanted to make decisions rather than carry them out. I am the sort of guy who likes to say, “Let’s get it done.” I chose surgery because surgeons are the decision makers. We have to be assertive. That suits my personality. WHAT DREW YOU TO PEDIATRIC SURGERY? It’s the last bastion of general surgery. There are only about 500 pediatric surgeons in North America, and we can treat all types of problems. In one day I operated on a 1.5-pound baby and a 280-pound child. I often see things I have never seen before or haven’t seen for years. I find that very challenging and stimulating. Also, I relate better to children than adults. I like their veracity. You have to tell it like it is with kids because they can tell if you aren’t telling the truth and won’t put up with it. I like the purity of children. That’s why I have four kids—I would have had more if I could. WHAT IS YOUR LIFE LIKE OUTSIDE THE HOSPITAL?

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

I read, go to art museums, work out at the gym, ride my bike—I do a lot of fitness stuff. Physical activity helps me unwind from a relatively stressful work environment. —D.L.

Steven Palder, M.D., and his dog, Tyson

“THERE ARE ONLY ABOUT 500 PEDIATRIC SURGEONS IN NORTH AMERICA, AND WE CAN TREAT ALL T YPES OF PROBLEMS.” —STEVEN PALDER, M.D. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_12.indd 7

|

JULY 2011

23

6/8/11 2:34 PM


ATHLETES HAVE NO MONOPOLY ON ORTHOPEDIC INJURIES—OR ON TREATMENT AT THE SPORTS MEDICINE INSTITUTE DON’T LET THE NAME FOOL YOU. The Saint Peter’s Sports Medicine Institute treats athletics stars, for sure. But it also treats a wide variety of others who have never won crowd applause with a game-winning touchdown or home run. Take, for example, a Rutgers student we’ll call Joe. His victory comes simply in walking normally—after surgery a decade ago that corrected a congenital hip deformity. Three months ago, troubled by joint stiffness and recurrent aches, he began working with the institute’s director, physical therapist Jeff Erickson. “He came to us with a severe limp, but now much of his motion has been

restored, and he’s feeling far less pain,” says Erickson. The 10,000-square-foot facility, located at 562 Easton Avenue, Somerset, accommodates about 200 patients. And yes, some are postoperative professional sports players who’ve undergone shoulder surgery, rotator cuff repairs or surgery to replace a torn knee ligament. But more than 50 percent of patients are ordinary people involved in ordinary activities—many of which become more frequent now that warm weather beckons us all outside. There are dads who’ve strained their backs doing yard work, moms with

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE AT THE SAINT PETER’S SPORTS MEDICINE INSTITUTE, PLEASE CALL 732.565.5455. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

24

JULY 2011

|

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_REV2.indd 8

6/8/11 4:33 PM

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

not just for jocks

repetitive-motion joint pain, teens who’ve pulled a muscle playing catch. “Occasionally we’ll get motor-vehicle accident victims,” says Erickson, “and many people come to us suffering from fibromyalgia [a syndrome that causes long-term joint and muscle soreness] or lower-back problems—which are still the leading cause of pain in America.” Whatever brings you to the Sports Medicine Institute, Christopher Mendler, M.D., its sports medicine physician, can suggest a course of treatment. He may order an X-ray or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging study) to determine the severity of a break or sprain. Depending on the diagnosis, surgery by one of the facility’s three rotating orthopedic surgeons may be prescribed, or rehab with one of its nine physical therapists. Dr. Mendler’s orthopedic training lets him deal with injuries in a very focused way. “Instead of just administering Advil and letting you limp around on a sprained knee for several weeks—after which your muscles could atrophy and your hip and back hurt—the institute provides appropriate specific care right away,” explains Erickson. “For example, treatment could involve immediate surgery and/or stretching exercises designed to prevent future problems.” Every case starts with a 60-minute patient evaluation, followed by a customized 30-minute treatment session. “We don’t follow a cookie-cutter rehabilitation plan, and we provide a lot of one-on-one care,” says Erickson. Recovery times also vary depending on age and circumstance. A physically active teenager with pliable tissue might be back on the football field after just a few weeks, whereas a 50-year-old businessman who spends most days behind a desk might take longer to recuperate. There’s just one universal rule at the Saint Peter’s Sports Medicine Institute: Every patient receives the attention you’d expect to be showered on professional athletes. Says Erickson: “We’ll take anyone with an orthopedic injury and do our best to swiftly find a way to help it heal.” —FRANCESCA MOISIN

BULL’S EYE/IMAGEZOO/GETTY IMAGES

SEASONAL HEALTH


UP CLOSE

A PASSION FOR HELPING

CARLA GUERREIRO HAS A SPECIAL REASON TO AID THE POOR: HER MEMORIES know Carla Guerreiro. For 21 years she’s been a community outreach worker at Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Women’s Ambulatory Care Services, where she helps distribute goods and coordinate social services. A Highland Park mother of one and grandmother of two, Guerreiro, 67, says it is the hospital’s mission—and her own—to provide a helping hand for the needy in the New Brunswick-Somerset area. And she has a special motivation: A half-century ago, she and her family needed a helping hand themselves. Guerreiro grew up in postwar Italy in the northern town of Trento. Her father had spent 12 years in the Italian Army, where his job sometimes entailed carrying wounded comrades back from the front line. For three years, he’d been a prisoner of war. “He would cry when he told the stories,” says Guerreiro. Those postwar years were difficult, as they were for many Europeans. “There was no work, no money, no food,” she recalls. “We were very poor. Many times we went hungry, or the little food we did have had to be divided equally among myself and my three siblings, while my parents went without.” Her father traveled to America in the mid-1950s and in 1958 she, her mother, her two brothers and her sister came to meet him. As they sailed into New York Harbor on March 12 (she still remembers the date), Guerreiro, then 14, was awakened by her mother. “We were sleeping, and she called us to get up to see the Statue of Liberty,” she says. Her dad (“100 pounds lighter than BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

BULL’S EYE/IMAGEZOO/GETTY IMAGES

NEEDY FAMILIES IN OUR AREA

I remembered him,” she recalls) had worked several jobs and saved enough to buy a small house, but illness then incapacitated him for years and her mother had to support the family. On her first day in America, speaking little English, her mom set out to find a clothing factory she’d heard about where the workers all spoke Italian. But when she boarded a bus, she made a mistake—it turned out to be a school bus. The driver asked her to get off, but she refused. “Work, work,” she told him over and over. Finally the driver took her to the factory. “He went 10 miles out of his way to help her,” says Guerreiro.

“WHEN SOMEONE COMES TO ME FOR HELP, I SEE MYSELF AS A LITTLE GIRL.”

found the position at Saint Peter’s, in which she uses a minivan donated by McDonagh Chevrolet to deliver food, clothes and toys, helps connect people with support services and—at the clinic —helps put on Christmas parties and baby showers. “When I was young I often didn’t have food or clothes, so I’m grateful that I can now help others with these things,” says Guerreiro. “When someone comes to me asking for help, I see myself as a little girl in their eyes.” She doesn’t often tell others her story, though. She prefers the quiet sense of satisfaction she gets from fulfilling the hospital’s mission. “I want people to know that Saint Peter’s University Hospital will never turn its back on anyone,” she says. “Our hands are always extended and ready to provide support, compassion and understanding.” —D.L.

— CARL A GUERREIRO

The factory gave her mom a job operating a sewing machine. “Americans were very good to us,” says Guerreiro. “I had great teachers in school who helped me learn English and be happy.” Eventually, her father recovered and found construction work. The family’s lot improved. The children assimilated. They lived the archetypal American immigrant story. Guerreiro became a pattern maker in the fashion industry just as her mother had been. But when her marriage ended in divorce, she decided to make a change. “I believe my destiny was always to help, to give people something they didn’t have,” she says. She

Carla Guerreiro

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

_MID0711_InGoodHealth_REV2.indd 9

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

|

JULY 2011

25

6/8/11 4:33 PM


gatherings at saint peter’s

springtime celebration More than 300 people attended the Saint Peter’s Healthcare System Annual Spring Gala, held April 9 at the Heldrich Center in New Brunswick and themed “A Celebration of Service.” Pictured among the event’s attendees are, from left: Niranjan V. Rao, M.D., chief of vascular surgery at Saint Peter’s University Hospital and president of the Medical Society of New Jersey; James E. Gervasoni Jr., M.D., chief of surgery at Saint Peter’s; Ronald C. Rak, president and CEO of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System; Saroja Ramaprsad, M.D., (Dr. Gervasoni’s wife), and Meena Rao (Dr. Rao’s wife).

Collaborators in care The partnership between doctors and nurses is vital to hospital care 52 weeks a year, but it gets special attention during National Nurses Week in early May. Here Linda Carroll, left, director of professional practice at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, and Sarah Maute, advance practice nurse in the Adult Intensive Care Unit, present the Physician Partnership Award to Carlos Lastra, M.D., pediatric neurologist and medical director of pediatric diagnostic neurology, at an awards ceremony May 11.

“It’s nearly impossible to measure the importance of Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s volunteers, who give so much to the hospital but ask for nothing in return,” says Stacy Siegelaub, manager, volunteer services. More than 200 volunteers were honored for their devotion and length of service to Saint Peter’s at the Volunteer Recognition Brunch April 25. Shown here are, from left, volunteers Virginia Kwiatkowski, Leonida Eng and Daisy Whigan.

For information on upcoming events sponsored by the Saint peter’s Foundation, go to saintpetershcs.com/Foundation.

26

july 2011

|

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_HptlGather_06REV1.indd 1

bashir baskinger/saint peter’s healthcare system (3)

brunch for a helpful bunch

6/10/11 10:15 AM


Currently seeking participants for the following

clinical trials: COMPENSATION PROVIDED FOR TIME AND TRAVEL

• GOUT • HIGH CHOLESTEROL • DIABETES • FLU VACCINE • OPIOID INDUCED CONSTIPATION • NOCTURIA (FREQUENT NIGHT TIME URINATION) • ARTHRITIS • SHINGLES (ZOSTER) VACCINE Study-related medical care & medication are provided at no cost to participants. Health insurance is not required to participate.

Visit our website!

www.accrinc.com

Anderson & Collins Clinical Research, Inc.

1 ETHEL ROAD • SUITE 106 B • EDISON, NJ 08817 732-287-5130 • email: admin@accrinc.com • www.accrinc.com

027_MSHL_JULY11.indd 9

6/10/11 8:54 AM


shop local leader

Ge t ting there

WHITE LOTUS HOME HIGHLAND PARK 431 Raritan Avenue Highland Park, 732.828.2111 whitelotus.net

Marlon Pando in the store’s window display

Handmade bedding? Naturally! Entrepreneur Marlon Pando of White Lotus Home brings “green” values to the marketplace Think about it, says Marlon Pando: You spend one-third of your life in bed. Why not rest easy on natural materials instead of synthetics rife with chemicals? The 37-year-old, Peruvian-born entrepreneur applies this logic—and a philosophy of environmental sustainability—as owner and president of White Lotus Home, a 30-year-old, eco-friendly company that produces handcrafted natural and organic bedding and home furnishings for sale online, at stores across the country and at its own 10,000-square-foot store in its Highland Park headquarters. What’s White Lotus Home all about? I believe we’re the only company in America that actually handcrafts organic mattresses, sheets, pillows and other bedding materials. Others are making them, but I don’t think they’re hand-making them. How long have you been with the company?

Six years. I was born in Peru, where being “green” and recycling were a part of life. Once I became established in corporate America, I wanted to do something where I could go back to my roots. In 2005, I found that opportunity as general manager of White Lotus Home, and 11 months into my new role, I was able to buy the company from the previous owner. I understand White Lotus Home is a good

For one thing, we offer jobs to farmers and college students and they become artisans, which is something that you don’t see much of in America. I think such made-in-America products could be a huge help to the economy. If we become a more selfreliant nation, we’ll be better off.

corporate citizen. How so?

How else do you give back to the commu-

Each year we pick a family in need and make a gift to them—sometimes a mattress, sometimes an entire bedroom. Throughout the year, we’re also involved in a number of fundraisers. For example, we did one last year for victims of the earthquake in Haiti. I’m also the chair-

nity?

28

_MID0711_LocLead_REV2.indd 1

person of Main Street Highland Park’s Economic Revitalization Committee. My focus is to help local businesses thrive and bring more business into the community. Where do you get your raw materials?

We use materials from the U.S. whenever we can. Some materials aren’t yet available from this country, and some may never be. But our organic cotton, organic buckwheat and fabrics are all domestic. Natural and organic materials

How long does it take to make a mattress

Once you know how to do it, it can take an hour and a half to three hours. But it takes one to two months to fully train someone to make a mattress. And an employee trained to make pillows can make between 20 and 50 a day. by hand?

Green Cotton Boulder Firm Mattress with decorative Organic Case Kapok Pillows

How do you help people choose bedding and home furnishing products? We ask them what their goals are with the bedding or furniture they’re buying. Once we know that, we try to offer what makes sense. From a health standpoint, we ask people to consider the many hours they spend sleeping. Once they realize that there are standards out there that allow traditional bedding makers to put more than 100 different chemicals in their bedding, many people say, “Oh, I definitely don’t want that!” So we offer a handful of options for pillows, including natural wool, organic cotton, organic buckwheat and a natural, silky substance harvested from the Ceiba tree called kapok. For mattresses, we use some of those same products as well as things like natural latex.

The 3,200-squarefoot showroom

What explains your personal success?

Besides having an M.B.A. and a lot of experience in entrepreneurship, I also keep my “green” hat on. There are fine entrepreneurs who are mostly into making the sale, and then you’ve got folks who love the environment but aren’t business-savvy. I wear both hats, and I think the combination has helped a lot. —Elizabeth Larner send your ideas for “shop local leader” to shoplocalleader@wainscotmedia.com.

6/8/11 2:30 PM


AT HOME

INSTANT GLAM

1 2

3

4

5

7

6

CHECK OUT JENNIFERMCGEEDESIGN.COM.

_MID0611_AtHome_REV2.indd 1

WE ASKED INTERIOR DESIGNER JENNIFER MCGEE (KNOWN FOR HER FUNCTIONAL YET ELEGANT STYLE) FOR HER FAVORITE FINDS

1 Perk up any piece of furniture with Ikat throw pillows, $450 each, by Madeline Weinrib, available in 76 dif ferent colors and patterns. ABC Carpet & Home, Hackensack, 201.641.3400, madelineweinrib. com. 2 “Floor mirrors are always on my ‘must have’ list,” says McGee. “They add instant glamour and dimension to any room.” Try the Anna mirror, $3,480, from Julian Chichester. It has a bleached oak fretwork frame and an eglomise back. julianchichester.com. 3 In decorating any room, a key element is lighting. “I love the architectural leaf design of the Maize vintage lamp by Arteriors,” says McGee. $1,575 at British Home Emporium, Madison, 973.443.0303. 4 Function meets fashion with heavy-duty indoor and outdoor rugs by Dash and Albert, which are washable and fade-resistant. Shown in a diamond pattern in lighthouse denim and white. Trouvaille, Summit, 908.273.1400. 5 “With this fresh, bright lacquer color, I can’t wait to sit in my garden!” says McGee of this Chippendale curved garden bench by O’Brien Ironworks, $3,900. thewellappointedhouse.com. 6 “There’s nothing like walking into your home and smelling the beautiful scents of lilies, peonies and roses,” says McGee. Place small bouquets around your home in brightly colored vases like the peony vase in Hampton links, $58, by Jill Rosenwald. etsy.com/shop/jillrosenwald. 7 Take classic natural planters like the Devonshire urn from Elegant Earth, and fill them with moss or flowers for an architectural addition to your garden or entryway, suggests McGee. elegantearth.com. —MAUREEN SCULLY

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

|

JULY 2011

29

6/8/11 4:00 PM


Walls in the living room are covered in a fine, oatmealcolored Donghia hemp.

The Natural

_MID0711_HomeFeat_03.indd 1

California sunshine, oce an blues and he alth y living inspire a fresh interior in Ne w Jerse y written By Sallie Brady Interior design by Frank DelleDonne Interiors Produced by Betsy Marx Photography by Peter Margonelli

6/7/11 3:39 PM


31

_MID0711_HomeFeat_03.indd 2

6/7/11 3:39 PM


this page: Sunny yellow walls

redefine the dining room. opposite, clockwise from top left: Polished-nickel

chandeliers illuminate the gallery that runs the length of the living room; The house boasts two leaded glass windows; A reproduction Ushack rug inspired the living room palette.

_MID0711_HomeFeat_03.indd 3

6/7/11 3:40 PM


H

ouse-hunters Jennifer Barr y and her husband, Michael, who lived with their three children in a Hoboken apartment, were determined to find the perfect home in northern New Jersey. When they pulled up to a 1930s Mediterranean revival, their real estate agent said, “This house really reminds me of Pasadena.” “I knew then that we might have to buy this house,” says Jennifer, “because I grew up right near there in San Marino.” The orange hue of the California stucco on the home’s exterior, the small leaded windows and exposed wood beams in the living room and the rounded doorways throughout the house all looked wonderfully familiar to the Golden State native, and it wasn’t long before the family was unpacking boxes. While the couple liked the bones of the 8,000-square-foot house, they felt it needed finishing. They also had to marry their tastes—hers was more traditional, his was more contemporary. They wanted to work with an interior designer, but they didn’t want the house to become stuffy or formal; they preferred to maintain a fresh look that took its cues from nature. “I love being outside by the pool or in the garden,” says Jennifer. “I wanted bright colors to liven up the rooms and a lot of windows to let the sunshine in.” Summit-based designer Frank DelleDonne understood and went to work to interpret the couple’s vision. He started by building up the Mediterranean flavor of the house, adding authentic wainscoting and architectural detailing where it had been lacking. His palette was inspired by coastal landscapes—golden yellow Venetian stucco for the dining room; ocean blues everywhere from the kitchen granite countertop to living room sofas and the powder room; and a delicious ripe cherry for the library to contrast with toasty white oak

33

_MID0711_HomeFeat_REV1.indd 4

6/8/11 3:55 PM


“Just look outside at all of the variations of color in nature—the blues, the greens, the browns. I like to echo that indoors.” — Frank DelleDonne

The 8,000-square-foot Mediterranean Revival. above: The library features a leather herringbone floor and a wingback covered in a bold Manuel Canovas red floral.

walls and the brown leather floor. A very fine oatmeal-colored hemp worked for wall coverings. There was one design element, however, that the designer didn’t dare pursue actively with the Barrys. “Jennifer was terrified of window treatments,” says DelleDonne. “She is from California and wanted maximum natural light.” His solution? Simple silk curtains for the living room. The environmentally-minded couple also wanted to try to use wood from the trees that had to be cleared for the addition to the home. “We wanted to make floorboards, but that didn’t work,” says DelleDonne. “Now we’re going to make a table.” Accustomed to lots of outdoor activity, Jennifer also charged DelleDonne with creating a Mediterranean-style pool area and requested trees such as crape myrtle and Southern magnolia that reminded her of home. “I love being outside,” she says. “I love gardening and always involve the kids. I play tennis every day—even in the winter—and my husband is crazy about running.” “We were really able to redo this house to suit this modern family’s lifestyle,” says DelleDonne. The result brings some of the joys of California right here to northern New Jersey.

34

_MID0711_HomeFeat_REV1.indd 5

6/8/11 3:55 PM


CJPDO-MiddlesexHL-5-2011-OUTLINES-VF.pdf CJPDO-MiddlesexHL-5-2011-OUTLINES-VF.pdf CJPDO-MiddlesexHL-5-2011-OUTLINES-VF.pdf 5/16/11 5/16/11 5/16/11 9:26:07 9:26:07 9:26:07 PM PM PM

Lic.13VH04755300 13VH04755300 Lic.

TOWN & COUNTRY

k i t c h e n a n d b a t h

25 │ www.townandcountrykitchenandbath.com www.townandcountrykitchenandbath.com 25Bridge Bridge Avenue Avenue Suite Suite 100 100 Red Red Bank, Bank, NJ NJ 07701 07701 │ │ 732.345.1441 732.345.1441 │

035_MSHL_JULY11.indd 1

6/10/11 10:40 AM


the rising By Christopher Hann

The Wonder Bar, a popular venue for live music

36

july 2011

|

Sonja O’Brien is something of a walking billboard for the revival of Asbury Park. She and her husband were living in Montclair when they bought an investment property in the one-square-mile seaside city 11 years ago. They took a year to restore it, but then a funny thing happened. They fell in love with Asbury Park, sold their home in Montclair and moved into their beach house. “We really love being in this town,” says O’Brien, a local real estate agent. “It’s got a great edge and a great vibe. People are authentic here, and they really live life to the fullest.” Named for Francis Asbury, the first bishop of the American Methodist church, Asbury Park was laid out near the end of the 19th century as a Christian resort. Through the first half of the 20th century, the city mostly thrived. But when it fell, it fell hard. White flight. Urban decay. Municipal corruption. By the 1990s, Asbury Park had become a place to avoid. But the city is making a comeback. In the decade since O’Brien moved, funky shops opened on the once-moribund boardwalk and in the compact business district. A sizable gay

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_Asbury_REV3.indd 1

6/9/11 9:21 AM

top three: courtesy of asbury galleria. bottom left: michael hynes/mikeyhynes@gmail.com. bottom right: dennis carroll/denniscarrollphoto.com

Down-at-the-heels just a fe w ye ars ago, Asbury Park is, at long l ast, lovable

top: michael hynes/mikeyhynes@gmail.com. bottom: dennis carroll/denniscarrollphoto.com

In its heyday, this old structure called the Casino included a skating rink.


for more information

apboardwalk.com asbur yboardwalk.com asbur ypark.net asbur yparkchamber.com cit yofasbur ypark.com

top three: courtesy of asbury galleria. bottom left: michael hynes/mikeyhynes@gmail.com. bottom right: dennis carroll/denniscarrollphoto.com

top: michael hynes/mikeyhynes@gmail.com. bottom: dennis carroll/denniscarrollphoto.com

Convention Hall, the Paramount Theatre and the Grand Arcade were designed by architects Warren and Wetmore, who also designed New York City’s Grand Central Terminal.

The top of the carousel house

community pioneered the renovation of the Victorian housing stock. New boutique hotels and B&Bs appeared, and established restaurateurs made the same leap of faith. And in a city long known for its music scene—and regular Bruce Springsteen sightings—cultural life flourished. “I knew it would get better,” O’Brien says. “It was the last undeveloped shore town on the Eastern Seaboard, 50 miles from one of the greatest cities in the world and surrounded by million-dollar towns. So it was only a matter of time.” For O’Brien, as for the rest of the city’s loyal chorus of boosters, that time is now, as Asbury Park has become the surprise success story of the Jersey Shore. There’s plenty of work still to be done, but the mile-long boardwalk has been reborn, with new restaurants, retail shops, a miniature golf course, a water park, a pinball museum and the renovation of the 130,000-square-foot Convention Hall. The boardwalk’s resurrection is being overseen by Madison Marquette, a property management company that took ownership in 2006. Oakland resident Gary Mattola, the company’s president, says future development along the boardwalk,

including the Casino building at its southern end, will depend largely on the pace of residential and commercial development elsewhere along the waterfront. “If you look across Ocean Avenue,” Mattola says, “you see that we on the entertainment side have gotten way ahead of the residential and commercial side.” “I made the leap of faith, and I’m so glad I did,” says Mike Buess, who owns Bodega Shoppe on the boardwalk, which sells a colorful mix of gifts, clothing and jewelry. Buess moved his store from downtown Red Bank three summers ago, then sold his home in Ocean Grove and bought another in Asbury Park. He walks to work in seven minutes, and this summer he plans to hire his first employee. Buess is among a hardy breed of entrepreneurs who have been vital to Asbury Park’s resuscitation: Mike Sodano opened the Showroom, an art-house theater, on Cookman Avenue downtown; Howard Raczkiewicz and Luke Magliaro moved their already successful restaurant, Moonstruck, from Ocean Grove to an elegant three-story home on Lake Avenue; Tim McLoone created two restaurants in the old Howard Johnson’s on the

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_Asbury_REV3.indd 2

|

july 2011

37

6/9/11 9:21 AM


The Arcade connecting Convention Hall and the Paramount Theatre

Asbury Park’s makeover has included the appearance of new hotels and B&Bs and the renovation of old ones. A sampling: Hotel Tides, 408 Seventh Ave., 732.897.7744, hoteltides.com This 20-room boutique hotel in a century-old building is open for its third season. In-season rates start at $140; two-day stay required on weekends.

Bodega Shoppe

Asbury Ocean Beach Inn, 404 Asbury Ave., 732.539.8440, asburyoceanbeachinn.com Built in 1895, the newly renovated inn offers four suites that come with a nighttime snack and made-toorder breakfast. In-season rates start at $250; weekly rates also available.

The boardwalk

The Empress Hotel, 101 Asbury Ave., 732.774.0100, asburyempress.com Just across the street from the boardwalk, the Empress has 100 rooms, an ample pool, and (on weekends) a lively nightclub. In-season rates start at $159; oceanside rooms start at $229. Mikell’s Big House Bed and Breakfast, 405 Fourth Ave., 732.869.0988, mikellsbighouse.com The Victorian-era home of a local bank president, Mikell’s comes with mid-century modern décor, a library, a dining room, an art collection and a wraparound porch. In-season rates start at $160; the “Gigantic Suite,” with wet bar, full-length fridge and private deck, starts at $250. The Berkeley Oceanfront Hotel, 1401 Ocean Ave., 732.776.6700, berkeleyhotelnj.com The granddaddy of local inns, the eight-story Berkeley is in the midst of a renovation that has included the opening of the Dauphine Grille, its new in-house restaurant. In-season rates start at $149.

from top to bottom: courtesy of bodega shoppe, shutterstock, SRS photography/srsphotographer.com, shutterstock, amy mills, courtesy of langosta lounge, courtesy of watermark

If You’re Staying...

Langosta Lounge Fireworks on the beach entertain revelers every Wednesday in July and August.

The upscale bar The Watermark hovers above the boardwalk.

boardwalk; and Marilyn Schlossbach and her partners opened a surf shop, a skate shop and four restaurants. In the past year alone, two new music clubs have opened downtown. The Shore Institute for Contemporary Arts, long based in Long Branch, is planning to move to Asbury Park later this year. And this summer’s schedule of events ranges from weekly fireworks on the beach to women’s roller derby to daily concerts at clubs such as the legendary Stone Pony and, a few blocks north on Ocean Avenue, the Wonder Bar, where both Springsteen and Southside Johnny Lyon performed unannounced at a concert in April. O’Brien says she happened to be there when the Boss and Southside climbed onstage. It was just another fortuitous event in a city that, these days, is full of surprises.

38

_MID0711_Asbury_REV3.indd 3

To share this article with a friend, visit middlesexhealthandlife.com.

6/9/11 9:21 AM


PREVIEWS

TM

NG LOCAL LUXURY LIVI AN INSIDE LOOK AT

SUMMER 2008

12 PAGES of premier properties

POWDER ROOMS

with panache

HOW ONE MAN’S CASTLE became a movie set

WHERE TO EAT

A local dining guide

EUROPEAN ANCE ELEGlls

MENTION OR BRING THIS AD AND GET FOLLOWING GREAT DEALS (OFFER EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30, 2011):

in Far Hi

• 15% OFF ALL LASER HAIR REMOVAL SERVICES • 50% OFF ON “SLIM-DOWN” & DETOXIFICAION • BUY ANY PACKAGE OF LASER HAIR REMOVAL SERVICE AND GET A FREE FACIAL ON US!!

To receive a complimentary copy,* please call 847.763.9525 or email nyspacesrequests@wainscotmedia.com.

• BUY ANY PACKAGE OF OUR FAMOUS MICROPEEL (“facials with results”), AND WE WILL GIVE YOU A PROFESSIONAL GRADE SUNBLOCK ABSOLUTELY FREE!!

Also view it online at NEWYORKSPACESMAG.com 1 1 4 0 S T E LT O N R O A D # 1 0 2 • P I S C ATA W AY, N J 0 8 8 5 4

* $2 POSTAGE CHARGE WILL APPLY.

PreviewPR1-4P0908FM1.indd 1 039_MSHL_JULY11.indd 1

7 3 2 • 7 7 7 • 9 5 7 7 • W W W . A N A R A M E D S PA . C O M

7/31/08 12:00:07 PM 6/9/11 11:46 AM


tastes

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: This classic

cheese board features Morbier, with its distinctive streak of ash running through the middle; Tymsboro, an ash-covered pyramid; Barkham Blue; charcoal crackers; the bloomyrinded Waterloo; and fresh figs.

local cheese shops A&G Italian fine Foods 6 Mar ket St., Plainsboro 6 0 9.275.9 0 9 0, agfinefoods.com Cranberry’s Gourmet Café 10 Cedar brook D r., Cranbur y 609.655.0134, cranberrysgourmet.com Pino’s Fruit Basket Shoppe and Wine Cellar 13 N. Four th Ave., Highland Par k 732.247.5421, pinosshop.com The Rafferty Gourmet 10 6 A lbany St., New Br unswick 732.628.0565, raffertygourmet.com

nearby dairy farms

Take a road trip to one of the se dair y far ms for a close r look at how che e se is made. Bobolink Dairy & Bakery 369 Stamets Rd., Milford, N.J. 9 08.864.7277, cowsoutside.com Cherry Grove Farm 320 0 Main St. (Route 20 6) L awre nceville, N.J. 609.219.0053, cherrygrovefarm.com Rainbeau Ridge 49 David’s Way, Bedford Hills, N.Y. 914.234.2197, rainbeauridge.com Valley Shepherd Creamery 50 Fair mount Rd., Long Valley, N.J. 9 08.976.320 0, valleyshepherd.com

Cheese 101 A comprehensive overview of cheese and its cl assic combinations

on T YPES OF CHEESE In my view, the consistency of a cheese and the presence or absence of rind are the easiest ways to categorize cheese, together with how strong the flavor is. Here are seven key varieties: YOUNG, UNRINDED Young goat and sheep cheeses dominate this popular style. When they’re first made, they’re light and moussey, just formed into a small flat disc or cylinder. A few days on they can be

40

july 2011

|

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_Tastes_REV1.indd 1

crumbled, and a week or so later, sliced. After a month on they will have acquired a protective greyish coating of mold, often described as a “natural rind.” Better-known ones are the pyramid-shaped Valençay and Tymsboro, and the herb-coated Perroche cheeses. Other well-known examples are mozzarella and mascarpone. SEMI-SOFT Unlike other cheeses, Bries and Camembert, which are also known as

semi-soft cheeses, get softer as they age rather than firmer and drier. HARD How hard must a hard cheese be? Some experts consider only rock-hard crystalline cheeses such as Parmigiano Reggiano truly hard, but most of us would include cheeses that were cut from big wheels such as cheddar or Gruyère. VERY HARD CHEESES These are the oldest cheeses you’re likely to find—cheeses

so hard they’ve become almost crystalline and need to be shaved or grated rather than sliced. The best-known type is Parmesan or Parmigiano Reggiano, but matured Grana Padano and Pecorino (also from Italy), Sbrinz from Switzerland, Roomano from Holland and Vella Dry Jack from California are similar. WASHED-RIND These are described as washed-rinded because the surface of the cheese is rubbed with a brine

text © Fiona Beckett and photography © Loupe Images/Richard Jung

Overwhelmed by the dizzying array of varieties offered at your local cheese store? Don’t worry—help has arrived. In her book Fiona Beckett’s Cheese Course, author Beckett, an award-winning British food and wine writer, demystifies cheese and offers wisdom on the classic cheese board and the best pairings. Here, an excerpt:

6/8/11 2:47 PM


text © Fiona Beckett and photography © Loupe Images/Richard Jung

(salt water) solution, which promotes the growth of a bacterium which breaks down the texture of the cheese, turning it soft and pliable. Well-known examples are Epoisses, Langres, Munster and Reblochon from France, Chimay from Belgium, Appenzell from Switzerland and Stinking Bishop from England. BLOOMY-RINDed This term refers to the downy white surface these cheeses acquire as they mature. Some bloomy-rinded cheeses are exceptionally rich and creamy thanks to the addition of cream during the cheesemaking process. Referred to as double- and triple-creme cheeses, they’re popular in France, which produces some of the most indulgent examples—Explorateur, Brillat Savarin and PierreRobert among them. BLUE Cheeses develop their blue veining when a harmless penicillin mold is added to the milk or curds. Once the cheese is formed, fine steel needles are inserted to expose the center to oxygen, which enables the mold to spread throughout. Favorites include Gorgonzola, Roquefort, Stilton and Cashel Blue. On cheese boards The classic approach is to aim for a contrast of textures, tastes and shapes. Mild to strong, rounds and wedges, light against dark, soft and hard—it’s an aesthetic impact as much as a gustatory one. A classic selection would be a young, fresh-tasting goat cheese, a white or bloomyrinded cheese such as a Brie or a Camembert, a hard cheese like a cheddar and a blue such as a Stilton. You could also add a washed-rind cheese, a sheep cheese or a cheese flavored with herbs. What I like to do is create a miniature cheese board for two. You could have two goat cheese buttons, two wedges

of Camembert or other whiterinded cheese, two slices of Beaufort and two radicchio leaves topped with a spoonful of a soft blue cheese such as Gorgonzola or Cashel Blue. Perch two small pots of fruit compote or chutney alongside or a couple of shots of grape jelly, add a few grapes or a couple of fresh figs, some small home-baked rolls or precut slices of raisin bread and some rustic artisanal breadsticks, and you’ve got a very pretty-looking board indeed. On bread In general, softer and sliced breads are better with harder, sliced cheeses and crustier breads like baguettes and ciabatta with soft or semi-soft cheeses. Try Scandinavian-style crispbreads with mild, semi-soft cheeses like Havarti; seeded, crisp flatbreads with creamy cow, goat or sheep cheeses; breadsticks with mozzarella; a baguette with Brie and Camembert; sourdough bread with all kinds of cheeses, particularly washed-rind cheeses and hard sheep cheeses; mixed-grain bread with cheddar, Cheshire and Lancashire; light rye with alpine cheeses such as Beaufort and Comté; darker ryes with creamy, spreadable cheeses. OTHER PAIRINGS In summer, take advantage of the wealth of fresh fruit and vegetables to show off your cheeses. Also, don’t be afraid to introduce a touch of spice. Chili peppers and garlic work well with cheese. One idea: Serve thinly sliced sheep cheese with grilled peppers and almonds as a mini tapas plate with a glass of fino sherry, or do as the Basques do and serve it with a cherry compote and a glass of fruity red wine. Or plate up individual ploughman’s platters with a good chunk of cheddar, some thickly carved ham, a dollop of chutney, an apple and some crusty bread.

hard

young, unrinded

blue semi-soft

bloomy-rinded washed-rind

very hard

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_Tastes_05indd.indd 2

|

july 2011

41

6/7/11 3:38 PM


power food

Fig Fancy

The ancients were onto something: This delicate fruit packs a nutrient-rich punch did you know? Figs were among the first plants to be grown by humans. Believed to have originated in the ancient Sumerian and Assyrian cultures in Asia, they were then spread by Phoenicians and Greeks to other parts of Europe and the African coast. Fig trees were considered sacred by Greeks, Italians, Egyptians and Southeast Asians— they were presented to Olympic athletes in place of medals at the first games and are the most mentioned fruit in the Bible. American settlers brought figs westward to California during the

Gold Rush in the 19th century, and today that state produces 100 percent of the United States’ dried figs and 99 percent of commercially available fresh figs.

powers Packed with nutrients and interesting properties, figs have myriad health benefits and practical uses. They have the highest fiber content of any common fruit or vegetable—just one-quarter cup of dried figs provides 5 grams of fiber, or 20 percent of the daily recommended value. Figs also contain generous helpings of iron, calcium, potassium and polyphenol antioxidants, which can help battle neurodegenerative and cardiovascular issues. Psoralen, a chemical found in figs, has been used for centuries to combat skin pigmentation diseases, and the fruit also contains a natural humectant that enhances the moisture in baked goods and helps them stay fresh longer.

buy · store · grow Our regional climate is not ideal for growing figs, but determined gardeners can do it. Plant in well-drained soil adjacent to southfacing walls protected from wind, and wrap in burlap from November through March, says Lana Dimidjian of Perennial Plantings Inc. in Englewood. When buying figs, look for fruit that is rich in color, plump and soft (but not mushy) and smells slightly sweet, not sour. Fig fanciers can also opt for dried figs, which have a shelf life of six months when they remain unopened or one month when opened. Store in a pantry or cabinet where the temperature is constant— exposure to fluctuations in temperature can increase “sugaring,” the development of a white crystalline coating on the fruit. Though the coating doesn’t alter the quality, it can be rinsed off under hot water if it’s undesirable. —Kelley Granger

recipe

grilled fig salad This salad incorporates varied flavors: sweet, salty, pungent and even a little sour. It’s perfect for a night when the grill is already fired up. Courtesy of Whole Foods Market. Serves 4

ingredients 4 large fresh Black Mission or Calimyrna figs 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 
 2 to 3 teaspoons dark brown sugar 
 1 ⁄8 teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 2 to 3 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 
 ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard 
 Sea salt, to taste 
 Ground pepper, to taste 
 8 cups mixed salad greens Snip the tiny stem end off each fig and cut in half lengthwise. Mix vinegar, brown sugar and cinnamon together in a medium bowl. Add figs and gently toss to coat. Let marinate while you heat a grill (indoor or outdoor). If necessary, coat your grill with a little olive oil. When ready, grill the figs, reserving all of the marinade in the bowl, for about 2 to 3 minutes per side or until grill marks appear. Do not overcook as the figs will become mushy. Remove figs to a plate. To the reserved marinade add olive oil, lemon juice, mustard, salt and pepper, whisking well to incorporate. Place greens in a large salad bowl. Toss with dressing, then divide among four individual serving plates. Place two fig halves on each plate of greens and serve.

42

_MID0711_Power_09REV1.indd 1

to see more fig recipes or share your own, visit middlesexhealthandlife.com.

shutterstock

preparation

6/8/11 2:30 PM


where toeat f i n e

AVENEL

c a s ua l

fa m i ly

JAMESBURG

BUD’S HUT Casual dining featuring seafood and steak, 906 Route 1 North, 732.634.5530

FIDDLEHEADS American fine dining, Sunday brunch served, 27 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.0878

the OLD BAY RESTAURANT Contemporary French dining, 61 Church St., 732.246.3111

CARTERET

MARIA’S Family-friendly traditional Mexican restaurant, 194 Buckelew Ave., 732.656.9722

SPICE’IN Contemporary Indian cuisine, 371 George St., 732.247.1177

KENDALL PARK

VERDIGRE Eclectic dining with tapas bar, 25 Liberty St., 732.247.2250

CHATEAU MADRID Spanish and Portuguese fare, 8 Holly St., 732.969.0692 JULIAN’S American steak house with seafood options, 1000 Roosevelt Ave., 732.541.9500

COLONIA

LUSO bbq American and Portuguese BBQ, 330 Inman Ave., 732.499.0455

CRANBURY

CRANBURY INN Traditional American dining, 21 S. Main St., 609.655.5595 CRANBURY PIZZA Casual Italian pizzeria, 63 N. Main St., 609.409.9930 ZINNA’S BISTRO Casual Italian fare, BYO, 1275 S. River Rd., 609.860.9600

DAYTON

DUSAL’S Casual Italian seafood and pizza eatery, 3300 Route 27, 732.821.9711 SHOGUN 27 Hibachi steak house with sushi bar, 3376 Route 27, 732.422.1117

KINGSTON

ENO TERRA Italian seafood, homemade pasta, extensive wine list, 4484 Kings’ Hwy., 609.497.1777 OSTERIA PROCACCINI Quaint Italian restaurant with organic and sustainable produce, 4428 Route 27 North, 609.688.0007

METUCHEN

ANTONIO’S BRICK OVEN PIZZA Traditional Italian pizzeria, 453 Main St., 732.603.0008

FUJI Japanese hibachi and sushi, 485 Georges Rd., 732.274.8830

MAIN STREET TRATTORIA Upscale Italian cuisine, 413 Main St., 732.589.7141

LA TAVERNA Cozy traditional Italian dining, 375 Georges Rd., 732.274.2200

THE ORCHID Fine kosher dining, 455 Main St., 732.321.9829

EAST BRUNSWICK

SPICE MéLANGE Upscale Indian eatery, 419 Main St., 732.906.9050

CASA NOVA 68 Traditional Italian fare, 68 Ryders Ln., 732.246.1888

EDISON

CAFÉ GALLO Family-style Italian dining, 1153 Inman Ave., 908.756.5752

MIDDLESEX

CARPACCIO Southern Italian fare, 651 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.3242

MILLTOWN

NORTH BRUNSWICK

ARTHUR’S Steak house & pub Traditional American steak house, 644 Georges Rd., 732.828.1117 THE RUSTY NAIL Contemporary American eatery, 1609 Route 130, 732.821.4141

OLD BRIDGE

BIG ED’S BBQ American Tex-Mex BBQ, 305 Route 34, 732.583.2626 PONTE VECCHIO Classic Italian fare with seafood options, 3863 Route 516 East, 732.607.1650

PERTH AMBOY

THE BARGE Waterfront restaurant featuring steak and seafood dishes, 201 Front St., 732.442.3000

PISCATAWAY

AL DENTE Traditional Italian eatery, 1665 Stelton Rd., 732.985.8220 CHAND PALACE Family-friendly Indian restaurant, 1296 Centennial Ave., 732.465.1474 midori Authentic Japanese dining, 1392 Centennial Ave., 732.981.9300

PLAINSBORO

LOUCáS Upscale American and Italian fare, 9 Lincoln Hwy. #9A, Colonial Village Center, 732.549.8580

FRESCO Seafood and steak fare, prix fixe menu, 210 Ryders Ln., 732.246.7616

CASA ROSARIA’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE Classic Italian food with modern American influences, 607 Plainsboro Rd., 609.799.9009

MEEMAH Casual Chinese and Malaysian cuisine, 9 Lincoln Hwy. #27, Colonial Village Center, 732.906.2223

TOMATO FACTORY Family-friendly Italian fare, BYO, 264 Ryders Ln., 732.249.1199

CROWN OF INDIA Authentic Indian cuisine, 660 Plainsboro Rd., 609.275.5707

MING Vegetarian-friendly pan-Asian fare, 1655 Oak Tree Rd. #185, 732.549.5051

MONMOUTH JUNCTION

PIERRE’S Fine international dining with awardwinning wine list, 582 Georges Rd., 732.329.3219

EAST Asian fusion fare with bubble tea bar, 5 Market St., 609.750.3278

MOGHUL Fine Indian cuisine, 1655 Oak Tree Rd. #195, 732.549.5050 PENANG Malaysian and Thai eater y with a sushi bar, 505 Old Post Rd., 732.287.3038

FORDS

MCLOONE’S WOODBRIDGE GRILLE Traditional American bar food, 3 Lafayette Rd., 732.512.5025 VILLA BORGHESE Traditional Italian fare with modern twists, 432 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.0666

SENS ASIAN Far East fusion cuisine, 4095 Route 1 South #28, 732.355.1919

MONROE

GARVEY’S pub Family-friendly American eatery, 405 Spotswood Gravel Hill Rd., 732.521.3311 LA VILLA Casual Italian dining, 335 Applegarth Rd., 609.655.3338

NEW BRUNSWICK

SAYREVILLE

SPANISH RIVIERA Spanish and Mediterranean fare, 1776 Route 35 North, 732.316.1500

SOUTH AMBOY

COSTA VERDE Portuguese and Spanish cuisine featuring fresh seafood, 6039 Route 35 South, 732.727.7070

SOUTH PLAINFIELD

ADELINES RiSTORANTE Casual northern Italian dining, 2243 Hamilton Blvd., 908.755.8520

2FIFTY4 Saint Peter’s University Hospital restaurant, offering healthy dishes and vegetarian options for breakfast, lunch and dinner, 254 Easton Ave., 732.745.8600, ext. 7773

FLANAGAN’S American and Irish pub fare, 2501 Plainfield Ave., 908.757.1818

MIDORI SUSHI Asian fusion with sushi bar, 237 Raritan Ave., 732.246.4511

CARIBBEAN CAFÉ Cuban eatery, 85 Bayard St., 732.846.2620

KRAKOWIAK Casual Polish restaurant, BYO, 42 Main St., 732.238.0433

PAD THAI INC. Vegetarian-friendly Thai eater y, 217 Raritan Ave., 732.247.9636

DUE MARI PESCE E VINOTECA Modern Italian food featuring fresh, local and seasonal ingredients, 78 Albany St., 732.296.1600

RIA-MAR Traditional Portuguese fare, 25 Whitehead Ave., 732.257.1100

THE FROG & THE PEACH American fare with a focus on fresh ingredients, 29 Dennis St., 732.846.3216

CHRIS MICHAEL’S STEAKHOUSE Seafood, steak and sushi bar, 40 Oakwood Ave., 732.634.5355

HIGHL AND PARK

PITHARI TAVERNA Greek and Mediterranean seafood fare, 28 Woodbridge Ave., 732.572.0616

ISELIN

SOUTH RIVER

WOODBRIDGE

CASA GiuSEPPE Southern Italian fare, 487 Route 27, 732.283.9111

KAIRO kafe Casual Greek dining, 49 Bayard St., 732.545.2476

J.J. BITTING BREWING CO. Traditional American fare, 33 Main St., 732.634.2929

URBAN SPICE Authentic Indian fine dining, 42 Marconi Ave., 732.283.1043

MARITA’S CANTINA Classic Mexican fare, 1 Penn Plaza, 732.247.3840

MULBERRY STREET RESTAURANT Italian seafood eatery, 739 Rahway Ave., 732.634.4699

middlesexHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_WTE_REV1.indd 1

|

july 2011

43

6/8/11 2:24 PM


wine + spirits

Three tast y ways to toast the season—and ple ase your conscience too After an apparently never-ending winter and a spring heavily coated in pollen, summer is finally in full swing, and we’ll drink to that. Break out your blenders, shakers, pitchers and ice for a trio of refreshing and rejuvenating summer drinks. Here’s to your health!

44

july 2011

|

© Loupe Images/William Lingwood

Healthy Summer Sips

top: © Loupe Images/William Lingwood. bottom: © Loupe Images/Debi Treloar

Flavor-infused vodka mixed with sparkling water or club soda is a tasty way to avoid excess calories.

Waist Watcher: Me yer Lemon Spritzer Yes, you can have a drink without all the guilt that comes with indulging during swimsuit season. Just skip the fattening mixers, syrups, sodas and sugared rims. You can cut almost 100 calories, for example, just by turning your rum and Coke into a rum and Diet Coke. But why not be a bit more imaginative? Omit the mixer altogether and mix a flavorinfused vodka with sparkling water or club soda for a refreshing cocktail you won’t be disappointed in. Makes 1 drink

ingredients 2 ounces Charbay Meyer lemon vodka Club soda Ice Lemon twist for garnish

preparation

Fill a Collins glass with ice, add the vodka, top off with the club soda. Garnish with the lemon twist and serve. If you want to cut the calories even further, simply think “portion control” and cut this recipe in half, serving the chilled ingredients in a champagne flute.

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_Wine_REV4.indd 1

6/8/11 3:58 PM


wine + spirits Heart-Healthy: Pomegranate Margarita

top: © Loupe Images/William Lingwood. bottom: © Loupe Images/Debi Treloar

Pomegranate does a body good. Whether it’s for preventing or slowing cancers or lowering your blood pressure, this juice makes for a healthy choice when ordering from the bar. It boasts antioxidant benefits (the compounds help you ward off cell-damaging free radicals) and aids in lowering bad cholesterol. In moderation, this cocktail’s a heart-smart choice. Makes 4 to 5 drinks ingredients 3 cups ice 4 ounces silver tequila 2 ounces triple sec ¾ cup pomegranate juice Juice of 1 lime Lime wedges for garnish Kosher salt, optional

preparation

Pomegranates boast high levels of vitamin C, potassium and antioxidants.

In a blender, combine all the ingredients except the salt and lime wedges. Blend until evenly combined and the ice is a slushy consistency. Serve in margarita glasses and garnish with a lime wedge. For a salted rim, press the flesh part of the lime wedge around the rim of the glass. Then dip the glass into a shallow plate with salt. (Of course, doctors recommend lowering salt intake for heart health.)

Antioxidant Boost: Green Tea and Ginger Martini

© Loupe Images/William Lingwood

Green tea has long been loved for its ability to fight heart disease, cancer and strokes, thanks to its antioxidants. Ginger has its own health benefits such as aiding in digestion and easing muscle cramping and headaches. Together, the green tea and ginger are perfect for summer sipping.

The antioxidants in this martini may help prevent disease, and the ginger aids digestion.

Makes 4 drinks ingredients ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated ½ cup granulated white sugar 1 cup water 12 ounces vodka 1 cup green tea, chilled Ice

preparation

In a small saucepan combine the ginger, sugar and water. Bring to a simmer and cook until it has reduced by ¹⁄ 3 . Remove from the heat and chill. In a cocktail shaker filled with ice, combine the vodka, green tea and ginger syrup. Shake and strain into four martini glasses. —Maureen C. Petrosky

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_Wine_REV4.indd 2

|

july 2011

45

6/8/11 4:12 PM


thingstodo au g u s t

s e p t e m b e r

See the expressive woodblock prints of artist Idaherma Williams, starting May 15.

by the Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick to view the remarkable exhibition An American Printmaker in an Age of Progress by the Hungarian-American artist Jolán Gross-Bettelheim. This exhibition showcases the artist’s rare prints of industrial scenes, technology and machinery. Museum hours: 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Tickets: free for members, Rutgers University students, children under 18, faculty and staff with a valid I.D. and everyone on the first Sunday of each month; $6 for adults; $5 for seniors over 65. To learn more, call 732.932.7237 or visit zimmerlimu seum.rutgers.edu.

Mar 19–Dec 31Learn

about and view vintage clothing, accessories and household heirlooms at the East Brunswick Museum exhibit Through the Looking Glass. Free admission. Call 732.257.1508 or visit eastbrunswickmuseum.org for additional information.

May 15–Sept 10

Enjoy an artistic and cultural exhibi-

46

july 2011

|

tion by the talented Idaherma Williams called Joy in Watercolor and Woodblock Prints at the Museum of the American Hungarian Foundation in New Brunswick. Williams combines Eastern and Western traditions in her woodblock prints and showcases vibrant colors in her watercolor pieces. Admission: $5 donation . Call 732.846.5777 or visit ahfoundation. org for additional information.

Jul 10 Head to the State The-

atre in New Brunswick for a heartpumping performance by the legendary singer/songwriter Rick Springfield, 7 p.m. And to start the night off right, The Squirts will be opening for Springfield. Tickets: $20–$105 . To learn more, call 732.246.7469 or visit statetheatrenj.org.

Jul 11–15, Aug 8–12

Sign your child up for the weeklong Rutgers Gardens Exploration Camp at Rutgers University in New Brunswick. The program gives children the opportunity to learn about the natural world through fun hands-on activities, projects, games, guest speakers and more. Full-day admission: $275 for members, $300

for nonmembers. Half-day admission: $200 for members, $225 for nonmembers. Sign up early to get a discount! To learn more, call 732.932.8451 or visit rutgersgardens. rutgers.edu.

Jul 12 Get ready to tee off at

the Monroe Education Foundation’s 16th annual Golf Outing at Forsgate Country Club in Monroe Township, 8 a.m. Besides great golf, enjoy delicious food and prizes throughout the day. Tickets: $200 per golfer. A special parent/child package is available for $250 . Call 732.561.4747 or visit monroeedfoun dation.org to learn more.

Jul 12 For one night only,

Grammy Award-winners Huey Lewis and the News will honor Memphis soul with the Soulsville Tour at the State Theatre in New Brunswick, 8 p.m. Enjoy classics such as “The Power of Love,” “Stuck with You,” “Doing It All For My Baby,” “(Too) Hip to be Square,” “Back In Time” and many more. Tickets: $25–$75 . For more information, call 732.246.7469 or visit statethe atrenj.org.

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_ThingsToDo_REV1_.indd 1

6/8/11 2:30 PM

courtesy of QuickChek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning

MaR 19–Jul 31Stop

Enjoy food and prizes at the Golf Outing at Forsgate Country Club, July 12.

left: Idaherma Williams exhibition. right: Martin Tremarco Photography

j u ly


things to do

Jul 13–23

The whole family will enjoy entertainment under the stars with the “Plays in the Park” production of Hairspray, the hit musical that inspired a major motion picture, at Roosevelt Park in Edison, 8:30 p.m., Mondays through Saturdays. Tickets: $6 for adults, $5 for seniors 60 and over, free for children 12 and under. Call 732.548.2884 or visit playsin thepark.com for additional information.

Jul 23

Take a trip down memory lane with Glen Burtnik & Friends as they perform their Jersey Beatles Bash, with songs from Revolver on the album’s 45th anniversary, at the State Theatre in New Brunswick, 8 p.m. Songs include “Eleanor Rigby,” “Got to Get You into My Life,” “Taxman,” “Tomorrow Never Knows,” “Yellow Submarine” and more. Tickets: $20–$45 . Call 732.246.7469 or visit statetheatrenj.org to learn more.

Jul 29–30

Take the kids to see the Annual Conservatory Concert “new voices of 2011”: i’ll Take Manhattan, at the Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn. You’ll enjoy a night of entertainment with this musical review, which showcases 120 of the state’s most talented young performers. Showtimes: 7:30 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets: $22.50–$42.50 . To find out more, call 973.376.4343 or visit papermill.org.

courtesy of QuickChek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning

left: Idaherma Williams exhibition. right: Martin Tremarco Photography

Jul 29–31

Experience a one-of-a-kind event at the 29th annual QuickChek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning at the Solberg Airport in Readington. Take flight in one of 125 balloons, be amazed as Jennifer the Cannon Lady shoots out of the 27-foot barrel of a truckmounted cannon, hear various groups in concert including Barenaked Ladies, Disney’s Mitchel Musso and Meat Loaf, participate in a 5K, watch the spectacular fireworks show, visit more than 200 crafters and vendors and more! General Admission: $17–$30 for adults, $7–$15 for children, free for children ages three and under. Call 973.882.5464 or visit balloonfestival. com to find out more.

Aug 1–7

Perfect for the entire family, the Middlesex County Fair at the intersection of Cranbury Road and Fern Road in East Brunswick offers a fun-filled day, complete with rides, games, contests, mouth-watering food, free shows, shopping and fireworks (on August 2). Fair hours: 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday. Admission: $6 for adults, $4 for seniors 65 and older, $1 for children ages 3–12, free for children under 3. For additional information, call 732.257.8858 or visit middlesexcountyfair.org.

Aug 3–13

Edison’s outdoor theater company “Plays in the Park” will per form Godspell, a play based on the gospel according to St. Matthew and filled with well-known songs like “Day by Day,” at Roosevelt Park. Shows begin at 8:30 p.m, Mondays through Saturdays. Tickets: $6 for adults, $5 for seniors 60 and over, free for children 12 and under. Call 732.548.2884 or visit playsinthepark. com for additional information.

Aug 11–13

According to Chris Rock, “If Steven Wright, Mos Def and Dave Chappelle had a baby, that would be disgusting, but he would sound like Hannibal Buress. The funniest young comic I’ve seen in years.” Get your laugh on with Buress at Stress Factory Comedy Club in New Brunswick, 8 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $20 . For more information, call 732.545.HAHA (4242) or visit stressfactory.com.

tem’s Annual Golf Classic at The Ridge at Back Brook in Ringoes. Registration and brunch begin at 9 a.m., followed by a shotgun start at 11 a.m. and a reception and dinner at 5 p.m. Tickets: $750 per golfer. For more information, call 732.745.8542 or visit saintpetershcs.com.

Sept 24

Take advantage of this opportunity to visit Thomas Edison National Historic Park in West Orange free on National Public Lands Day! Once inside, stop in the recently opened laboratory complex, explore the Glenmont estate and take in a ranger-led program, such as a tour of the chemistry building and a phonograph demonstration. To learn more, call 973.736.0550, ext. 11, or visit nps.gov/edis/index.htm.

Send event listings to: Middlesex Health & Life, 110 S u m m i t Ave n u e, Mo nt va l e, NJ 076 4 5 ; o r e-mail us at thingstodo@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Community Calendar at middlesexhealthandlife.com.

Sept 3

Join one of today’s most widely celebrated country music superstars, Trace Adkins, at the Starland Ballroom in Sayreville, 7 p.m. He has had more than 20 singles on the Billboard country music charts and continues to thrill audiences around the globe. Tickets: $39.50 . To learn more, call 732.238.5500 or visit starlandballroom.com.

Sept 12

Play a round at the Saint Peter’s Healthcare Sys-

High fliers: You can hear musical artists Barenaked Ladies, Mitchel Musso and Meat Loaf at the Festival of Ballooning, July 29–31.

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

_MID0711_ThingsToDo_REV2_.indd 2

|

july 2011

47

6/9/11 9:29 AM


clockwise from top: The Vista Pool

Ge tting there

Grand Cascades Lodge 3 Wild Turkey Way Hardyston, N.J. 973.827.5996 crystalgolfresort.com Driving time: about 1.5 hours

at Grand Cascades Lodge; the clubhouse at Ballyowen; Crystal Springs golf course; Grand Cascades Lodge

splendor in sussex This luxe resort in the state’s northernmost count y will suit you to a tee

Jonesing for a golf getaway? Sure, you could travel to Myrtle Beach, Orlando or San Diego, but why deal with the hassle and expense of flying when you can choose from seven courses, including the highly ranked Ballyowen, just an hour and a half away at Crystal Springs Resort in Hardyston, N.J.? Designed by renowned golf course architect Roger Rulewich, the linksstyle Ballyowen was built in 1998 atop a plateau and features near-treeless terrain with fescue grass framing the plush green fair ways. In addition to six other golf courses (including the family-

48

_MID0711_Escapes_REV1.indd 1

friendly, nine-hole Minerals Golf Club), Crystal Springs also has a natural grass putting course, a David Leadbetter Golf Academy and a golf simulator (play Pebble Beach!). But there’s a lot to love at Crystal Springs even if golf’s not your game. Wine enthusiasts will appreciate the immense wine cellar that houses more than 7,000 labels and more than 100,000 bottles. Roughly 30-minute tours of the cellar provide a fascinating look at the collection of resort owner Gene Mulvihill, who began amassing wine more than 50 years ago. One high-

to see more photos of crystal springs resort and to plan your visit, go to middlesexhealthandlife.com.

light: more than 100 vintages of Chateau Latour dating back to 1863. This vast collection (the second largest on the East Coast after Bern’s Steak House in Tampa, Fla.) draws wine connoisseurs to the resort’s fourstar Restaurant Latour, where the impressive wine list is presented in two cork-covered binders, one for white and champagne and one for red and port. The restaurant showcases locally grown produce, meat and fish from the Hudson and Delaware valleys and organic rack of lamb from its own ranch in Colorado. Latour’s chef de cuisine is John Benjamin, who has worked under world-renowned chefs Thomas Keller and Charlie Palmer. Keller’s influence was evident in a divine amuse bouche, an oyster in a bed of tapioca pearls with a crème fraiche sabayon and caviar, which was the best thing I tried in an altogether outstanding three-course dinner. (Three- or eight-course tasting menus are offered.) The resort actually consists of three hotels: Grand Cascades Lodge, Minerals Resort & Spa and The Appalachian, a lodge at the base of the Mountain Creek ski area. In addition to Restaurant Latour, Grand Cascades Lodge boasts Reflections Spa, an eye-catching space with fire-inspired red art glass aglow throughout and 8,000 quartz crystals hanging from the ceiling. Minerals has its own spa, called Elements, and a sports club with tennis, basketball, a running track and fitness classes. All three of the resorts offer swimming pools, but the Grand Cascades Lodge has a four-season tropical paradise called the Biosphere Pool Complex, consisting of an indoor free-form pool, a 140-foot water slide, a grotto-like Jacuzzi, a cave-themed steam room and sauna and a café, all housed under a retractable roof. Crystal Springs makes for a great family trip (Minerals caters more to kids than Grand Cascades) or a romantic couples getaway (be sure to book early for Restaurant Latour), and with so much to do, you’ll wish you had more time to enjoy a guided hike along the Appalachian Trail, fishing with the family, a yoga class or the water park at Mountain Creek. Luckily, you can easily return with another brief drive nor th into the hills of Sussex County. —Marisa Sandor a

CLOCKWISE from top: joe church, WILL BLOCHINGER, courtesy of crystal springs, LAWRENCE BRAUN

escapes

6/8/11 2:36 PM


b

MAKING NEW JERSEY

eautiful

ONE PATIENT AT A TIME!

SMARTLIPOTM HAIR TRANSPLANTS COSMETIC LASER SURGERY • Acne/Rosacea Treatment • Facial Plasma Resurfacing • Chemical Peels • Laser Tattoo Removal • Skin-Tightening Affirm LaserTM • Mole Removal • Laser Vein Treatment • Laser Hair Removal • Minimally Invasive Face & Eye Lid Lift • Fat Transfer

AYMAN EL ATTAR, M.D. Dr. El Attar is a member of the American Society of Laser Medicine and Surgery and a Faculty of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery and the American Academy of Aesthetic Medicine. Dr. El Attar has successfully performed over 3000 SmartLipoTM procedures since 2006. He is the inventor of the TOPALTM technique for awake power-assisted laser liposuction. He teaches this procedure in the USA & internationally.

DC DERMA LASER CENTERS

CALL US TODAY FOR YOUR FREE CONSULTATION! 120 CEDAR GROVE LANE, SOMERSET

732-356-8700 WWW.DERMANJ.COM WWW.TOPALIPO.COM WWW.HAIRDOCNJ.COM

FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF OUR SERVICES, VISIT OUR WEBSITE WWW.DERMANJ.COM

C3_MSHL_JULY11.indd 9

G

IFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE FOR ANY OCCASION

ATTENTION

0

%

FINANCING FOR 18 MONTHS

Middlesex Health & Life Readers: PRESENT THIS AD FOR YOUR CHOICE OF: A FREE MICRO FEEL GOOD FACIAL $500 OFF SMARTLIPOTM $499 BOTOX® TREATMENT $100 FACIAL REJUVENATION PACKAGE

6/9/11 10:33 AM


I t ’s a l l i n t h e e x t r a o r d i n a r y d e t a i l s …

40,000 square feet of exquisite collections for him and her Impeccable customer service • Expert in-house tailoring A f t e r- h o u r s s h o p p i n g b y a p p o i n t m e n t

121 Broad St.

Red Bank, NJ 07701

(732) 576-8500

Monday thru Saturday 9:30 AM – 7 PM

w w w. g a r m a n y. c o m

Closed Sundays

Free Park ing In Our Private Lot Behind the Store

Need a Garmany fashion fix? Read our blog on garmanyblog.com

C4_MSHL_JULY11.indd 2

7 for All Humankind Akris Alberto Arnold Zimberg Artico Avon Celli BD Baggies Bettye Muller Billy Reid Blugirl Blumarine Bogosse Brioni Brunello Cucinelli Butterfly Bowties Canali Catherine Malandrino Charvet Cole Haan Collette Dinnigan Converse Coppley Creenstone Diesel DL1961 Earnest Sewn Ermenegildo Zegna Escada Etro Façonnable Garmany Custom Shirts Gimo¹s Gucci Hiltl Hugo Boss Incotex Isaia J. Lindeburg Jan Leslie James Jeans Just a Cheap Shirt Kiton Knirps Umbrellas Knomo Bags Lanvin Laurentino Lafayette 148 Local Celebrity Magaschoni Marc Cain Marc Jacobs Max Mara Monique Lhuillier Moreschi Moschino Cheap and Chic Malo Mulberry Musi MZ Wallace Nanette Lepore Nat Nast Paul Smith Philosophy di Alberta Ferretti Poggianti Polo by Ralph Lauren Ports 1961 Psycho Bunny Rafe Ralph Lauren Women Rebecca Minkoff Red Jacket Robert Graham Robert Talbott Robert Zur Roberto Cavalli Robin Rotenier Salvatore Ferragamo Sam Edelman Santa Maria Novella Santandrea Schumacher Scott Kay Stuart Weitzman Superdry Suzi Roher Tallia To Boot NY Tommy Bahama Tory Burch Tumi Luggage V.K. Nagrani Valentino Victorinox Vilebrequin Vince Wellensteyn Wolford Zac Posen Zachery Prell Zanella And more!

6/10/11 12:53 PM


Middlesex Health & Life: July 2011