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M I D D L E S E X H E A LT H & L I F E

T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

A P R I L 2 0 11

IN GOOD HEALTH:

T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

HELP YOUR FAMILY GET IN SHAPE

TA K E C H A R G E

  -

21 tranquility

SPOTTING SEIZURES ON VIDEO EEG NEW HOSPITAL INSTANT RESPONSE SYSTEM

WAYS TO FIND

ideas

FOR A HARMONIOUS HOME

THE F I RST AN NUAL

T H E U LT I M AT E S PA G U I D E

ULTI M AT E

A P R I L 2 011 | $ 3 . 9 5 | M I D D L E S E X H E A LT H A N D L I F E . C O M

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SPA GUIDE

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Š2011 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Franchises independently owned and operated.

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For more than 30 years, California Closets has been the leader in custom home storage solutions. Call us today for a free consultation, and see all the possibilities that California Closets offers, all affordably priced and beautifully customized for your home.

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Contents 34 FEATURES

28

T h e U lt i m at e S pa G u i d e

Discover Middlesex County’s best spas in our first annual listing.

30

Ta k e C h a r g e o f Your Well-being

Here’s how to nurture mind, body and spirit for a healthier, happier you.

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H a r m o n y at H o m e

Smart planning can help you create a functional and beautiful space.

i n e v ery i s s ue

6 w e lc o m e l e t t e r 8 Ed i to r’s N ot e 9 On the Web 43 Wh e r e to E at 46 t h i n g s to d o

Top: Harmonious Home © Loupe Images/Ryland Peters. Bottom: Blend Images/the Agency Collection/getty images

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2 MAIN AVENUE, PASSAIC, NJ 07055

973.779.3200

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www.michelangelodesigns.com Wholesale Distributor of Fine Italian Furniture Since 1939

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

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Contents APRIL

44 38

View luxe bath products like Porcelanosa’s Samsara Natural Traver tine Marble Bathtub, available on Porcelanosa’s website, porcelanosa-usa.com, in our At Home section on page 38.

42 DEPARTMENTS

26

G AT H E R I N G S

Photos from recent events at Saint Peter’s University Hospital—and around the area

38

AT H O M E

39

SHOP LOCAL LEADER

Edward Massood of the Thomasville home furnishing store in Woodbridge

40

TA S T E S

Local restaurants ser ve up sumptuous spa cuisine.

42

POWER FOOD

Discover the histor y and health benefits of grapefruit.

I N G O O D H E A LT H I N S I D E LO O K FA C E S O F S A I N T P E T E R’S S E A S O N A L H E A LT H T E C H S AV V Y U P C LO S E

18 20 22 23 24

44

WINE + SPIRITS

Today’s organic and biodynamic wines are planet-friendly—and taste great too.

45

FO LLOW U S Friend us on Facebook by visiting facebook.com/middlesexhealthandlife Follow u s on Twitter: @MiddlesexHandL Sign up for our e-newsletter at middlesexhealthandlife.com/newsletter Visit middlesexhealthandlife.com to subscribe!

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FINANCIAL BALANCE Top ways to save on your taxes

48

ESCAPES

Check out the luxurious Mayflower Inn & Spa, this month’s drivable destination.

GRAPEFRUIT: KIERAN SCOTT/GETTY IMAGES. WINE: IMAGE SOURCE/GETTY IMAGES. TOWELS: PAUL ALVES/MICHAEL C. FINA. FAMILY: SHUTTERSTOCK

Give your bathroom the feel of a spa with these stunning new products.

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SPECIAL EVENTS 

KidFest 2011

SUNDAY, APRIL 10 • 11:00 AM – 3:00 PM The Fields at East Brunswick, 8 Cornwall Court, East Brunswick Magic 98.3FM and The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital host live music, sports and games, arts and crafts, food and more, including a VIP Princess Party, Fun Zones and information on how to keep your children healthy and safe. Free admission. Listen to Magic 98.3FM or visit WWW.MAGIC983.COM for more details.

Rutgers Day 2011

SATURDAY, APRIL 30 • 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM Experience New Jersey’s state university. Fun family activities. Saint Peter’s Healthcare System will be on hand at two locations – College Avenue and Somerset Street, New Brunswick – to provide health information, screenings and a Teddy Bear Clinic. Free admission. Rain or shine. Visit WWW.RUTGERSDAY.RUTGERS.EDU.

Edison Family Day

SUNDAY, MAY 1 • 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center at Raritan Center, 97 Sunfield Avenue, Edison Health information and screenings, Teddy Bear Clinic and “Ask the Doctor” from Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. Activities for all!

Just for the Health of It

SATURDAY, MAY 14 • NOON – 4:00 PM Buccleuch Park, Easton Avenue, New Brunswick Free annual community health fair for children and adults sponsored by Saint Peter’s Healthcare System and New Brunswick’s Division of Recreation. Contests and games, and health information and screenings. Call the New Brunswick Division of Recreation at 732-745-5125 for more information.

Saint Peter’s Community Golf Outing & Networking Reception

TUESDAY, JUNE 7 7:00 AM Registration and continental breakfast 8:00 AM Shotgun start Forsgate Country Club, 375 Forsgate Drive, Jamesburg Proceeds to benefit Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. For more, call Saint Peter’s Foundation at 732-745-8542.

254 EASTON AVENUE

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welcome letter

training tomorrow’s physicians Most people know saint peter’s University Hospital as an outstanding place of healing, but fewer are aware of its growing reputation as a place of education. I am referring to the announcement made last fall that Saint Peter’s University Hospital is now a regional medical campus for Drexel University College of Medicine, the largest private medical school in the nation. Please peruse this edition of Middlesex Health & Life to learn about some of the newest breakthroughs in clinical care that are taking place at Saint Peter’s. Among them, you will read about a wireless device that is revolutionizing health communications and a tool that helps doctors determine if a patient who is experiencing seizures has epilepsy. But please remember, too, that Saint Peter’s is doing all it can to meet not only today’s clinical needs, but also our society’s demand for the doctors of tomorrow. Physicians are fleeing New Jersey at an alarming rate, and experts project a shortage of 2,800 physicians in 10 years. The shortage is forecast to include a broad range of specialties, among them family medicine, geriatrics, obstetrics and surgery. The threat extends beyond New Jersey. With nearly half the country’s physicians projected to retire in the next 15 years, the United States could face a deficit of as many as 150,000 physicians by the year 2025. A new medical school anywhere is a big bonus. Here’s how it will work: Drexel medical students in their third and fourth years will be able to complete their required course work at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, where they will receive training in core clinical areas such as surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, family medicine, neurology and psychiatry. With plans to graduate more than 20 additional students into medicine ever y year, the Saint Peter’s–Drexel partnership is one more solution to a problem that threatens the foundation of effective and accessible health care. Now that I’ve had my say, please enjoy this edition of Middlesex Health & Life.

NayaN Kothari, M.D. CHIe f ACA De MIC OffIC e r, S A IN T Pe T e r’S H e A lT H C A r e SyST e M A S S O C I AT e De A N f Or e DUCAT I ON, Dre x e l UNI v e r S I T y C O l l e g e O f M e D I C I N e

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600 | www.saintpetershcs.com

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Saint Peter’s

is 1 of only 6 hospitals in the world to achieve Nursing’s highest honor 4 times in a row!

THE BEST OF THE BEST. THAT’S WHAT A MAGNET DESIGNATION SAYS ABOUT SAINT PETER’S NURSING EXCELLENCE. But this isn’t the first time the compassion, professional dedication and commitment of our nurses have been recognized. This latest Magnet® recognition not only marks our fourth consecutive time we have received this honor for nursing excellence, it makes Saint Peter’s one of only six hospitals internationally to do so! Saint Peter’s University Hospital. When you want the best in patient care, trust the best nursing team.

Treating you better...for life. 254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901



732.745.8600



www.saintpetershcs.com

Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen  State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center Regional medical campus of Drexel University College of Medicine  Affiliate of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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INNER BEAUTY

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RENEW!

WELCOME TO THE “RENEWED” MIDDLESEX HEALTH & LIFE. As you may have noticed, we’ve got a new look, both inside and out! I am so happy to be an integral part of this redesign and to join Wainscot Media as the Editor in Chief of the Health & Life family of magazines. I spent most of my publishing career, more than 13 years, at Country Living magazine as an editorial director and style maven, traveling across the U.S. uncovering unique places, people and trends to share with readers. Now I can combine this passion for style with a love for “all things local.” Having lived in New Jersey for more than 15 years, I’ve experienced the ever-changing landscape of the area’s towns, main streets and communities, discovering what “Good Living” means in Middlesex. This first issue of the year we’ve themed “Take Charge of Your Well-Being.” To stay healthy inside and out, it’s crucial that you look at your whole lifestyle in addition to your physical health (see article on page 30). Discover bliss with our first annual “Ultimate Spa Guide.” We’ve scoured the county and discovered the best spas with the most talented estheticians and massage therapists, the most serene settings and the most distinctive treatments. The benefits of a massage or a facial are immeasurable—not only will it de-stress you and ease aching muscles, but the endorphins released will lift your spirits and boost your immunity. Check out our newly added departments, from fashion and finance to our profile of a special Shop Local Leader in the county. We hope you like this fresher, more contemporary design and our up-to-date take on “Good Living” in Middlesex County. Enjoy!

SHAMPOO Redken Color Extend Shampoo CHEMICAL SMOOTHING SYSTEM Keratin Complex Smoothing Therapy by Coppola PERMANENT COLOR LINE Redken Color Fusion DEMI-PERMANENT COLOR LINE Redken Shades EQ

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE

SMALL COMPANY Unite

JENNIFER VREEL AND, EDITOR IN CHIEF E DI TOR @ WA IN SCOT ME DI A. CO M

w h a t i’m lo v i n g . . .

TOP: ROBERT DESANTOS/VENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY OF RIDGEWOOD; HAIR: MARYANN ESMAILI; MAKEUP: BARBI DIAZ/PANICO SALON & SPA OF RIDGEWOOD

VOI SALON & SPA

lo o k!

When searching for cool Zen activewear for the Local Fashion story (page 14), I discovered this SHIVA PILLOW from Yogitoes ($36 at yogatoes.com). It was created for Savasana (yoga’s most relaxing posture) to support the natural curve of the back. I keep it in my car so I don’t forget to take it to yoga class, but it’s a perfect back support in the car too.

WWW.VOISALONANDSPA.COM

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ON THE WEB

THERE’S MORE TO LOVE

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BLEND IMAGES/ THE AGENCY COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES, COURTESY OF MAYFLOWER INN & SPA, MARISA SANDORA, SHUTTERSTOCK, SHUTTERSTOCK, KIERAN SCOTT/GETTY IMAGES

AT MIDDLESEXHE ALTHANDLIFE.COM...

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SPA SERENITY

GREAT ESCAPES

DINING OUT

Visit our site for a downloadable version of “The Ultimate Spa Guide,” beginning on page 28, which you can easily print or e-mail to share with your friends.

Love the look of the Mayflower Inn & Spa featured in Escapes (page 48)? Visit middlesexhealthandlife.com/ escapes to view a slide show of more stunning photos or to plan your getaway.

Use the convenient mapping technology at middlesex healthandlife.com for directions to the best Middlesex County restaurants featured in our first-ever Where to Eat in Middlesex dining guide on page 43.

EATING RIGHT

SAVV Y SHOPPING

LOCAL EVENTS

Gushing over grapefruit? Print a recipe featuring this month’s Power Food by going to middlesexhealth andlife.com/powerfood. Also, submit your favorite recipe highlighting figs by using the form at the bot tom of the page, and it may be featured on the website!

What’s your favorite shop in Middlesex County? Head to middlesexhealthandlife. com/shopping to tell us about it by July 15, and we may fe ature your pick in our October issue’s “Shop Local Middlesex Guide.” Stores in all categories will be included. Go online for the complete list.

Want to know about more things happening in the neighborhood? Go to our site to check out our daily Community Calendar. Let your neighbors know of local events by submitting the information using our online entr y form.

MIDDLESE XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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• EYEBROWS: Sparse hair, needs pencil, poor shape, uneven • EYELASH ENHANCEMENT: For thin or sparse eyelashes • EYELINER • LIPS: Lacks fullness, color, border or cleft lip repair

Saint Peter’S healthcare SyStem

• BREAST AREOLA: Mastectomy or augmentation

PreSident and chief executive officer ronald c. r ak , j. d.

chief oPerating officer, Senior vice PreSident

• SKIN CAMOUFLAGE: Vitiligo (must be inactive)

chief marketing officer Peter connolly

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Patricia carroll

director, marketing and media relationS

• SCALP AND HAIR LOSS: Surgery or bald patches

director, Public relationS Phil hartman

Complimentary consultations available.

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Marie D. Barbuto, RN

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executive director Ste ven S. radin, eSq.

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PreSident, medical and dental Staff

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310 MADISON AVENUE | SUITE 210

(973) 993-5100

SKINCAREOFNJ.COM

saint peter’s HealtHcare system 254 Easton Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. For more information about Saint Peter’s facilities and services, please visit saintpetershcs.com or call 732.745.8600.

Faculty of the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses and Fellow of the American Academy of Micropigmentation

We Want to hear from you! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Middlesex Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Middlesex Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials.

middlesex HealtH & life is published 4 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 5, Issue 1. © 2011 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Middlesex County: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. advertising inquiries Please contact Shae Marcus at 856.797.2227 or shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com.

Craftsmanship • Functionality • Design

BR

IN G

ING

A SOU

THERN TRADITION TO Y

subscription services To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Middlesex Health & Life, C i r c u l a t i o n D e p a r t m e n t , 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; e - m a i l c h r i s t i n e . h a m e l @wainscotmedia.com.

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TOWN & & COUNTRY COUNTRY TOWN kk ii tt cc hh ee nn aa nn dd bb aa tt hh

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25 Bridge Avenue Suite 100 Red Bank, NJ 07701 │ 732.345.1441 │ www.townandcountrykitchenandbath.com 25 Bridge Avenue Suite 100 Red Bank, NJ 07701 │ 732.345.1441 │ www.townandcountrykitchenandbath.com

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localbuzz middlesex

news

reviews

tips

trends

environmental drive

Love the space, power and handling of an SUV, but hate the environmental impact? Starting now, you can swap your gas guzzler for a 2011 Touareg, Volkswagen’s first hybrid. The Touareg pairs a gas engine and battery-powered electric motor that together produce the muscle of a V8 while bettering the fuel efficiency of a V6. Plus, the electric motor captures the kinetic energy used during coasting and braking to recharge itself. The bottom line: You get where you’re going using less gas, releasing fewer fumes and attracting more bravos than boos! Visit Reydel Volkswagen in Edison (866.537.6397, vwreydel.com) to check it out.

jewelry with heart

water and pilates: shutterstock

smart site

“Greening” your home is easier than ever thanks to itseasybeinggreen. com, a site that lets you outfit everything from your sink to your shower, your windows to your weather stripping, for maximum energy savings. As the direct-to-consumer branch of New Jersey-based Niagara Conservation Products, itseasybeinggreen.com specializes in water- and energysaving products that keep your home humming—and you comfortable— while sparing the environment (and your bank account)! Take the popular $20 Earth Massage Showerhead, which uses just 1.5 gallons per minute compared with standard showerheads’ 2.5. A special pressurecompensation device ensures that the stream is still powerful so you don’t have to worry about washing under a trickle. At the end of the year, you’ll have saved 7,300 gallons and shaved about $150 off your water bill.

enter to win

One lucky reader will win the Deluxe Water Green House EcoKit, which includes the handheld Earth Massage Showerhead, plumber’s tape, leak detection tablets and tips, aerators for bath and kitchen faucets, toilet water saver and more! For a chance to win, visit middlesexhealthandlife.com/ecokit.

top five ways to protect the water table 1. Turn off the faucet while you brush your teeth. 2. Run appliances such as the washing machine and the dishwasher only when they’re full. 3. Keep a pitcher of water in the fridge so you don’t have to run the tap until the water turns cool. 4. Save the water you use to rinse fruits and veggies; it absorbs nutrients that make it perfect for watering plants! 5. Glance at your water bill—if you notice unusual highs, it probably means you have a leaky faucet, pipe or toilet.

A cat showed up on the deck of Joseph Romanowski’s house while the designer was planning his line of handcrafted charms, so the animal lover did everything he could to locate the feline’s owner. When no one stepped forward, Romanowski adopted the “poor cat,” named him Felix, and used the kitty’s likeness for his logo. Felix’s good luck was contagious: New Jersey-based Poor Cat Designs (855.766.7228, poorcatdesigns. com) has gained devotees such as Bruce Springsteen and his wife, Patti Scialfa, who love mixing and matching the precious metal charms. And Romanowski’s charitable work extends beyond Felix. Poor Cat Designs was tapped to craft the “Tunaweza Disc” for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. The purchase of one helps the foundation provide 13 women with much-needed services.

physical therapy meets p i l a t e s The newest trend to help athletes and others recover from injuries is to blend Pilates moves into a physical therapy regimen, say fitness pros like Nirali Patel, registered physical therapist and owner of Health Plus Physical Therapy in Edison (732.494.5999, healthpluspt.com). “Many Pilates moves are non-weight-bearing or partial-weightbearing,” says Patel, “so you can protect certain joints, as well as stabilize and strengthen muscles.” She often integrates Pilates mat positions into her work with clients, and she’s not the only PT who’s turning to this popular fitness practice. According to Jennifer Gamboa, a physical therapist and spokesperson for the American Physical Therapy Association, “in the last 10 years, the popularity of incorporating Pilates moves into physical therapy practices has really grown. It’s such a good match to help clients train their abs and protect their lower backs.” Want to increase your core strength and alleviate lower back or hip pain? Patel suggests a move called the Scoop. Do it daily for best results: • Lie flat on your back with both knees bent and your feet flat on the ground, knees and feet in line with your hips. • Place the palm of your hand underneath your lower back. • Tighten your abs and gently push your back down toward your hand, doing a small pelvic tilt movement. • Hold for 10 seconds; breathe deeply and evenly. • Relax and release for 30 seconds. • Repeat 7-8 times. middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

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H AV E IT A L L & ZEN SOME ACHIEVE BALANCE IN STYLE WITH OUR FAVE ACTIVEWEAR AND GEAR FOR YOGA AND PILATES

1 The Skidless Yoga Towel from Yogitoes, $64, is made with durable microfiber yarn and backed with silicone nubs, which prevent it from bunching up or slipping. yogitoes.com. 2 Ion Actif’s Om Tank and Side Pocket Shorts, both $48, are made of breathable supplex and stretchable lycra. ionactif.com. 3 Yogoco’s earthminded Yoga Bag, $87, is crafted of pre-consumer T-shirt scraps. yogoco.com. 4 The Sleeveless Tee, $48, and Hot Yoga Short, $52, from Zobha are perfect for the court, gym or studio. Can Do Fitness, Princeton, 609.514.0500. 5 Colorful and comfy, Omgirl’s Refresh Hoodie, $95, Practice Cami, $57, and Nomad Leggings, $66, are made with organic cotton. omgirl.com 6 Zobha’s form-fitting Isabel Tank, $62, and Essential Pant, $82, are quick-drying and odor-resistant. zobha.com. 7 Open-cell Natural Rubber Yoga Mats from JadeYoga, $50 to $70, feature interconnected air pockets that provide optimum grip for the practitioner. Inner Light Yoga Studio, North Brunswick, 732.951.1100. 8 Alo’s stylish Double-Strap Black Sports Bra, $36, and Tipped Rollover Capris, $55, are made of nylon and spandex. Flemington Department Store, Flemington, 908.782.7662. 9 The mesh Jeanne Hoodie from RESE Pilates, $74, features bell sleeves and a keyhole neck. Pair it with the slim-cut, slightly flared Chloe Pants, $78. Can Do Fitness, Princeton, 609.514.0500.

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ingoodhealth Medicine

t e c h n o lo g y

pat i e n t car e at sa i n t p e t e r ’ s u n i v e r s i t y h o s p i ta l

shutterstock

in any season, wellness is at the heart of good times. on these pages, you’ll read about how the saint peter’s community is your family’s partner in safeguarding your health.

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inside look

seizures

Video eeg helps doc t o r s d i a g n o s e a n d t r e at e p i l e p s y Is it epilepsy? That’s the question doctors must answer when they evaluate a patient with a seizure disorder. And a special tool helps them make that call. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition marked by abnormal electrical activity in the brain that causes seizures and involuntary changes in body movement or function, sensation, awareness or behavior. It’s often diagnosed with an electroencephalogram (EEG), which

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records brain-wave patterns in much the same way an electrocardiogram records heart rhythms. But sometimes an EEG alone isn’t enough, and doctors turn to video EEG, which matches up the record of brain-wave activity created by the EEG with a video of the patient.

powerful diagnostic tool “Changes in brain waves don’t always result in seizures, and not all seizures

are caused by epilepsy,” says Carlos Lastra, M.D., a pediatric neurologist at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital and medical director of pediatric diagnostic neurology at The Epilepsy Center at Saint Peter’s. As he explains, neurologists use video EEG to help make a direct correlation between brain-wave patterns and external signs of seizures—and to rule out other disorders such as cardiac arrhythmia or narcolepsy

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a better view of


INSIDE LOOK

“NOT ALL SEIZURES ARE CAUSED BY EPILEPSY. VIDEO EEG SAYS YES OR NO TO EPILEPSY.” — CARLOS L ASTRA, M.D.

that can look like epilepsy. “Video EEG says yes or no to epilepsy,” says Dr. Lastra. Patients can be connected to an EEG and videotaped from 24 hours to a week or more, depending on the circumstances, says Jeffrey M. Politsky, M.D., neurologist and medical director of adult diagnostic neurology at The Epilepsy Center at Saint Peter’s. The longer tests are usually for patients in an intensive care unit. Shor t-term tests of a day or two require the patient to stay within one room of the hospital so he or she can be constantly videotaped. For the patients’ comfort and convenience, the rooms have a TV, VCR/DVD player and a computer hookup. “Otherwise healthy patients bring in work, movies and books to help pass the time,” Dr. Politsky says. When the patient is a child, one parent is required to stay with him or her throughout the test, says Dr. Lastra.

OPPOSITE: SHUTTERSTOCK. THIS PAGE: BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

ASSESSING EPILEPSY The doctor can view the EEG readings side by side with the videotape either in real time (if necessary for critical care) or after the test period. And besides being a diagnostic tool, video EEG can also be useful in patients already known to have epilepsy. “We use it to learn how stable the disorder is and if the patient is a candidate for a reduction in medication,” Dr. Politsky says. “We also can see if the patient is having more seizures than we know, because there are often

Carlos Lastra, M.D., views test results from a video EEG being performed on a young patient.

seizures that one can’t see and that the patient isn’t even aware of.” The hospital is expanding the center further in the second quarter of 2011. Saint Peter’s is already a Level 4 epilepsy center—the highest rating available from the National Association of Epilepsy Centers. That means it has a full-time dedicated, specially trained staff, and it is able to offer the most complete range of available evaluative and surgical treatments for epilepsy. “We want to build up this highlevel epilepsy unit even further,” says Dr. Politsky. “We hope to offer special treat-

ment programs focusing, for example, on women with epilepsy, emergencyroom treatment of those with the condition, and patients with epilepsy who also have mood disorders.” There’s a big need for these services. “Epilepsy is an undertreated problem,” says the doctor. “It has been estimated to affect 1 percent of the population, but it’s probably more like 1.5 percent. That means about 100,000 people in New Jersey and maybe 250,000 in the tristate area. That’s why Saint Peter’s is striving to offer the fullest and finest services in epilepsy care.” —DAVID LEVINE

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SERVICES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF SEIZURE DISORDERS AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 866.440.3893 FOR ADULTS AND 732.339.7870 FOR CHILDREN. TO SHARE THIS STORY WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR

FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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faces of saint peter’s

Rocco R. Tutela Jr., M.D.

A general surgeon at Saint

Peter’s University Hospital since October 2009, Rocco R. Tutela Jr., M.D., 37, is the son and grandson of physicians, with two physician brothers as well. (His two sisters are a lawyer and a Rutgers University professor.) A Short Hills native, he attended Saba University School of Medicine in the Netherlands Antilles, did his residency at Morristown Memorial Hospital and completed surgical fellowships at North Shore University Hospital and Long Island Jewish Medical Center. Dr. Tutela lives in East Brunswick with his wife, Tracy, a doctor specializing in infectious diseases, and their sons, Sebastian, 4; and Roman, 7 months. D id you fe e l pre s s u re to go into “th e

Not at all. I majored in political science and Italian and did a clerkship with the public defender to explore other fields. But my grandfather had been a general practitioner in Newark and an Army physician during World War II, and I saw how his patie nts love d a nd reve re d him. A nd my father, a plastic surgeon, used to take me on hospital rounds. I saw pictures of how he’d transformed his patients to look as if nothing had happened to them, and that intrigued and inspired me. I even have a cousin in Naples who’s also a general surgeon—we communicate by e-mail and on Facebook. family business” of medicine?

Rocco R. Tutela Jr., M.D., shares cooking duties with his wife, Tracy H. Zivin-Tutela, M.D., and their sons, Sebastian, 4; and Roman, 7 months.

I do general surgery, including hernia repairs, gallbladder removals and breast procedures. I like general surgery because it’s not the same procedures or diseases every day. But I’m also trained in trauma care and cancer surgery. What do you do for fun? I used to love scuba diving and basketball. But these days, when I’m not busy trying to grow my practice, I’m home—it’s treadmills for exercise and coloring books with the kids. —D.L.

“my grandfather was a general pr actitioner in ne wark, and I saw how his patients loved him.” ­— rocco r. tutel a jr., M.D.

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both portraits by bohm-marrazzo photography

Wh at t y pe s of s u rg e ry do you pe rform?


FACES OF SAINT PETER’S

Preston Powell

SAINT PE TER’S UNIVERSIT Y

Hospital is lucky to draw on the talents of a host of volunteers, including 86-year-old Preston Powell of East Brunswick. Powell, who has volunteered at the hospital for more than two decades, runs its weekly video-fed Bingo game. Retired from the printing business, Powell, a widower, has one son and two grandchildren. HOW DID G E T YOU INTO VOLUNTE E RING? My wife, Dorothy, started giving her time at Saint Peter’s before I did, and she suggested I join her when I retired in 1986. We’ve been part of the Saint Peter’s family since our son, also named Preston, was born there in 1956. Later, she had five major operations there for cancer, and most of the nurses knew her and me. I started running the Bingo game in 2000 after volunteering in the accounting department. WHY BINGO? It’s very rewarding because I meet so many people. Patients ask me to stop by their beds to talk when I deliver the prizes. Their smiles make it all worthwhile. I UNDERSTAND YOU KNOW BASEBALL HALL OF FAMER STAN MUSIAL. WHAT’S YOUR CON-

BOTH PORTRAITS BY BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

NECTI O N? I played ball in high school and was scouted by a man who told me to look out for “this kid Musial.” I was signed by the Phillies in 1942, but went into the Navy to fight in World War II. T hat’s w he re I met Sta n — we playe d together. He was already an all-star, and he became a baseball instructor in the Navy. I kidded him that I had to go overseas to save the country while he stayed and had fun. We’re good friends to this day. He’s 90, still sharp, and one of the nicest guys you’ll ever meet. I told him I’d root for his team, the Cardinals, but I’m really a Yankees fan. —D.L.

Hospital volunteer Preston Powell, 86, was signed by baseball’s Philadelphia Phillies in 1942.

“PATIENTS ASK ME TO STOP BY THEIR BEDS TO TALK WHEN I DELIVER THE PRIZES. THEIR SMILES MAKE IT ALL WORTHWHILE.” —PRESTON POWELL

TO SHARE THIS STORY WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR

FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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SEASONAL HEALTH

IS YOUR FAMILY BEACH-READY?

If you’re like most of us, the coldweather months have left you with an extra pound or two that you’d be better off without. “During the winter, with all the parties, extra food and less physical activity, it’s very common to gain weight,” says Beverley Waithe, a nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at the Thyroid and Diabetes Center at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. It’s a health concern, not just a matter of vanity, Waithe explains. And the concern isn’t limited to grown-ups. Says Susan R. Brill, M.D., a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital: “I think kids, especially adolescents, are even more susceptible than adults. Their holiday celebrations tend to feature more fattening candy, desserts and soda, and their exercise opportunities are more limited by cold weather.” The smart move is to get your family on a weight-control regimen now. But take it slowly. “Don’t try to lose 100 pounds all at once,” says Carol Schindler, another

nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at the Thyroid and Diabetes Center. “Set a realistic goal of 1 to 2 pounds a week, and you’re more likely to shed weight and keep it off.” There is no mystery as to how to accomplish this: Eat fewer calories and exercise more. But these experts have a couple of tricks to help you succeed. “The first thing I advise is, eat three meals a day,” says Schindler. “Skipping meals catches up with you. Eating three meals helps you space out calories and control intake. At breakfast, include lean proteins such as eggs or egg whites, peanut butter or peanuts and soy nuts to help you feel full.” Schindler also suggests two other lifestyle changes to help lose weight. “ First, drink lots of water,” she says. “Sometimes we mistake thirst for hunger, so go for the water bottle, not the snack. Second, get enough sleep. When you’re tired, you have less discipline. Also, sleep deprivation increases stress hormones, which can intensify bloodsugar fluctuations and make you eat more.”

To cut down on portion sizes when you eat out, obser ve the one-third rule, says Waithe. “Eat one-third of what’s on your plate and take the rest home,” she says. “Many restaurant portions are way too big and loaded with fat and salt.” Help your kids regain control, Dr. Brill suggests, by establishing and consistently enforcing a regular meal schedule—including breakfast every day— and limiting snacks. “It’s good to give up sugary soda any time of the year, but especially now,” she says. And that means you too, not just your children. “When I ask kids why it’s hard to stop drinking soda, they often say, ‘My parents still buy it.’ That’s not helping your kids.” Finally, these experts say, keep things simple. “Don’t overload your family with what seems a complex agenda of tasks —eating more of this, less of that, cutting down TV time, exercising more,” advises the doctor. “It will overwhelm them. Instead, set reasonable, achievable goals for them—and for you. Go for a family walk or bike ride, for example. If it doesn’t involve eating, it’s a good thing.” —D.L.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT WEIGHT-CONTROL RESOURCES FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY, PLEASE CALL THE THYROID AND DIABETES CENTER AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, 732.745.6667.

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FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM. SHUTTERSTOCK

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W I T H W E AT H E R WA R M I N G , I T ’ S T I M E T O G E T B A C K I N S H A P E


TECH SAVVY staff of 120 or more, so making it easy to get the help we need is huge for us.” Weighing less than 2 ounces, the Vocera Badge contains a speaker, a microphone, a wireless radio and a display that shows caller ID, messages and aler ts. It can be worn on a lanyard or clipped to the user’s apparel or existing lanyard. The system will be rolled out to other departments soon. “Technology is always scary to some people, but the staff has done a fabulous job with it,” says Lisa DiG i ova n n i, staff development instructor, who helped train employees to use the new system. “It’s not hard to use at all.” Users simply log in at the start of their shift, stating their name and their role— s ay, c h a rg e n u r s e fo r a c e r ta i n f l o o r. “Then the caller just touches a button and says the name, position or role he or she is looking for,” says Carol Negvesky, communications manager. The call recipient’s badge announces the incoming call, and that person can either accept the call or send it to voice mail. “We use Vocera every day, and it really helps,” says Strausser. “I love it.” —D.L.

voice of efficiency

TOP: SHUTTERSTOCK. RIGHT: BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY (2)

SHUTTERSTOCK

A N E W I N T E R N E T- B A S E D C O M M U N I C AT I O N S SYSTEM IMPROVES CARE BY PUTTING H O S P I TA L S TA F F E R S I N T O U C H I N S TA N T LY Whenever Saint Peter’s University Hospital Emergency Department nurse Linda Strausser draws blood from a patient to store in the hospital’s blood bank, she needs a witness to verify the procedure. That used to mean searching the corridors for someone who was free, then, once she’d found someone, making him or her wait while Strausser set up her equipment. But today she can get set up first, then speak into a wireless device worn around her neck to use an Internet-based communication system to find a witness in a jiffy. The device is the Vocera Comm u nications Badge, and it’s par t of a wireless “voice over Internet protocol” ( VoIP) communication system. “It

saves a lot of steps,” says Strausser. The voice-controlled Vocera Badge puts staffers across the hospital in touch for a quick a ppe a l for he lp or a thorough conversation. They can contact someone instantly by either that person’s title or the hospital duty to which he or she is currently assigned. The Vocera Badge can also be used to call the entire ER staff at once, says Ruby Ymbong, Emergency Department nurse manager. “In the past when we had a very sick patient, I would literally scream out for assistance,” she says. “Now, with Vocera, I can broadcast and say, ‘I need help stat in room so-and-so’ and guarantee that somebody receives the communication and responds immediately. The ER has a

Pulmonologist Carol Ash, M.D., speaks into her cell phone to connect with the Vocera system.

The yellow Vocera Badge lets nurse Jennifer O’Leary receive communications instantly.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600. TO SHARE THIS STORY WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR

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UP CLOSE

PHILANTHROPY BY ACCIDENT ALWAYS A BELIEVER IN “ G I V I N G B A C K , ” T H I S

ENTREPRENEUR FOUND HIMSELF NUDGED BY CIRCUMSTANCE TO DO JUST THAT

It sounds so grand you’d think it would require a grand plan. But for Ken Fisher of Hillsborough, owner of the Robbinsville-based printing company Nassau Communications, it happened almost by accident. When Fisher started his company in 1984 after years of working for newspapers in production, his first philanthropic beneficiar y was New Brunswick’s George Street Playhouse. “I sort of backed into doing some pro bono printing work for them when the printer they were using didn’t honor a contract,” says the longtime theater buf f. “I developed a good relationship with them, and a year later they asked me to join their board of directors.” Fisher still sits on the board and supports the theater “financially and emotionally,” with in-kind donations from his company as well as personal monetary gifts. His next foray into giving was the result of a literal accident. In 1986, his wife, JoAnn, fell off a horse when the couple was vacationing and broke her cheekbone in three places. A friend recommended a Saint Peter’s University Hospital plastic surgeon, Mort Goldstein, M.D., who has since retired. “The care and attention my wife got at Saint Peter’s were beyond anything I expected,” Fisher says, “The doctor was rubbing my wife’s hand as they went into the OR.” After his wife recovered, Fisher told Dr. Goldstein he wanted to do something to repay him. The doctor replied, “Then do something for Operation Smile”—

referring to a program that sends docto r s to poor countries to perform free life-changing plastic surgeries (such as repairing cleft lips and cleft palates). Fisher offered the organization pro bono printing services, and then helped to start a local Operation Smile chapter, to which he lent his time and energy for 12 years. Through his work with that group, the former high school football player met members of the Delaware Valley chapter of the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame. Fisher joined that board too, helping to raise money for schola r ships for loc a l high school seniors who are scholars and leaders as well as athletes. “It’s based on a combination of character, citizenship and athletic ability,” Fisher explains. “It’s a ver y wor thwhile organization—and the most unorganized thing I’m involved with! But that makes it fun.” In the early 1990s, the Fishers had another encounter with Saint Peter’s when JoAnn was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. Again a friend recommended a specialist, this time breast surgeon Susan McManus, M.D. “Sue was the best thing that ever happened in our lives in terms of health care,” Fisher says. “She took a personal interest in us and explained everything. We did everything she suggested.” JoAnn had surgery and is now cancer-free. “After that experience, I felt an even stronger affinity for the hospital,” says Fisher. That led to more charity work. Fisher’s

company does much of the hospital’s printing at cost, and he is a sponsor of the annual golf outing and attends the Saint Peter’s Healthcare System gala every spring. Fisher and his wife, a high school special education teacher, have three grown children and one grandchild. He says his generous ways were inspired in part by the generosity his parents showed in caring for their family when he was growing up in Trenton—though they never had the means to be big-time donors. Fisher keeps on giving to good causes in the community, both with funds and with his time. Once he got started, it seems, it was a hard habit to break. “It just makes me feel good,” says Fisher. —D.L. Philanthropist Ken Fisher

TO FIND OUT HOW YOUR PHIL ANTHROPIC EFFORTS CAN HELP PATIENTS AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8542. TO SHARE THIS STORY WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR

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BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

BECOMING A PHILANTHROPIST?

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IT’S NOT IF YOU WIN OR LOSE

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WE SPECIALIZE IN PREVENTION, TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION OF SPORTS INJURIES…AND MORE. Saint Peter’s Sports Medicine Institute offers a multidisciplinary approach to treatment that recognizes the unique relationship between sports medicine, orthopedic surgery and physical rehabilitation. Whether you’re injured, suffer from osteoporosis or arthritis, recovering from surgery, or just want to get in shape, our sports medicine team can help. Our staff includes a board-certified sports medicine specialist from Saint Peter’s University Hospital, three in-house, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons from University Orthopaedic Associates, and physical therapists. Every member of our team has extensive experience caring for professional, Olympic and student athletes... even weekend warriors. All of us at the Sports Medicine Institute are committed to providing patients with a prompt diagnosis, comprehensive treatment and thorough rehabilitation.

To learn more about Saint Peter’s Sports Medicine Institute, call 732-565-5455 or visit saintpetershcs.com

Treating you better...for life. 562 EASTON AVENUE, SOMERSET, NJ 08873

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732.565.5455

3/2/11 9:05 AM


gatherings at saint peter’s A gift of fun For k ids, be ing in the hospital is no picnic. But the recent donation of a Starlight Fun Center mobile enter tainment unit to The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital in New Brunswick promises to provide hours of fun and distraction for young pediatric patients. Each unit includes a Sharp Aquos LCD TV, a DVD player and a Nintendo Wii gaming system. Present at the unit’s recent dedication were two hospital representatives: (from left) child life coordinator Kristal R. Neal and Bipin Patel, M.D., chairman of the Department of Pediatrics; John Simone, board member for Starlight Children’s Foundation and director of marketing services for Colgate-Palmolive Company; Yasmin Sexton, a representative of BJ’s Wholesale Club; and Lauren Berninger, program manager for Starlight NY*NJ*CT.

Lift every voice and sing The Saint Peter’s University Hospital choir honored all those who have struggled for racial equality when it pe r for me d at the 21st a nnual “Interfaith Celebration of the Life and Legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” The event took place at the hospital in New Brunswick on Monday, January 17, the holiday marking the birth of the slain civil rights leader.

For information on upcoming events sponsored by the Saint peter’s Foundation, go to saintpetershcs.com/Foundation.

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bashir baskinger/saint peter’s healthcare system (3)

Magnet for mettle In January, Saint Peter’s University Hospital became one of only six hospitals worldwide to be honored for nursing excellence for the fourth time as a “Magnet” hospital by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Nursing leaders who were instrumental in the application proc e s s f o r t h e M a g n e t d e s i g n a t i o n were: top row from left, Cheryl Saffer, D o n n a We e k s , L i n d a C a r r o l l, L i n d a Spishock and Nona Juan; and, bottom row from left, Debbie Strauss, Elizabeth Wykpisz and Jennifer Butwill.

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gatherings 2

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Beerfest

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James D’Heron Memorial Foundation Har vest Moon Brewer y and Ca fe in New Br unswick , January 16, jimmydfoundation.org Attendees at this charity event enjoyed beer and prizes, and proceeds suppor ted the Connecticut Burns Foundation’s Children’s B urn Camp.

1 Attendees loved the bagpipe per formance. 2 Erin D’Heron Varga and Frank Kopf 3 Patrons sampled a fine brew. 4 Par ticipants awaited the raf fle drawing.

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Golf Classic

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Middlesex County College Foundation Colonia Country Club in Colonia, October 14, middlesexcc.edu/foundation More than 65 golfers teed off to raise money for Middlesex Community College scholarships, then joined other supporters for a reception, “tricky tray” raffle and silent auction in the country club’s ballroom.

5 Golfers practiced their swings. 6 Darlene Gillette 7 Xenia Balabkins, Brian DeUriante and Barbara Bernard 8 Michael Maroney Jr., lef t, with another player 7

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Flowers on Stage

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MAC Events New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center, February 17-20, macevents.com Green thumbs and garden enthusiats gathered for the 9th annual Flower and Garden Show, which included gardening displays, workshops, luncheons and seminars. Exhibitors embraced this year’s “Gardens on Broadway” theme by featuring landscape designs inspired by their favorite shows.

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to be considered for gatherings, send high-resolution photos and information about your event to gatherings@wainscotmedia.com.

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9 Attendees browsed lily planters. 10 Bright flowers and yellow pavement embodied the “yellow brick road” from Wicked. 11 A life-size model of Shrek stood in the swamp garden that he calls home.

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april 2011

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T HE ULT I M AT E

SPA GUIDE

I

t used to be that going for a spa treatment once a year—for special occasions like birthdays, anniversaries or holidays— was considered extravagant. Now people realize that getting regular spa treatments isn’t a luxury, but an important adjunct to good health. The benefits of massages (soothing your aching muscles and releasing toxins), facials (clearing your pores and hydrating your skin) and medical treatments (removing those unsightly spider veins) have helped bring spas growing acceptance. In fact, some insurance plans even cover massage

ANARA MEDSPA & COSMETIC LASER CENTER 1140 Stelton Rd. Piscataway, 732.777.9577 anaramedspa.com

QUICK FIX

Hate your spider veins? Regret that tattoo? Bugged by your brown spots? Fix all your cosmetic woes at Anara, a medi-spa offering a wide range of treatments such as laser vein removal, laser tattoo removal, chemical peels, Botox and fillers. The staff physician, Ram Chandra, M.D., and esthetician, Olga Babynyuk, are widely praised for their friendly and thorough service.

AQUASPA DAY SPA & NAIL SALON 718 Route 18 East Brunswick 732.238.6522 aquaspasalon.com

REFRESH AND RELAX Stress relief is yours at this modern, serene spa, and you won’t

be disappointed with the array of treatments available—including an anti-aging facial (formulated with Italy’s Tivoli spring water, famous for its therapeutic effects), a mud wrap (which draws impurities from the body), a shiatsu deeptissue massage (which stimulates pressure points to restore wellbeing) and a reflexology pedicure (which not only makes your feet look pretty, but is also thought to open energy pathways in your body).

AVANCE AESTHETICS SKIN CARE 1870 Route 27, Suite 2B Edison, 732.287.3223 avanceaesthetics.com

TODAY’S TECHNOLOGY AT ITS FINEST

Licensed esthetician Winnie Lee offers free consultations to provide clients with customized skin care based on their distinct needs. With

WE FOUND THE BEST SPAS IN MIDDLESEX COUNTY SO YOU CAN GET PAMPERED NOW—AND ALL YEAR LONG BY RACHEL RABKIN PECHMAN

and some of the dermatologic options. Plus, the stress relief you’ll get from regular pampering trips to your favorite spa is hard to match. You spend your days balancing work, family and obligations—you deserve a little R & R. We picked the best spas in Middlesex County specializing in ever ything from basics such as massages and facials to the unusual, like belly casts (for pregnant women) and photorejuvenation (to even out skin tones). So book a sitter, put work on hold and treat yourself to a day of bliss.

the latest technology available, you can choose from cryotherapy (to freeze away skin irregularities), laser hair removal, permanent cosmetic enhancement (a method of applying natural pigments to the skin to create permanent eyebrows, eyeliner and more), microdermabrasion (to remove old skin cells and smooth the sur face of the face) and facials.

BOCA SALONS DAY SPA & TANNING Lions Plaza 1626 Route 130 North Brunswick 732.422.9229 Renaissance Commons 333 Forsgate Drive Jamesburg, 732.521.2700 bocadayspas.com

HAIR AND SKIN CARE WITH FLAIR These elegant salons offer a full range of hair-care services for adults and children in addition to an array of skin, nail and body treatments. The

manicures and pedicures provide something for everyone (highlights include paraffin dips and acrylics), the facials are varied (from deeppore cleansing to cellregenerating peels), the waxing services are reasonably priced and the massages include specialties such as hot stone and aromatherapy.

EDEN ORGANIX 215 Raritan Ave. Highland Park, 888.907.3336 edenorganix.com

ECO-CONSCIOUS BEAUTY

“What we put onto our largest organ, the skin, has lasting consequences for our health and well-being,” says founder Valerie Mason-Robinson. That’s why her spa offers premium organic treatments that are free of harmful toxins. So you can let your tension melt away with a restorative massage infused with essential oils, or a warm

shea butter wrap that will leave your skin feeling silky smooth. Even the waxing services are done with gentle organic milk and honey, cream, and green tea waxes. All products sold at the spa are organic and preservative-free. Another reason this spa will make you feel good from the inside out? Ten percent of profits are donated to nonprofit organizations that help the environment, women and children.

GENTLE HEALING WELLNESS SPA 1274 Cranbury/South River Rd. Cranbury, 609.409.2700 gentlehealingspa.com

DECADENT INDULGENCE

Located in a luxurious 1853 Queen Anne Victorian farmhouse, this spa prides itself on catering to the needs of each guest. Whether you indulge in an exfoliating scrub, a stress-relieving

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aromatherapy herbal soak, a romantic champagne couple’s massage, or a rejuvenating milk manicure (meant to give your hands a healthier, more youthful appearance), you will be treated like royalty. Not ready to leave after your treatments are finished? Relax on the grounds (featuring a gazebo and sunlit patios), where you can be wined and dined for lunch, hors d’oeuvres or dinner.

Lookin Good Salon & Day Spa 9 Lincoln Highway Edison, 732.906.0601 lookingoodspa.net

Beautification and relaxation

The mission at this spa is not just to help you look good, as the name implies. The professional staff also aims to nurture your mind, body and spirit. Whether you’re in need of a quick shampoo and blow dry, a leisurely pedicure or massage, a heavenly Hawaiian salt glow body treatment (a body scrub using hydrating sea salts and coconut cream) or even a makeup lesson, you will leave here looking and feeling renewed.

Massage Envy 314 Route 18 North East Brunswick 732.238.4444 massageenvy.com

A massage for every body

Massage Envy makes stress relief af fordable and convenient. Open until 10 p.m. on weeknights, this spa makes a real ef for t to help you fit relaxation into your busy day. Sample a facial or a massage (such as the sports, deep-tissue or Swedish, to name a few), or sign up for a Massage Envy membership

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and enjoy discounted massages as often as you’d like.

Serenity Day Spa 330 Old Bridge Turnpike South River, 732.257.8118 halcyondayssalonsandspas.com

Serenity now One

of the 40 members of the prestigious Halcyon Days Salons and Spas, Serenity Day Spa has been providing quality service to clients for more than 25 years. It’s located in the restored historic Van Nest house, and the professional staf f de s ign s all tre atme nts (including ma ss age s, body wraps, facial s, make up le sson s, h air removal, hair care and nail care) to suit your particular needs, making it easy for you to sit back and enjoy the pampering.

Skin by Nicole Day Spa 7 Lincoln Hwy., Ste. 106 Edison, 732.906.8800

Skin solutions

Nicole Corbin, a licensed cosmetologist and esthetician, provides one-on-one personalized skin care at her specialty spa. With nearly 20 years of experience, Corbin offers facials, waxing, eyelash perming (giving lashes a curled, luscious look), body treatments (such as seaweed wraps), microdermabrasion and LED light therapy (which promotes healthy tissue growth and can reduce age spots, wrinkles and acne), among other services. Trusted by dermatologists in the area and by a loyal clientele, Corbin puts the needs of each client first.

Solace Day Spa The Shoppes at Old Bridge 3855 Highway 9 Old Bridge, 732.970.0100 thesolacespa.com

Where tranquility and peace reign

Enter Solace Day Spa and feel calm wash over you. Before or after your treatment (which may include options such as massages, hair care, facials, body treatments, mani-pedis and more), linger in the sauna or steam room. Or take a dip in the small, heated tranquility pool while gentle music plays and you bask in the warmth of an adjacent fireplace. Want to include the family? There are special ser vices designed for men and children.

Voi Spa 253 Route 18 South East Brunswick, 732.390.9390

voisalonandspa.com

Quality care

Voi Spa offers superior hair and nail care at affordable prices—and that’s not all. Waxing, inten se pulse light (IPL) hair removal, microdermabrasion and teeth whitening are available in addition to the relaxing spa manicures and pedicures. The spa also specializes in bridal packages aimed to help you (and your bridal party) look your very best on your special day.

Vito Mazza Salon and Day Spa 114 Main St. Woodbridge, 732.636.0119 vitomazza.com

A welcome escape

What started as a small family barbershop more than 40 years ago has grown into a thriving salon and day spa with a personal touch. Clients value the salon’s warm and friendly ser vice as much as they value the relaxing treatments they receive there. Escape your daily grind by entering the soothing salon for a haircut and color, a mani-pedi, a facial or a massage, to name just a few of your many treatment options.

2/25/11 9:33 AM


ake charge of your well-being! You know it’s important to stay on top of doctor visits. But optimum health involves nurturing your mind, body and spirit When Donna Mezzina started taking yoga classes nine years ago, her goal was to get her body into shape and achieve more flexibility and strength. As she progressed in her yoga practice, however, she realized she was getting a lot more than she bargained for: She was experiencing a change not just in her body, but in her mind as well. “I noticed so much more than just a physical improvement; over time, I realized I was also learning how to relax and calm the mind, and it carried over into helping me feel happier and stronger in my everyday life,” says Mezzina, who is now a certified yoga instructor teaching at Innovative Wellness Center in Jamesburg. Through the holistic practice of yoga, Mezzina learned a valuable lesson: Being healthy doesn’t just mean keeping your body fit; it means taking charge of your whole wellbeing—body, mind, and spirit. Countless studies confirm that there is an inseparable connection between mind and body. One such study, done by a Harvard researcher, shows that more than 60 percent of doctor visits are due to stress-related issues. “Stress exacerbates many underlying medical conditions,” says Shira Goldberg, M.D., a geriatrician and internist at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. It has been linked to weakened immune function and increased inf lammation in your body and can lead to all kinds of problems—big and small— such as c olds, gastr ic ref lu x, ir r ita ble bowe l syndrome, migraines, teeth grinding, hear t disease and cancer. The bottom line: In order

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left: Cultura RM/masterfile. right: Bet tina Salomon/masterfile

by R achel R abkin Pechman


to achieve true health, it’s crucial that you look beyond your strictly physical health and the numbers on your cholesterol test (although it is important to stay on top of regular health screenings—see page 32), to examine your whole lifestyle, which includes stress reduction, mind-body activities, spirituality, nutrition and sleep.

the Importance of Exercise

Experts agree that exercise is one of the best things you can do to relieve stress, enhance mood and benefit overall health. Not only does it improve cardiovascular health, flexibility, coordination, strength and bone density, it also releases endorphins, lowers stress hormones and ups your energy level. To get even more of a mental boost, you could try a mind-body activity such as yoga or tai chi, which helps you be mindful of your present thoughts and breathing patterns and promotes inner calm. These practices have been shown to relieve stress, lower blood pressure and improve health in various ways. “I view these exercises as a wonderful part of a health program, and they may even lessen the need for people to take certain medications,” says Dr. Goldberg. But you don’t need to become a Zen master to include mind-body activity in your life. Most any exercise can have a mind-body component if you simply shift your mental focus while doing it. For instance, go outside into nature to exercise and feel the wind on your cheeks while you free your mind. Whatever it is you like to do, whether it’s walking, yoga, gardening, dancing or kickboxing, do it mindfully—take in the environment, listen to your breathing or feel the beat of the music in your core as you dance or kickbox—and you’ll give your mind as big a boost as you give your body.

left: Cultura RM/masterfile. right: Bet tina Salomon/masterfile

Come On, Get Happy

Another key way to make yourself healthier and more energetic is to make yourself happier. And as you can imagine, there are many ways to accomplish that if you give yourself the opportunity. “Find something that you enjoy—something that challenges your mind in a creative way—whether it’s a new hobby, reading the newspaper, going to museums, traveling or taking an adult education class,” says Dr. Goldberg. You’ll also feel happier if you take time to de-clutter your mind when you feel crazed. For Mezzina, meditating does just that, and as a result, she is more content and even spiritual. “I now have a clearer perspective, which helps me deal with life in a more positive way,” she says. “I am a happier, stronger person inside and out.” Another way to get happy is to connect with others. After all, we are social creatures, and research shows that people with social ties actually live longer. “Having relationships is key to improving mood and maintaining functionality,” says Dr. Goldberg. So have lunch with a friend, snuggle with your spouse or volunteer in your town. It will help you feel good, lower stress and ultimately be healthier.

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Most any exercise can have a mind-body component if you simply shift your mental focus while doing it.

Nutrition Know-How

Anyone who has ever skipped a meal could tell you that when you don’t eat regularly (or healthfully), you end up feeling cranky, lethargic and depleted. That’s because taking in nutritious fuel on a regular basis is key to the proper functioning of your mind and body. So instead of grabbing a fat-filled muffin on your way to work or a processed bag of chips for lunch, put pure, nutrient-dense, fiber-rich foods into your body throughout the day—and don’t forget to keep a drink of water handy. Unsure of which foods to choose? Dr. Goldberg recommends filling your plate with color ful vegetables and fruit because they are rich in nutrients (think of the lush red of juicy tomatoes and the dark green of leafy spinach). Then, eat moderately and at regular intervals, and you’ll keep your blood sugar stable, your energy up, your waistline in check and your mind sharp.

Sleep Sense

Most Americans skimp on sleep because we feel our lives are too busy to fit it in, but we all would be wise to make time for more shut-eye because the sleep period is when the body and mind repair themselves. “When people don’t get adequate, quality sleep, there are real consequences for cognitive and social function—for instance, people can’t be as effective at work or as much in control of their mood,” says Dr. Goldberg. To make sure you get the sleep you need, practice good sleep hygiene, she suggests. That means that you should aim to ease yourself into a calming bedtime routine, avoid exercise within two hours of going to bed, turn off the TV or computer in your room, limit heavy foods close to bedtime, and try to still your mind before sleep. This will send you on your way toward a good night’s rest.

2/25/11 9:38 AM


ealth Screenings Taking charge of your whole well-being me ans nurturing your mind and spirit— and staying on top of your physical he alth. To keep your body in tip-top shape, check this list of the vital he alth screenings adults should ge t regul arly test

who

what

when

Fasting lipoprotein check

women and men

A blood test that screens for risk of heart disease and stroke by measuring the two types of cholesterol—HDL and LDL—and triglycerides, which are fat-like substances in the body

Blood pressure

women and men

Colorectal screenings

women and men

Skin check

women and men

A simple device wrapped around your arm measures the pressure of blood vessels to screen for risk of heart disease and stroke. Three tests that screen for colorectal cancer: highsensitivity fecal occult blood test (FOBT), which checks for hidden blood in stool samples; flexible sigmoidoscopy, in which a flexible, lighted tube is used to inspect the interior walls of the rectum and part of the colon; colonoscopy, in which a flexible, lighted tube is used to inspect the interior walls of the rectum and the entire colon A visual examination by a dermatologist that screens for skin cancer

At least every five years. Have the test done more frequently (per your doctor’s recommendation) if you have high cholesterol or other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or are over age 50 for women or age 45 for men. Ideally, every year along with your annual physical

Bone mineral density test

women and men

An X-ray exam that measures bone density and determines bone strength and risk for osteoporosis

Dental exam

women and men women and men

An oral exam of the teeth and gums done by a dentist—and a cleaning An optometrist or ophthalmologist checks for any eye conditions, such as glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration, and assesses your vision.

Pelvic exam, Pap smear and HPV test

women

A pelvic exam screens for signs of STDs and abnormalities of the cervix or uterus. A Pap smear, in which the cervix is swabbed to obtain a sample of cells, checks for infections and abnormal cervical cells. The Pap smear is a preliminary screen for the human papillomavirus (HPV), which can lead to cervical cancer. If Pap results show abnormalities, the sample will be further tested for HPV.

Breast exams and mammogram

women

A breast exam is a physical check of the breasts that helps determine if there are any changes in the tissue that could indicate cancer. A mammogram is an X-ray of the breasts that screens for cancer.

Prostate screenings

men

Genital exams

men

A digital rectal examination (DRE) is a physical exam of the rectum done by a medical professional to assess if there are any bumps on the prostate that may indicate cancer. A prostatespecific antigen (PSA) test is a blood test that screens for prostate cancer. Testicular screening is a self-exam of the testes in which you feel for any changes that may indicate a cancerous tumor. STD screening, done by a medical professional, determines whether or not there are any sexually transmitted diseases present.

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Once a year unless your dermatologist suggests otherwise People with no risk factors should get their first test at age 65 (women) or 70 (men). If, however, you are 50 or older and you have risk factors for osteoporosis, or if you are a woman of menopausal or postmenopausal age (yet younger than 65) with risk factors, ask your doctor about getting screened earlier. Every six months unless your dentist recommends otherwise There are no universal standards for frequency of exams. Some doctors recommend yearly exams, while others suggest exams every two to four years. If you have an eye condition or you wear glasses, you may need to go more frequently. Recent recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists state that women age 30 and older should get Pap smears every two years, depending on the results and their doctor’s recommendations. If you have had irregular results in the past or you have other risk factors for cervical cancer, you may need more frequent screening. Experts are not in complete agreement as to the recommended screening schedule. The American Cancer Society recommends that women age 40 and older do a breast self-exam monthly and get a clinical (physical) breast exam by a health professional and a mammogram every year. If you are at increased risk for breast cancer, you may need to start screening earlier and get additional tests. Many experts recommend DRE and PSA every one to two years for men age 50 and older. Discuss this with your doctor based on your personal and family history because experts disagree as to when testing should start and how frequently it should be done. Discuss this with your doctor based on your age and sexual activity. There are no standard recommendations for everyone.

These recommendations are general guidelines. If you have a personal or family history of these illnesses, or you are at increased risk for these illnesses for any other reason, your doctor may suggest screenings at an earlier age and/or on a more frequent basis.

Eye exam

FOBT—every year starting at age 50; sigmoidoscopy—every five years starting at 50; colonoscopy—every 10 years starting at 50

to send this chart to friends or family members, visit middlesexhealthandlife.com.

2/28/11 12:25 PM


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Dominant architectural features can be a rich source for woodwork themes. Here, a glass and wood screen has been inspired by the geometric grid of the ceiling beams. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: With moveable screens and partition

walls, an open-plan space provides the best of both worlds: intimate and sociable areas; In open-plan zones, the partition between areas can be designed to incorporate lots of storage; Plan to streamline large appliances. Neatly sunk into a false partition wall, this fridge all but disappears in a small galley.

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Harmony at home s m a rt pl a nning ca n he l p yo u cre at e a s pace t h at re a l ly work s

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by Judith Wilson Photography by Jan Baldwin

W

e all long for a harmonious home—a tempting space where color and texture blend seamlessly and each room has a visual connection with the next. A home so well-planned you can chat on the phone while stirring supper, where work lights are aptly placed, and there’s always a connection for the laptop. Even better, one whose space configuration perfectly matches your lifestyle, whether that means flexible areas for socializing or a tiny cottage for two. In an ideal world, we’d all reach design nirvana with a newly built home. The reality, however, is that most of us will need to tweak the property we already own. The first step in creating a harmonious home is to think through why an existing home isn’t working, and how it may be altered. Is the lighting system beyond its years? Do you have to run from room to room to answer the phone? Apply these thought processes across the whole home, not just to random rooms. Think of it as a home health-check. And when it’s time for decorative decisions, the whole-home approach makes light work of creating a cohesive scheme. Many of us plan individual rooms with little thought to how ever ything hangs together visually. Yet the dynamic of any home is that we travel constantly through it catching glimpses from room to room, even moving furniture between spaces. So it makes sense to pick a limited palette of colors and surfaces, which can be reinterpreted around the house, giving balance and contrast. In its simplest form, a unifying hard sur face might be wood flooring that runs across the ground floor. Or it may be the decision to choose polished plaster walls throughout, or oak-paneled storage ever ywhere. When it comes to fabrics, plan schemes in the context of the whole home so that key

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2/25/11 9:50 AM


textures or patterns repeat from room to room. Plain curtains or Roman blinds, all identical, can be wonder fully unifying. So, too, can the same slip covers in every room: white cotton, say, or linen. If it’s difficult to work out which fabrics will suit a variety of rooms, get a large sheet of cardboard, sketch out every room on a particular floor, then start to assemble fabrics. You will soon see if a gray denim upholstery or cream linen curtains will work well throughout. As for color, a home feels calmer if colors blend smoothly throughout the whole interior. A carefully chosen palette (from three to six shades) can be reworked in var ying tones and quantities in ever y room. The core palette will depend not just on the colors you personally find uplifting, but on how light or dark the property is, whether the planned mood is cozy or tranquil, and if the desired decorative effect is dramatic or soothing. The best homes have a balance of great spaces. Be they boxy and modern or a mix of big and small, it’s not dimensions that matter, but the ebb and flow from intimate space to openplan and back again. If you have a big room, list the room’s good and bad architectural points. How can you enhance or correct them? Decide what your focal point will be. Do you need to add one? Ask yourself what functions the large space must fulfill. How will you arrange furniture to create different activity zones? Does your furniture look in proportion? If you have small rooms, consider visual tricks to prevent claustrophobia. A room will seem bigger if the borders between individual planes (walls, floors, ceiling) are blurred. So try painting ever ything in one color. Check that a fireplace and mantel aren’t too large for the room, and plan treatments that elongate, rather than shorten, windows: full-length curtains, not tiny blinds. It’s a common misconception that large furniture clutters up a small room. In fact, it can actually make it feel larger. So use scale cleverly, to trick the eye. A four-poster bed can make a bedroom ceiling seem higher; a generous round table sociably fills a dining room. The key is to keep furniture shapes streamlined, accessories bold yet minimal, and—most important—plan room layouts for ease of movement. Just as every lifestyle is unique, there’s only one individual who can guarantee a truly personalized environment—and that is you. So take responsibility for it. Time spent planning a tailor-made home shouldn’t be a chore, but a pleasure. Enjoy the ride. Hardworking, practical details—from the flow of hot water and heating to well-planned storage—are the lifeblood of a home. Seamlessly incorporated, they make daily living more comfortable. But plan them methodically. 1 Get a professional to check wiring and plumbing. If it needs overhauling, is the budget available? 2 Are any rooms consistently chilly or too hot? Do any radiators break up the run of a wall or spoil a window? If the style of radiators is jarring, is underfloor or grille heating an option? 3 Do you want the ambience of an open or faux gas fire? 4 Are there enough work area lights? In the right places? Which rooms need extra lighting to improve ambience or drama? 5 Does the plumbing work well? Is the tank big enough to cope with several bathrooms? 6 Is feeble water pressure a problem, or should you add a water pump to improve water flow? 7 Will TV/music/computer be shown or concealed? from top to bottom: Spare space, from a room alcove to a landing, can be “grown into” for a study or quiet corner; For music fans, installing ceiling or wall speakers in every room is a must; A large bedroom runs the risk of feeling like an impersonal hotel room. To add atmosphere, create a seating zone in the spare space at the end of the bed. These chairs are placed in front of a built-in TV.

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visit middlesexhealthandlife.com for more home he alth checklists to see how your home me asures up.

photos and excerpt: Harmonious Home © Loupe Images/Ryland Peters

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2/28/11 12:13 PM


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2/25/11 9:53 AM


shop local leader

furniture, outside the box for Edward Massood of Thomasville home furnishings, the product itself is only the beginning Getting there

After 30 years with his family’s business in Nor th Carolina, Fair Lawn native Edward Massood became president of Thomasville Home Furnishings of New Jersey, with store locations in Woodbridge, Princeton, East Hanover, Eatontown and Paramus. Motivated by service to his customers, this local entrepreneur sells high-quality furniture to “help dreams come true.”

Thomasville Home furnishings of woodbridge 453 Green Street Woodbridge, 732.726.0200 thomasvillewoodbridge.com

How did you get into the furniture business?

When I graduated from Seton Hall University in 1978, I moved to Nor th Carolina to join my family’s furniture carrier company, MGM Transport. It had started only in 1975, and because I was a recent grad looking for a job, I decided it wasn’t a bad gig. I became president of MGM in 1997. Though we were a transportation company, we handled furniture exclusively, so we decided to go into retail, becoming partners with Thomasville Furniture Industries. We opened three stores in Virginia in 2001 and three stores in New Jersey in 2002. In 2008, I made the decision to focus my energies on running the New Jersey stores.

portrait: marisa sandora. other images courtesy of thomasville

What lines of furniture do you carry?

We offer all the major collections from Thomasville, including The Hills of Tuscany, Ernest Hemingway and Fredericksburg. Studio 455, another favorite line, features contemporary products. how about accessories? We carry local brands like Nourison Rugs, a Saddle Brook company with a great selection. Being nearby, they can deliver within three days. And all our custom window treatments are produced in local work rooms in Totowa—right here in New Jersey. How would you describe your products?

They can be considered heirloom furniture; people hand down sets to their children because of the quality and history behind the Thomasville name. Our special strength has been in custom upholstery because it permits you as the customer to “have it your way.” We figure those who want a bedroom set out of a box can go anywhere. What sets you apart from other retailers?

Furniture is only part of what we sell. We

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deliver, set up and “build” a room—and provide support throughout the lifetime of a purchase. We provide “deluxe treatments” by cleaning and inspecting every piece of furniture before it goes on the truck to ensure a smooth delivery. If anything goes wrong, we provide replacements within 24 hours or minor repairs within 48. Making customers’ visions a reality can be an emotional experience. We work with the New Jersey Affordable Housing Management Association (JAHMA), helping people who have lost their homes to fire and other disasters, and you should see the smiles when I deliver furniture their clients can call their own. What’s your advice for choosing furniture

Everyone has a dream of what they want their room to look like. And most people—whether or not they have a design degree—are concerned about making a mistake. If you have all the necessar y resources at hand, you can minimize your chances of making a mistake. That’s what we try to provide. What EXPLAINS YOUR SUCCESS? Our staff is the finest in the industry—they’re in it for the long haul. We provide structure and the products, but our people make the difference. —jessica Solloway wisely?

send your ideas for “shop local leader” to shoplocalleader@wainscotmedia.com.

clockwise from top left: Edward Massood; Diffused Lines rug from Nourison Rugs; Ernest Hemingway Masai Curio China Cabinet; Rivage Signature Chair and Ottoman; Ernest Hemingway Safari Writing Desk and Chair

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G e t t i n g t h er e

tastes

Due Mari Pesce e Vinoteca 78 A lbany St. New Br unswick 732.29 6.16 0 0 duemarinj.com The Frog and The Peach 29 De nnis St. New Br unswick 732.846.3216 frogandpeach.com

for thought

The elegant dining room at Due Mari

Due Mari Pesce E Vinoteca When Francois Rousseau was growing up in the south of France, he went with his mother to the market ever y day to buy fresh fish. “I would wait for the sea urchin to be fished, and I’d eat it as soon as it came out,” he remembers. “Nothing could be any better than that. Nothing fresher, nothing tastier.” He strives to offer

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that same just-off-the-boat taste in the dishes he serves at his modern Italian restaurant in New Brunswick. Due Mari opened in 2008 and is run by the same team who brought the successful Due Terre Enoteca to Bernardsville. Because that restaurant had an ear th mindset (Due Terre means “two lands” in Italian) Rousseau and his par tners decided to make this location more seafood-focused (Due Mari means “two seas”), although they also offer plenty of meat and other options. And the fish isn’t the only thing that is incredibly fresh. “Pret t y much ever y thing in the restaurant is homemade, from bread to pasta to ice cream,” says Rousseau. “We try to get everything organic, and we use a lot of Jersey products, which promotes local business. We know these people. They come to the restaurant, and we know the passion they put into their produce.” Due Mari offers gluten-free pasta, and whole-wheat linguini is served in a popular dish with a shrimp sausage that is made in the restaurant. Other signature menu options are the octopus (“so tender and made to perfection,” says Rousseau) and the grilled Mediterranean branzino, ser ved with escarole, ovenroasted tomatoes, Caribbean white shrimp and black olive vinaigrette. “I love that people know they can trust us for fresh fish,” he says. “If you get bad seafood, it’s terrible, and it turns you off seafood. But if it is fresh and cooked the right way, there’s nothing better.” Rousseau believes in keeping things simple so that the true essence of the dish comes through. “It’s funny when people learn about the food and they’re surprised it isn’t complicated,” he says, “just simple dishes made of fresh food.”

COURTESY OF Due Mari Pesce e Vinoteca AND The Frog and The Peach

Man y restaur ants are preparing dishes in a way that is se asonal, lighter and more health-conscious than ever before— without sacrificing fl avor. Here, a couple of our favorites

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by marisa sandora

COURTESY OF Due Mari Pesce e Vinoteca AND The Frog and The Peach

The Frog and The Peach As co-owner of New Brunswick’s The Frog and the Peach for more than 27 years, Betsy Alger has been serving fresh, healthy, seasonal fare since long before it was trendy. “I was trained in what was then known as ‘California cuisine,’ and that’s what we wanted to carry over to our restaurant, which at the time was pretty revolutionary, not just for New Brunswick, but for the East Coast,” says Alger. She and her husband and business partner, Jim Black, both have degrees in horticulture, “so we knew about seasonal ingredients, especially produce, and what was available and what it took to produce it. We brought that understanding with us.” The Frog and the Peach was the result of their shared love of food that was healthy and “real,” according to Alger. “We were looking to do a business that expressed who we were, rather than a business for the sake of getting rich quick,” she explains. Their commitment to producing honest, approachable cuisine has never wavered, says Alger, but the restaurant isn’t stuck in a time warp, either. “We’ve remained current in our cuisine, service and décor. We’ve stayed in touch and changed with the times,” she says. These days, Alger is happy to report, patrons are more knowledgeable about food, how it’s produced and where it comes from. To please health-conscious guests, the restaurant offers two “Farm to Table” prix fixe menus featuring sustainably grown organic produce from local growers, seafood from Jersey waters and poultry from nearby Griggstown Farm. (The Frugal Farmer Prix Fixe Menu is $32 for three courses, and the 5-Course Tasting Menu is $59 without wine, $105 with.) Alger explains that buying smaller quantities of ingredients from local farmers allows chefs to be more creative in the kitchen. “Sometimes from broadline distributors you can’t get less than a case, so if you’re going to buy an item, you’ll have to make sure it’s on your menu in several places, or it’ll go bad on you,” she says. “If you’re getting something from a farmer, you can just buy a small amount and use it the way you want to. It’s harder to manage, but it’s more fun. The people in the kitchen love what they do. When they can work with a really cool ingredient, they’re happier, and you can taste that in the food.”

Seared day boat sea scallops from The Frog and the Peach

Sea Scallop Tartare From Chef Bruce Lefebvre, The Frog and the Peach (makes 20 to 25 hors d’oeuvres) INGREDIENTS 1½ cups fresh sea scallops, finely chopped 2 tablespoons pickled ginger, finely chopped ¾ cup apple, peeled and brunoise ½ jalapeño, minced 1 cup chives, chopped ¹⁄ ³ cup extra virgin olive oil 1 seedless cucumber or 20-25 rice crackers salt and white pepper to taste

Preparation

Combine the scallops, ginger, apple, jalapeño and chives in a bowl and gently toss with the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours (and up to overnight) to allow the flavors to combine.

—betsy alger, the frog and the peach

To Serve

Place a dollop of the scallop mixture on a ½-inch slice of cucumber or a rice cracker. Garnish with additional crumbled cracker if you wish. for a recipe from due mari pesce e vinoteca, visit middlesexhealthandlife.com.

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“ when people in the kitchen work with a re ally cool ingredient, the y’re happier, and you can taste that in the food.”

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power food

Glorious Grapefruit

Tart and tangy in flavor, this citrus frui t has health benefits that are prett y sweet

powers

Named for their tendency to grow in clusters like grapes, these juicy gems were discovered in the West Indies in the early 1700s and are believed to be the result of a natural crossbreeding between an orange and a pomelo. We can thank the Spanish for introducing grapefruit to Florida in the 1820s, though they grew grapefruit trees for their beauty, turned off by the fruit’s slightly bitter taste. Today the United States is the world’s top grapefruit producer, with the majority of our country’s supply grown in Florida. You can find the fruit in three main varieties, categorized by flesh color: white, pink/red and star ruby/rio red.

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buy · store · grow Don’t attempt to grow a grapefruit tree in your backyard in New Jersey—the fruit thrives in warm, subtropical climates. Luckily, you can purchase grapefruit at your local grocery store year-round, and right now is the height of the grapefruit season, when they are ripe and contain the most antioxidants, according to research. Choose a grapefruit that is glossy, smooth, round and heavy for its size, steering clear of those with brown or soft spots. Store grapefruit at room temperature for up to a week, or in your refrigerator for up to eight weeks. Let grapefruit warm to room temperature before consuming, whether you prefer to scoop yours out with a spoon or slice it into wedges. —Kristin Colella

Kieran Scott/Getty Images

did you know?

Step aside, OJ: Grapefruit can also help ward off nasty colds with its high vitamin C content (just half of a grapefruit contains 80 percent of your recommended daily value). The fruit is also a good source of vitamin A, vitamin B6, potassium, thiamin and niacin, and contains pectin, a form of soluble fiber that may lower cholesterol. But not all grapefruit are created equal: The pink and red varieties contain lycopene, a powerful antioxidant that may play a role in reducing cancer risk, and are more vitamin-rich than the white. Grapefruit have also been touted for their supposed weight-reducing powers. Advocates of the “Grapefruit Diet”—a fad diet popular in the 1970s that involved consuming the fruit at every meal—claimed that grapefruit contains a special fat-burning enzyme. While research has not supported this theory, at just 40 calories for half of a medium-sized grapefruit, there’s no doubt this nutrient-packed super fruit is a great option for those watching their weight.

Visit middlesexhealthandlife.com for a great grapefruit recipe.

2/28/11 12:10 PM


where toeat f i n e

avenel

c a s ua l

fa m i ly

jamesburg

BUD’S HUT Casual dining featuring seafood and steak, 906 Route 1, 732.634.5530

fiddleheads American fine dining, Sunday brunch ser ved, 27 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.0878

OLD BAY RESTAURANT Contemporary French dining, 61 Church St., 732.246.3111

carteret

maria’s Family-friendly traditional Mexican fare, 194 Buckelew Ave., 732.656.9722

SPICE’IN Contemporary Indian cuisine, 371 George St., 732.247.1177

kendall park

VERDIGRE Eclectic dining with tapas bar, 25 Liberty St., 732.247.2250

Chateau Madrid Spanish and Portuguese fare, 8 Holly St., 732.969.0692 julian’s American steak house with seafood options, breakfast ser ved, 1000 Roosevelt Ave., 732.541.9500

colonia

Luso Barbecue American and Portuguese BBQ, 330 Inman Ave., 732.499.0455

cranbury

cranbury inn Traditional American dining, 21 S. Main St., 609.655.5595 cranbury Pizza Casual Italian pizzeria, 63 N. Main St., 609.409.9930

dusal’s Casual Italian seafood and pizza eatery, 3300 Route 27, 732.821.9711

north brunswick

shogun 27 Hibachi steak house with sushi bar, 3376 Route 27, 732.422.1117

Arthur’s tavern Traditional American steak house, 644 Georges Rd., 732.828.1117

kingston

sizzlz asian grill Asian fusion fare, 2313 Route 1, 732.951.0141

eno terra Italian seafood, homemade pasta, extensive wine list, 4484 Kings Hwy., 609.497.1777 osteria procaccini Quaint Italian restaurant with organic and sustainable produce, Main St., 609.688.0007

Metuchen

the rusty nail Contemporary American eatery, 1609 Route 130, 732.831.4141

old bridge

BIG ED’S BARBECUE American Tex-Mex BBQ, 174 Route 34, 732.583.2626

zinna’s bistro Casual Italian fare, BYO, 1275 S. River Rd., 609.860.9600

Antonio’s brick oven pizza Traditional Italian pizzeria, 435 Main St., 732.603.0008

PONTE VECCHIO Classic Italian fare with seafood options, 3863 Route 516, 732.607.1650

dayton

Main Street Trattoria Upscale Italian cuisine, 413 Main St., 732.589.7141

perth amboy

fuji Japanese hibachi and sushi, 485 Georges Rd., 732.274.8830 la taverna Cozy traditional Italian dining, 375 Georges Rd., 732.274.2200

east brunswick

CASA NOVA 68 Traditional Italian fare, 68 Ryders Ln., 732.246.1888

edison

CAFÉ GALLO Family-style Italian dining, 1153 Inman Ave., 908.756.5752 Loucas Upscale American and Italian fare, 9 Lincoln Hwy., 732.549.8580 Meemah Casual Chinese and Malaysian cuisine, Colonial Village Shopping Center, 9 Lincoln Highway, 732.906.2223 MING Vegetarian-friendly pan-Asian fare, 1655 Oak Tree Rd. #185, 732.549.5051 MOGHUL Fine Indian cuisine, 1655-195 Oak Tree Rd., 732.549.5050 PENANG Malaysian and Thai eater y with a sushi bar, 505 Old Post Rd., 732.287.3038

Fords

MCLOONE’S WOODBRIDGE GRILLE Traditional American bar food, 3 Lafayette Rd., 732.512.5025 Villa Borghese Traditional Italian fare with modern twists, 432 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.0666

highl and park

MIDORI SUSHI Asian fusion with sushi bar, 237 Raritan Ave., 732.246.4511 pad thai inc. Vegetarian-friendly Thai eater y, 217 Raritan Ave., 732.247.9636 pithari taverna Greek and Mediterranean seafood fare, 28 Woodridge Ave., 732.572.0616

THE ORCHID Fine kosher dining, 455 Main St., 732.321.9829

THE BARGE Water front restaurant featuring steak and seafood dishes, 201 Front St., 732.442.3000

piscataway

SPICE MELANGE Upscale Indian eatery, 419 Main St., 732.906.9050

AL DENTE Traditional Italian eatery, 1665 Stelton Rd., 732.985.8220

middlesex

CHAND PALACE Family-friendly Indian restaurant, 1296 Centennial Ave., 732.465.1474

CARPACCIO Southern Italian fare, 651 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.3242

plainsboro

milltown

fresco Seafood and steak fare, prix fixe menu, 210 Ryders Ln., 732.246.7616

Casa Rosaria’s Italian Ristorante Classic Italian food with modern American influences, 607 Plainsboro Rd., 609.799.9009

tomato factory Family-friendly Italian fare, BYO, 264 Ryders Ln., 732.249.1199

crown of india Authentic Indian cuisine, 660 Plainsboro Rd., 609.275.5707

monmouth junction

east Asian fusion fare with bubble tea bar, 5 Market St., 609.750.3278

pierre’s Fine international dining, breakfast ser ved, 582 Georges Rd., 732.329.3219 SENS Asian Far East fusion cuisine, 4095 Route 1, 732.355.1919

monroe

sayreville

SPANISH RIVIERA Spanish and Mediterranean fare, 1776 Route 35, 732.316.1500

south amboy

garvey’s Family-friendly American eatery, 405 Gravel Hill Rd., 732.521.3311

Costa Verde Portuguese and Spanish cuisine featuring fresh seafood, 6039 Route 35 S., 732.727.7070

LA VILLA Casual Italian dining, 335 Applegarth Rd., 609.655.3338

south plainfield

new brunswick

2fifty4 Saint Peter’s University Hospital restaurant, offering healthy dishes and vegetarian options for breakfast, lunch and dinner, 254 Easton Ave., 732.846.2620 CARIBBEAN CAFÉ Cuban eatery, 285 George St., 732.846.2620 Due Mari pesce e vinoteca Modern Italian food featuring fresh, local and seasonal ingredients, 78 Albany St., 732.296.1600

adelines restorante Casual northern Italian dining, 2243 Hamilton Blvd., 908.755.8520 flanagan’s American and Irish pub fare, 2501 Plainfield Ave., 908.757.1818

south river

krakowiak Casual Polish restaurant, BYO, 42 Main St., 732.238.0433 ria-Mar Traditional Portuguese fare, 25 Whitehead Ave., 732.257.1100

woodbridge

The FROG and THE PEACH American fare with a focus on fresh ingredients, 29 Dennis St., 732.846.3216

chris michael’s steakhouse Seafood, steak and sushi bar, 40 Oakwood Ave., 732.634.5355

CASA GUISEPPE Southern Italian fare, 487 Route 27, 732.283.9111

KAIRO CAFÉ Casual Greek dining, 49 Bayard St., 732.545.2476

jj Bitting Brewing Co. Traditional American fare, 33 Main St., 732.634.2929

URBAN SPICE Authentic Indian fine dining, 42 Marconi Ave., 732.283.1043

MARITA’S CANTINA Classic Mexican fare, 1 Penn Plaza, 732.247.3840

mulberry street restaurant Italian seafood eatery, 739 Rahway Ave., 732.634.4699

iselin

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WINE + SPIRITS what to try, where to buy

Dan Ratti, owner/manager of Oak Tree Discount Wine & Spirits in South Plainfield, recommends wines in three “green” categories:

ORGANIC

CASA AL VENTO 2008 “Aria” Chianti Classico From Tuscany, Italy $20 “A harmonious wine—dry, warm and pleasantly tannic, its bouquet balanced between ripe red pulp fruit fragrances and spiced wooden notes”

MADE WITH ORGANIC GRAPES

COSTA AL SOLE 2008 Montepulciano From Abruzzo in central Italy $10 “A smooth, medium-bodied wine with bold, inviting aromas of sour cherry, spices and dried herbs, balanced by good acidity and soft tannins”

BIODYNAMIC

ECOFRIENDLY SIPPING

TODAY’S ORGANIC AND BIODYNAMIC WINES AREN’T JUST GOOD FOR YOU AND FOR THE PLANET, THEY’RE ALSO DELICIOUS If you’re a wine drinker who is concerned about protecting both your health and the environment, there’s good news. These days, vineyards that use healthy, environmentally friendly growing techniques are producing some of the tastiest wines in the world. “There is growing interest in organic and biodynamic wines, and the taste of these wines has improved a lot,” says Dan Ratti, owner/manager of Oak Tree Discount Wine & Spirits in South Plainfield. Organic and biodynamic wines aren’t just kinder to the soil; there’s evidence that they’re kinder to our bodies as well, containing more of the cholesterol-reducing compound resveratrol and more vitamin C, iron, magnesium and phosphorous. For a wine to be called organic, says the U.S. Department

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of Agriculture, it must come from a vineyard that for at least three years has refrained from using genetically modified seeds, chemical fertilizers or pesticides. USDA labels that say “100 Percent Organic” or “Organic” (which requires that 95 percent of ingredients be certified organic) also mean that no sulfites have been added, while the phrase “Made with Organic Grapes” means that a wine has been produced using at least 70 percent organic ingredients, and sulfites may have been added up to 100 parts per million as a preservative. (A word to the wise: Foreign labels may say “Certified Organic” even when the wine falls into the USDA’s “Made with Organic Grapes” category.) Sulfites occur naturally in wine in small quantities because they’re a by-product of the fermentation process. They have also been added to wines for centuries to prevent oxidation and spoilage. But for about 1 percent of us, sulfites can cause allergic reactions such as asthma or stomach cramps. So if there’s a chance you’re allergic, stick with “100 Percent Organic” or “Organic” wine to avoid these added sulfites. Biodynamic wines are another earth-friendly, pesticide-free option to consider. The term “biodynamic” means that a wine is made from grapes grown with an agricultural system inspired by the teachings of the early 20th-century Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner—a system reputed to be better for the soil. To earn this label, a wine must meet strict standards set by an international certifying body called the Demeter Association. Biodynamic growing practices can sound a bit strange to the uninitiated. They include planting, pruning and har vesting according to the moon’s phases, and sprinkling a mixture that includes diluted cow manure on the vines. Critics contend that the biodynamic approach has little scientific support, but enthusiasts say these wines excel in what the French call “terroir,” expression of the unique flavor of a wine’s place of origin. And a blind taste test conducted by Fortune magazine in 2004 gave biodynamic boosters some support. Twenty biodynamic wines were pitted against similar conventional wines, and 19 of the biodynamics were declared superior. —TIMOTHY KELLEY

TOP LEFT: IMAGE SOURCE/GETTY IMAGES

PAUL DOLAN 2007 Deep Red From Mendocino County, northern California $40 “Ripe, round red fruit aromas and deep flavors with complex earthy spice notes”

2/25/11 9:36 AM


financial balance on the “Other Taxes” section of Form 1040. Other wise, you risk a penalty.

5

Deduct job-search expenses. If you had to scramble for a new job in 2010’s tough economy, you’re not alone. But while most relocating expenses for that position aren’t deductible, expenses from the search itself can be listed among “miscellaneous” deductions on your Schedule A, says Malek. (You start to save when that category exceeds 2 percent of your income.) Eligible are fees for resume preparation, union dues, train and airplane fares, gas mileage, tolls and parking (but not, alas, that spiffy new suit for the interview).

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6

ways to save on your taxes

Keep more of your money this April with these tips from a local expert

1

top left: Jamie Grill/Photographer’s Choice RF/getty images

Deduct medical expenses on state taxes. On your federal income tax return, you can deduct medical expenses (including health-insurance premiums) only when they exceed 7½ percent of your adjusted gross income. “But you can deduct these expenses on your New Jersey state return starting after just 2 percent of adjusted gross income,” says A. Malek, a certified public accountant in Old Bridge. “For 90 percent of filers in our state, that’s a help. So don’t discard those records!”

2

Fund an individual retirement account (IRA). The law allows you to put money into a 2010 IRA until April 18, 2011. Adding to your IRA—if you’re sure you can afford it—can reduce your tax obligation. (The deductibility of IRA contributions is phased out at certain income levels if you’re an active par ticipant in an employer-sponsored retirement-savings plan such as a 401K, but you may still qualif y for a deduction — ask your ta x

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preparer.) If an IRA brokerage account charges you a management fee, you can deduct that fee if you pay it by check, but not if it’s subtracted from your balance.

3 Deduct charitable expenses.

Most people know they can take a tax deduction for a check written to a charity. But they may not realize they can also deduct other charitable expenses— for example, 14 cents per mile for driving to provide charitable volunteer services, such as delivering meals to the homebound.

4 Report first-time home buyer’s

credits. You’re probably aware that this credit was extended to include homes bought by May 1 of last year. But did you buy a first home in 2008? That year’s credit was te mpora r y, a nd its 15-year re p ay ment period began last year. A preparer who is new to you may not think to suggest it, but repayment is treated as a tax and should be reported

Visit middlesexhealthandlife.com to send these tax savings tips to a friend—or to your tax preparer.

Claim education credits. Did you pay tuition in 2010 for schooling for yourself or a family member? Claiming one of two tax credits on Form 8863 may offer relief. The American Opportunity Cre dit (AOC), which debuted in 2009, covers—for the first four years of postsecondar y education—100 percent of the first $2,000 of qualified tuition or related expenses and 25 percent of the next $2,000, to a total credit of $2,500 per student. Then there’s the Lifetime Learning Credit, which covers 20 percent of the first $10,000 in tuition paid. Ask your tax preparer which education credit is better for you. Each is phased out at certain income levels, which are lower for the Lifetime Learning Credit, where phaseout begins at a household income of $100,000 for married couples filing jointly.

7 deduct interest on student

loans. If you paid interest in 2010 on a qualified student loan, those payments are deductible with a limit of $2,500 per year up to certain income levels.

8

Report health savings account activity. These accounts (not to be confused with flexible spending accounts) are offered by a growing number of employers to employees who choose health insurance plans with low premiums and high deductibles—they’re a way of putting money aside to pay medical expenses tax-free until you meet those deductibles. You can deduct contributions on your ta x return. Check Form 1099-SA, which you’ll receive from the plan sponsor, and be sure to repor t contributions and distributions—or you’ll risk a fine. —timothy Kelley

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thingstodo m a rc h

a p r i l

m ay

j u n e

Participate in workshops about holistic health, personal growth, natural weight loss and spirituality at the Mind, Body and Spirit Expo, Apr. 9.

APR 2 Catch a well-timed per-

formance of SPRING AWAKENING, the Tony Award-winning rock musical adaptation of the controversial 1891 German play about the rebellious and anxiety-filled sexual journey of a group of teens, at the State Theatre in New Brunswick, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets range from $32 to $67 . Visit statetheatrenj.org to learn more.

APR 2

Enjoy an evening of food, drinks and art at the ART WITHIN REACH benefit at Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick, where PNC will be honored for its support of museum preschool programs, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Proceeds will benefit the museum’s education courses for all ages. Tickets: $150 . Call 732.932.7237, ext. 634, or go to www.zimmerlimuseum.rutgers. edu for more information.

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APR 7

Experience “Remember Me,” contemporary American dance mixed with rock and opera music, when the PARSONS DANCE AND EAST VILLAGE OPERA COMPANY performs at the State Theatre in New Brunswick, 8 p.m. Enjoy the company’s retelling of a classic story of tragic love. Tickets: $32 to $52 . Call 732.246.7469 or visit statetheatrenj.org to learn more.

APR 8 Join ’80s rock-folk

sensation and Portlandia guest star AimEE MANN at the Forum Theatre Arts Center in Metuchen, 8 p.m. Mann fronted the new-wave band ’Til Tuesday and has released nine albums in her solo career. Tickets: $45 . Call 732.548.5600 or visit forumtheatrearts.org to learn more.

APR 9

Spend the evening exploring spirituality and holistic well-being with New York Times bestselling author Deepak Chopra at the Mind, Body and Spirit Expo at the New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center in Edison, where Chopra will lecture on higher consciousness and self-healing. Tickets: $57 to $182 . Call 215.627.0102 or visit mindbodyspirit expo.com for more information.

APR 13

Join the host of MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show at IT’S ALL POLITICS: A CONVERSATION WITH RACHEL MADDOW in Rutgers’ Nicholas Music Center at 9:30 a.m. to hear this pundit’s lively take on current American politics. Free admisson. Call 732.932.9384 or visit eagleton.rutgers.edu to learn more.

APR 14–16 Get ready

for a night of stand-up with STEVE RANNAZZISI at Stress Factory in New Brunswick. Star of FX’s The League and former Punk’d prankster, Rannazzisi is a sure bet for a few good laughs. Showtimes: 8 p.m. Thursday and 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $20 . Call 732.545.4242 or visit stressfactory. com to find out more.

APR 15–17

Head to Old Bridge Township Raceway Park in Englishtown to admire the vehicles at the 29th annual SPRING SWAP MEET & AUTO SHOW, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Vehicles of all ages and varieties will be given People’s Choice Awards in various categories. Admission: $10 each day, free for children under 12. Learn more at etownraceway.com.

shutterstock

MAR 27

Hear hard-rock classics like “The Boys are Back in Town” from musical legend THIN LIZZY at Starland Ballroom, 7 p.m. Fans of all ages are welcome to sing and dance along to old favorites and new tunes. Tickets: $25 to $30 . Call 800.745.3000 or visit starlandball room.com for more information.

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things to do

Apr 26

Participate in a day of fine food, drinks and golf contests at the Middlesex County Regional Chamber of Commerce’s 65th annual Golf Classic at the Forsgate Country Club in Monroe Township, 8:30 a.m. Register by March 25, $300 per person. Learn more by calling 732.745.8090, ext. 204.

APR 30 Join the Scarlet Knights

for a day of music and theater performances, tours, exhibits and athletic events at RUTGERS DAY on the New Brunswick campus, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission. Find more information at rutgersday.rutgers.edu.

APR 30

Volunteer at TOOLING AROUND THE TOWNSHIP in Woodbridge, a community program that organizes teams to fix up homes for senior citizens and disabled residents. Home-repair volunteers, both skilled and unskilled, are welcome. Nominate a house for repair or volunteer by calling 732.634.2750, ext.105, or by visiting twp.woodbridge.nj.us.

MAY 11 Grab tickets and

head over to see DEFTONES at the Starland Ballroom in Sayreville, 7 p.m. This alternative rock ensemble will perform songs from their new album, Diamond Eyes. Tickets: $32 to $37 . Call 800.745.3000 or visit starland ballroom.com for more information.

MAY 21–23 Discover how

people of all ages with disabilities can enhance their lives at the 2011 ABILITIES EXPO at the New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center in Edison, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Learn about the latest products and ser vices, including adaptive sports, which help disabled residents stay active in their communities. Learn more at abilitiesexpo.com.

MAY 30 Drop by the State

Theatre in New Brunswick for an outdoor celebration with games, art, workshops and live music and dance at the URBAN ARTS FESTIVAL, starting at noon. Free admission. Call 732.246.7469 or visit statethe atrenj.org for additional information.

JUNE 4

Immerse yourself in Hungarian culture with traditional food, crafts and folk dance at the 36th annual HUNGARIAN FESTIVAL AND TWILIGHT CONCERT at the Hungarian Heritage Center in New Brunswick, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. The festival is free and a voluntary donation of your choice is requested for the concert. Find out more at ahfoundation.org.

JUN 22–JUL 2 Take the

kids for a night of theater under the stars featuring the “Plays in the Park” production of ANNIE at the Stephen J. Capestro Amphitheater in Edison, 8:30 p.m., Mondays through Saturdays. Tickets are $7 for adults, $5 for seniors 60 and over and free for children 12 and under. Call 732.548.2884 or visit plays inthepark.com for more information. Send event listings to: Middlesex Health & Life, 110 S u m m i t Ave n u e, Mo nt va l e, NJ 076 4 5 ; o r e-mail us at thingstodo@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Community Calendar at middlesexhealthandlife.com.

shutterstock

Catch a glimpse of classic cars and trucks at the 29th annual Spring Swap Meet & Auto Show, Apr. 15–17.

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

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april 2011

47

3/4/11 12:52 PM


escapes

Ge t ting there

Mayflower Inn & Spa 118 Woodbur y Road Washington, CT 860.868.9466 mayflowerinn.com

Relaxation reigns supreme at the Spa House, just over the hill from the inn.

pure indulgence A luxurious inn and spa awa i t only a short drive away Nestled in the New England countr yside in the idyllic town of Washington, Conn., lies a place of perfection, The Mayflower Inn and Spa. The luxury hotel offers a serene respite for those looking to get away from it all. Check into one of the 30 guest rooms, and you’re likely to find an antique, four-poster bed with Frette linens, an enormous marble soaking tub, a gas fireplace and a gorge ou s view of the ground s. Curl up with a book from the Mayflower’s wood-paneled library, or head over to the 20,000-square-foot spa to indulge in one of many enticing treatments. In addition to the usual massages and facials, you’ll find inte re sting option s like an Immune B o o ste r Tre atm e nt (dr y brushing, hot ginger compress, essential oil-imbued balm, acupressure and reflexology) and a Seasonal Balancing Ritual

48

Ship_MID_escapes_05_REV2.indd 1

(body wash, exfoliation, scalp treatment and massage). Also on the menu: aquatic classe s, yoga, Pilate s, tai chi and qigong, chakra balancing, guided imagery and sound therapy. Guests looking to enjoy the scener y can explore one of the many trails in the nearby Steep Rock Nature Preser ve or just take a leisurely walk around the expansive 58-acre proper ty. After you’ve worked up an appetite hiking, biking or bird-watching, enjoy fine dining in the Main Dining Room, or grab a bite to eat in the more casual Tap Room. Executive Chef Justin Ermini uses seasonal and local ingredients to create what he calls authentic “Connecticut cuisine.” We just call it good. If you can bear to leave the Mayflower, you’ll return to the real world refreshed in mind, body and spirit. —marisa sandora

to see more photos of The Mayflower Inn & Spa or to pl an your getaway, go to middlesexhealthandlife.com.

3/4/11 12:51 PM


732-780-0222 345 ROUTE 9 SOUTH

MANALAPAN, NJ 07726

Destination for the Soul

20% OFF NEW CLIENTS

OR EXISTING CLIENTS TRYING A NEW SERVICE.*

w w w. AVA N T I D AY R E S O RT. c o m F U L L S E RV I C E D AY R E S O RT F O R M E N A N D W O M E N . *AD MUST BE PRESENTED AT TIME OF SERVICE FOR DISCOUNT. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER OR USED WITH AN AVANTI GIFT CARD, SPA FINDER OR A SPA WISH GIFT CARD OR TOWARDS PURCHASE OF AN AVANTI GIFT CARD. OFFER CANNOT BE USED ON A SATURDAY. SELECT STYLIST/TECHNICIANS ONLY.

C3_MSHL_APR11.indd 9

2/25/11 9:10 AM


“When I die, bury me on the golf course so my husband will visit”

–Anonymous

KEN LUDWIG’S

THE FOX ON THE FAIRWAY Directed by David Saint

“A Grand Slam”

–Washington City Paper

A HILARIOUS COMEDY about Love and Golf

MARCH 22 – APRIL 17 Starring PETER SCOLARI from GSP’s Inspecting Carol and TV’s Bosom Buddies and Newhart

Production sponsor: The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation

For tickets call 732-246-7717 or visit GSPonline.org

GEORGE STREET PLAYHOUSE 9 Livingston Avenue • New Brunswick, NJ 08901

David Saint, Artistic Director This Program is made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Departments of State, A Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

C4_MSHL_APR11.indd 4

3/4/11 10:45 AM

Middlesex Health & Life April 2011 issue  

The Good Living Magazine from Saint Peter's Healthcare System

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